Episode 20 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 20

Antiques challenge. It's the final leg for Paul Laidlaw and Anita Manning as they begin in Norwich and head for a nail-biting final auction in Stamford, Lincolnshire.


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts...

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What about that?

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..with £200 each, a classic car

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and a goal to scour Britain for antiques.

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Can I buy everything here?

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The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction but it's no mean feat.

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Feeling a little SAW.

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This is going to be an epic battle.

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There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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So will it be the high road to glory or the slow road to disaster?

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-The honeymoon is over.

-I'm sorry.

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This is the Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah.

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On this road trip, we're on the very last leg of our journey

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with auctioneers and awfully good pals Paul Laidlaw and Anita Manning.

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-Oh, Paul, it's been such a great time with you.

-It's been a giggle.

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Anita's a glorious Glasgow girl with an eye for finery

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and a talent for turning a profit.

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I've just laughed all the way to the bank.

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Ever the professionals, you and I.

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While Paul's a gimlet-eyed Carlisle chappy,

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whose vast knowledge and passion for militaria marks him as one of the trip's toughest contenders.

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We can't be too unhappy with the items that we bought,

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-we fell in love with all these things.

-Yeah.

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We made a couple of bob on them.

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So far in this trip, they've each won two legs...

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-Are you happy?

-I am happy.

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..meaning that this final auction could be anyone's.

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They both started with £200.

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Paul's now traded up to a healthy budget of £344.99

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while Anita's still a hair ahead of him holding £389.20 cash -

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that's less than £50 in it and everything to play for.

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I think we've acquitted ourselves well enough, have we not?

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Today, they're driving a delightful little

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1957 Morris Minor 1000 Traveller.

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The car was manufactured before seat belts were mandatory

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so it's legal to drive without.

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We've got one more batch of shops to do.

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Indeed you have. On this grand road trip, they've clocked up

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more than 1,000 miles from Ford in Northumberland

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criss-crossing England's ancient shires

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to end in Stamford in Lincolnshire.

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On this final leg, they'll begin in Norwich -

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indeed, aiming for auction at Stamford.

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And look, the sun's coming out, Paul.

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How lovely.

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They're just arriving in Norwich, a city with a proud

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and ancient history - as their first stop of the morning attests.

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St Andrew's and Blackfriar's Hall is thought to be

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the most complete surviving medieval friary complex in England.

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Nowadays, it's an event venue

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and today host to Norwich Antiques Market.

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-Paul, this looks fabulous.

-What a venue, eh?

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-We're going to have fun.

-You reckon?

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-But who's going to have the most fun?

-I'll race you.

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I can't wait to find out.

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This is a busy, regular antiques fair

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which attracts more than 100 dealers.

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-Paul, this is a busy old place.

-It's mobbed.

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Yeah, we're going to have to fight for bargains.

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-You go that way, I'll go this way.

-Good luck!

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And they're off.

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Paul is really in his element this morning.

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Welcome to my geek world.

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I'm glad you're enjoying yourself.

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Looks like he's found something.

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May I see the watch chain, please?

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Ah, look at that. That is massive and it looks really substantial.

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It looks like you could kill somebody with it in all honesty.

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But you won't, will you?

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It's a Victorian silver chain for a fob watch.

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He's also found another Victorian gentleman's item -

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an ornate, white metal buckle for a shoe or belt.

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So, watch chain and buckle - can I squeeze you any more?

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It's more than I want to pay.

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You're going to try and squeeze a bit, Paul.

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-£48, how's that?

-Oh, small steps, small steps.

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-I want to shake your hand...

-Yeah?

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..but it wants to be 40 quid, I'm afraid.

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Make it 45 and that's it.

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-You're a good man.

-Cheers.

-Deal's done, thank you.

-Bye-bye.

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I'll give you some money.

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Have we got money?

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Yes, you have. There it is.

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Meanwhile, true to form,

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Anita's glad-handing her way through the crowds.

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-Nice to see you.

-How lovely to meet you.

-Everything looks so lovely.

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Ah, thank you very much, thank you.

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If you've quite finished greeting your public, Anita.

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Oh, what's she spotted?

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This is a lovely thing, is this silver?

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I think it's Italian, continental.

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-Is that expensive?

-It's 120.

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-Uh-huh. Not dear, is it?

-Not really, it's not, no.

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What's the very best that dealer John could do?

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-It's not 95...

-105.

-105.

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-Could you do 100 on it? For an immediate sale.

-Yes.

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-Right, OK, that's lovely. Thank you very much.

-OK, that's great.

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Well, she's spent big on her first lot -

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bravely done when one buy can make or break this game -

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and she's rummaging on through this fair's many stalls.

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Meanwhile, Paul's like a proverbial child in the sweetshop in here

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and he's soon spied something else he likes.

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In this tiny little strip-sealed bag is a compass.

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-You see that?

-Only just.

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North, clearly - that-a-way.

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Home.

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The tiny compass is a World War II item, probably issued to RAF airmen.

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This is escape and evasion equipment.

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If we end up bailing out, shot down over enemy territory, captured -

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we've got something that we could maybe conceal,

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we've got a little tool that might just get us back to Blighty safely.

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Good story, yeah? I love this stuff.

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It really taps into Paul's love of militaria.

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Ticket price is £20 -

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best have a word with the friendly dealer, I reckon.

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-How are you doing?

-Very well, thank you, sir.

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Can you work wonders on that or not?

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16?

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I'm going to offer you a tenner expecting you not to take it

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but hoping that 16 is not going to be where we end up.

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Give me 12 quid, real 12 quid.

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-14 and we've got a deal.

-OK, good man.

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Another deal struck at £14.

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Now he's got the scent of wartime items in his nostrils.

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Here we have an ashtray. Now, I'm not generally drawn to ashtrays.

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However, very - I'm familiar with this piece -

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very nicely decorated here.

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It's another Second World War piece,

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commemorating the units of the Allied Tactical Air Force.

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And it's a commemorative piece,

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bearing the insignia of the various units.

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There's an RAF roundel in there, for example, American Air Force

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insignia - the units that made up the Tactical Air Force.

