Herstmonceux 34 Flog It!


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Herstmonceux 34

This edition comes from Herstmonceux Castle in Sussex, where finds include a pristine 19th-century silver prayer book and a selection of Tom and Jerry cartoons.


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Transcript


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Today, we're in Sussex and this is the stately ballroom

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of Herstmonceux Castle near Battle.

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As you can see, our stewards are putting

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the rows of chairs out for our owners

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and our crews are making the final checks on their equipment.

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And out here, the most important people of all, our visitors,

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hundreds of them, who have come from far and wide.

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I hope you've brought some great treasures along today.

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-ALL:

-Yes!

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Welcome to Flog It!

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Our host venue, Herstmonceux Castle in Sussex,

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looks immaculate for a building that is nearly 700 years old.

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But it wasn't always so.

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In the 1800s, it had become a ruin,

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fallen into disrepair after a century of neglect.

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Fortunately, recent owners took the castle under their wing

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and brought it back to its former glory,

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giving us a glorious location for our Flog It! valuation day.

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Look at this. What a fantastic crowd we have today

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and the sun's coming out. We're going to be in for a good day.

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Are you going to have a good time, everyone?

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-ALL:

-Yes!

-Yes, of course you are.

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Look, we need to get this crowd inside

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to get on with the valuations.

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It is now 9:30.

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We're going to get the doors open and we are going to find out exactly

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what's it worth?

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And we're going to take the best items off to auction and,

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fingers crossed, we are going to have

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one or two big surprises. So, stay with us.

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And joining us on our quest

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to find the finest antiques brought in by our visitors

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are our very own antiques experts.

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With a keen eye for collectables, it's Jonathan Pratt.

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And entertaining the crowd, it's Catherine Southon.

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# Do do do do do do! #

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They'll be battling it out

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to unearth the best treasures to take to auction.

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Off on your hols, Jonathan?

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Oh, maybe, maybe.

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While everyone gets seated and settled,

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here's a quick taste of what's coming up later on the show.

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Jonathan gets to try out one of his finds.

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-What would you like?

-Oh, yes, cup of tea with one sugar, please.

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One sugar? Oh, right, OK, there we are.

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Our auction really moves Catherine.

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I'm doing a little dance!

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And I discover a piece of history that's very futuristic.

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This looks pretty impressive.

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It looks like something out of a Bond movie set.

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Having a good time, everyone?

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-ALL:

-Yes!

-Yes, that's what it's all about.

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Look at this. It looks like chaos, but believe me,

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Flog It! is a well-oiled machine.

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Lots of cogs working together.

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Everybody knows exactly what they're doing

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and I know you're going to have a good time.

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We're all here to learn something and, hopefully, you will, too.

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We're going to crack on with our first valuation.

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Who is that lucky owner going to be?

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We're going to find out right now, as we join up with our experts.

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So, do you want to pour?

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Do you want to be mother?

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-Oh, yeah.

-So, Julie,

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you've brought along a nice tea service and I'm always amazed

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with children's tea services how, actually,

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any of it survived, frankly.

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-Oh, yeah.

-You know,

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I've got kids and I've seen tea services and they get destroyed.

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Well, it was mine when I was a child.

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-Yeah.

-I've got two daughters

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and they did get to play with it a bit

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when they were young, as well.

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So, you were, you were given this tea service by your mother,

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-is that right?

-Well, I was adopted

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and the tea service was given with me.

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-Oh, really?

-But I did track down my birth mother

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years later and asked her about it. And she said,

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"Well, it must have been Aunt Jane's, because I smashed mine!"

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-Oh, really?

-So, the sisters both had these when they were little.

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That's sweet, isn't it?

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-Yeah.

-Well, it's a Grimwades tea service.

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It's...it's porcelain.

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So, it's quite finely potted.

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Grimwades came around, sort of, you know, 1900, and, you know,

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at that point, tea was becoming,

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tea was becoming available for the masses.

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And then, obviously, at the end of the 19th century, circa 1900,

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that's when we see Beatrix Potter

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and she's up in Cumbria, isn't she?

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And she was writing her stories of Peter Rabbit and Tom Kitten,

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who we've got, and Squirrel Nutkins. And so, those books were

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first published at the end of the 19th century.

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Cup factories like Grimwades

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realised they could endorse products and market them

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-to a new audience, being children.

-Right, yeah.

-So this would have been produced -

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from the shape of the tea service, as well -

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probably around the '20s, '30s.

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Yeah.

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Well, we've got all sorts going on in here and, you know,

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I think every parent is familiar with this, you know,

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with the characters and the storylines.

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And so we've got Mittens, Tom Kitten and Moppet...

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playing. In this instance, obviously, Tom Kitten's...

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He's naked. He hasn't got his blue coat on.

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Oh, I hadn't noticed that.

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And he's here, there he is in his proud suit.

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So, lovely tea service and there's

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a big collectors' market for children's things.

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So going to the value, well, I mean, this chap here,

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-he's not going to hold much tea, I don't think.

-No.

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So bearing that in mind and it is a popular tea service

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but bearing that condition element in mind,

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I would say a sensible estimate would be £180-£220.

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-Yeah.

-And, then, maybe, we put a reserve just below,

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giving us a little bit of wriggle room

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for the auctioneer of maybe £150?

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-Yeah, that would be fine, yeah.

-OK. That's wonderful.

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Well, there we are. I think, after all that, it's thirsty work, this,

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isn't it? So, maybe... What would you like?

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Oh, yes, cup of tea with one sugar, please.

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One sugar? Oh, right, OK, there we are.

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Well, that's wishful thinking, Jonathan. We haven't got time for tea breaks.

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There are hundreds of people here and even more items to look through,

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so let's crack on and see what Catherine has found.

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Mary, this is a beautiful card case that you've brought along.

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Can you tell me a little bit about where you got it from?

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Well, I inherited it from my mother.

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And I'm pretty sure it came from a place in China called Weihaiwei.

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My grandfather was a missionary and he was sent out there.

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And I inherited it and that was really about it.

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Is it something that you remembered from your childhood?

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Yes, but I wish I'd asked a bit more about it.

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You never asked any questions?

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-Not much.

-Well, it's certainly

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a card case. It's actually made in China.

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It's Cantonese.

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-Oh.

-And it probably dates from around 1850 or 1860,

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that sort of period.

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And the quality of the carving is absolutely superb.

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And it's carved not only on one side but also on the back and also around

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the sides, as well. And then, you open up the top, here,

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and that's where your calling card

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would have been placed, in the top, there.

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But it's been made in Canton for the Western market.

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And is it something that you always admired in your family?

