13/03/2017 The One Show


Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS


13/03/2017

Matt Baker and Michelle Ackerley are joined by Simon Callow and Simon Bird, who discuss their new play The Philanthropist.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to 13/03/2017. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

Hello and welcome to the one Show with Matt Baker

:00:17.:00:18.

We are joined by two of the stars of the biggest British comedy films.

:00:19.:00:31.

Please welcome Simon Callow and Simon Bird. CHEERING

:00:32.:00:39.

It's pretty impressive. Interestingly, Four Weddings And A

:00:40.:00:42.

Funeral held the record for highest grossing independent British comedy

:00:43.:00:45.

but it has been overtaken by The Inbetweeners Movie. Will things be

:00:46.:00:53.

OK tonight? Have you had this conversation? It's the first time

:00:54.:00:59.

it's been pointed out! This is very awkward now! Four Weddings will win

:01:00.:01:03.

tonight because we happen to have a film made about Four Weddings,

:01:04.:01:10.

presented by none other than Duckface herself, Anna Chancellor.

:01:11.:01:15.

Looking forward to that. We are feeling the joys of spring, it's

:01:16.:01:18.

been a lovely day and we know there are plenty of you out there as well.

:01:19.:01:22.

This is a little photo from the farm in Durham. They are adorable! To

:01:23.:01:33.

keep as in this mood, we thought Simon Callow, would you like to read

:01:34.:01:36.

a spring poem? I would love to! The spring is sprung,

:01:37.:01:41.

the grass is riz. APPLAUSE

:01:42.:02:06.

I think it is by Spike Milligan, he read it better than I did. And we

:02:07.:02:09.

will be using your dulcet tones later. Make sure you send us those

:02:10.:02:15.

springlike pictures and we were look at them at the end of the show.

:02:16.:02:19.

Something that had you contacting us in your droves recently was our

:02:20.:02:24.

story about monthly bin collections. The aim of monthly collections is to

:02:25.:02:30.

make us risk by -- recycle more so it might surprise you to find out

:02:31.:02:33.

that one of the most popular pieces of food packaging that we send off

:02:34.:02:37.

for recycling ends up going straight in the ground. Obviously, fresh is

:02:38.:02:45.

best but sometimes to be quick and convenient, is to come to a ready

:02:46.:02:51.

meal. You might think as it's made of plastic, the trade it comes them

:02:52.:02:55.

can always be recycled. But it can't. So it all comes down to eight

:02:56.:03:04.

colourant in trays like this. Recycling machinery uses infrared

:03:05.:03:10.

detectors to select the plastic to be recycled. This colour makes this

:03:11.:03:16.

plastic invisible so trays like this go to waste. Currently 1.3 billion

:03:17.:03:22.

black plastic food trays are needlessly sent to landfill or

:03:23.:03:26.

incineration each year, frustrating for keen recyclers like me and

:03:27.:03:30.

confusing. So how many of us actually know what can be recycled

:03:31.:03:34.

and what kind? To find out, I've joined packaging expert to put

:03:35.:03:40.

customers at this cafe in Rochester, Kent, to the test. Are you ready?

:03:41.:03:47.

Lives off, go. What do you think? First, aluminium. Yes. You all got

:03:48.:03:54.

this right, aluminium can be recycled forever. Clea bendy

:03:55.:03:59.

plastic. How about red plastic? This will be picked out for

:04:00.:04:06.

recyclability. The black plastic tray finally. Yes. You go to the

:04:07.:04:11.

bottom of the class, this causes real problems in the recycle

:04:12.:04:16.

industry. But it doesn't have to do. Scientists have come up with a new

:04:17.:04:20.

kind of black tray which could be recycled. Saving the taxpayer

:04:21.:04:26.

billions of pounds a year in disposable costs. But no one is

:04:27.:04:31.

using it. Nobody wants to go first. The guys at the recycling plant, do

:04:32.:04:36.

they make the investment, the packaging designers? Do the local

:04:37.:04:40.

authorities change what they do? It seems the stand-off is getting a way

:04:41.:04:46.

of common sense here at the One Show, we want to do something about

:04:47.:04:51.

it. We are bringing everyone together from supermarkets to

:04:52.:04:54.