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If you own an RAF escape compass

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and you're trying to sex it up with something else

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to stick into auction, then it might be of interest to you as well.

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Indeed it might.

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Paul's keen to add it to his compass to build a job lot,

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so dealer Owen can expect a visit.

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-Hello there, how're you doing? This is yours, is it?

-It is.

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-Yeah.

-All right.

-But I'm hoping to God

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you can do something on that price.

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I'll do a very special price of a tenner.

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Oh, good, you're a good man. And at a tenner, you've got a deal.

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-Thank you very much.

-Easy-peasy.

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Another item bagged and he's also remembered another aviation-related

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trinket he saw earlier that he might add to the lot. Back to the

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same dealer from which he bought the chain and buckle he goes.

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-I'm back.

-Back again.

-You're an antiques magnet for me.

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-You had sweetheart brooches, an RAF one.

-Yep.

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-There you go.

-There we go.

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It's a little sweetheart brooch that would have been worn for luck

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by the lady friend of an RAF pilot during the Second World War.

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-Not expensive, I would hope?

-Nope, five pound.

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I'll take it, good man.

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He takes the sweetheart brooch for £5, giving him three items

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in a job lot of World War II-related Air Force objects -

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as well as his watch chain and buckle in a separate lot.

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He's spent £74 so far - wow.

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Now, what's Anita been up to?

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Hello, tell me a bit about these, these are fabulous.

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She's happened upon some necklaces dating from the 1920s.

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But what I like about it is the age and the style.

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We don't have precious jewels but what we have is a bit of style

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and I was wondering if I maybe got a wee group together...

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-Yeah, no worries.

-..you could give me a deal on that?

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Yeah, yeah, no worries.

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She's assembled a group of three of the costume jewellery necklaces

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but what will she offer dealer Mark?

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In auction I'd be putting them in at...

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that group at 15-20, 15-25.

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-Yeah.

-That's what I would be putting them in at.

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Could I be buying these in that region?

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-16 the lot.

-16 the lot?

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-That's good, thank you very much.

-OK, cool.

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That's fine, that's OK. Good luck.

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Spiffing - a generous deal from Mark means she's bagged

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the jazz-age baubles as well and spent £116 so far.

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Now, after his epic buying spree this morning Paul's hopped

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back in the car and is motoring towards the environs of

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the Norfolk village of Forncett St Peter.

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He's heading for the Norfolk Tank Museum,

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an independent museum that showcases the incredible collection

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amassed by a man who might be even more heavily into military history

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than Paul - crikey. Now that takes some doing.

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Who on Earth has a collection of tanks, I ask you?

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Why, owner Stephen MacHaye does, Paul.

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-Is it Stephen?

-Yes, it is.

-Good to see you.

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Tanks were first widely used on the battlefield in World War I

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and armoured fighting vehicles like these -

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designed for the harsh rigours of frontline combat -

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were instrumental in changing the nature of warfare

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throughout the 20th century.

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Stephen's extraordinary personal collection of tanks,

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armoured vehicles and heavy artillery is on display here,

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at his home - a farm that's been in his family since the 1950s.

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Wow. How many do you have?

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There's about 20 on site now, going from full, main battle tank

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down to small armoured cars.

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Wow.

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Stephen's built up his collection by restoring retired tanks

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to working order by himself.

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You're an engineer, clearly - cos you say you restore these.

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No, I'm all self-taught.

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Yep, just a love of history, love of engineering and just tinkering.

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Wow. Well I always say about antiques and the things that I love

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-that they transport you...

-Yes, absolutely.

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..but your toys actually do transport!

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They certainly do.

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And then what do you do with them, drive round the garden or what?

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Have done in the past, took 'em to shopping, Tesco's.

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PAUL LAUGHS Parking might be easy -

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well, difficult or easy depending how brutal you're prepared to be.

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Easy.

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Stephen's private collection opened as a museum for the general public

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a few years ago but Stephen's love of tanks and heavy artillery

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was originally sparked by hearing tales

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of his grandfather's wartime service - not in the Second World War, but the First.

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Then when the tanks appeared on the battlefield,

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he must have had a love of engineering like myself,

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he saw these massive beasts coming across the battlefield

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and thought, "That's where I want to go."

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Ended up driving the First World War tanks.

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This love of tanks has certainly passed down the generations.

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-What's the first one you bought?

-First tank was this one.

-This is it?

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Yes, it is, yes.

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Yeah, bought this 20-odd years ago, not in this condition.

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Spent 18 months, lovingly restored it,

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now the pride of a prized collection.

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It's a Saladin Armoured Scout Car which was owned by the British Army.

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The Saladin was widely used around the globe

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and manufactured from 1958 until the late 1970s.

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This is one of the very earliest produced.

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-British Army, 1959 this particular vehicle was built.

-Right.

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Served up until the early '80s.

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It saw service in many of the British Army's areas of operation.

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-She's been to Aden, she's been to Cyprus...

-Yeah.

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..done the Middle East tour, she's done Northern Ireland...

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-Fantastic vehicle.

-Yeah.

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They're just fascinating, there's nothing out there built like them.

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Stephen's collection also extends to heavy artillery.

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Oh, absolutely, yeah. German artillery pieces, Second World War.

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-You're kidding - seriously?

-Yeah, yeah.

-Show me some artillery.

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Paul's luck really is in today.

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Stephen - what, aside from the obvious, is that?

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It's a German FH 15 150mm Howitzer.

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The Howitzer's an artillery piece

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-designed for lobbing shells at the enemy.

-OK. And a towable piece,

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-a manoeuvrable piece from battlefield to battlefield.

-Yes, yeah.

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This example dates from the period just before the Second World War.

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They were actually produced around about 1934,

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-when Hitler first come to power.

-Right.

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And he was trying to disguise what he was producing

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by making them look like First World War artillery pieces.

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Agreements forged at the end of the First World War

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prohibited Germany from rebuilding its national arms

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so the Fuhrer had these new guns designed this way

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so that they could be disguised as existing weaponry.

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They were pressed into service when war broke out.

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These particular guns were actually on the Eastern Front,

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fighting against Russia, captured by the Russians

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and then used against the Germans for the rest of the war.

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My word, so where did this turn up?

