Episode 18 Inside Out


Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS


Episode 18

The week's strongest stories from the BBC's Inside Out teams - with exclusive, striking and human reports from across England.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to Episode 18. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

the BBC's Inside Out teams.

0:00:010:00:04

Hello and welcome to Inside Out with me, Dianne Oxberry.

0:00:040:00:08

This week, it's no longer just just one for the road.

0:00:080:00:11

We investigate a growing number of people driving under

0:00:110:00:13

the influence of drugs.

0:00:130:00:17

They're going to lose their job and lose their licence

0:00:170:00:19

and they don't think about this before they go out on the road.

0:00:190:00:23

We report on the Cumbrian farmers feeling left out

0:00:230:00:25

in the cold by their landlords, The National Trust.

0:00:250:00:27

What would Beatrix Potter make of it all?

0:00:270:00:29

She would be utterly horrified at how much has gone into tourism

0:00:290:00:32

and everything else.

0:00:320:00:34

I don't think the higher management have any interest in agriculture.

0:00:340:00:37

And we meet the Singh twins who are bringing their art to live

0:00:370:00:40

with augmented reality, just like the recent Pokemon craze.

0:00:400:00:44

Wow, it literally comes to life!

0:00:440:00:49

New figures show that there are a growing number of people

0:00:570:01:00

on our roads driving under the influence of drugs.

0:01:000:01:03

Jacey Normand has been out with the Cheshire police

0:01:030:01:05

as they try to combat the offenders.

0:01:050:01:11

These videos show people driving recklessly as they try

0:01:130:01:16

to evade the police.

0:01:160:01:21

The drivers' actions show a complete disregard for other road users

0:01:230:01:26

whilst speeding excessively on our roads.

0:01:260:01:31

They all felt they had a reason to try to avoid capture.

0:01:350:01:38

They were all found to be driving under the influence of drugs.

0:01:430:01:47

The latest video from the road safety campaign THINK

0:01:530:01:55

is targeted at young men.

0:01:550:01:58

Those most likely to use drugs and get behind the wheel of a car.

0:02:010:02:04

In order to effectively police this, the government changed the drug

0:02:070:02:10

driving law in March 2015 which gave Cheshire Police and Inspector Steve

0:02:100:02:13

Griffiths additional powers to combat offenders.

0:02:130:02:20

In the past we couldn't test on the roadside and since then

0:02:200:02:22

they've introduced drug wipes.

0:02:220:02:25

So we can now test on the roadside.

0:02:250:02:27

We were finding there was an issue with people using drugs before

0:02:270:02:30

driving and this has given us a good way of testing and taking them off

0:02:300:02:34

the road if need be.

0:02:340:02:36

But certainly what it's found is there are people out there who do

0:02:360:02:39

take those risks daily and the amount of arrests we've had

0:02:390:02:42

demonstrates that we're onto it.

0:02:420:02:45

We're going to talk a little bit now about Section 5a.

0:02:450:02:48

It was introduced in March 2015 and includes...

0:02:480:02:54

At this training centre, these Cheshire police officers

0:02:540:02:56

are learning how to use the new equipment.

0:02:560:02:59

And it will give us an indication if it tests positive for either

0:02:590:03:03

cocaine or cannabis.

0:03:030:03:07

They're also being walked through the FIT test,

0:03:070:03:09

an American-style sobriety test, which is useful in finding out

0:03:090:03:12

if a driver's ability is impaired through drugs.

0:03:120:03:17

Officers have a power to do a breath test for alcohol.

0:03:170:03:20

A roadside test for drugs and also one of these FITs.

0:03:200:03:25

The only issue we have is that they only detect cannabis

0:03:250:03:28

or cocaine at the scene.

0:03:280:03:33

If an officer suspects there is impairment caused

0:03:330:03:35

by any other type of drug, the driver can be taken back

0:03:350:03:38

to the station for a blood test.