Council to recycling companies. We are meeting at a recycling plant in

:04:55.:04:58.

Rochester where they have trialled a system that can pick out the new

:04:59.:05:03.

black plastic trays. First, Martin will show us how it works. For the

:05:04.:05:09.

plastic to be identified as being recyclable, an infrared beam which

:05:10.:05:12.

shows up as a greenish blob needs to shine through it. I pass through our

:05:13.:05:19.

standard black plastic tray, you can see we are losing infrared and this

:05:20.:05:23.

plastic will not be sorted or identified. What if you try a bit of

:05:24.:05:29.

your plastic? In this case, the beam passes through the plastic so it

:05:30.:05:32.

will be sorted and identify correctly. So simple. Sarah who

:05:33.:05:40.

works for the recycling company shows us how the technology works in

:05:41.:05:45.

practice. We are going to take some of these old-style trays and put

:05:46.:05:49.

them on the conveyor belt. We should seek black plastic trays come out,

:05:50.:05:52.

if they haven't been picked up in the process. We can see them. These

:05:53.:05:58.

would eventually be sent for incineration or landfill. Next, the

:05:59.:06:03.

new ones. You can see the thing that belt where the new black plastic

:06:04.:06:06.

trays will be picked out if they've got through. There they go. So we

:06:07.:06:12.

know it works. But recycling plants would have to tweak machinery and

:06:13.:06:17.

supermarkets need to start using the new black trays. Ian Ferguson is

:06:18.:06:22.

from the Co-op. Your brand is known for its planet friendliness. Why are

:06:23.:06:27.

you not already doing this? We have an ambition to make it easier to

:06:28.:06:30.

recycle all of our packaging. This would be a major step forward but we

:06:31.:06:34.

need all the other sorting facilities to adopt this technology

:06:35.:06:38.

before we start to put it into place. If you take the plunge and do

:06:39.:06:43.

it, they will have to follow. We can't do it before they tell us. The

:06:44.:06:47.

recycling plants won't make that change before the supermarkets use

:06:48.:06:53.

the new trays. What about the councils? Joanna Dixon is from

:06:54.:06:58.

Medway Council. Do you like that technology? It's fantastic, to see

:06:59.:07:02.

these developments in Medway is brilliant. When will you sign up and

:07:03.:07:07.

make that your recycling default? It will be to give us because we are

:07:08.:07:12.

locked into a contract. We need our technology to catch up and

:07:13.:07:15.

thankfully, these guys have shown the potential to do that. You need

:07:16.:07:20.

your recycler to switch to this system? We need the manufacturers to

:07:21.:07:25.

make the trays have the special content. Disappointed face! I need

:07:26.:07:30.

to her commitment! The will is here but it's a case of who goes first.

:07:31.:07:33.

The changes will cost less than a tenth of a cost of a penny per tray.

:07:34.:07:40.

STUDIO: That will come as a big surprise to a lot of people. 1.3

:07:41.:07:45.

billion is a huge figure. Quite confusing because the packaging for

:07:46.:07:50.

these trays saying it is recyclable but most local authorities can't

:07:51.:07:54.

recycle them. Yes, so the waste action resources programme is

:07:55.:07:59.

charged with turning the local authorities and giving clear

:08:00.:08:03.

guidance which is no mean feat because there are nearly 400

:08:04.:08:06.

different recycling schemes across the UK. Last week, they came out

:08:07.:08:12.

with their annual advice and they updated it and said, local

:08:13.:08:14.

authorities should regard these trays as not recyclable. I've spoken

:08:15.:08:19.

to a few people in the industry and they are a bit disappointed because

:08:20.:08:22.

they think they are on the brink of change, especially if the retailers

:08:23.:08:27.

and manufacturers take it on. Technically they can do it and now

:08:28.:08:31.

we need the manufacturers to push it forward. I suppose that might mean

:08:32.:08:34.

in a couple of years, householders are getting a different advice from

:08:35.:08:40.

their local authorities which is confusing. You brought some

:08:41.:08:46.

recycling in. I am intrigued! Which one do you want to start with? This

:08:47.:08:50.

is stuff we are sending to be recycled but actually it can't be.

:08:51.:08:57.