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It came over from Russia in the mid-'80s.

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-Oh, so it stayed in Russia...

-Yep.

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-..till someone brought it back?

-Yep.

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Astonishing.

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It's a real piece of military history

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but Stephen's got one last surprise for Paul

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and I think he's going to be delighted.

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There's somebody in there.

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I know, this is Richard. He's going to give us a ride around in the vehicle.

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They're going for a spin in the Saladin.

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Wa-hey. Whoa - it's a big drop in there.

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-RICHARD:

-It is. Are you OK to climb in?

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Yeah, I'll give it a go.

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Right then. Richard.

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-It does feel a bit good, doesn't it?

-Oh, yeah.

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-It's just got to be done.

-I think it has.

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I've never seen him so delighted.

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How big a telescope have you got?

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-It's Manning I'm looking for.

-Sorry?

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Somewhere in the region of Norwich, I'm looking for Anita Manning.

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-Yes.

-We're - how powerful's the gun sight on this?

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Onwards!

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I can see you're going to be in there for a while.

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We'll leave you to it.

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Meanwhile, Anita's still back in Norwich and well out of range -

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thankfully.

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She's heading for Treasure Chest Antiques

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where dealer Pasquale is ready to greet her.

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-Hello.

-Hello, I'm Anita.

-How are you? Pleased to meet you, Anita.

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-Oh, it's absolutely...

-Welcome to the Treasure Chest.

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Anita's up to her old tricks.

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I've already bought some jewellery

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and I shouldn't really be poring over the jewellery cabinets

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but I can't help it.

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I've still got quite a lot of money to spend but I'm going to

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have a good look, take my time and just go with the flow.

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Groovy, Anita.

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SHE ROARS

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It never takes her long.

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-Pasquale?

-Yes.

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-What can I do, Anita?

-I love this little cabinet.

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Oh, you like this one, do you, yes?

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-Well I love the things in it.

-Oh.

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-Yeah.

-I'll get the key for you.

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I know this is a bit obvious

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but guess the thing that I like in there.

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-How did you know?

-That one?

-Yeah, that's such a sweet wee thing.

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I know your taste.

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It's a child's sporran,

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a traditional part of Scottish Highland dress.

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It's probably made of cowhide and has a ticket price of £55.

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It's the thing that he would wear on his kilt to keep his, er,

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thruppence and sixpence in.

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-Sixpences, yes?

-Yeah, and it's a nice wee thing.

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-Quite nice condition, too.

-I think that's quite sweet.

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I don't think it's a Victorian one.

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-Right.

-I think that it's later.

-Later, yes.

-Yeah, a wee bit later.

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But it's still quite nice.

0:16:530:16:55

Dealer Sally owns it and will be summonsed.

0:16:550:16:58

Sally?

0:16:580:17:00

Oh, hi, Sally.

0:17:000:17:01

Selling it in auction and looking to buy it for round about...

0:17:010:17:06

£20-25. Are we -

0:17:070:17:10

is it possible to, to be...

0:17:100:17:13

-Yeah, I think we could do that.

-We could do that?

0:17:140:17:17

We can have a deal on that. 25?

0:17:170:17:19

-Ah, let's go for it, let's go for it.

-Yeah.

0:17:190:17:22

-Thank you very much, that's smashing.

-Thank you.

0:17:220:17:24

I reckon you're on a winner there.

0:17:240:17:26

A better-than-half-price deal, thanks to Sally -

0:17:260:17:29

but Anita's magpie eyes soon alight on another trinket

0:17:290:17:33

with just a little bit of Caledonian flavour,

0:17:330:17:36

this one belonging to dealer Jules.

0:17:360:17:38

-Excuse me. Oh, hi.

-Hello, I'm Anita.

-Hi, Anita.

0:17:380:17:42

The thing that took my eye was this little brooch here

0:17:420:17:46

and it's a wee golfing bag and of course I come from Scotland

0:17:460:17:52

and Scotland is the home of golf.

0:17:520:17:55

Ticket price on the golfing-themed brooch is £65.

0:17:550:17:58

-I'm not sure of the age of it, Jules, but I do like it.

-OK.

0:17:580:18:02

-I'd like to have a go at it...

-Mm-hmm.

0:18:020:18:05

..but I don't want to take a chance on it at a very big price.

0:18:050:18:09

Is there a rock-bottom price that you could...

0:18:090:18:13

I tell you what.

0:18:150:18:16

Being as it's you, I will let you have it for what I paid for it -

0:18:160:18:20

how's that?

0:18:200:18:21

It depends on what you paid for it!

0:18:210:18:23

-SCOTTISH ACCENT: 30.

-Oh, 30.

0:18:230:18:25

£30, yes.

0:18:250:18:28

Have you been practising that?

0:18:280:18:30

You've gone a bit Scottish, Jules. It's catching.

0:18:300:18:33

OK, let's go at it for £30, thank you very much.

0:18:330:18:35

That's lovely, it's a pleasure. Thank you.

0:18:350:18:38

Deal done and she's bagged another two items for a total of £55.

0:18:380:18:42

And with that they've reached the end

0:18:420:18:44

of an incredibly industrious first day so, nighty-night.

0:18:440:18:48

The morning greets them, as is traditional,

0:18:510:18:53

back in the car and bounding onwards towards more bargains.

0:18:530:18:57

The skies are a wee bit grey but there is -

0:18:570:19:00

-we're happy, we've got a couple of quid to spend.

-Yeah.

0:19:000:19:04

So far Paul's bought the silver fob watch chain

0:19:040:19:08

and Victorian white metal buckle

0:19:080:19:10

and the job lot of Air Force items.

0:19:100:19:12

He's spent £74, leaving him £270.99 for the day ahead.

0:19:120:19:18

While Anita's picked up the continental silver bowl,

0:19:200:19:23

the three 1920s necklaces,

0:19:230:19:25

the brooch on a golfing theme

0:19:250:19:28

and the child's sporran.

0:19:280:19:30

She's spent £171, leaving her £218.20 in her purse this morning.

0:19:300:19:37

Hey, this is it. This is our last shopping day.

0:19:370:19:39

-This is our last shopping day.

-Oof.