0:03:380:03:42

There are a considerable amount of drugs as regards to illegal drugs

0:03:420:03:45

and prescription drugs which can be misused and have an

0:03:450:03:48

effect on drivers.

0:03:480:03:53

The drug driving law sets strict limits for 17 different drugs.

0:03:530:03:58

Police can now test for illegal drugs like cannabis,

0:03:580:04:01

cocaine and ecstasy, but also prescription drugs

0:04:010:04:03

like Temazepam or Diazepam, used for anxiety and sleeping

0:04:030:04:05

problems and also, morphine-based pain killers.

0:04:050:04:15

And these new powers have produced results.

0:04:150:04:18

In 2016, Cheshire Police arrested 966 people for failing

0:04:180:04:20

a roadside drugs test, and so far over 500

0:04:200:04:25

of those have been charged with drug driving offences.

0:04:250:04:31

One of the officers on the front line is Chris Buckley.

0:04:320:04:37

He's been patrolling the streets of Cheshire for 12 years.

0:04:370:04:40

Chris took me out on an evening shift and he told me

0:04:440:04:46

what he looks for.

0:04:460:04:47

You kind of get used to not sort of stereotyping,

0:04:480:04:50

but what sort of cars or vehicles get used by people who may use

0:04:500:04:54

cannabis or cocaine.

0:04:540:04:58

It is a bit of the bobby's nose and it does literally become

0:04:580:05:01

the bobby's nose as sometimes you're following a vehcle and,

0:05:010:05:04

believe it or not, you can actually smell it coming through the air

0:05:040:05:07

vents from the car.

0:05:070:05:09

You do have your own little ways, all the places where you might go

0:05:090:05:12

where you think there's a good chance you might get somebody.

0:05:120:05:17

What was the speed limit down that road you just came down?

0:05:170:05:19

Do you know you have got a light out at the front?

0:05:270:05:29

A few broken tail-lights and some questionable driving means Chris

0:05:290:05:31

has stopped quite a few cars this evening.

0:05:310:05:35

The majority of people wouldn't dream of drink driving.

0:05:350:05:37

They use the two-pint rule.

0:05:370:05:41

In fairness, you can can never go by the two-pint rule because you've

0:05:410:05:44

got a legal limit of 35 for drink driving and that could be

0:05:440:05:47

two pints for you, it could be three pints for me.

0:05:470:05:50

We just don't know.

0:05:500:05:53

With the law being so new, I wondered how anyone

0:05:530:05:55

using recreational drugs could know the limits for driving.

0:05:550:06:00

It can't be measured in the same way that people do with alcohol.

0:06:000:06:08

I can't imagine someone would sit there on a Friday night

0:06:080:06:11

with their mates and think, "You know what, if I have

0:06:110:06:13

two spliffs tonight, I'm gonna be fine tomorrow,

0:06:130:06:15

but I won't drive tonight" and that's the trouble.

0:06:150:06:19

A lot of the times they'll say, "Well, I've not had any today.

0:06:190:06:22

I had some yesterday or the day before.

0:06:220:06:25

I wouldn't dream of drink or drug driving" but unfortunately you are.

0:06:250:06:31

And then, on a routine check, his copper's nose pays off.

0:06:310:06:35

Is it your vehicle?

0:06:350:06:37

Are you insured on it?

0:06:380:06:40

Really?

0:06:400:06:41

You are not, are you?

0:06:410:06:42

Have you got cannabis in there by any chance?

0:06:420:06:45

When did you last have some?

0:06:450:06:49

I can smell it.

0:06:490:06:53

Have you got a driving licence?

0:06:530:06:56

That would explain your driving, then.

0:06:560:06:57

Pass me the key.

0:06:570:07:00

No insurance and a provisional licence.

0:07:000:07:10

Right, this takes eight minutes but we have paperwork.

0:07:140:07:18

You know cannabis can stay in your system for some time, don't you?

