Episode 33 University Challenge


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Episode 33

It is the penultimate quarter-final match in the long and winding road to the semi-finals of the quiz for students. Jeremy Paxman asks the questions.


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APPLAUSE

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University Challenge.

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Asking the questions, Jeremy Paxman.

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Hello. You win some, you lose some

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is an aphorism which applies pretty well

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to the two teams playing tonight,

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each of whom have won their first- and second-round matches

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and one of their quarterfinals,

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but they've each lost a quarterfinal as well.

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That means that whichever of them wins tonight

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will join Emmanuel College, Cambridge, and Edinburgh University

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in the semifinals,

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and we'll be saying goodbye to the losers.

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Now, the team from the University of Warwick

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beat Liverpool University and the University of East London

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in their first two matches.

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Having lost to Emmanuel College, Cambridge,

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in their first quarterfinal,

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they narrowly beat Bristol University in their second

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to find themselves here.

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Now playing their reserve member,

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let's meet the Warwick team again.

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Hello, I'm Jamie Keschner-Lycett,

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I'm from Mytholmroyd in West Yorkshire,

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and I'm studying French and history.

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Hiya, I'm Sophie Rudd, I'm from Parts of Lindsey,

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and I'm studying computer science and its applications.

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And this is their captain.

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Hello, I'm Giles Hutchings, I'm from Farnham in Surrey,

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and I'm studying maths.

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Hello, I'm Thomas Van, I'm from Geneva in Switzerland,

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and I'm studying history.

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APPLAUSE

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The team Wolfson College, Cambridge, arrived here

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by beating the School of Oriental and African Studies in round one,

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Jesus College, Cambridge, in round two,

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and Balliol College, Oxford, in their first quarterfinal.

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But they followed that with a narrow defeat

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at the hands of Edinburgh University.

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Let's meet the Wolfson team again.

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Hi, my name is Justin Yang,

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I'm from Vancouver, Canada,

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and I'm studying for a PhD in public health and primary care.

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Hi, I'm Ben Chaudhri, I'm from near Cockermouth in Cumbria,

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and I'm studying natural sciences.

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And this is their captain.

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Hi, my name is Eric Monkman, I'm from Oakville, Canada,

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and I'm studying economics.

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Hi, I'm Paul Cosgrove, I'm from Cookstown in Northern Ireland,

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and I'm studying nuclear engineering.

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APPLAUSE

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OK, fingers on the buzzers,

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here's your first starter for ten.

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"He had a large, loving mind

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"and the strongest sympathy with the poorer classes."

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Queen Victoria wrote those words in her diary

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soon after the death of which author in...?

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Disraeli. No, sorry.

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I'm afraid you lose five points.

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..of which author in 1870?

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Dickens.

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It was Charles Dickens, yes.

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APPLAUSE

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So you get the first set of bonuses, Wolfson College.

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They're on railway architecture.

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Firstly, from its construction in 1837, which London terminus

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was distinguished by a tall Doric entry arch?

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The arch was demolished despite public outcry in the 1960s.

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Euston.

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Euston.

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Correct. The counterpart of the Euston Arch

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is now the world's oldest surviving example

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of monumental railway architecture.

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It lies on Curzon Street in which English city?

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Birmingham?

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Say Liverpool?

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-No.

-Go for it.

-Birmingham?

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Liverpool.

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No, it's Birmingham.

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A statue of which public figure

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stands inside London's St Pancras station?

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From the 1960s he was an outspoken opponent

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of the destruction of station architecture.

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-John Betjeman.

-OK.

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John Betjeman.

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Correct.

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Ten points for this starter question.

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Give the Italian title

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of the Renaissance painting

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that depicts Zephyrus, Flora, the Three Graces,

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Mercury and Venus competing...

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Primavera.

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Correct.

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APPLAUSE

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Your bonuses are on the words

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of the early 19th century critic and essayist William Hazlitt.

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In each case, identify the Romantic poet he's describing.

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First, "He has a fire in his eye,

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"a fever in his blood, a maggot in his brain,

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"a hectic flutter in his speech,

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"which mark out the philosophic fanatic."

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Is it Byron, or...?

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-Blake?

-Blake?

-Is he 19th century, though?

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-But he would've... Blake.

-Maybe Shelley.

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-Shelley.

-You tell me what to say and I'll say it.

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Shelley.

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Shelley.

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Correct.