0:19:390:19:42

It is indeed.

0:19:420:19:43

They're still in Norwich this morning

0:19:430:19:45

and Anita's dropping Paul off.

0:19:450:19:47

-Well.

-Good luck, darling.

-Enjoy yourself.

-Yeah.

0:19:470:19:52

And... I don't know when I'll see you! Look after yourself.

0:19:520:19:57

He's heading off into Looses Emporium

0:19:570:20:00

where he's promised a jolly good morning's browse.

0:20:000:20:04

Afore long, he's come across a very sizeable item

0:20:130:20:17

he'd like to discuss with dealer, Vince.

0:20:170:20:19

Just utterly charming if you've got the right room to pack that in.

0:20:190:20:24

-Fantastic.

-It is rather amazing, isn't it?

0:20:240:20:27

It's a travelling trunk, bound in cowskin with brass studs

0:20:270:20:31

and containing two oak stands that it would sit on.

0:20:310:20:35

-Oh, I see.

-Sits on them.

-Yeah, yeah.

0:20:350:20:37

-Just raised off the ground.

-Not unattractive, really.

0:20:380:20:42

Ticket price is £120.

0:20:420:20:44

But it's a long way off for me.

0:20:440:20:47

Well, it depends how long is a long, long way.

0:20:470:20:49

I'll tell you what, if you want it here and now,

0:20:490:20:51

80 quid.

0:20:510:20:53

It' a good price. You must be tempted, Paul.

0:20:530:20:55

Age wise, I would date this

0:20:550:20:58

to the first half of the 19th century.

0:20:580:21:01

That's 150-200 years old.

0:21:010:21:04

Ta-dah! Quite good, yeah.

0:21:040:21:07

Sounds like you're talking yourself round.

0:21:070:21:09

-I'm back.

-You're back?

0:21:090:21:11

-The...travelling trunk.

-Yes.

0:21:110:21:14

-Got a deal?

-£80. Really happy with that.

0:21:140:21:17

-Thank you.

-He strikes that deal at £80.

0:21:170:21:20

A bold buy when he and Anita are vying so closely for victory.

0:21:200:21:24

Let's hope it pays off.

0:21:240:21:26

Now, Paul's trunk may have some venerable age to it,

0:21:280:21:31

but today Anita is going to see some objects

0:21:310:21:33

which are a little older than that.

0:21:330:21:35

She's heading for Norwich Castle Museum where she is going to explore

0:21:350:21:38

their extraordinary collection of ancient Egyptian treasures,

0:21:380:21:43

some more than 4,000 years old

0:21:430:21:45

and still yielding their secrets today.

0:21:450:21:47

She's meeting curator of the Egyptian gallery, Faye Kalloniatis.

0:21:490:21:53

-Hi, I'm Anita.

-Hello, lovely to meet you.

0:21:550:21:57

I'm so excited to be at Norwich Castle.

0:21:570:21:59

Well, I'm excited to have you here, so welcome to the castle.

0:21:590:22:02

Norwich might not be the place you would expect to find

0:22:020:22:05

the treasures of the Nile, but the museum here at Norwich Castle

0:22:050:22:09

holds an enviable collection of ancient Egyptian artefacts

0:22:090:22:13

from funerary objects to the remains of the Egyptians themselves.

0:22:130:22:17

The backbone of the collection is here thanks to the efforts

0:22:170:22:20

of Victorian travellers who amassed Egyptian objects

0:22:200:22:23

and later donated them to the museum.

0:22:230:22:25

They show how 19th-century Britain was gripped by a fascination

0:22:250:22:29

with ancient Egypt,

0:22:290:22:30

even going so far as to stage public unwrappings of mummies.

0:22:300:22:34

This phenomenon became known as Egyptomania.

0:22:340:22:38

And "mania" is a really good word to describe it

0:22:380:22:41

because people just love the thought of Egypt.

0:22:410:22:45

It was something that was exotic, it was unknown,

0:22:450:22:48

and one of the outcomes of that

0:22:480:22:50

was that there were people who travelled to Egypt.

0:22:500:22:53

If you travelled in Egypt,

0:22:530:22:54

generally that meant you had a deep pocket,

0:22:540:22:57

which meant that you would buy artefacts.

0:22:570:23:00

They brought artefacts and then just brought them back here to Britain.

0:23:000:23:04

So there would be little collections built-up throughout the country?

0:23:040:23:09

One of these wealthy collectors was Jeremiah Colman,

0:23:090:23:13

head of the prominent Norfolk family that owned Colman's Mustard.

0:23:130:23:17

Fay's taking Anita to learn a bit more about Colman

0:23:170:23:20

and the extraordinary objects he gifted to the museum.

0:23:200:23:23

Jeremiah Colman travel to Egypt because his son Alan

0:23:230:23:27

had consumption and had been advised to go there for the arid climate.

0:23:270:23:31

Jeremiah, together with his daughters, went to Egypt

0:23:310:23:34

in order to be with their son and eventually they got to Luxor

0:23:340:23:38

and it was at that time that all the objects which Jeremiah bought

0:23:380:23:42

were bought, there in Luxor.

0:23:420:23:44

Sadly, Alan died of consumption in Egypt,

0:23:440:23:47

but while in the country,

0:23:470:23:49

his father Jeremiah amassed a large number of ancient artefacts.

0:23:490:23:52

The whole collection, their Egypt collection,

0:23:520:23:56

was bought within a very short period of time.

0:23:560:24:00

Absolutely. There were over 250 objects

0:24:000:24:03

and they bought them within a week.

0:24:030:24:05

He did have the whole collection catalogued and you can see it here.

0:24:050:24:09

He had this specially bound leather book

0:24:090:24:12

and it's a catalogue of all of the objects that he bought in Egypt.

0:24:120:24:16

And you can see here, it says "Curios from Egypt."

0:24:160:24:19

So here, all the objects have been numbered

0:24:190:24:22

and the very first object is the ancient Egyptian granary

0:24:220:24:27

and in fact we have this ancient Egyptian granary

0:24:270:24:30

and here it is here.

0:24:300:24:32

It's what's called a model granary,

0:24:320:24:34

but what it meant by that is that it was made specifically

0:24:340:24:37

to be buried with the dead.