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Yes, oh, yes, I think it's amazing.

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Because it's in lovely condition.

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The quality of the carving here is absolutely superb.

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And on one side you can see that these little figures

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are playing a game.

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These always do make

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good money at auction. It is ivory,

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so we do have to be very careful in stating that it is pre-1947,

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so it is legal to sell items like this at auction.

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But they always command good prices.

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Any ideas on price?

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£200?

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You should be doing my job!

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You are absolutely spot on.

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If I was to put this into auction, I would say probably around 200-£300.

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But they do command high prices.

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The Chinese are really hot on these at the moment,

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so it wouldn't surprise me if it did make 400 or £500.

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-Oh.

-But I think, let's put it in at 200-300,

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with a reserve of £200 and it should do very well, indeed.

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How does that sound you, Mary?

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-Thanks very much.

-Does that sound good?

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-Great. Yes.

-Well, you've really looked after it

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and I hope that'll go to

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someone who will also look after it in the same way you have.

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Thank you so much, Mary.

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It's been lovely to meet you.

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-Thank you.

-Thank you.

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Back over to Jonathan's table now

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and it looks like a very famous figure

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has scurried on to his table.

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Well, Wendy.

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-Hello.

-Are you a big cartoon fan?

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-I am, yes.

-Are you?

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Yes, yes.

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I remember Tom and Jerry from a long time ago.

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I think I spent my childhood watching re-runs of these guys,

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-you know.

-I think it's just nostalgia, now,

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-for those times.

-So, who did you want to win all the time?

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-Oh, the mouse.

-Did you?

-Because he's so small.

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It's that, that sort of, archetypal rivalry, isn't it?

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-It's the cat and mouse.

-Absolutely.

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The origins of this go right back to 1940, OK?

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I hadn't realised that.

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So the creation of...the creation

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of these two characters

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by William Hanna and Joseph Barbera,

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who came up with these characters in 1940,

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and they worked on throughout the '40s, '50s, '60s, '70s.

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I think there was a bit of a lull

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-and they have reproduced them recently.

-Yes.

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And the production company that

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I think did it was Warner Brothers,

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right, because you saw the big logo, there, at the end.

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-That's it, yeah.

-You know, and the theme tune.

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I think we can probably hum it away now.

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Well, we've got Jerry, here.

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Yes.

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And we've got a view of Jerry in various poses, OK?

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Nicely separated by acid-free tissue paper.

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And then we hit some drawings down the bottom,

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where he's wielding a book.

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-He is.

-And at the moment, no cats involved.

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There's Tom cat, Tom cat's down the bottom there, OK.

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Now, so those viewers who don't understand

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-how cartoons were done in the old days...

-I know.

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You know, they were literally drawn and painted onto celluloid,

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which is a hard plastic.

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Yes. They would do cell by cell, folding over, folding over,

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each movement, sort of stop-start animation,

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they might understand a bit more like today.

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-Yeah.

-So, an enormous amount of work.

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-Effort, yes.

-So, how did you come by these?

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Well, I went to a book fair in Lewes about five or six years ago

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and he happened to have these for sale, as well,

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and I just was intrigued by them.

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And he said he got them in a job lot

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and didn't really know what to do with them.

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And I just, sort of, it was a bit of an impulse thing,

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I thought, oh, that's really, really nice and I might frame one or two.

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-So I bought them...

-Yes.

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..intending to do that, but I never have.

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How much did you pay for them?

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Well, he wanted about £30 and I beat him down to about 20.

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-OK.

-And I didn't pay any more,

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I'm sure I didn't pay any more than that.

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It doesn't seem like a lot of money.

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-No.

-But there is the "What do you do with them?"

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I know, but they were so unusual and I just fell in love with them.

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It was a bit of an impulse, really.

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What do you want for them?

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I don't know. It would be nice to get my money back.

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It would, wouldn't it? OK, let's say £40-60 and let's put,

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just to protect you, a £20 reserve on it.

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-Right.

-And you're going to get your money back, I promise you.

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Yes, all right. Yes.

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Well, Jonathan, we shall find out soon enough.

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Well, there you are, you've just seen them,

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our experts have now found their first three items

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to take off to auction.

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This is where it gets exciting.

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You've heard what they've had to say.

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You've probably got your own opinions,

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but right now, it's down to the bidders.

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Let's find out what they think.

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Let's find out exactly what it's worth, as we go into the saleroom.

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Here's a quick recap of all the items we are taking with us.

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Julie's tea set might be a children's toy,

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but I'm sure it will get the bids pouring in.

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Mary's card holder is so beautifully carved,

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it's sure to do the business at auction.

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And the Jerry cartoons are a delightful little set.

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Let's hope the collectors will sniff them out.

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We are off to Rye, down on the south coast of Sussex.

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In medieval times this pretty town was right on the coast,

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but the sea has retreated since then,

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and now only small ships and fishing boats bob on the river.

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Well, this is what I like to see.

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A packed auction room full of bidders and fine art and antiques.

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On the rostrum, we have auctioneer Kevin Wall

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and the sale is just about to start.

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Let's catch up with our owners

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and, fingers crossed, we get some great surprises.

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Our items are going under the hammer at Rye Auction Galleries.

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Like all auctions, there's commission to pay

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and, here today, it's 15% plus VAT.

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Kevin Wall is the man on the rostrum

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and he is fast approaching the Beatrix Potter tea set.

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-Good luck to you, Leigh.

-Thank you.

-Time to say goodbye to the tea set,

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going under the hammer right now.

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We've got a Grimwades Beatrix Potter tea set

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and I am a big Beatrix Potter fan.

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-Are you?

-Oh, yes, yes, I love it.

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-What about you?

-Oh, yes, definitely.

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-Got all the books?

-I did have them.

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They got handed on to my children.

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Do you know, I've still got all the books

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and I've read them to my son and also to my daughter.

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They are so tatty, but they're still complete.

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Good luck with this. Why are you selling this, anyway?

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I'm actually trying to raise some money for a new sofa.

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Not terribly exciting.

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Right, OK. So, we need something to sit on,

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this is a good start, isn't it?

0:13:270:13:29

-Yes.

-Fingers crossed we sell this.

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Good luck. Right, let's find out what the bidders think.

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It's going under the hammer right now.

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Lot number 40 is the Grimwades Beatrix Potter child's tea set.

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There's a small bit of damage to it, but however, I start it at 100, 120,

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150, 180, 200, 220.

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-We are in there.

-250, 280. 280 I'm bid.

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290. 300. 310.

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At 310, my commissions are out, it's on the phone now, at 310.