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"Remote from the passions and events of the great world,

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"he's communicated interest and dignity

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"to the primal movements of the heart of man."

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-Wordsworth?

-Wordsworth, or Keats.

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Wordsworth's remoteness, maybe.

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Wordsworth.

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Correct. And finally,

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"He makes man after his own image,

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"woman after his own heart.

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"The one is a capricious tyrant, the other a yielding slave."

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-Byron?

-Could this be Lord Byron?

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-Sure.

-Lord Byron?

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Correct. Ten points for this.

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Beginning with the same three letters,

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which two six-letter terms

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are near-synonyms in everyday usage

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but in physics denote one quantity with the dimensions of pressure

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and one dimensionless number?

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For any given substance,

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the ratio of the two gives the modulus of elasticity.

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Stress and strain.

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Correct.

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APPLAUSE

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Your first bonuses, Warwick, are on China.

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Also known as Tomb-Sweeping Day,

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which festival to honour ancestors takes place in early April?

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Meaning "pure brightness" in Chinese,

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its name coincidentally combines the names

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of China's two most-recent imperial dynasties.

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OK, so most recent is Qing.

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-And Ming.

-So is it that order?

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No, Qing is the most recent.

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And then Ming.

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Is it Mingqing?

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Mingqing.

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-No, it's Qingming.

-Oh!

-Bad luck.

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The Qingming Festival in 1976

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saw major demonstration in Tiananmen Square

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following the death of which Chinese Premier?

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He was also foreign minister from 1949-1958.

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OK. Nominate Van.

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Zhou Enlai.

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Correct. Born in Szechuan in 1904,

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which political figure was formally purged

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after the 1976 demonstrations?

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He was later restored to power

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and presided over wide-ranging economic reforms.

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I'm pretty sure it's Deng Xiaoping, right?

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-Nominate Rudd.

-Deng Xiaoping.

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Deng Xiaoping is right, yes.

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Ten points for this.

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In logic, what three-word English term

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is often used to translate the Latin expression petitio principii?

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Begging the question.

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Correct.

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APPLAUSE

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These bonuses are on physics and astronomy, Wolfson.

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All three answers are two-word terms

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that include the same short adjective.

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Firstly, what two-word term

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is used for a hypothetical type of degenerate star

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that's cooled until it is no longer visible?

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This process is thought to take considerably longer

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than the current age of the universe.

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That could be brown dwarf?

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-Yeah, maybe.

-Brown dwarf.

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No, it's a black dwarf.

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What apparent phenomenon is seen during planetary transits

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as a dark area that briefly seems to link the limb of the sun

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to the limb of the transiting planet?

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-The...

-Black...

-The...

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Um...

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It's called a lip or something.

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-Black spot?

-No. Black lip...

-Black Jupiter?

-Black...

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-I don't know.

-Black lip.

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No, it's the black drop effect.

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And finally, in physics, what two-word alliterative term

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is used for a hypothetical body

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that absorbs all the radiation falling on it?

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Black body.

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Correct.

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We're going to take a picture round. For your picture starter

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you'll see a well-known quotation from the Bible

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in St Jerome's Latin translation.

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For ten points, I simply want the sense of the quote in English.

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Am I my brother's keeper?

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Correct.

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APPLAUSE

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So, you get, Wolfson,

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picture bonuses on more short extracts from the Vulgate.

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Again, I want the sense of each quote in English.

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Firstly, for five...

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-Render unto Caesar that which is Caesar's.

-Yes. Yep.

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Render unto Caesar that which is Caesar's.

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Yes. Secondly...

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I come to bring... All who accept the sword...

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He who will live by the sword will perish by the sword.

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He who lives by the sword shall perish by the sword.

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You would have made a wonderful revivalist preacher, yes.

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LAUGHTER

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Yes, that's the sense of it, perfectly. And finally...

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-Nothing new under the sun.

-Yes.

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Nothing new under the sun.

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Well done. Yes.

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Right, ten points for this -

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which two consecutive letters of the alphabet

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are the only two consonants in words meaning

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"a man who behaves dishonourably, especially towards women..."

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C and D.

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Well done, yes.

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APPLAUSE

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Right, Warwick, your bonuses this time

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are on US Open tennis champions.

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Which Russian won the men's singles title in 2000,

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beating Pete Sampras in straight sets?

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His sister is also a former number one world-ranking tennis player

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who won the women's doubles in 2007.

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Is that the one that came out of nowhere

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-and, like, surprised everybody?