0:24:370:24:39

Extraordinarily, the model granary is around 4,000 years old.

0:24:390:24:43

According to Egyptian religious law,

0:24:430:24:45

burying it with the dead would allow the deceased

0:24:450:24:48

plentiful access to grain in the afterlife.

0:24:480:24:51

It meant that you had a grain...you had a store of grain

0:24:510:24:54

and grain of course was for bread,

0:24:540:24:56

but even more importantly for beer.

0:24:560:24:59

And I see that there's some wonderful painting,

0:24:590:25:02

original painting.

0:25:020:25:03

So here is the tomb owner relaxing.

0:25:030:25:06

That's him in his afterlife.

0:25:060:25:08

-This is a wonderful piece.

-It is.

0:25:080:25:10

And in fact it's a very rare piece

0:25:100:25:12

because normally these models were made out of wood.

0:25:120:25:16

Colman's collection includes something even more extraordinary.

0:25:160:25:21

This one is about 3,500 years old.

0:25:210:25:25

Tell me about this thing.

0:25:250:25:26

Well, the other thing that Jeremiah collected

0:25:260:25:30

was a shoe box with, er,

0:25:300:25:35

crumpled linen inside it.

0:25:350:25:37

And it wasn't until a few years ago that we had this conserved

0:25:370:25:41

and in conserving it, it's opened up to this.

0:25:410:25:44

And it's turned out to be a rare Egyptian shroud.

0:25:440:25:48

It is only one of about 30 known worldwide,

0:25:490:25:55

so it is a very rare piece indeed.

0:25:550:25:57

And we have all these hieroglyphs here.

0:25:570:25:59

I can see a wee scarab beetle there.

0:25:590:26:02

They were just verses or spells

0:26:020:26:04

which came from the Book Of The Dead.

0:26:040:26:06

The Book Of The Dead was a series of prayers, incantations,

0:26:060:26:11

instructions and so on in order to help the deceased.

0:26:110:26:15

It was really kind of a passport, if you like, to the afterlife.

0:26:150:26:20

This truly is a priceless item.

0:26:200:26:22

It is interesting that these things should be housed

0:26:220:26:25

in this museum in Norfolk.

0:26:250:26:28

We're very lucky that 19th-century travellers made these travels

0:26:280:26:33

and bought these objects and then finally, also,

0:26:330:26:36

donated them to museums.

0:26:360:26:38

Indeed we are.

0:26:380:26:39

Faye, it has been an absolutely fascinating journey back to

0:26:390:26:43

Egypt with you.

0:26:430:26:45

-Thank you very, very much.

-It's been a pleasure. Thank you.

0:26:450:26:48

Now, Paul's still on the hunt for bargains in Norwich Lanes.

0:26:510:26:54

He's heading into St Gregory's Antiques And Collectables,

0:26:540:26:57

a large antique centre attractively housed

0:26:570:27:00

within a 14th century former church.

0:27:000:27:03

Paul's nose for military items is twitching once again.

0:27:100:27:13

Well, you can imagine

0:27:140:27:16

how many sets of spurs there are in the world.

0:27:180:27:21

These are 1918-dated

0:27:210:27:25

and British cavalry issue.

0:27:250:27:29

That's evocative, is it not?

0:27:290:27:32

It is indeed.

0:27:320:27:33

A set of British Army cavalry spurs

0:27:330:27:35

dating from the First World War. And Paul's quite taken with them.

0:27:350:27:39

On the ticket is £28.

0:27:390:27:41

Dealer Graham is on hand today

0:27:410:27:43

and will call the person who owns spurs for their best price.

0:27:430:27:47

Giddy-up!

0:27:470:27:48

-20 is going to be the best.

-20 is it? 20 it is then.

-Magic.

0:27:480:27:52

Thank you very much.

0:27:520:27:53

Another deal clinched. And he's wandering on.

0:27:530:27:56

Meanwhile, Anita's in the car and heading to the town of Wymondham.

0:27:590:28:03

Wymondham is a historic Norfolk market town of note

0:28:030:28:06

as its handsome 17th-century market cross shows.

0:28:060:28:10

Anita's strolling off into the aptly named Market Cross Antiques,

0:28:110:28:15

where dealer David's ready to greet her.

0:28:150:28:17

-I'm Anita.

-David.

0:28:170:28:20

-Oh, what a lovely shop!

-Thank you.

0:28:200:28:22

It's like walking into another world.

0:28:220:28:25

Better scour this new world for bargains then, Anita.

0:28:250:28:28

Ah, she's onto something already.

0:28:310:28:34

Quite an interesting wee lot that I've found tucked under

0:28:340:28:37

this piece of furniture.

0:28:370:28:41

It's a quantity of music rolls.

0:28:410:28:44

Now these would have been used for a piano.

0:28:460:28:48

The late 19th and early 20th century,

0:28:500:28:53

you didn't have television, you didn't have a radio

0:28:530:28:57

and people got together in their sitting rooms

0:28:570:29:00

with their old joanna.

0:29:000:29:02

The rolls would play in a Pianola or self-playing piano.

0:29:020:29:06

There's no ticket price on them.

0:29:060:29:08

But they would put on these rolls,

0:29:080:29:10

wind it up and the piano would play a tune by itself.

0:29:120:29:16

I think that's a wee find.

0:29:160:29:18

That is one potential buy.

0:29:180:29:21

And elsewhere...

0:29:210:29:22

I quite like this wee cabinet. It's a sweet little thing.

0:29:220:29:26

It's made of pine, so it's not a fine piece of furniture,

0:29:260:29:29

but what I like about it is, as well as a simplicity of the design,

0:29:290:29:35

it's decorated with these straps of copper

0:29:350:29:39

which are in the Art Nouveau style.

0:29:390:29:42

Always a fan of anything in the sinuous Art Nouveau style,

0:29:420:29:45

Anita's keen on that and the Pianola rolls.

0:29:450:29:49

Time to buttonhole dealer David.

0:29:490:29:51

David, it's so hard to make a choice in here.

0:29:510:29:54

It's hard to make a choice.

0:29:540:29:56

I've seen a couple of things that I like.