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Do I see 320?

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At 310 here on the phone, at £310, you're all out, on the telephone,

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at 310.

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£310.

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-Very good.

-Lovely.

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Sofa! Sofa, so good!

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-Register that trademark!

-Yes.

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-Hey, look, good luck with that one.

-Thanks very much.

-Good luck,

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enjoy it and put your feet up on the sofa and watch Flog It!

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Oh, definitely.

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If you've got anything like that you want to sell,

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then bring it along to one of our valuation days.

0:14:260:14:28

Details of up and coming dates and venues, you can find

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on our BBC website or our Flog It! Facebook page.

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Come along and join us. Dust them down and bring 'em in.

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Hopefully, we're coming to a town very near you soon.

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Right, there's no time to waste. Today's auction is fast and furious.

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So, it's time for a bit of Tom and Jerry.

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Wendy, good luck.

0:14:450:14:46

-Oh, thank you.

-Going under the hammer right now,

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we've got those cartoon strips, the Warner Bros ones.

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I love these. You got them in a fair in Lewes.

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I did. Yes. I got carried away by them.

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-Well...

-Memories of Tom and Jerry bashing each other over the head.

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Hopefully, hopefully, we'll get you your money back, plus a bit more.

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Well, good luck with this.

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-Thank you.

-I think these deserved to be

0:15:030:15:05

framed in strips on the wall, don't you?

0:15:050:15:07

I think they are good children's bedroom things, aren't they?

0:15:070:15:10

I mean, I grew up on Tom and Jerry.

0:15:100:15:11

So did I. Yeah. Good luck, both of you.

0:15:110:15:13

-Thank you.

-Going under the hammer right now, this is it.

0:15:130:15:15

Lot 235 is a selection of Warner Bros cells and drawings.

0:15:150:15:19

These are quite a few laughs over them and I've got, what have I got,

0:15:190:15:23

12 to start. 12 only.

0:15:230:15:25

Do I see 15? Unusual little lot, £12.

0:15:250:15:28

Do I see 15 now? 15, 18, 20, sir.

0:15:280:15:31

20 is with you. At £20, do I see two now?

0:15:310:15:34

At £20 only, have we all done and finished here?

0:15:340:15:38

At £20, then.

0:15:380:15:40

-Well, there we are.

-Oh. That's all right.

0:15:400:15:42

Just about got the £20 back.

0:15:420:15:45

Do you know, for a moment it was that...

0:15:450:15:47

I heard that sound of Tom scraping his nails.

0:15:470:15:49

Going... Oh, it was Jerry, wasn't it,

0:15:490:15:51

or Tom, both of them were going...

0:15:510:15:52

Down the side of a ship when they were trying to escape something,

0:15:520:15:55

-and that noise.

-That's fine, I got my money back,

0:15:550:15:57

that's all that mattered, really.

0:15:570:15:59

Oh. It's going to a new home, which is brilliant.

0:15:590:16:01

-Exactly.

-Yes, they'll be used, where I didn't use them.

0:16:010:16:04

Well done, anyway.

0:16:040:16:06

And right now, it's Mary and our third lot of the day.

0:16:080:16:12

Going under the hammer right now, we have a Cantonese ivory card case.

0:16:120:16:16

It belongs to Mary and I think this one's going to fly away.

0:16:160:16:19

It's good to see you again, Mary.

0:16:190:16:20

And how have you been since the valuation day?

0:16:200:16:22

Oh, yes, still upright.

0:16:220:16:24

Still upright!

0:16:240:16:25

Now, this card case has been in the family a long time.

0:16:260:16:29

It was your mother's. She lived in China.

0:16:290:16:31

-Yes.

-For a little while.

0:16:310:16:32

But I don't know whether she brought it back, or...

0:16:320:16:35

-Right, OK.

-I really don't know.

0:16:350:16:37

Your grandfather was a missionary in China.

0:16:370:16:39

-Yes.

-A lot of history there.

0:16:390:16:41

-Are you ready for this?

-Yes.

0:16:410:16:42

OK, let's put it under the hammer

0:16:420:16:44

and find out what those bidders think.

0:16:440:16:46

Here we go.

0:16:460:16:48

So, 190.

0:16:480:16:49

Here we are.

0:16:490:16:51

It's a 19th-century Chinese, shaped, ivory card case.

0:16:510:16:54

Another nice piece they are showing and I've got 150 to start,

0:16:540:16:58

150 with me.

0:16:580:16:59

At 150, 160, 170, 180, 190, 200, 200 here, 200,

0:16:590:17:06

210, 220, 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, 290, at 290,

0:17:060:17:14

we're doing the coco here.

0:17:140:17:16

300, 320, 340, 360, 380, 400, 420, 440,

0:17:160:17:23

460, at 460, on the next deal, 480 now.

0:17:230:17:27

At 500, at 500, do I see 520 now?

0:17:270:17:32

-At 520.

-Oh, I'm so pleased for you.

0:17:320:17:34

-This is wonderful.

-At £520 now.

0:17:340:17:36

At 520, have we all finished here?

0:17:360:17:40

At £520.

0:17:400:17:43

Oh, bless you, brilliant, well done, Mary.

0:17:430:17:45

£520.

0:17:450:17:47

Quality always sells, doesn't it?

0:17:470:17:50

Doing a little dance.

0:17:500:17:51

That's a great result, that's a great result.

0:17:540:17:57

How do you feel about that?

0:17:570:17:59

Oh, very pleased, thrilled.

0:17:590:18:01

Thank you so much for coming along

0:18:010:18:03

to the valuation day and bringing it along.

0:18:030:18:06

-Oh. It was beautiful.

-Yeah.

0:18:060:18:08

It's a shame, I could talk to you all afternoon.

0:18:080:18:10

Why don't you stay with us and watch the rest?

0:18:100:18:12

Well, that's the end of our first visit to the auction room.

0:18:130:18:16

We'll be back later on with three more exciting sales.

0:18:160:18:19

Now, it's time to head back to Herstmonceux, our host location,

0:18:240:18:28

but before we go back inside the castle,

0:18:280:18:29

I want to show you something quite spectacular

0:18:290:18:32

that's also on the same grounds.

0:18:320:18:34

And just up the hill it really is quite something.

0:18:350:18:38

This is like the set of a futuristic movie.

0:18:380:18:41

It's actually a very impressive and quite unique science park,

0:18:410:18:45

with all kinds of exhibits

0:18:450:18:47

for visitors to experience hands-on science.

0:18:470:18:50

And these strange green domes contain enormous telescopes,

0:18:500:18:54

designed to explore the universe.