Yes, let's start with a pizza box. To all intents and purposes,

:08:58.:09:02.

corrugated cardboard, except... Look at that disgusting Greece. This

:09:03.:09:07.

Greece refuses to the paper fibre and when they try to pulp it, they

:09:08.:09:15.

can't separate them. You could rip off the nice clean bit possibly but

:09:16.:09:19.

overall because of the grease, it's the no. These little packets,

:09:20.:09:30.

laminated pouches, difficult to recycle because they have different

:09:31.:09:38.

plastics fused together. These used to be my bugbear, cleaning products

:09:39.:09:42.

with this trigger gun which used to be all different plastics and you

:09:43.:09:46.

can recycle them. Could possibly recycle this but who would separate

:09:47.:09:51.

them? They've taken the metal bits out, most manufacturers so these can

:09:52.:09:57.

be recycled. Soap dispensers. I hope this is all going in! These still

:09:58.:10:02.

have the metal bits inside them so they can't be. Manufacturers, do

:10:03.:10:07.

better! How good are you both with recycling? Is this a terribly boring

:10:08.:10:15.

subject? They are transfixed! I'm very passionate about it. People

:10:16.:10:21.

should do it. This is appalling. I'm appalled. Good, that the emotion I

:10:22.:10:26.

want! Thank you for raising awareness. As we mentioned, Simon

:10:27.:10:30.

Callow starred in one of the biggest British comedies of all time, Four

:10:31.:10:35.

Weddings And A Funeral. This is another of its stars reminiscing

:10:36.:10:42.

over the movie, a start we fondly remember as Duckface.

:10:43.:10:47.

The summer of 1994 changed British similar forever. -- cinema. Despite

:10:48.:10:55.

the fact its producers were convinced it would flop, much like

:10:56.:11:00.

its leading man's air. The film went on to receive Academy Awards

:11:01.:11:05.

nominations, launched the cast into stardom and would define a genre for

:11:06.:11:13.

a generation. That film was of course Four Weddings And A Funeral

:11:14.:11:16.

in which I played Henrietta, the girlfriend from hell, otherwise

:11:17.:11:20.

known as Duckface. The film is about a group of friends who meet and keep

:11:21.:11:24.

meeting, told through the eyes of the bumbling Brit Charles who

:11:25.:11:28.

becomes a obsessed with the sassy American Carrie. Quite out of your

:11:29.:11:37.

league! That's a relief. The selling point was casting big-money

:11:38.:11:39.

Hollywood actress Andie MacDowell. They spent the rest of the cast

:11:40.:11:43.

comprised of relatively unknown actors including its leading man

:11:44.:11:46.

Hugh Grant. As shown in this behind the scenes clips. This is a really

:11:47.:11:54.

good guy, handsome and talented and he is called... Hugh Grant! For me,

:11:55.:12:01.

Four Weddings was a real life changer, enabled me to have a career

:12:02.:12:04.

as a regular working actress. People say to me, isn't it awful being

:12:05.:12:09.

called Duckface and I say no, because I love ducks and I have a

:12:10.:12:17.

pet one! How is Duckface? Good form, not too mad. Charles and his friends

:12:18.:12:24.

tried to find true love. But the course of true love never did run

:12:25.:12:27.

smooth and nor did the production team choosing the film's name.

:12:28.:12:32.

Duncan Kenworthy was the producer. Suggested titles are, Loitering In

:12:33.:12:41.

Sacred Places, Skulking Around, True Love And Near Misses, Rolling In The

:12:42.:12:47.

Aisles. Richard Curtis gave me the script he had written and he openly

:12:48.:12:52.

said he had written it because he looked at his diary and realised in

:12:53.:12:57.

the previous two years, he'd been to 56 weddings of his friends. Who is

:12:58.:13:02.

it today? We didn't have enough time for what we were attempting to do.

:13:03.:13:07.

Anything we could do to cut corners and the final sequence which was

:13:08.:13:13.

never scripted... The reason for this being me is because I did it

:13:14.:13:18.

for nothing! To save money, the team used the same extras in the various

:13:19.:13:23.

weddings, even enlisting help from current Home Secretary Amber Rudd

:13:24.:13:29.

who used her social circle to provide more extras. The film was an

:13:30.:13:34.

international success, earning over ?200 million worldwide, making it at

:13:35.:13:37.

the time the highest earning British film ever made. Part of the other

:13:38.:13:42.

was shot out side the BFI on London's Southbank where I agreed to

:13:43.:13:47.

meet a film critic. It created a whole new John Reel for romcom is.