0:29:560:29:58

What could David do on the Pianola rolls?

0:29:580:30:01

How does £15 sound for the whole lot?

0:30:010:30:04

For the whole lot? I'm happy with that, that's great.

0:30:040:30:07

What's the best you can do on the cabinet?

0:30:070:30:09

Absolute best? Well, if we said 18.

0:30:090:30:11

Can you go to 15 on that?

0:30:110:30:14

-15?

-Yeah, go on.

-All right!

0:30:160:30:18

That's a deal on both of them. Thank you very much, David.

0:30:180:30:20

You're welcome.

0:30:200:30:21

£30 total for the lot. Smashing!

0:30:210:30:24

Now, Paul has moved on to the town of Watton

0:30:250:30:28

where he's heading for one last shop.

0:30:280:30:31

RetroRecyclers and dealer Barney.

0:30:310:30:34

-You look like a welcoming party.

-Hello, Paul.

0:30:340:30:36

-How you doing. Is it Barney?

-Barney, yes.

0:30:360:30:38

-Good to see you. Is there treasure in here for me?

-Lots of it.

0:30:380:30:42

There certainly is in this vast antique centre.

0:30:420:30:45

Paul's combing over the stock in his usual thorough fashion.

0:30:450:30:49

And his diligence looks to pay off.

0:30:490:30:52

OK, good!

0:30:520:30:54

Not trying overly hard to sell this.

0:30:550:30:58

I've always been interested in antique and vintage technology

0:30:580:31:02

and domestic bygones.

0:31:020:31:04

What you reckon that is?

0:31:040:31:06

That is the forerunner...

0:31:060:31:08

..of your electric vacuum cleaner.

0:31:100:31:13

This is, um, just a whopping great syringe,

0:31:130:31:16

to be honest with you.

0:31:160:31:18

This is Reeves Pneumatic Broom.

0:31:180:31:21

The Reeves Vacuum Cleaner Co made it.

0:31:210:31:23

They were based Victoria street, London.

0:31:230:31:26

And the patent was granted for this technology

0:31:260:31:29

July 29, 1913. 1913!

0:31:290:31:33

Although a patent was issued for the first electric vacuum cleaner

0:31:330:31:37

in the USA in 1908,

0:31:370:31:40

these costly machines didn't pass into common usage here

0:31:400:31:43

until later decades.

0:31:430:31:44

Ticket price on the pneumatic broom is £25.

0:31:440:31:47

This price is really, really reasonable.

0:31:470:31:51

But I do consider it only a starting point because,

0:31:510:31:54

frankly, it was buried next to the skirting board, underneath a shelf!

0:31:540:31:57

I think we go in and make an offer.

0:31:570:31:59

It will be the only one in the sale room.

0:32:000:32:02

Of that, we can be sure.

0:32:020:32:04

Oh, you've found something then, have you?

0:32:040:32:06

Would you believe it?

0:32:060:32:08

-But what could Barney do on the price?

-What about 18?

0:32:080:32:11

It's going in the right direction. What about a tenner?

0:32:110:32:14

How about 15?

0:32:140:32:16

-Do it 12?

-OK, I'll do it for 12.

0:32:160:32:18

12 it is. You're a good man, Barney.

0:32:180:32:21

A staccato haggle and Paul's cleaned up on his last lot.

0:32:210:32:24

Ha-ha.

0:32:240:32:26

And so, they're all brought up.

0:32:260:32:28

Paul bought the fob watch chain and white metal buckle,

0:32:280:32:31

the job lot of Air Force items,

0:32:310:32:34

the cowskin trunk,

0:32:340:32:36

the cavalry spurs and the pneumatic broom.

0:32:360:32:39

He spent £186 exactly.

0:32:390:32:43

Anita picked up the Continental Silver bowl,

0:32:430:32:45

the three 1920s necklaces,

0:32:450:32:47

which she's putting in a job lot with the golfing brooch,

0:32:470:32:50

then the child's sporran,

0:32:500:32:52

the Pianola rolls

0:32:520:32:54

and the Art Nouveau cabinet.

0:32:540:32:56

She spent £201 on the nose.

0:32:560:32:58

Now that they're all spent up,

0:33:000:33:02

what do they make of each other's buys?

0:33:020:33:04

Oh, this is it.

0:33:040:33:06

I'm up against Anita's final offering.

0:33:060:33:09

Sporran's a sweetie,

0:33:090:33:10

um, not a lot of money, only £25 paid.

0:33:100:33:13

There's a little cabinet

0:33:130:33:15

and the Pianola rolls.

0:33:150:33:17

Well, frankly, at the money, how can she go wrong?

0:33:170:33:21

Seriously, I needn't comment on the object,

0:33:210:33:23

because she paid nothing for them!

0:33:230:33:25

Hats off, good purchases.

0:33:250:33:27

So, I think she's in safe territory,

0:33:270:33:29

she's going to be difficult to beat.

0:33:290:33:31

And Anita?

0:33:310:33:32

Paul has been very canny

0:33:320:33:34

in buying that little Royal Air Force group.

0:33:340:33:38

I like the ceramic,

0:33:380:33:39

I like the colour in it

0:33:390:33:41

and, of course, I love sweetheart brooches.

0:33:410:33:43

I love that big calfskin trunk, isn't that gorgeous?

0:33:430:33:46

It's blond and it's beautiful.

0:33:460:33:49

I can see that doing over £100.

0:33:490:33:51

Dash it! Let the battle commence!

0:33:510:33:54

Indeed.

0:33:540:33:56

On this last leg of their road trip, they began in Norwich

0:33:560:33:59

and are now nearly at auction in Stamford, Lincolnshire.

0:33:590:34:02

Its storeyed streets make an ideal place for their final showdown,

0:34:020:34:07

taking place at Batemans Auctions.

0:34:070:34:10

This is it. The last...

0:34:100:34:12

-The last auction.

-That is the finishing post.

-Oh! Not quite yet.

0:34:120:34:18

Auctioneer David Michael Palmer rules the rostrum today.

0:34:180:34:21

But before the off, what does he make of our pair's lots?