0:18:540:18:56

They were once the heart of one of the most advanced astronomy sites

0:18:560:19:00

in the world. So how did they get here and what became of it?

0:19:000:19:04

Our story starts in London in 1675.

0:19:040:19:08

King Charles II wanted to improve navigation for sailors,

0:19:080:19:12

because too many ships were getting lost and wrecked.

0:19:120:19:16

So the Royal Greenwich Observatory was built

0:19:160:19:19

and, from here, astronomers created the principles

0:19:190:19:22

of longitude and Greenwich Mean Time.

0:19:220:19:25

Greenwich led the world of astronomy,

0:19:250:19:27

but by the 20th-century,

0:19:270:19:29

pollution from smoke and streetlights made it redundant.

0:19:290:19:33

So, the decision was made to build a brand-new state-of-the-art

0:19:330:19:36

facility in the countryside and the grounds

0:19:360:19:38

of Herstmonceux Castle were chosen.

0:19:380:19:40

However, when the first dome appeared on the horizon,

0:19:400:19:43

the local residents weren't that happy.

0:19:430:19:45

In fact, they were upset.

0:19:450:19:46

They thought it looked ugly and it ruined the peacefulness,

0:19:460:19:50

the tranquillity of the medieval castle and its surrounding area.

0:19:500:19:54

So, the architects went back to the drawing board and redesigned

0:19:540:19:57

the project, to make it into something more in keeping

0:19:570:20:00

with the area. The buildings were clad with local Sussex brick,

0:20:000:20:03

similar to Herstmonceux Castle.

0:20:030:20:05

The copper domes were coated with a chemical to turn them green quicker,

0:20:050:20:10

helping to blend in with the countryside.

0:20:100:20:12

In 1957, the site was finished,

0:20:120:20:14

looking quite beautiful and distinct.

0:20:140:20:16

Telescopes from Greenwich were brought down and carefully installed

0:20:160:20:20

into their new country homes -

0:20:200:20:22

each dome containing a different kind of telescope for studying the

0:20:220:20:25

cosmos, with grand names like the Astrographic and the Yap Reflector.

0:20:250:20:30

And my favourite is this, the Thompson Refractor.

0:20:300:20:34

For over 100 years, this has photographed the sky at night.

0:20:340:20:39

Now this can snap photographs

0:20:390:20:41

of the stars 100,000 times fainter than what

0:20:410:20:43

we can see with our naked eye at night.

0:20:430:20:46

That is very faint.

0:20:460:20:48

This was the golden age of the Royal Observatory.

0:20:480:20:50

At its peak, with over 200 people working here,

0:20:500:20:54

it was the largest facility of its kind in the world.

0:20:540:20:57

Scientists led the way in research,

0:20:570:20:59

including finding the first-ever black hole,

0:20:590:21:01

and, not surprisingly, the site was a popular destination for one

0:21:010:21:05

of the longest-running TV series in the world,

0:21:050:21:07

presented by the legendary Sir Patrick Moore.

0:21:070:21:10

This is Herstmonceux Castle,

0:21:100:21:13

astronomically, the most famous castle in the world.

0:21:130:21:16

It's the headquarters of the Royal Greenwich Observatory.

0:21:160:21:19

As the name suggests,

0:21:190:21:20

the Greenwich Observatory was originally in Greenwich Park.

0:21:200:21:24

This is a big telescope and very suitable for this kind of work,

0:21:240:21:27

but of course, it's also very much of a precision instrument

0:21:270:21:30

and, by remote control, as Diane is doing here,

0:21:300:21:33

you can point it exactly in the right direction.

0:21:330:21:35

Even playing a special part in the nation's timekeeping.

0:21:350:21:39

Now, do you recognise this sound?

0:21:390:21:41

Listen.

0:21:410:21:42

REGULAR BEEPS

0:21:420:21:43

Yes, that's the BBC pips.

0:21:430:21:45

Now, they were generated from

0:21:450:21:47

the Observatory's incredibly-accurate atomic clock

0:21:470:21:50

that was based here, then transmitted to the BBC,

0:21:500:21:54

to be used on TV and radio sets.

0:21:540:21:56

The medieval estate of Herstmonceux Castle

0:21:560:21:59

had truly become a part of the modern world.

0:21:590:22:02

But this golden period was short lived.

0:22:020:22:04

30 years after the Royal Observatory

0:22:040:22:07

opened its doors here at Herstmonceux,

0:22:070:22:09

it was almost made redundant.

0:22:090:22:11

The large telescopes were moved out and, in 1990, it closed its doors,

0:22:110:22:16

leaving just the old historic telescopes.

0:22:160:22:19

The site reopened in 1995 in its current reincarnation -

0:22:200:22:25

a science centre open to the public.

0:22:250:22:28

Dr Sandra Voss helps run the centre.

0:22:280:22:30

The Royal Observatory in London was established for over 300 years,

0:22:310:22:35

but it only lasted 30 years here.

0:22:350:22:37

Why is that?

0:22:370:22:39

Well, the reason why it came out here

0:22:390:22:40

in the first place was the light pollution

0:22:400:22:43

and air pollution from London.

0:22:430:22:45

And it only lasted 30 years here

0:22:450:22:47

really because the light pollution was encroaching again.

0:22:470:22:51

Astronomers now do all their research in La Palma,

0:22:510:22:55

but we've still got all the telescopes here.

0:22:550:22:58

I mean, it seems such a shame,

0:22:580:23:00

but I know you've put the whole area to good use, haven't you?

0:23:000:23:04

I mean, it's not been wasted.

0:23:040:23:05

-Not at all.

-Things are still happening.

0:23:050:23:07

Yes, things are still happening and we've brought the astronomy back.

0:23:070:23:10

We've got three of the historic telescopes working,

0:23:100:23:12

so the general public can come and have a look through the telescopes

0:23:120:23:15

when we've got open evenings.

0:23:150:23:17

We're trying to inspire the next generation in science,

0:23:170:23:19

not just in astronomy, but in science in general.

0:23:190:23:22

I've been inspired looking at those telescopes,

0:23:220:23:24

so it's a brilliant thing.

0:23:240:23:25

Going from the world's foremost astronomy site

0:23:250:23:28

to an inspiring science park might be

0:23:280:23:30

a bit of a step down for these magnificent telescopes,

0:23:300:23:34

but it's not all over for serious astronomical research

0:23:340:23:37

on the Herstmonceux estate.

0:23:370:23:39

Take a look at this.

0:23:390:23:41

Tucked away in a quiet corner of the grounds,

0:23:410:23:43

not far from the green domes,

0:23:430:23:45

this special telescope is the

0:23:450:23:47

only working leftover from the Royal Observatory days.