0:07:180:07:24

Right, that has indicated you've got cannabis in your system so I need

0:07:240:07:28

to tell you you're under arrest for driving with the drug level over

0:07:280:07:31

the prescribed limit.

0:07:310:07:34

All right?

0:07:470:07:49

It's a good result for us.

0:07:490:07:50

We've got a drug driver and an unlicenced driver off the road.

0:07:500:07:54

But for him, his car's been towed away, or his girlfriend's car

0:07:540:07:57

has been towed away, so he's gonna get

0:07:570:07:59

an earful for that.

0:07:590:08:02

He's going to get a disqualification.

0:08:020:08:05

And what's this chap here for?

0:08:050:08:07

Been stopped dring a motor vehicle...

0:08:070:08:10

He smelt of cannabis and failed a drugs test.

0:08:130:08:17

At the station the driver is processed and blood is taken

0:08:170:08:19

by a nurse to find out what drugs he has in his system.

0:08:190:08:23

The results take about a month to come back.

0:08:230:08:31

He's got a lot to worry about.

0:08:420:08:43

Financially it's going to hit hard.

0:08:430:08:45

He's potentially just ruined his life through stupidity.

0:08:450:08:50

Throughout December in Cheshire, 156 people were arrested for drink

0:08:510:08:53

driving with the drug driver arrest figure at a total of 111.

0:08:530:08:59

Both Merseyside and Greater Manchester Police also reported

0:08:590:09:01

an increase in drug driving arrests in December, compared

0:09:010:09:03

to the previous year.

0:09:030:09:08

It's perhaps surprising that in the space of two years under

0:09:080:09:11

new laws that the figures for both are creeping ever closer together.

0:09:110:09:16

I've been to numerous collisions where alcohol

0:09:160:09:18

and drugs are a major factor.

0:09:180:09:21

Also, being a family liaison officer, you get to deal

0:09:210:09:24

with the families and having to be the one who goes and knocks

0:09:240:09:27

on the door and tells that family.

0:09:270:09:28

It has a devastating effect on, not only the victim and the victim's

0:09:280:09:32

family, but even the offender.

0:09:320:09:33

They can potentially go to prison.

0:09:330:09:35

They can lose their job.

0:09:350:09:38

They can lose their licence and they just don't think about this

0:09:380:09:41

before they go out on the road and it's selfish.

0:09:410:09:44

Farming has sustained the Lake District for centuries,

0:09:530:09:56

but now one of the country's largest charities and landowners stands

0:09:560:09:59

accused of being out of touch with the challenges of working

0:09:590:10:01

the Cumbrian fells.

0:10:010:10:04

Chris Jackson has been investigating the mounting tension

0:10:040:10:06

between the National Trust and the hillfarmers

0:10:060:10:07

of the Lake District.

0:10:070:10:14

The peace and tranquillity of the Lakes has been

0:10:160:10:20

The Lake District, loved and revered by millions.

0:10:220:10:24

But the inspiring landscape conceals mounting fury.

0:10:240:10:29

They are not believing in the people that have been here for generations.

0:10:290:10:34

I don't think, the higher management have any interest in agriculture.

0:10:340:10:41

The charity, The National Trust, owns around a fifth of this dramatic

0:10:410:10:44

landscape and 54 upland farms.

0:10:440:10:49

It has always been a challenge to make a living for the generations

0:10:490:10:52

of families who farm at these fells, but now those who work the land

0:10:520:10:55

say their landlord is out of touch and is making

0:10:550:10:58

their lives even harder.

0:10:580:11:02

WHISTLING.

0:11:020:11:04

I love this.

0:11:060:11:07

This is us.

0:11:070:11:10

The landscape is our identity and we have committed ourselves

0:11:100:11:12

as a family for three generations to this landscape.

0:11:120:11:16

But Isaac's future is uncertain.