0:34:210:34:25

The lot with the ashtray and I absolutely love the ashtray,

0:34:250:34:27

nice and bright, very much of the period.

0:34:270:34:30

The child's sporran is fun.

0:34:300:34:31

I mean it looks like a load of gerbils that have been killed

0:34:310:34:34

and put on a chain.

0:34:340:34:35

No gerbils have been harmed in the making of that sporran.

0:34:350:34:39

Let the auction commence!

0:34:390:34:41

First up, Anita's embossed bowl of Continental Silver.

0:34:430:34:47

Goes on at £20.

0:34:470:34:48

The main bid at 20. 22, at 22, 25, 28.

0:34:480:34:51

At 28, 30, 32. That side at 32, 35, 38, at 38, 40.

0:34:510:34:55

At 40, goes then at 40 and I sell then at £40.

0:34:560:35:00

-The bid is here at... 45.

-Yes!

0:35:000:35:02

At 50, 55 on the net, 60 in the room,

0:35:020:35:05

65, 70, 75 on the net.

0:35:050:35:07

80, back in the room at 80 now, in the room at 80.

0:35:090:35:12

Goes at 80, no-one else at 80...

0:35:120:35:15

I think I got away lightly.

0:35:150:35:18

Some good work from our auctioneer

0:35:180:35:20

means it doesn't lose too badly.

0:35:200:35:23

But Paul's definitely catching up.

0:35:230:35:25

-Oh, I don't know if I can take this.

-This could be...

0:35:250:35:28

Now it's Paul's silver fob watch chain

0:35:280:35:31

along with the Victorian white metal buckle.

0:35:310:35:33

£20 then? Come in at 20.

0:35:330:35:36

OK, a tenner?

0:35:360:35:38

10, 10, 12, 15, 18,

0:35:380:35:41

20, 22, 25, 28,

0:35:410:35:44

-30? 30, 32, 35, 38...

-Just keep moving...

0:35:440:35:47

38 here, doorway at 38.

0:35:470:35:49

I sell with you at £38, no-one else at 38?

0:35:490:35:54

That last-minute rally means the loss isn't too stinging.

0:35:540:35:58

-Bad luck there, darling.

-C'est la vie.

0:35:580:36:01

It's Anita's job lot of 20s necklaces

0:36:010:36:04

and golf-themed brooch next.

0:36:040:36:06

£10 for the beads and the brooches,

0:36:060:36:08

5 I'm bid, down here at 5,

0:36:080:36:10

with the lady at 5, I'll take 6 as the next bid.

0:36:100:36:14

Nope? Are you bidding 6?

0:36:140:36:15

6 on there, 7, 8, 9,

0:36:150:36:17

10, 12, on the stairs at 12,

0:36:170:36:19

stick with it, madam.

0:36:190:36:20

15, go 15! At 12, with the gentleman at 12,

0:36:200:36:23

each of these items was hand selected.

0:36:230:36:26

By me!

0:36:260:36:28

At 15, I sell standing at £15. You're both on here.

0:36:280:36:31

Standing then at 15, new money at £15.

0:36:310:36:36

-182.

-He...he...

-He tried it.

-He flogged it.

0:36:360:36:40

Our auctioneer is putting the hours in indeed.

0:36:420:36:44

Hard luck, Anita.

0:36:440:36:46

Anita Manning, where's this going?

0:36:460:36:48

Selling on the net at £6.

0:36:480:36:50

Don't speak too soon.

0:36:500:36:52

This game could still be anyone's.

0:36:520:36:54

Can Paul's job lot of Air Force items see him flying high?

0:36:540:36:58

20 quid?

0:36:580:37:00

Anyone 20? 10 then?

0:37:000:37:02

£10 for this little lot.

0:37:020:37:04

10 I'm bid here. 10, 12, at 12 now, goes at 12.

0:37:040:37:07

-15, 18, against it at 18...

-That's it.

0:37:070:37:10

20, the net at 20.

0:37:100:37:12

At 22, underbidder, have another go, 25,

0:37:120:37:15

is that it, all done?

0:37:150:37:16

At 25 I sell the net, then, at 25.

0:37:160:37:20

Sadly, it's not a flyer.

0:37:200:37:22

But there's still everything to play for.

0:37:220:37:26

Today's auctioneer liked Anita's little child's sporran.

0:37:260:37:28

Will the crowd?

0:37:280:37:30

The sporran, 20 quid. Anyone 20?

0:37:300:37:32

-Yes, go on!

-It's got to be worth 20.

0:37:320:37:34

22, 25, it's with the net at 25.

0:37:340:37:37

Anyone else in the room?

0:37:370:37:38

It's your sort of thing, sir! It really is your sort of thing.

0:37:380:37:41

At 25, I'm selling here on the net at 25. No-one else?

0:37:410:37:44

Done and finished then at 25.

0:37:440:37:48

Ah, well.

0:37:480:37:49

That's the best result of the day so far, isn't it?

0:37:490:37:52

We're keeping in to break even.

0:37:530:37:55

It breaks even indeed.

0:37:550:37:57

Now it is Paul's sizeable cowskin trunk.

0:37:570:38:00

Will a big item mean a big profit?

0:38:000:38:02

Come in at 50 quid. 50 I'm bid,

0:38:020:38:04

-50, 55, 60, 65...

-It's running.

-70, 75, 80...

-It should.

0:38:040:38:08

85, at 85 now, down then at 85,

0:38:080:38:10

90, 95, 100 I've got.

0:38:100:38:12

-Hey, Paul, you're going...

-110...

0:38:120:38:15

At £110 now.

0:38:150:38:17

Is that it? I sell at 110.

0:38:170:38:20

At £110, no-one else?

0:38:200:38:22

All done at 110. Net, nothing on you.

0:38:220:38:27

Excellent. A nice profit for Paul.

0:38:270:38:30

-How the hell did I get a profit?

-Well done.

-Take it.

-Well done.

0:38:300:38:34

That was a good spend.

0:38:340:38:36

Anita's cabinet in the Art Nouveau style is up next.

0:38:360:38:39

10 I'm bid, 10, 12, 15, 18, 20,

0:38:390:38:41

down here at £20, seated at 20,

0:38:410:38:43

in the middle of the seats at 20, 22, 25,

0:38:430:38:46

in the room at 25 now.