:13:48.:13:52.

Characters you don't expect to see in a film, like a deaf character.

:13:53.:13:59.

He says that's a beautiful place, hilly. Would you say he turned

:14:00.:14:08.

stereotypes around? Yes, Hugh Grant playing the shy, nervous, prim and

:14:09.:14:12.

proper character and she is the more worldly character which is the

:14:13.:14:15.

opposite of what a traditional romantic comedy would be. Before

:14:16.:14:22.

rich and I settled down to watch the film, the One Show team had a

:14:23.:14:26.

surprise message for David Bauer, while on tour with his theatre group

:14:27.:14:28.

in Italy. That's a beautiful message and

:14:29.:14:38.

something to be proud of. I think is right, it is something to be really

:14:39.:14:41.

proud of and it's so lovely to see him again. I love the opening. I

:14:42.:14:49.

love it because it established it as a film you would immediately

:14:50.:14:53.

identify with, they are always running late. I'm immensely proud of

:14:54.:15:02.

being part of Four Weddings. A film that shows a low-budget,

:15:03.:15:06.

unconventional, very British romantic comedy can be a worldwide

:15:07.:15:07.

hit. Such a good movie. And thank you

:15:08.:15:18.

Anna Chancellor for making that film. I was interested that it was

:15:19.:15:24.

such a low budget. Do you have memories of what it was like to work

:15:25.:15:29.

on a shoestring. Yes, it was shot in 36 days. Six 16 weeks. A very short

:15:30.:15:38.

amount of time for the locations for the budget was so low they could not

:15:39.:15:42.

afford separate cars to take us to these locations. So one car, one

:15:43.:15:48.

large car would go round the whole of the outer London suburbs picking

:15:49.:15:53.

up the cast. You had to pull straws to find out who would get picked up

:15:54.:15:58.

by four o'clock in the morning! By the time you got to set you were

:15:59.:16:04.

exhausted. So they could not afford to take us back and when you've

:16:05.:16:08.

finished your steam you would sit around waiting to midnight! The

:16:09.:16:11.

result of that was with all side around together having a wonderful

:16:12.:16:15.

time and drinking a lot of excellent white wine as I remember! It was a

:16:16.:16:26.

delightful film to make. And one of those extraordinary things, the

:16:27.:16:30.

chemistry of the cast, in the end, the film is wonderfully directed and

:16:31.:16:34.

superbly written but the real bonus was the chemistry of the cast. And

:16:35.:16:38.

you just never know if that is going to work. Because people are cast

:16:39.:16:42.

individually and really it is an ensemble film with one especially

:16:43.:16:47.

strong central character. But the whole thing together. And Richard

:16:48.:16:53.

Curtis has reunited the original cast of another well-known film.

:16:54.:16:58.

Andrew Lincoln was one of them and here he is with the details.

:16:59.:17:21.

Friday the 24th as you saw on the card. Let's talk about The

:17:22.:17:28.

Philanthropist. This new stage play. Let's take a look the casting. From

:17:29.:17:32.

the 3rd of April at Trafalgar Studios. A wonderful bunch. Simon

:17:33.:17:37.

Bird, what is it like having Simon Callow as the boss? You put the cast

:17:38.:17:46.

together, really. He is an ogre! A tyrant! It has been amazing so far.

:17:47.:17:57.

The rest of the cast are all brilliant. Charlotte Ritchie from

:17:58.:18:07.

call the midwife, Tom Rose and tell. Friday night dinner is the sitcom

:18:08.:18:12.

that he is in. And Matt Perry. A great voice. Lily Cole, people know

:18:13.:18:19.

her as a supermodel but also an amazing actor as well. So we are all

:18:20.:18:25.

excited about that. We have had one week of rehearsal and I think it is

:18:26.:18:30.

looking good. It is fantastic. The chemistry is working and it feels

:18:31.:18:35.

like a whole generation is there. A generation of brilliant comic actors

:18:36.:18:38.

and comedians and so on. Exactly what we wanted to do. Because this

:18:39.:18:45.