0:11:160:11:20

His landlord, The National Trust, has given him a 15 year farm tenancy

0:11:200:11:23

which runs out in four years.

0:11:230:11:27

Do you feel that you need to speak out on this?

0:11:270:11:30

They have left me no choice.

0:11:300:11:31

In order for me to carry out what we have done for generations,

0:11:310:11:36

they need to give me a platform to do it.

0:11:360:11:38

A secure platform and they are not doing that.

0:11:380:11:42

Isaac's concerns for his future are just one of the things

0:11:420:11:45

I want to talk to the Trust about.

0:11:450:11:50

This is a particular landscape isn't it and to make any kind

0:11:500:11:53

of commitment to it, it is a hard living and not very

0:11:530:11:56

profitable, frankly, so surely they deserve a bit more

0:11:560:11:58

commitment from you to them?

0:11:580:12:00

I always see tenancy as a marriage between two people.

0:12:000:12:04

An organisation represented by a person and the tenant coming

0:12:040:12:06

in and they need to make sure that the marriage works and you have

0:12:060:12:09

break clauses during that period to make sure that it is working

0:12:090:12:12

for them and working for the landlord.

0:12:120:12:16

It is not unreasonable and at times, we separate.

0:12:160:12:21

The ones where it is working really well where they are delivering

0:12:210:12:24

on the tenancy they have signed, it is working financially

0:12:240:12:26

and viable, of course we want them to stay.

0:12:260:12:36

The negative headlines for The National Trust began here at

0:12:360:12:39

Thorney Thwaite Farm near Keswick.

0:12:390:12:42

Last summer the farmhouse and land came up for auction and the Trust

0:12:420:12:45

put in a bid of nearly ?1 million, just for the land.

0:12:450:12:52

And that was 200 grand over the asking price.

0:12:520:12:54

And the price was actually going down at the time.

0:12:540:12:56

It was.

0:12:560:12:57

The auctioneer was bringing the price down and The National

0:12:570:13:00

Trust person made an absurd bid of 950000 and I couldn't

0:13:000:13:03

work on that.

0:13:030:13:10

Peter lives next door to Thorney Thwaite Farm and thought

0:13:100:13:13

he was in with a chance of buying both the farmhouse and the land.

0:13:130:13:16

He is also a National Trust tenant and was left fuming.

0:13:160:13:21

Six generations of Edmondsons have been here and we were going

0:13:210:13:25

to continue to conserve the land at Thorney Thwaite as a farm.

0:13:250:13:28

One of the family members.

0:13:280:13:30

It was basically split.

0:13:300:13:32

It was ruined.

0:13:320:13:33

It is ruined now.

0:13:330:13:34

It will never be a farm again.

0:13:340:13:39

Do you still stand by the decision to buy the land but not farm?

0:13:390:13:43

We stand by the decision we made to buy the land.

0:13:430:13:45

We bought that land because we felt it was of international significance

0:13:450:13:48

along with the other land in the area.

0:13:480:13:50

A rich mosaic of farmland, woodland and the fell.

0:13:500:13:56

Thorney Thwaite, bit of a PR disaster and you must regret it.

0:13:560:13:59

We regret we did not manage to communicate as best

0:13:590:14:01

we could and we were taken by surprise by the negative feelings

0:14:010:14:04

towards the purchase, because we imagined that people

0:14:040:14:06

would think it was a good thing that we were buying the land

0:14:060:14:09

on behalf of the nation and securing it.

0:14:090:14:17

At least these guys are happy, Peter.

0:14:170:14:19

You go that way and I'll go this way.

0:14:190:14:21

Since the sale, Peter has locked horns with the trust,

0:14:210:14:23

relations are at an all-time low as he discovered the

0:14:230:14:26

director-general of the trust came to the valley before Christmas.

0:14:260:14:30

Dame Helen Gosch visited Thorney Thwaite Farm,

0:14:300:14:32

why did she not ask to meet me?