0:38:460:38:47

At 25, 28, 30 off you. Oh, come on!

0:38:470:38:50

-30, the lady at 30,

-Yes. His wife said yes.

0:38:500:38:53

Sold the lady at 30. Take 2 again, 32, 35.

0:38:530:38:56

35, 35, the lady at 35.

0:38:560:38:58

With the lady at 35, 38, 40, madam.

0:38:580:39:01

Yes.

0:39:010:39:03

40, at 40, back at 40, take the 5? No, you are out.

0:39:030:39:06

-At 40, do you want to bid against her, sir?

-LAUGHTER

0:39:060:39:10

At 40, sell then at £40.

0:39:100:39:12

-Yes!

-Well done.

0:39:140:39:15

Another healthy profit and this race is nearly neck and neck.

0:39:150:39:19

Now we're back on the boil, Anita Manning.

0:39:190:39:22

So can Paul's spurs...spur him to further success?

0:39:220:39:28

Anyone 10? 10 here. 10?

0:39:280:39:31

Is that it? At 10? Take 2?

0:39:310:39:33

12, 15, here at 15.

0:39:330:39:36

This side at £15.

0:39:360:39:37

All done at £15.

0:39:370:39:40

Goes at £15.

0:39:400:39:42

Oh! He's done really well there, no luck.

0:39:420:39:47

That's sore.

0:39:470:39:49

An unfortunate loss, but again a small one.

0:39:490:39:53

Now it's Anita's last lot.

0:39:530:39:55

Any self-playing piano enthusiasts out there?

0:39:550:39:58

Pound apiece. 17 quid, come in at £17?

0:39:580:40:01

Anyone 17? Tenner then?

0:40:010:40:03

£10? Has anyone got a Pianola at home?

0:40:030:40:05

Could you put your hand up, please, and identify yourself?

0:40:050:40:08

-And we'll take your bid.

-That old trick.

0:40:080:40:10

Fiver then?

0:40:100:40:12

5 on the net, the net at 5. And I sell at £5.

0:40:120:40:16

Is that it at a fiver? 6 net. Who's at 6?

0:40:160:40:18

Sell then at 6.

0:40:180:40:20

Done then at 6, all done at 6.

0:40:200:40:23

-7, at 7 now.

-£7!

0:40:230:40:27

At 8. I'm selling at 8 then.

0:40:270:40:30

Done at £8, no-one else?

0:40:300:40:32

All done at 8, goes at 8.

0:40:320:40:35

Oh, Anita Manning!

0:40:350:40:37

This is going to be pretty close.

0:40:370:40:39

We've sold 50 lots in five auctions.

0:40:390:40:43

There's nothing in it and it is hanging on Reeves Pneumatic Broom!

0:40:430:40:47

This is indeed the situation in which we find ourselves, Paul.

0:40:500:40:53

The bid's at 5, 5, 6,

0:40:530:40:56

is that it at 6?

0:40:560:40:57

All done at 6?

0:40:570:40:59

-Oh!

-7, the net at 7, 8, at 8 now,

0:40:590:41:02

9, 10...

0:41:020:41:04

we're in at 10. At £10.

0:41:040:41:06

Cheap! It's cheap!

0:41:060:41:08

At 10... It is cheap, I agree, it's cheap.

0:41:080:41:11

This would make an ideal Christmas present for somebody.

0:41:110:41:14

-There could be...

-If they want a divorce.

-..power cuts!

0:41:140:41:17

Sell at a tenner. Finished and done at £10. No-one else?

0:41:170:41:20

All done at ten. Is that it?

0:41:200:41:22

Done and finished then at £10.

0:41:220:41:25

Hysteria all-round in the sale room,

0:41:270:41:30

but it's a photo finish to see who's won.

0:41:300:41:32

I think that's it.

0:41:320:41:34

£2 in it.

0:41:340:41:35

Anita Manning, this has been some trip.

0:41:350:41:38

I don't believe this.

0:41:380:41:41

I don't believe it.

0:41:410:41:44

Paul started this leg with £344.99.

0:41:440:41:48

After auction costs,

0:41:480:41:49

he made a loss of £23.64

0:41:490:41:51

so ends this trip with £321.35.

0:41:510:41:55

While Anita began with £389.20.

0:41:570:42:02

After costs, she made a loss of £63.24.

0:42:020:42:06

So although she loses this battle, she still wins the war,

0:42:060:42:09

ending with £325.96

0:42:090:42:11

and besting Paul by a mere £4.61.

0:42:120:42:16

Wow! All profits go to Children In Need.

0:42:170:42:19

That was the most exciting end.

0:42:190:42:22

It was fabulous.

0:42:220:42:24

What a wonderful end to the most sweet trip.

0:42:240:42:27

Thanks of the companionship and the journey.

0:42:270:42:30

MUSIC: It's Got To Be Perfect by Fairground Attraction

0:42:300:42:32

What a lovely pair you do make.

0:42:320:42:34

# To play silly games. #

0:42:340:42:35

This really has been a near-perfect partnership,

0:42:350:42:38

full of the fun, frolics and fancy goods the road trip can offer.

0:42:380:42:41

# I won't do that again.

0:42:410:42:44

# It's got to be

0:42:440:42:49

-# Perfect. #

-They've compared notes...

-Does my bum look big in this hat?

0:42:490:42:53

# It's got to be

0:42:530:42:56

-# Worth it... #

-..shared jokes.

0:42:560:42:58

LOUDSPEAKER SQUEAKS Jimi Hendrix has entered the building.

0:42:580:43:01

# Too many people take second best... #

0:43:010:43:03

Yeah, perfect working order.

0:43:030:43:05

And really had a grand old time on the road.

0:43:050:43:08

# Yeah

0:43:080:43:10

# Perfect. #

0:43:100:43:13

Goodbye, you two.

0:43:130:43:15

Don't forget to write.

0:43:150:43:17

It's the final leg for Paul Laidlaw and Anita Manning. There are only a few pounds separating this competitive duo as they begin in Norwich and head for a nail-biting final auction in Stamford, Lincolnshire.