play was written in 1970 by a 23-year-old Christopher Hampton. A

:18:46.:18:47.

dazzling piece of work. And you know him. I saw the show in its first

:18:48.:18:55.

week at the Royal Court Theatre. It was a raging success. It transpired,

:18:56.:19:00.

it is the play that has transpired for the longest, it ran for five

:19:01.:19:06.

years in the West End. I'm not going to be doing it for five years! It is

:19:07.:19:17.

so fresh and sparkling. Partly perhaps because he was so young when

:19:18.:19:21.

he wrote it. But in the original production they had some superb

:19:22.:19:30.

actors. Alex Cowens, Charles Graham, but all a lot older than they should

:19:31.:19:33.

have been. This is a play about young people, young teachers and set

:19:34.:19:40.

in a university campus. But it is constantly surprising, constantly

:19:41.:19:49.

sexy, constantly... Yes, Simon Bird is the sexual centre of the play!

:19:50.:19:53.

Tell us about your character. His name to Philip and is obsessed with

:19:54.:19:58.

words. He likes to come up with anagrams in his spare time as his

:19:59.:20:03.

idea of fun. And so he takes words at face value and he doesn't really

:20:04.:20:08.

understand humour or sarcasm. Is he a bit of a nerd because your other

:20:09.:20:12.

characters have been based on that kind of outsider role. Is this a

:20:13.:20:18.

similar thing? He's definitely an outsider. The play is about how he

:20:19.:20:23.

fits into the modern world. And if you can. And also it is really

:20:24.:20:29.

funny. The thing about the character, he cannot tell a lie,

:20:30.:20:34.

that is the joke. We all inevitably cover up what we really feel and in

:20:35.:20:39.

the end when he is pressed he has got to tell the truth and that gets

:20:40.:20:41.

him of course into a lot of trouble. him of course into a lot of trouble.

:20:42.:20:44.

you're quite a perfectionist when it comes to sitcoms and movies. Are

:20:45.:20:49.

you enjoying that sense of freedom being up on stage. Obviously you

:20:50.:20:54.

have not got the chance to do another take. Or is that quite

:20:55.:21:00.

daunting? Terrifying! It is a different style. I Junot have much

:21:01.:21:06.

experience of doing theatre. One time it was a very short run a while

:21:07.:21:11.

ago. I do not know whether I will enjoy it, I hope that I do. But the

:21:12.:21:15.

rehearsal process so far has been so much fun. And we all just love the

:21:16.:21:19.

play. I had never read it before, never heard of it. So it is exciting

:21:20.:21:25.

to be working on something where we know the script is brilliant. We are

:21:26.:21:30.

the only ones who can mess it up! Good luck with the rest of

:21:31.:21:33.

rehearsals. Underneath the city where Simon and

:21:34.:21:39.

Simon are putting on their plate with the tonnes of rubble have been

:21:40.:21:44.

dug up to make way for new train tunnels. What is being done with the

:21:45.:21:48.

rubble is just as impressive as the building project.

:21:49.:21:56.

Beneath the streets of London something incredible is happening.

:21:57.:22:01.

The Crossrail project is one of the biggest engineering feats in a

:22:02.:22:06.

generation. But with 26 miles of new channels being dug beneath London,

:22:07.:22:10.

there comes a problem. What to do with 3 million tonnes of waste

:22:11.:22:15.

material. The answer is, you bring it here to Wallasea Island off the

:22:16.:22:19.

coast of ethics to create a nature reserve.

:22:20.:22:27.

Just a decade ago this was Wallasea Island. Marshland strain for three

:22:28.:22:33.

centuries to create agricultural fields. All protected by this

:22:34.:22:40.

ancient seawall. Then the area was spotted as having huge potential as

:22:41.:22:46.

a much-needed wildlife refuge. So ten years ago the RSPB came up with

:22:47.:22:51.

an ambitious plan. To turn the clock back on Wallasey and recreate the

:22:52.:22:54.

last haven for wildlife and natural sea defence. Conveniently, the 3

:22:55.:23:03.

million tonnes of rock and soil from the Crossrail excavations in London

:23:04.:23:07.

was just what Wallasea Island needed. It was transported and used

:23:08.:23:13.

to raise the land by up to three metres. Teams of dumper trucks

:23:14.:23:20.

spread the earth across the island. To sculpt a new landscape. The final

:23:21.:23:28.

step was to remove sections of the ancient seawall itself. Project

:23:29.:23:36.

manager Chris was there the day they let the sea Bacchin. In July of 2015

:23:37.:23:42.

they dug all the material away, the tide rose and water came in for the

:23:43.:23:45.

first time in a controlled way for over 300 years.