0:23:470:23:51

Dr Graham Appleby has worked here at Herstmonceux since 1969.

0:23:510:23:55

Graham, hi there.

0:23:580:23:59

-Hello, hi.

-This looks pretty impressive.

0:23:590:24:02

It looks like something out of a Bond movie set.

0:24:020:24:04

What we're doing with this telescope

0:24:040:24:06

is tracking satellites in orbit round the earth.

0:24:060:24:08

How many satellites will be up there?

0:24:080:24:10

We'll be tracking something like 50 or 60 during a night.

0:24:100:24:12

-That's a lot.

-And the laser's firing at 2,000 shots per second.

0:24:120:24:16

-Wow.

-Getting a lot of data.

0:24:160:24:18

So, it hits the satellite, then bounces back.

0:24:180:24:20

Bounces back and we time how long it takes to do that.

0:24:200:24:22

This is essential support

0:24:220:24:24

for navigation, as we know it, on the surface of the Earth these days.

0:24:240:24:28

GPS in our cars and our aircraft all depend

0:24:280:24:31

on support from stations like this.

0:24:310:24:33

So, really, the Royal Observatory

0:24:330:24:34

was set up to help sailors navigate the oceans and, now,

0:24:340:24:37

in a slightly different way, but helping us to get around.

0:24:370:24:40

Precisely, yes, yes.

0:24:400:24:41

It's a good legacy of that original 300-year-old set-up at Greenwich.

0:24:410:24:45

Mm. It's great to have a chat with you, Graham,

0:24:450:24:47

and I'll let you carry on. I know you can't do an awful lot

0:24:470:24:50

with the cloud cover, but I'm sure there's plenty to do.

0:24:500:24:52

There certainly are plenty of things to do.

0:24:520:24:54

-Thank you very much.

-Very nice to meet you, Paul.

0:24:540:24:56

The story of Britain's Royal Observatory

0:25:050:25:07

is a tale of one of the most famous scientific institutions

0:25:070:25:11

in the world for over 300 years.

0:25:110:25:13

And in this quiet corner of Sussex

0:25:130:25:15

is a testament to mankind's obsession

0:25:150:25:18

with the stars, with space, with the whole universe and our place in it.

0:25:180:25:22

Back at the castle, just across the estate,

0:25:360:25:38

our experts have been working away

0:25:380:25:40

looking through all the antiques that have been brought in,

0:25:400:25:44

And out in the gardens, Catherine has something that

0:25:440:25:46

would have felt right at home in the Royal Observatory.

0:25:460:25:49

Colleen, it's wonderful to come out here.

0:25:490:25:51

It seems very calm, very tranquil.

0:25:510:25:53

So, what have you brought for me to see?

0:25:530:25:55

Right, I've bought this.

0:25:550:25:57

-Right.

-Which I didn't know what it was, when I first saw it.

0:25:570:26:00

Oh, what did you think it was?

0:26:000:26:02

I thought it was a military shell.

0:26:020:26:05

-Right.

-Don't ask me why, other than the fact

0:26:050:26:08

that it was in my uncle's cabinet, along with militaria, swords.

0:26:080:26:13

-Ah.

-Rifles.

-So, that's why you thought a shell.

0:26:130:26:16

-Yes.

-Well, I certainly know what it is,

0:26:160:26:18

but I'm interested to see, really,

0:26:180:26:20

who this was made by and when it was made.

0:26:200:26:23

-Mm-hm.

-Do you know anything more about that?

0:26:230:26:25

-Not really.

-Right, because the first place you look on a telescope,

0:26:250:26:29

when you're trying to identify who it is made by,

0:26:290:26:33

is you open up the drawers and

0:26:330:26:34

the first section here, the first drawer,

0:26:340:26:36

that tells us exactly who it was made by,

0:26:360:26:39

so we've got Spencer, Browning and Rust.

0:26:390:26:42

Now they were a firm that manufactured scientific instruments,

0:26:420:26:46

and when I say scientific instruments,

0:26:460:26:48

I mean navigational instruments.

0:26:480:26:50

So, mainly octants, sextants and, also, telescopes.

0:26:500:26:55

They were manufacturing in the 18th and 19th-century

0:26:550:26:59

and this, I would probably date from the first half of the 19th century,

0:26:590:27:04

so perhaps around 1830-1840, that sort of date.

0:27:040:27:07

Was he a collector, your uncle?

0:27:070:27:09

Well, a modest amount, yes.

0:27:090:27:13

As I say, militaria and that.

0:27:130:27:16

Well, this is something, this is a telescope that has been used.

0:27:160:27:20

You can tell that really by the way

0:27:200:27:22

that this drawer has been going in and out

0:27:220:27:24

of the main body of the telescope.

0:27:240:27:26

It's actually a day or night telescope,

0:27:260:27:29

which means it can be used in different types of light,

0:27:290:27:33

so different situations.

0:27:330:27:35

And then you've got a little cover there, can you see that?

0:27:350:27:38

Where you would open up and you could actually look through it.

0:27:380:27:41

But it is in lovely condition,

0:27:410:27:42

-because these do often split over the years.

-Oh, right.

0:27:420:27:45

Quite often we find that they crack or split.

0:27:450:27:47

This bit at the top, that's not its original cap.

0:27:470:27:51

-Oh, right.

-Originally, I'm going to hand that to you,

0:27:510:27:54

you would have had a rather nice brass cap on the top.

0:27:540:27:58

So that will affect the value slightly.

0:27:580:28:00

You can see there where it would have been, once upon a time,

0:28:000:28:03

but it would have been brass, certainly not that.

0:28:030:28:05

I think that's a replacement.

0:28:050:28:07

The important thing with these is to see if you can use them.

0:28:070:28:10

Let's have a look, what can we see?

0:28:100:28:12

Can we see the Observatory?

0:28:140:28:15

Well, it's certainly in good condition and the lenses

0:28:150:28:18

are in good condition. There is no cracks or chips.

0:28:180:28:21

-No.

-And I think something like this would

0:28:210:28:24

probably command about £80-100 at auction.

0:28:240:28:28

How does that sound to you?

0:28:280:28:29

Yes, that's... that's quite reasonable.

0:28:290:28:32

Would you be happy to sell it at that?

0:28:320:28:34

Yes, I think so.

0:28:340:28:35

I'm not going to use it.

0:28:350:28:37

-No.

-I'm not going to do anything with it, so, yes, I mean,

0:28:370:28:40

if it's of interest to somebody else, that's fine.