-It could be.

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I can't remember his name. Agassi is not Russian, is he?

0:09:460:09:49

-No.

-I can't remember. Sorry, pass.

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It's Marat Safin.

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And secondly, on defeating Serena Williams

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in the 2011 women's singles final,

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who became the first Australian woman to win a Grand Slam title

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since Evonne Goolagong won Wimbledon in 1980?

0:10:020:10:05

-Any ideas on Australian tennis players?

-No.

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No, sorry, don't know.

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That was Sam Stosur.

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And finally, which men's doubles pair

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has the most team wins in the Open era?

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In 2013 they became the first team

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to hold all four Grand Slam titles and the Olympic gold medal

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at the same time.

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-It's not the Murray brothers?

-Perry-Perry or something.

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Two brothers called Perry. I could be completely wrong.

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I'll go with that if you want. Perry and Perry.

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No, it's Bob and Mike Bryan.

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Ten points for this.

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"Lie heavy on him, Earth, for he laid many a heavy load on thee."

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These words are from an epitaph

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written for which exponent of the English Baroque style,

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the architect of Castle Howard and Blenheim Palace?

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Capability Brown.

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Nope.

0:10:510:10:53

Warwick, one of you buzz.

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Inigo Jones.

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No, it was Sir John Vanbrugh.

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Ten points for this.

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The English name of a late 17th century travel account

0:11:020:11:05

by the Japanese haiku master Basho,

0:11:050:11:07

what title did the Australian author Richard Flanagan...?

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The Narrow Road to the Deep North.

0:11:120:11:14

Correct.

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APPLAUSE

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You get three bonuses, Warwick, on sea birds.

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Balearic, Sooty and Manx

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are species of which genus of long-winged oceanic birds

0:11:240:11:28

named after their ability to glide with rigid wings

0:11:280:11:31

along the troughs of waves?

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Nominate Keschner-Lycett.

0:11:330:11:34

Shearwater.

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Correct.

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Antarctic, snow and storm

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are among species of which smaller oceanic birds

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related to the shearwaters?

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Nominate Keschner-Lycett.

0:11:440:11:47

Petrel.

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Correct. And finally, related to the petrels and shearwaters,

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which bird has a six-letter common name

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combining Norse words meaning foul and gull,

0:11:540:11:57

a reference to the unpleasant smell of its stomach oil?

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It's not puffin, is it?

0:12:000:12:02

-Could be puffin.

-I can't think of any six-letter ones?

0:12:020:12:05

Shall I go with that? Puffin.

0:12:050:12:07

No, it's the fulmar. Ten points for this.

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The mother of modern dance

0:12:100:12:11

is an epithet that's been given to which dancer and choreographer

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born in San Francisco in the 18...

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Duncan.

0:12:170:12:18

Yes, I'll accept that. Isadora Duncan.

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These bonuses, Wolfson, are now on Brythonic, or Celtic, kingdoms

0:12:210:12:26

of post-Roman Britain.

0:12:260:12:27

Firstly, ruling an indeterminate area of present-day Yorkshire,

0:12:270:12:31

which Brythonic kingdom was conquered by Northumbria

0:12:310:12:34

in the 7th century?

0:12:340:12:36

Its name appears in the names of two villages to the east of Leeds.

0:12:360:12:40

Merc... Mercia, maybe?

0:12:420:12:44

It's not Mercia.

0:12:440:12:46

It's...

0:12:460:12:47

No.

0:12:470:12:49

It's... I don't know.

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Pass.

0:12:510:12:52

It's Elmet.

0:12:520:12:54

And secondly, which 6th century kingdom

0:12:540:12:56

is thought to have been centred on the Solway Firth?

0:12:560:12:59

The early Welsh poet Taliesin praised its king, Urien,

0:12:590:13:03

and a discovery centre named after it

0:13:030:13:06

opened in Penrith in 2000.

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Rheged.

0:13:070:13:09

Nominate Chaudhri.

0:13:090:13:11

Rheged.

0:13:110:13:12

Rheged is correct.

0:13:120:13:13

The modern name Devon derives from the name of which Brythonic kingdom?

0:13:130:13:18

Its subjugation by Wessex was completed in the 9th century.

0:13:180:13:21

-The Devi, right?

-Yeah.

0:13:250:13:27

The Devi.

0:13:270:13:28

No, it's Dumnonia. Ten points for this.