:23:46.:23:57.

What was like the moment that the sea eventually came in? They like

:23:58.:24:03.

and it to the breath of your first child! It is difficult to explain.

:24:04.:24:09.

But very emotional. And this is the result. 12,000 birds counted on just

:24:10.:24:19.

one day this winter. I'm waiting for high tide with the site manager

:24:20.:24:25.

Natalie in the hope of seeing something special. A lot of the

:24:26.:24:32.

birds will be coming in now, feeding on the mudflats. Getting all the

:24:33.:24:36.

insects. They're all coming in now, look at that! Lapwing, shelduck, a

:24:37.:24:45.

large flock of Brent Kes. The amazing thing is we have birds from

:24:46.:24:50.

almost all over the world. From Siberia, northern Canada, Northern

:24:51.:24:55.

Europe. All coming to ethics. With dusk fast approaching we then

:24:56.:25:05.

spot something really special. Harry are coming our way. There it is!

:25:06.:25:19.

-- Harrier. Grey with a black bottom as if they had been dipped into Inc.

:25:20.:25:26.

A stellar bird. All kicking off as dusk approaches. Next the female

:25:27.:25:31.

Harrier and then another raptor arrives. Short eared owl as well,

:25:32.:25:39.

really close! With the Harrier flying low and the owl above it is a

:25:40.:25:43.

very rare sighting. A couple of brilliant birds in one view.

:25:44.:25:50.

Fabulous. It doesn't get any better than that. That is a first for me.

:25:51.:25:58.

Birds of prey or awe-inspiring but they also tell is that even after a

:25:59.:26:05.

gap of 300 years, the whole marsh ecosystem is already thriving.

:26:06.:26:15.

Amazing what you can do with a load of rubble in the right place! And

:26:16.:26:20.

talking of images that have got people excited, it feels like

:26:21.:26:24.

spring. We asked people to send in their pictures and this is from

:26:25.:26:31.

one-year-old Henry. And this was sent in from Tommy in Edinburgh.

:26:32.:26:40.

This is Morgan and Iestyn feeding the lambs. And Freddie driving his

:26:41.:26:45.

little car. That is from our assistant floor manager, Greg.

:26:46.:26:51.

There we are. Fantastic but now living on.

:26:52.:26:53.

We couldn't have two Simons on the sofa without coming up

:26:54.:26:55.

So here's one we've called Simon Said!

:26:56.:27:03.

On this card are lyrics sung by famous Simons.

:27:04.:27:07.

Simon Callow, you will be dramatically performing them

:27:08.:27:09.

Simon Bird, all you have to do is name which famous

:27:10.:27:17.

You're so vain, I bet you think this song is about you.

:27:18.:27:46.

Carly Simon? Shall we find out? Very good.

:27:47.:27:58.

If you'll be my bodyguard, I can be your long lost pal.

:27:59.:28:03.

And Betty when you call me, you can call me Al.

:28:04.:28:13.

OK. I think you are trying to throw me with the accent. It is Paul

:28:14.:28:25.

Simon. Let's have a listen. It is Paul Simon! And very quickly.

:28:26.:28:29.

A scent and sound, I'm lost and I'm found.

:28:30.:28:33.

I should get it, but I don't know. # In touch with the ground...

:28:34.:28:46.

And on that note we will finish it. Well done. Thank you to Simon and

:28:47.:29:01.

Simon for joining us. And The Philanthropist starring Simon

:29:02.:29:04.

previews from the 3rd of April at Trafalgar Studios in London.

:29:05.:29:09.

Rehearsals start at ten o'clock tomorrow on the dot! And we will see

:29:10.:29:13.

you tomorrow with Harry Hill at seven

:29:14.:29:13.

The psychiatrist was a figment of his imagination.

:29:14.:29:17.