0:14:320:14:36

Let's smooth things over, she had not got the guts

0:14:360:14:39

to come and speak to me.

0:14:390:14:42

We chose not to go and see Mr Edmonson, because we felt

0:14:420:14:45

that the relationship was not in such a great place.

0:14:450:14:48

That was the time to make it all up, wasn't it?

0:14:480:14:50

The boss is in town, time to make up?

0:14:500:14:53

I guess we could have done that but we chose not to.

0:14:530:14:57

Feels like talking to the tenants that the trust has sort

0:14:570:15:01

of lost its way over the last few years.

0:15:010:15:07

There is a new Chief Executive, new strategies and it

0:15:070:15:09

all feels very remote, quite scary for people.

0:15:090:15:18

Viv represents many of The National Trust tenants

0:15:180:15:20

and says her members believe that farming is no longer a priority.

0:15:200:15:25

They have come up with new strategies and the conservations

0:15:250:15:31

of biodiversity seemed to be what they are concentrating on.

0:15:310:15:35

They will talk about farming but it is usually lower down

0:15:350:15:37

the list and as we know, as we look around here,

0:15:370:15:41

it is the farming systems that deliver this landscape

0:15:410:15:43

and are maintaining what we have got.

0:15:430:15:45

It is about working hand in hand, environment and farming,

0:15:450:15:47

not environment or farming.

0:15:470:15:51

We're not after a significant change here, we are after

0:15:510:15:53

an adaptation place

0:15:530:15:54

by place and the joy of the Lake District is every

0:15:540:15:57

valley is different.

0:15:570:16:01

You walk into one, it has a different feel to another.

0:16:010:16:06

The plans that you talked about earlier, we really do

0:16:060:16:08

want to develop more than ten year plans, long-term plans shared

0:16:080:16:11

with our tenants and the community which set out what is special

0:16:110:16:14

about the valley and how we want to be able to manage it

0:16:140:16:17

into the future and at the moment we do not have that shared vision

0:16:170:16:20

and plans that would maybe overcome some of these problems.

0:16:200:16:28

This farm was one of the properties given to The National Trust

0:16:280:16:31

by its most famous benefactor, Beatrix Potter, author

0:16:310:16:33

and hill farmer.

0:16:330:16:38

I think she would be absolutely horrified at how much they have gone

0:16:380:16:41

into tourism and everything else.

0:16:410:16:44

Eric has devoted over 30 years to farming and he says the trust now

0:16:440:16:47

has other priorities.

0:16:470:16:50

I don't think the higher management have any interest in agriculture.

0:16:500:16:56

What is the one thing you would like the trust to do?

0:16:560:17:00

I would like them to come out onto these farms and show an active

0:17:000:17:03

interest in what our problems are and what we need

0:17:030:17:05

to keep these farms viable.

0:17:050:17:11

It is great coming on a nice sunny day but you know

0:17:110:17:14

what it is like today, the wind is trying to blow us over.

0:17:140:17:17

That is the reality of it.

0:17:170:17:20

Are you more interested in tourism in the lakes than farming?

0:17:200:17:24

No, we're not more interested in tourism, tourism has

0:17:240:17:26

a fundamental role to play here and a lot of the economy

0:17:260:17:29

in the Lake District in particular comes from tourism.

0:17:290:17:32

A lot of our farms have diversified over the years,

0:17:320:17:34

based on the back of the tourism industry and the trust as a whole,

0:17:340:17:38

we have a key role to play.

0:17:380:17:41

It is not either or, it is both.

0:17:410:17:46

Glad to speak to you of course, we would also have liked to speak

0:17:460:17:49

to the director-general who chose not to speak to us.

0:17:490:17:53

Can you give us a guarantee that we can get an interview

0:17:530:17:56

with her and get farmers along?

0:17:560:17:57

That is a question for Helen, not me.