0:13:280:13:31

What seven-letter term

0:13:310:13:33

did Lord John Russell define as "one man's wit and all men's wisdom"?

0:13:330:13:38

A book of the same name...

0:13:380:13:39

A proverb.

0:13:410:13:42

Correct.

0:13:420:13:43

APPLAUSE

0:13:430:13:45

Your bonuses, this time, Wolfson, are on psychology.

0:13:460:13:49

From a 1999 study, which two psychologists at Cornell University

0:13:490:13:53

give their names to a cognitive bias or effect

0:13:530:13:56

by which incompetent people are unaware of their mistakes

0:13:560:14:00

and overstate their abilities as a result?

0:14:000:14:02

Dunning-Kruger.

0:14:020:14:04

Correct.

0:14:040:14:05

In the 1951 work New Hopes for a Changing World,

0:14:050:14:09

which British philosopher observed

0:14:090:14:11

that those who feel certainty are stupid

0:14:110:14:14

and those with any imagination and understanding

0:14:140:14:17

are filled with doubt and indecision?

0:14:170:14:20

Russell.

0:14:200:14:21

Correct.

0:14:210:14:22

"The fool doth think he is wise,

0:14:220:14:24

"but the wise man knows himself to be a fool."

0:14:240:14:27

In which play by Shakespeare

0:14:270:14:29

does Touchstone repeat that saying to William?

0:14:290:14:32

THEY CONFER

0:14:320:14:34

It's not Twelfth Night.

0:14:340:14:36

-What's the one in the forest...?

-Midsummer Night's Dream?

0:14:370:14:41

No, the other one.

0:14:410:14:42

The one that's set in Ardenne?

0:14:420:14:44

-Erm...

-As You Like It.

-As You Like It.

0:14:440:14:48

As You Like It.

0:14:480:14:50

Correct.

0:14:500:14:51

Right, we're going to take a music round.

0:14:510:14:53

For your music starter, you'll hear an excerpt from an opera.

0:14:530:14:55

For ten points, I want the title of the opera in which it appears.

0:14:550:14:59

OPERATIC CHORUS PLAYS

0:14:590:15:01

Carmen.

0:15:040:15:05

You can hear a little more, Warwick.

0:15:050:15:08

Nabucco.

0:15:120:15:13

No, it's Il Trovatore.

0:15:130:15:15

So, music bonuses in a moment or two.

0:15:150:15:17

Fingers on the buzzers, here's a starter question.

0:15:170:15:20

Its name deriving from an ancient city on its banks,

0:15:200:15:23

which strait was formerly known as the Hellespont...?

0:15:230:15:26

The Dardanelles.

0:15:280:15:29

Correct.

0:15:290:15:30

APPLAUSE

0:15:300:15:32

So you recall that a moment ago

0:15:330:15:35

none of you recognised Verdi's Anvil Chorus.

0:15:350:15:38

Your music bonuses are excerpts from choruses

0:15:380:15:41

in three more of Verdi's operas.

0:15:410:15:43

For five points, I want the title of the opera

0:15:430:15:46

in which the chorus appears.

0:15:460:15:47

Firstly, for five...

0:15:470:15:49

OPERATIC CHORUS PLAYS

0:15:490:15:51

Aida.

0:15:530:15:54

Correct.

0:15:540:15:55

Secondly...

0:15:550:15:56

OPERATIC CHORUS PLAYS

0:15:560:16:00

THEY CONFER

0:16:020:16:05

Macbeth.

0:16:070:16:08

It is Macbeth. The Chorus of the Scottish Exiles.

0:16:080:16:11

And finally...

0:16:110:16:12

OPERATIC CHORUS PLAYS

0:16:120:16:15

Nabucco.

0:16:150:16:17

It is indeed, the Chorus of the Hebrew Slaves.

0:16:170:16:19

Ten points for this.

0:16:190:16:21

In the Wentworth scale,

0:16:210:16:23

used to classify sediment grain sizes in geology,

0:16:230:16:26

what grade comes between granules and cobbles?

0:16:260:16:30

Pebbles.

0:16:320:16:33

Pebbles is correct.

0:16:330:16:35

APPLAUSE

0:16:350:16:37

Your bonuses are on the Nobel Peace Prize, Warwick.

0:16:380:16:41

Which organisation was awarded the 2012 Peace Prize?

0:16:410:16:44

According to the official citation,

0:16:440:16:46

for over six decades it contributed to the advancement

0:16:460:16:49

of peace and reconciliation, democracy and human rights.