0:28:400:28:43

OK. Would you like to put a reserve on it?

0:28:430:28:46

-Yes, I would.

-Because it's something obviously that's been handed down

0:28:460:28:49

-through the family.

-Yes, yes.

-It meant something to your uncle.

-Yes.

0:28:490:28:52

So perhaps if we put a reserve on of £70, does that sound OK to you?

0:28:520:28:56

Yeah, yeah, that's fine.

0:28:560:28:57

I hope it goes to someone who's going to use it.

0:28:570:28:59

-Yes.

-It should be used, it's a great instrument,

0:28:590:29:02

great maker and it's been lovely to meet you.

0:29:020:29:05

-And you.

-Thank you very much, Colleen.

-Thank you.

0:29:050:29:08

And while we're out in a spectacular castle gardens,

0:29:080:29:11

there's a unique feature I want to show you.

0:29:110:29:14

Out of all the garden ornaments, my favourite has to be the sundial.

0:29:140:29:18

Not only is it a scientific instrument,

0:29:180:29:20

it's practical and functional,

0:29:200:29:21

and this is a classic example.

0:29:210:29:23

So, as the sun is shining, it casts a shadow

0:29:230:29:26

that moves as the day progresses.

0:29:260:29:28

Sundials have been around for thousands of years and have come

0:29:280:29:31

in all shapes and sizes,

0:29:310:29:33

but the basic design hasn't changed much until recently.

0:29:330:29:36

Now, here at Herstmonceux there is a sundial that is really quite unique.

0:29:360:29:40

And here it is. To give it the full name,

0:29:400:29:43

it is a reclining equiangular sundial.

0:29:430:29:46

This hi-tech looking dial was erected here in 1975,

0:29:460:29:51

to celebrate 300 years of the Royal Greenwich Observatory.

0:29:510:29:55

How it works? It really is quite simple.

0:29:560:29:58

You see this rod here?

0:29:580:30:00

Well, this gives you the reading and it slides up and down

0:30:000:30:04

on this pole here,

0:30:040:30:05

so you can actually fine tune it to get the timing more accurate.

0:30:050:30:09

The sun is shining up there, it's a good, clear day,

0:30:090:30:12

it is casting a shadow on the outer ring over there, on the 15, look,

0:30:120:30:16

it says nearly 3:30pm.

0:30:160:30:18

And by my watch, it's just gone 3:30pm.

0:30:180:30:21

It's not bad, not bad at all.

0:30:210:30:23

Needs a bit of fine tuning to meet Greenwich Mean Time,

0:30:230:30:25

but it just goes to show how simple and how beautiful sundials can be.

0:30:250:30:31

Back inside the castle, there is still plenty of buzz.

0:30:320:30:35

Next up, it's Jonathan, with two intriguing finds.

0:30:350:30:38

-Hello, Pauline.

-Hello, Jonathan.

0:30:400:30:42

You've brought two beautiful objects.

0:30:420:30:44

-Yes.

-Are they family objects? How have you come by them?

0:30:440:30:46

They've come through the family on my mother's side.

0:30:460:30:49

OK, did the family ever use them?

0:30:490:30:51

No, they've just been stored in a drawer.

0:30:510:30:55

How far back in the family do they go?

0:30:550:30:57

My great, great grandparents got married in 1862.

0:30:570:31:01

-Right.

-So they've come through my, um...

-Gosh.

-..well,

0:31:010:31:04

three generations, four generations?

0:31:040:31:07

And you believe that certainly they were your great great-grandparents?

0:31:070:31:10

-Yes.

-That's wonderful.

-Yes.

0:31:100:31:12

This is mourning jewellery.

0:31:120:31:14

Black is associated with mourning.

0:31:140:31:16

It tended... It comes through the Victorian period,

0:31:160:31:19

particularly when Albert died, Prince Albert died,

0:31:190:31:21

and he died in 1861.

0:31:210:31:23

It might have been their parents who had it

0:31:230:31:26

for some form of mourning and it was given to them at that time.

0:31:260:31:30

That date is actually from 1870,

0:31:300:31:33

1880, probably thereabouts.

0:31:330:31:35

It is...pearl, gold and probably

0:31:350:31:41

uh...jet, which is fossilised coal,

0:31:410:31:44

which again, was a very popular Victorian material

0:31:440:31:47

because it was a natural black, very hard and very shiny.

0:31:470:31:50

These, on the other hand, these are interesting, because you're...

0:31:500:31:53

Whether the family actually used these.

0:31:530:31:56

-I wouldn't know.

-I think they are great,

0:31:560:31:58

cos they are lorgnettes.

0:31:580:32:01

The origins of these are French,

0:32:010:32:04

essentially, the word "lorgne" means to squint.

0:32:040:32:06

They are not actually used for looking through as such,

0:32:060:32:10

they were more as pieces of jewellery, sort of a vanity thing.

0:32:100:32:13

They come in all shapes and sizes and to find one in nice condition

0:32:130:32:17

in gold is a little bit of a rarity.

0:32:170:32:21

-So, Pauline...

-Yes.

-..why are you selling them?

0:32:210:32:24

Because I have two sons who are

0:32:240:32:27

not interested in anything of any antique history

0:32:270:32:31

and I've got to an age now where I don't really want to be

0:32:310:32:36

weighed down, weighted down with all these things.

0:32:360:32:39

-Very sensible, too.

-I think someone else can enjoy them.

0:32:390:32:42

I would say they are worth..

0:32:420:32:44

..ah, gosh, what's the worth?

0:32:460:32:48

probably £150-£250 at auction.

0:32:480:32:51

-Yes.

-Yeah?

-Right.

0:32:510:32:52

Looking at the brooch here,

0:32:530:32:56

nice condition, nice quality, interesting antique object.

0:32:560:33:00

The estimate, I would say £40-£60, which judging by your face,

0:33:020:33:06

doesn't... Not as much as you might have imagined.

0:33:060:33:09

-No, not quite.

-It is good quality,

0:33:090:33:11

it is gold, it is not marked, it could be 15 carat gold.

0:33:110:33:16

It's that sort of quality.

0:33:160:33:18

I would suggest maybe putting a reserve, just protect it, £40 on it,

0:33:180:33:22

and see what happens.

0:33:220:33:23

-I'm happy with that.

-Good.

-Thank you.

0:33:230:33:26

We will be splitting those two little treasures

0:33:270:33:29

into separate lots for the auction.

0:33:290:33:31

And finally, Catherine has made her way to the castle bridge.

0:33:320:33:35

Hazel, you've brought along this really stunning prayer book.