0:17:570:18:03

The day after we met Mike, his boss, director-general

0:18:030:18:05

of The National Trust, Dame Helen Gosch came to Cumbria

0:18:050:18:07

and told a conference of farmers and conservationists that

0:18:070:18:09

suggestions that the trust was losing its commitment to upland

0:18:090:18:12

farming could not be further from the truth.

0:18:120:18:18

The past few months have been a bruising experience for both

0:18:180:18:20

The National Trust and some of its hill farmers.

0:18:200:18:22

And if this landscape is to be more than just a beautiful backdrop,

0:18:220:18:26

then some sort of lasting peace needs to be brokered

0:18:260:18:28

which will allow it to continue to be a vibrant environment for both

0:18:280:18:31

farmers and visitors.

0:18:310:18:34

Liverpool artists the Singh Twins have never been afraid to tackle

0:18:470:18:50

difficult issues and their Indian heritage with their artwork,

0:18:500:18:52

now they are embracing the latest digital technology

0:18:520:18:54

to bring their art to life, as I've been finding out.

0:18:540:19:03

There is more to the Singh twins than meets the eye.

0:19:110:19:14

And the same can certainly be said for their artwork.

0:19:140:19:22

It reflects who they are - proud Scousers who love

0:19:310:19:33

their home city of Liverpool.

0:19:330:19:36

But who are also in touch with their Indian heritage.

0:19:360:19:41

They are currently working toward a major exhibition

0:20:010:20:03

in Liverpool next year.

0:20:030:20:05

Their work is intricate and painstaking.

0:20:050:20:09

There's a lot of pleasure that comes from creating something

0:20:090:20:11

that is so technically skilled and decorative.

0:20:110:20:14

You feel a sense of achievement so, although your neck and your back

0:20:140:20:18

is aching and you feel you are never going to get through this

0:20:180:20:21

and it's taking forever...

0:20:210:20:22

Yes, it's physically challenging.

0:20:220:20:23

I think the end result makes it worthwhile and that challenging

0:20:230:20:25

yourself to progress and become better and better at

0:20:250:20:27

what you are doing.

0:20:270:20:35

In 1980, aged just 13, they embarked on a journey to India

0:20:350:20:37

that would change the course of their lives.

0:20:370:20:43

My father and his uncle built this homemade motor-home.

0:20:430:20:51

Quite spontaneously, we just jumped in this vehicle one

0:20:510:20:53

day and trundled across to India through Europe and the Middle East,

0:20:530:20:56

right the way through the Iran-Iraq War, I have to say,

0:20:560:20:59

and then spent a month in Pakistan trying to get into India.

0:20:590:21:02

And then eventually got across the border and travelled

0:21:020:21:04

for eight months around India itself.

0:21:040:21:07

It really opened our eyes to the whole diversity of Indian

0:21:070:21:10

culture, not just the arts, but the history as well and I think

0:21:100:21:13

it was a real turning point in our lives and having an influence

0:21:130:21:16

on, having a real pride in our Indian heritage.

0:21:160:21:21

And it was during this first visit to India the twins fell in love

0:21:210:21:25

with Indian Miniature, a traditional Indian art form that

0:21:250:21:27

dates back many centuries.

0:21:270:21:32

We were just bowled over by this style.

0:21:320:21:36

But it was something that was so exquisite in the detail

0:21:360:21:38

and the draughtsmanship and the vibrant colours

0:21:380:21:40

and the use of gold.

0:21:400:21:41

So the works were literally illuminated, almost jewel-like.

0:21:410:21:51

The twins have never been scared to tackle controversial

0:21:540:21:57

subjects in their art.

0:21:570:21:58

With the Iraq War for example it was something,

0:21:580:22:00

a painting that we did, which was called Partners

0:22:000:22:02

in Crime: Deception and Lies, which was about the whole debate

0:22:020:22:05

and the reasons for going to war.