0:16:490:16:53

It's EU.

0:16:530:16:54

EU.

0:16:540:16:56

Correct. The 2007 Nobel Peace Prize

0:16:560:16:58

was awarded jointly to Al Gore and the IPCC.

0:16:580:17:02

For what do the letters CC stand in that abbreviation?

0:17:020:17:05

Climate Change.

0:17:050:17:06

Correct.

0:17:060:17:08

1995 Peace Prize was awarded jointly

0:17:080:17:10

to Joseph Rotblat and which series of conferences

0:17:100:17:14

set up to reduce the role of nuclear weapons in international politics?

0:17:140:17:18

Oh, it's the disarmament one.

0:17:180:17:20

-START?

-Is it?

0:17:200:17:22

Or were they just START treaties?

0:17:220:17:23

It's like the name of a town somewhere.

0:17:230:17:26

Nominate Rudd.

0:17:270:17:29

The START.

0:17:290:17:30

No, Pugwash.

0:17:300:17:31

Ten points for this starter question.

0:17:310:17:33

"Who wields a poem huger than the grave?"

0:17:330:17:36

These are the words of which American poet, born in 1894?

0:17:360:17:39

He's generally known by his initials and surname,

0:17:390:17:42

which are often...

0:17:420:17:44

TS Eliot.

0:17:440:17:45

No, you lose five points.

0:17:450:17:47

..which are often rendered solely in lower case.

0:17:470:17:50

E E Cummings.

0:17:510:17:52

Of course.

0:17:520:17:53

APPLAUSE

0:17:530:17:55

Right, you get bonuses on river gorges in France, Warwick.

0:17:560:18:00

Firstly for five, a major tourist attraction,

0:18:000:18:03

which gorge lies on the boundary

0:18:030:18:05

of the Var and the Alpes-de-Haute-Provence department?

0:18:050:18:09

Its river empties into the artificial Lac de Sainte-Croix.

0:18:090:18:13

I don't know French.

0:18:130:18:15

Southern French rivers.

0:18:150:18:17

Loire?

0:18:170:18:18

Loire Valley.

0:18:180:18:20

No, it's the Verdon Gorge.

0:18:200:18:21

Noted for a series of gorges

0:18:210:18:24

between Florac and Millau,

0:18:240:18:25

the River Tarn is a tributary of which river

0:18:250:18:28

which it joins near Moissac?

0:18:280:18:30

THEY CONFER

0:18:300:18:34

Loire.

0:18:350:18:36

No, that's the Garonne.

0:18:360:18:37

And finally, rising in the Jura Mountains,

0:18:370:18:40

the River Doubs flows through gorges for more than 30km

0:18:400:18:44

along the boundary of France and which country?

0:18:440:18:47

Switzerland. The borders.

0:18:470:18:49

OK, Switzerland.

0:18:490:18:50

It is Switzerland, yes.

0:18:500:18:52

Right, ten points for this.

0:18:530:18:54

Shane Smith is the CEO and owner of which magazine

0:18:540:18:58

that he co-founded in Montreal in 19...?

0:18:580:19:01

VICE.

0:19:020:19:04

VICE is correct, yes.

0:19:040:19:05

APPLAUSE

0:19:050:19:07

These bonuses are on the Wars of the Roses, Wolfson.

0:19:080:19:11

Richard Plantagenet, Duke of York,

0:19:110:19:13

was killed at which battle of 1460, fought in Yorkshire?

0:19:130:19:16

Towton.

0:19:160:19:18

-Towton, yeah.

-Towton.

0:19:180:19:20

Towton.

0:19:200:19:21

No, it was Wakefield.

0:19:210:19:24

Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick,

0:19:240:19:26

died at which battle of 1471, fought in Hertfordshire?

0:19:260:19:30

1471...

0:19:320:19:34

The Battle of...?

0:19:340:19:36

I don't know.

0:19:360:19:39

Pass.

0:19:390:19:40

It's Barnet.

0:19:400:19:41

The Lancastrian Edward of Westminster, Prince of Wales,

0:19:410:19:44

was killed at which battle of 1471?

0:19:440:19:47

It took place in Gloucestershire

0:19:470:19:49

a few weeks after the Battle of Barnet.

0:19:490:19:51

Tewkesbury.

0:19:510:19:52

Correct.