0:33:370:33:42

And I think it's stunning, really,

0:33:420:33:45

because of the enamel, the colours are really quite special.

0:33:450:33:50

They really jump out at you, they are very vibrant.

0:33:500:33:53

And, actually, in rather nice condition.

0:33:530:33:56

Where did you get this prayer book from?

0:33:560:33:57

It was my mother's.

0:33:570:33:58

It has been in a household for a long time.

0:33:580:34:02

So, it was handed down?

0:34:020:34:04

-I believe so, yes.

-Because it doesn't strike me

0:34:040:34:07

as an English piece. I think it's probably Continental.

0:34:070:34:11

Is it something you had in your house for a while?

0:34:120:34:15

Yes.

0:34:150:34:16

As a child did you look at it?

0:34:160:34:18

Yes, I think so and possibly we broke the clasp.

0:34:180:34:22

Let's look more closely at it,

0:34:220:34:23

because the first thing you mentioned there is

0:34:230:34:25

the fact that the clasp is broken.

0:34:250:34:27

We are missing a little clasp on the side there, we can see.

0:34:270:34:31

But I love the fact that you've got,

0:34:310:34:34

it looks like real pearls inset on the corners.

0:34:340:34:38

For me, it is really the enamel and the quality of the enamel.

0:34:380:34:42

The best bit about it...

0:34:420:34:44

..is the back. Now look at that.

0:34:450:34:48

That speaks for itself to me.

0:34:480:34:51

We've got the cross here, but also these wonderful growing plants.

0:34:510:34:56

We've got really crisp colours,

0:34:560:34:59

crisp enamel in a wonderful Art Nouveau style,

0:34:590:35:03

and I would say it dates from the late 19th century,

0:35:030:35:07

bordering on 1900, but certainly got that lovely Art Nouveau style to it.

0:35:070:35:13

Is the book itself in good condition? Let's have a look.

0:35:130:35:16

Looks like it's missing a page.

0:35:180:35:20

-It does look as if...

-At the beginning. But generally speaking,

0:35:200:35:24

it looks in OK condition. It's one of those things, really,

0:35:240:35:27

that, it's not so valuable because of the religious content,

0:35:270:35:32

but I think people will be drawn towards it as,

0:35:320:35:35

indeed, I was, because of the colours,

0:35:350:35:38

the enamel. Really, the overall quality of it.

0:35:380:35:42

Because of that, I would suggest an estimate of 100 to 150,

0:35:420:35:46

-with a reserve of £80. How does that sound?

-Yes.

0:35:460:35:50

Are you happy to sell it at that?

0:35:500:35:51

-Yes.

-I don't think we should put discretion on it,

0:35:510:35:53

-I think we should have fixed reserve and, hopefully, let it fly.

-Yeah.

0:35:530:35:57

-All right?

-Thank you so much, Hazel,

0:35:570:36:00

it has been lovely to meet you

0:36:000:36:01

and it will be lovely to see

0:36:010:36:03

-how this goes at auction.

-All right. Thank you.

0:36:030:36:05

-Had a good time, everyone? ALL:

-Yes!

0:36:090:36:12

Yeah, so have I, so thank you so much for turning out.

0:36:120:36:15

The people of Sussex have given us

0:36:150:36:17

such a warm welcome and we found some

0:36:170:36:19

fantastic treasures worthy of such a magnificent host location.

0:36:190:36:23

So now, it's time to say goodbye to Herstmonceux Castle,

0:36:230:36:26

as we go over to the auction room for the very last time,

0:36:260:36:29

and here's a quick recap of all the items that are going

0:36:290:36:32

under the hammer.

0:36:320:36:33

Catherine spied with her little eye,

0:36:330:36:35

a wonderful wood and brass telescope

0:36:350:36:37

that is bound to catch the eye of the collectors.

0:36:370:36:40

Determined not to be left out,

0:36:410:36:43

Jonathan spotted an elegant lorgnette and brooch

0:36:430:36:46

to take to auction.

0:36:460:36:48

And I'm sure that enamel prayer book will fetch a heavenly price when it

0:36:500:36:53

gets to auction.

0:36:530:36:55

Back in the saleroom, Kevin is working his way through the lots.

0:36:550:36:59

He set his sights on the telescope.

0:36:590:37:02

Right, it's time to find out if we can find a buyer for your telescope.

0:37:020:37:05

-Yes, let's hope so.

-You excited about this, Colleen?

0:37:050:37:08

-I'm thrilled.

-Have you been to an auction before?

0:37:080:37:10

-No.

-Never?

-No.

-Well, they don't all look like this.

0:37:100:37:13

-This is very silver in here.

-It is.

0:37:130:37:16

It's a great little auction room, but they vary all round the country,

0:37:160:37:19

so next time you get the chance, go and visit your local one.

0:37:190:37:22

I'm going to go to others now, yes.

0:37:220:37:25

-Yes.

-Get the atmosphere.

0:37:250:37:27

Well, I think we'll do all right on the telescope.

0:37:270:37:30

-I think so.

-I think you've priced that spot on.

0:37:300:37:32

Let's find out what the bidders do,

0:37:320:37:33

because it is going under the hammer right now.

0:37:330:37:35

Lot 265 is the Spencer, Browning and Rust brass wooden-bound,

0:37:350:37:40

single draw, day and night telescope.

0:37:400:37:43

There it is.

0:37:430:37:44

I've got to start it at 55. 55.

0:37:450:37:49

Do I see 60? At 55.

0:37:490:37:51

Very cheap. At £55, are we done and finished, then?

0:37:510:37:55

No?

0:37:550:37:57

I'm afraid that's not going to sell then. Shame.

0:38:000:38:03

Well, he didn't put the hammer down, we didn't reach the reserve,

0:38:050:38:08

and I'm shocked at that,

0:38:080:38:09

because that was a lovely thing and you would think

0:38:090:38:12

in an old harbour town like Rye, everyone would want a telescope

0:38:120:38:16

like that, even if it's just a prop to use as a bit of fun.

0:38:160:38:19

Yeah.

0:38:190:38:20

I'm surprised. Really surprised.

0:38:200:38:22

It lives on a little bit longer.

0:38:220:38:25

Yes.

0:38:250:38:26

That's a shame, but fingers crossed

0:38:260:38:28

Pauline's brooch and lorgnette will sell.

0:38:280:38:30

Going under the hammer right now,

0:38:300:38:32

we've got a lorgnette and we have got a mourning brooch.

0:38:320:38:34

It's the mourning brooch coming up first, so why are you selling these?

0:38:340:38:37

Well, because I've got so much stuff that, you know, it's just...

0:38:370:38:41

-Clutter.

-I don't know what to do with it, to be honest.

0:38:410:38:43

And my sons don't want any of it.

0:38:430:38:45

-OK.

-So, they've told me, "Mum, get rid of it all."

0:38:450:38:50

So, that's what I decided to do.

0:38:500:38:51

-Take them down to the valuation day and get on the show.

-Yes.

0:38:510:38:53

OK, Jonathan. We've got the mourning brooch coming up first.

0:38:530:38:57

Yeah, it's nice quality and, you know,

0:38:570:38:59

you can buy antique jewellery reasonably priced and build up

0:38:590:39:02

collections of these things. And academically,

0:39:020:39:04

they're quite interesting and that's what this is.

0:39:040:39:06

It's in nice condition and is, sort of, very typically Victorian.

0:39:060:39:08

-But doesn't suit boys.

-No, no.

-Let's see if we can get £40-60 for this.

0:39:080:39:11

It's going under the hammer right now.

0:39:110:39:13

Lot 370...

0:39:130:39:15

is the carved jet mourning bar brooch

0:39:150:39:17

with applied gold and 32, I've got.

0:39:170:39:20

32. Do I see 35?

0:39:200:39:21

38, 40, sir?

0:39:210:39:22

40 here. Two, is it, now?

0:39:220:39:24

42. 45. 48. 50.

0:39:240:39:28

No? At £48, are we all done and finished?

0:39:280:39:31

At £48.

0:39:310:39:34

-£48. That's...

-Good.

-Spot on, Jonathan.

0:39:340:39:37

Right, now the lorgnette.

0:39:370:39:39

-We're looking for around £100, £150 for this.

-Yes.

-Fingers crossed.

0:39:390:39:42

-Fingers crossed, Pauline. Here we go, this is

-it.

0:39:420:39:44

Lot 490 is an antique lorgnette.

0:39:440:39:47

Rather decorative. I've got 100.

0:39:470:39:49

110 to start.

0:39:490:39:51

110. 120, are we now, for the lorgnette?

0:39:510:39:54

Do I see 120? 130.

0:39:540:39:55

140. 150. 150's here.

0:39:550:39:59

150. 160, is it, now?

0:39:590:40:01

At 150, have we all done and finished?

0:40:010:40:04

At £150?

0:40:040:40:06

-You were a bit shocked there, weren't you?

-Yes.

0:40:070:40:09

It did go, though. It went on that £150, plus the mourning brooch,

0:40:090:40:12

that's a total of £198.

0:40:120:40:15

-Thank you.

-Just shy of 200, OK?

0:40:150:40:17

-Yeah.

-I think that's a good day's work.

-Yes, thank you very much.

0:40:170:40:20

That's just what we needed, two great sales to get us back on track.

0:40:200:40:24

Going under the hammer right now we have a silver enamelled prayer book

0:40:240:40:27

belonging to Hazel.

0:40:270:40:28

Unfortunately, Hazel cannot be with us right now.

0:40:280:40:31

We do have the prayer book and we have our lovely expert,

0:40:310:40:33

Catherine Southon. And you like this, don't you?

0:40:330:40:35

I like the enamel work, as well.

0:40:350:40:37

Do you know what? The best thing about it was when you turned it over

0:40:370:40:39

and the enamel on the back was beautiful.

0:40:390:40:41

Really nice quality.

0:40:410:40:43

-Gorgeous.

-Really beautiful.

0:40:430:40:45

Well, it's been in Hazel's family a long time and I'm sure she'll

0:40:450:40:48

be pleased to get the top end of that result.

0:40:480:40:50

It's under the hammer now. This is it.

0:40:500:40:52

Lot 430 is the late 19th-century order of morning prayer book.

0:40:520:40:56

Here we are. And I've got to start it at 65.

0:40:560:41:00

At 65. 70, is it?

0:41:000:41:02

70. Five.

0:41:020:41:04

80, five.

0:41:040:41:05

90, five.

0:41:050:41:06

100. 110, sir?

0:41:060:41:09

110, 120, 130.

0:41:100:41:13

Ooh, ooh, ooh!

0:41:130:41:15

140?

0:41:150:41:16

Yes.

0:41:180:41:19

150?

0:41:190:41:20

160?

0:41:200:41:22

170?

0:41:220:41:24

180?

0:41:240:41:26

-It's gone quiet.

-190.

0:41:260:41:29

190?

0:41:290:41:30

200.

0:41:300:41:32

-No.

-200, sir.

0:41:320:41:35

210?

0:41:350:41:36

220, 230.

0:41:360:41:38

240?

0:41:380:41:40

We bring you in, 250. 260.

0:41:410:41:45

270. 280. 290.

0:41:450:41:48

-Fantastic! I wish she was here.

-I know.

0:41:480:41:51

300. 320. 340.

0:41:510:41:55

360.

0:41:550:41:56

380. 400.

0:41:570:41:59

420. 440.

0:42:010:42:03

460. 480.

0:42:040:42:06

500. 520.

0:42:080:42:10

Hazel, where are you? This is amazing.

0:42:100:42:13

540. 560?

0:42:130:42:14

At £560, it's on the telephone.

0:42:140:42:17

The other phone is out. The room is out. 560 here.

0:42:170:42:20

At 560. Did the internet come in?

0:42:200:42:22

At £560, are we all done and selling, at 560?

0:42:220:42:26

-Amazing.

-560. You didn't see that coming, did you?

0:42:260:42:28

-No.

-No, nor did I.

0:42:280:42:30

I thought maybe two.

0:42:300:42:32

-250.

-Wow!

0:42:320:42:33

-Unbelievable. I'm thrilled.

-Do you know what?

0:42:330:42:36

We always say, quality always...

0:42:360:42:38

Sells!

0:42:380:42:40

Well, there you are. That's it. It's all over for our owners.

0:42:430:42:46

As you can see, the sale is still going on, but what a day we've had.

0:42:460:42:49

The atmosphere has been terrific here.

0:42:490:42:51

I've lost my voice, but more importantly,

0:42:510:42:53

the owners have gone home happy.

0:42:530:42:55

Job done on Flog It! Join us again, for many more surprises

0:42:550:42:58

in more auction rooms to come,

0:42:580:43:00

but until then, from Rye, it's goodbye.

0:43:000:43:03

This edition comes from Herstmonceux Castle in Sussex, where antiques expert Catherine Southon finds a pristine 19th-century silver prayer book and Jonathan Pratt falls for a selection of Tom and Jerry cartoons.

Presenter Paul Martin takes a look at the telescopes of the Royal Observatory at Herstmonceux.