0:19:520:19:53

Ten points for this. What surname links the directors

0:19:530:19:56

of the films The Naked Spur and El Cid,

0:19:560:19:58

Separate Tables and Marty,

0:19:580:20:01

and Collateral and Heat?

0:20:010:20:03

Scorsese?

0:20:080:20:09

Anyone like to buzz from Wolfson?

0:20:090:20:11

Is it Lee?

0:20:130:20:14

No, it's Mann.

0:20:140:20:15

Ten points for this.

0:20:150:20:16

The Rani of Jhansi, Begum Hazrat Mahal of Awadh and...

0:20:160:20:21

The Indian mutiny?

0:20:220:20:24

Correct, yes.

0:20:240:20:25

APPLAUSE

0:20:250:20:27

Three questions on a Roman emperor for your bonuses, Wolfson College.

0:20:290:20:32

Firstly, the appointed successor of the Emperor Nerva,

0:20:320:20:36

who exceeded peacefully to the throne in AD 98?

0:20:360:20:39

Under him, the Roman Empire reached its greatest extent.

0:20:390:20:42

Trajan.

0:20:420:20:43

Correct.

0:20:430:20:44

Which lawyer and author did Trajan appoint as governor of Bithynia

0:20:440:20:48

in about 110?

0:20:480:20:49

The letters between the two are a major source of information

0:20:490:20:52

on Roman provincial administration.

0:20:520:20:54

-I think it's...

-It's Pliny the Younger.

-Is it Pliny the Younger?

0:20:540:20:57

Pliny the Younger.

0:20:570:20:58

Correct. Trajan's column in Rome is a pictorial narrative

0:20:580:21:01

of the emperor's campaigns in which reaches north of the Danube?

0:21:010:21:05

It corresponds to much of modern Romania.

0:21:050:21:07

Dacia.

0:21:070:21:09

Dacia is correct, yes. APPLAUSE

0:21:090:21:11

We're going to take another picture around now.

0:21:110:21:13

For your picture starter,

0:21:130:21:14

you'll see a painting of a historical figure.

0:21:140:21:16

Ten points if you can identify the figure.

0:21:160:21:18

Napoleon Bonaparte.

0:21:210:21:22

It is. APPLAUSE

0:21:220:21:24

As depicted by Antoine-Jean Gros.

0:21:260:21:28

Your bonuses are three more portraits of Napoleon Bonaparte,

0:21:280:21:31

each by a French artist. I want the artist's name in each case.

0:21:310:21:35

Firstly, who did this?

0:21:350:21:36

-I think that's D... Oh, that's David, maybe.

-David?

0:21:380:21:41

-Are we OK with David?

-Yeah.

0:21:410:21:42

David?

0:21:420:21:43

No, that's by Ingres.

0:21:430:21:45

Secondly...

0:21:450:21:46

-That one's David.

-That's David?

-That looks like a David to me.

0:21:470:21:50

David again?

0:21:500:21:51

No, that's Delaroche. And, finally...

0:21:510:21:53

-I think that's Delacroix.

-Delacroix.

-Delacroix.

0:21:550:21:57

Delacroix.

0:21:570:21:58

No, that WAS David. LAUGHTER

0:21:580:22:01

Right, ten points for this. Who was the US president at the time

0:22:010:22:03

of the Three Mile Island nuclear accident

0:22:030:22:06

and the start of the Iran hostage crisis?

0:22:060:22:08

Carter?

0:22:100:22:11

Jimmy Carter's right, yes. APPLAUSE

0:22:110:22:13

Three questions on currency crises for your bonuses.

0:22:150:22:19

In 1944, which Mediterranean country experienced an economic crisis,

0:22:190:22:23

culminating in the issuing of notes to the value of 100,000 million

0:22:230:22:28

of the local currency?

0:22:280:22:30

Oh, they said Mediterranean, I think there was a Hungary one but...

0:22:300:22:34

-Shall we say Turkey?

-Spain or Italy... Yeah, I don't know.

0:22:340:22:37

Turkey?

0:22:370:22:39

No, it was Greece.

0:22:390:22:41

Secondly, writing in 1979,

0:22:410:22:43

which US economist showed that for a currency crisis to happen,

0:22:430:22:46

all that is needed is for a government to carry out policies

0:22:460:22:50

that are inconsistent with the exchange rate?

0:22:500:22:53

I would say that would probably be Friedman, maybe?

0:22:530:22:55

You're the economist!

0:22:550:22:57

Friedman.

0:22:570:22:58

No, it was Krugman.

0:22:580:22:59

After a period of hyperinflation,

0:22:590:23:01

which southern African government revalued its dollar

0:23:010:23:05

by removing 12 zeros from the old notes in 2009?

0:23:050:23:09

Zimbabwe.

0:23:090:23:10

Correct. Ten points for this. APPLAUSE

0:23:100:23:12

In which city are the Evolution Tower,

0:23:120:23:14

the Mercury City Tower and the Federation Tower,

0:23:140:23:17

on which work began in 2003?

0:23:170:23:19

Dubai?

0:23:210:23:23

Nope. Wolfson, one of you buzz.

0:23:230:23:25

Abu Dhabi.

0:23:260:23:27

No, it's Moscow. Ten points for this.

0:23:270:23:30

"Rugged, mountainous, volcanic,

0:23:300:23:32

"he was himself more a French Revolution than any of his volumes."

0:23:320:23:36

These words of Walt Whitman refer to which Scottish historian,

0:23:360:23:40

born in 1795?

0:23:400:23:42

Carlyle.

0:23:440:23:45

Carlyle is correct, yes. APPLAUSE

0:23:450:23:48

These bonuses are on physical chemistry, Warwick.

0:23:490:23:53

Named after a 19th-century Scottish chemist,

0:23:530:23:55

which law states that under identical conditions

0:23:550:23:58

the rate at which gases diffuse is inversely proportional

0:23:580:24:02

to the square root of their densities?

0:24:020:24:04

-Raoult?

-Oh, it might be...

0:24:040:24:05

-Was he Scottish?

-Er...

-I think he was.

0:24:050:24:07

Raoult?

0:24:070:24:09

No, it's Graham. Graham's law.

0:24:090:24:11

Which Italian scientist's law states that equal volumes of ideal gases

0:24:110:24:15

at equal temperature and pressure contain equal numbers of particles?

0:24:150:24:18

-Avogadro?

-Yeah.

-Avogadro.

0:24:180:24:20

Correct. After a scientist born in Cumberland in 1766,

0:24:200:24:23

which law states that the pressure exerted by a mixture of gases

0:24:230:24:27

is equal to the sum of the partial pressures of the component gases?

0:24:270:24:30

Henry.

0:24:300:24:31

No, that's Dalton. Dalton's law.

0:24:310:24:33

Ten points for this. Three and a half minutes to go.

0:24:330:24:36

Which estuary is the location of two South American capitals,

0:24:360:24:39

named in Spanish after a precious...?

0:24:390:24:41

Rio de la Plata.

0:24:420:24:43

Correct. Yes, the River Plate. APPLAUSE

0:24:430:24:45

Your bonuses are on political figures.

0:24:470:24:49

All three answers are a number that is a multiple of 13.

0:24:490:24:53

Cleopatra, firstly, is generally cited as having been what age

0:24:530:24:57

when she died in 30 BC?

0:24:570:24:58

-39, 52 or 26?

-39.

0:24:580:25:01

39.

0:25:010:25:02

Correct. How old was Mahatma Gandhi

0:25:020:25:04

when he was assassinated in Delhi in 1948?

0:25:040:25:07

-78?

-78.

-Well, he was in...

0:25:070:25:10

78.

0:25:100:25:11

Correct. At what age was Abraham Lincoln first inaugurated

0:25:110:25:15

as President of the United States?

0:25:150:25:16

He was like the youngest.

0:25:160:25:17

-Right, so...

-Was it 26 or 52?

-39.

-Or 39?

0:25:170:25:19

-52?

-That's quite old.

-After that...

0:25:190:25:21

52.

0:25:210:25:22

52 is correct.

0:25:220:25:23

Ten points for this. APPLAUSE

0:25:230:25:25

"He brought a major art to a minor vision of life."

0:25:250:25:29

These words of the critic Alfred Kazin

0:25:290:25:31

refer to which US Nobel laureate born in 1899?

0:25:310:25:35

Hemingway.

0:25:380:25:39

Ernest Hemingway is right. APPLAUSE

0:25:390:25:41

Your bonuses this time, Warwick, are on zoology.

0:25:410:25:45

In each case, name the taxonomic rank, for example,

0:25:450:25:47

genus of which the following are representative.

0:25:470:25:50

Firstly - Nematode, Porifera, Arthropoda and Chordata.

0:25:500:25:54

-Is that kingdom or phylum?

-I think it's phylum.

-Phylum.

0:25:540:25:57

Phylum is right.

0:25:570:25:58

Secondly - Diptera, Crocodilia, Rodentia and Octopoda.

0:25:580:26:02

That'll be class or order. It's one of those, I think.

0:26:020:26:04

-Order.

-Order.

0:26:040:26:05

Order is right.

0:26:050:26:06

Finally - Corvidae, Ranidae and Hominidae.

0:26:060:26:09

-Genus?

-Genus...

0:26:090:26:11

Yeah. Genus.

0:26:110:26:12

No, it's family.

0:26:120:26:13

Ten points for this. In anatomy,

0:26:130:26:16

which bone articulates with the odontoid process?

0:26:160:26:18

The jaw?

0:26:210:26:22

Anyone like to buzz from Warwick?

0:26:220:26:24

The zygomatic bone?

0:26:250:26:27

No, it's the atlas.

0:26:270:26:29

Ten points for this.

0:26:290:26:30

First performed in 1942,

0:26:300:26:32

Capriccio was the final opera of which German composer?

0:26:320:26:35

His other works include Elektra, Salome and Der Rosen...

0:26:350:26:39

Richard Strauss.

0:26:400:26:41

Correct. APPLAUSE

0:26:410:26:43

These bonuses are on astronomy, Warwick.

0:26:450:26:47

Which constellation of the northern sky holds the Veil Nebula,

0:26:470:26:50

a section of the Great Rift and the Northern Cross asterism?

0:26:500:26:54

I don't know.

0:26:550:26:56

Ursa Minor?

0:26:560:26:57

No, it's Cygnus.

0:26:570:26:58

The Veil Nebula is part of the Cygnus Loop,

0:26:580:27:01

an expanding remnant of what type of astronomical event?

0:27:010:27:04

-Supernova.

-Supernova.

0:27:040:27:05

Correct. Also known as Alpha Cygni,

0:27:050:27:08

what five-letter name is given to the brightest star in Cygnus?

0:27:080:27:11

Deneb.

0:27:110:27:12

Correct. Ten points for this. APPLAUSE

0:27:120:27:14

In 1337, Edward the Black Prince

0:27:140:27:16

became the first holder of which dukedom traditionally held...?

0:27:160:27:20

Duke of Albany.

0:27:200:27:22

No, you lose five points.

0:27:220:27:23

..traditionally held by the eldest son of the reigning...?

0:27:230:27:27

Cornwall.

0:27:280:27:29

Cornwall is correct. APPLAUSE

0:27:290:27:32

These bonuses are on 20th-century British Prime Ministers, Warwick.

0:27:320:27:36

The final four letters of which Prime Minister's surname

0:27:360:27:39

spell the French word for oven?

0:27:390:27:41

Oven, "four". Is it F-O-U-R?

0:27:410:27:43

-So, Balfour.

-Balfour.

0:27:430:27:44

Balfour is correct.

0:27:440:27:45

Which Prime Minister's surname may be expressed in French

0:27:450:27:48

as Artisan Chaumier?

0:27:480:27:50

C-H-A-U-M-I-E-R.

0:27:500:27:53

-Is it Chamberlain?

-GONG

0:27:530:27:55

Chamberlain.

0:27:550:27:56

No, it's Thatcher. APPLAUSE

0:27:560:27:58

Well, Warwick, at the gong, you were coming back strongly

0:28:020:28:06

but you didn't come back quickly enough, I think.

0:28:060:28:08

So there's no shame in going out in the quarterfinals,

0:28:080:28:11

-none whatsoever.

-Thanks.

0:28:110:28:13

It's been a pleasure having you with us. Thanks very much.

0:28:130:28:15

Wolfson, many congratulations to you.

0:28:150:28:17

Congratulations, you will go through to the semifinal.

0:28:170:28:21

I bet you're pleased about that.

0:28:210:28:24

I hope you can join us next time for the last quarterfinal match.

0:28:240:28:26

But until then, it's goodbye from Warwick University.

0:28:260:28:29

-ALL:

-Bye.

0:28:290:28:31

-It's goodbye from Wolfson College, Cambridge. ALL:

-Goodbye.

0:28:310:28:33

And it's goodbye from me. Goodbye.

0:28:330:28:35

APPLAUSE

0:28:350:28:39

It is the penultimate quarter-final match in the long and winding road to the semi-finals of the quiz for students. Jeremy Paxman asks the questions.