0:22:050:22:06

That was an art work that actually happened a couple of years

0:22:060:22:09

after the event itself.

0:22:090:22:10

We've always learnt as artists that it's sometimes not always the best

0:22:100:22:13

thing to jump in and be current because as these arguments

0:22:130:22:16

and debates develop.

0:22:160:22:17

More facts come out.

0:22:170:22:18

It gives you more food for thought and a balanced view to then

0:22:180:22:21

document in the work itself.

0:22:210:22:22

Similarly with another political painting called 1984,

0:22:220:22:24

which actually depicts the Indian Government's storming

0:22:240:22:25

attack on the Golden Temple in 1984, which is the centre of the Sikh

0:22:250:22:29

faith in Amritsar in India.

0:22:290:22:36

Their latest work of art Indigo will form part

0:22:360:22:38

of their next exhibition, examining the relationship

0:22:380:22:39

between India's ancient blue dye and the history of global trade,

0:22:390:22:42

politics and slavery.

0:22:420:22:45

The focus is a 17th century queen called Mumtaz Mahal.

0:22:450:22:50

So she's dressed in a traditional 17th century dress for the top half,

0:22:500:22:53

but for the bottom half she is wearing a pair

0:22:530:22:55

of modern blue jeans.

0:22:550:22:56

Most people think that blue jeans was invented by Levis, you know,

0:22:560:22:59

part of the American Dream.

0:22:590:23:01

But actually if you dig deep enough you will find

0:23:010:23:03

these indigo dyed jeans, or denim fabric trousers,

0:23:030:23:05

were worn by sailors way back in the 17th century in Indian ports,

0:23:050:23:12

you know, in a place called Dungri in India where the people

0:23:120:23:15

were producing this sturdy cloth and dying it blue.

0:23:150:23:17

Which is where the word dungaree comes from, of course.

0:23:170:23:25

In a ground-breaking venture, the twins have teamed up

0:23:250:23:27

with a creative design technology company from Liverpool to literally

0:23:270:23:30

bring their art work to life with an app.

0:23:300:23:32

Well, Andy, here we have the artwork of Indigo,

0:23:320:23:34

about seven, eight foot high.

0:23:340:23:37

I can get that but what I don't understand is what you guys

0:23:370:23:40

have done with the app to enhance this artwork.

0:23:400:23:42

So you hold the iPad or iPhone up to the artwork and it comes to life.

0:23:420:23:47

Wow!

0:23:470:23:48

It literally comes to life, doesn't it?

0:23:480:23:52

So you can hold it up to any aspect of the artwork and click on.

0:23:520:23:56

You can click on this bit there and it brings out some

0:23:560:23:59

information about that character in the artwork.

0:23:590:24:02

So you've got a text box that explains all

0:24:020:24:04

about the character there.

0:24:040:24:05

All the time it's moving and growing and developing.

0:24:050:24:08

The flowers are blooming, the religious icons

0:24:080:24:09

are doing something.

0:24:090:24:12

You've got serpents swimming in the sea.

0:24:120:24:15

I mean, it really does enhance the work and this is sometimes

0:24:150:24:18

the challenge between technology and art to make them

0:24:180:24:20

work hand in hand.

0:24:200:24:21

But this is fabulous, isn't it?

0:24:210:24:23

We were really interested in how we could do something subtle

0:24:230:24:26

and inspiring and continue the Twins artwork and do something that was

0:24:260:24:29

very in keeping with their work.

0:24:290:24:35

And this is just the prototype.

0:24:350:24:37

The twins are planning to use augmented reality with as much

0:24:370:24:40

of the artwork in the exhibition as they can.

0:24:400:24:44

For us as artists to have our work interpreted this way

0:24:440:24:46

is absolutely brilliant.

0:24:460:24:47

The audiences are going to have a real fun time

0:24:470:24:50

interpreting the artwork.

0:24:500:24:51

It's so much more enjoyable than reading reams of text

0:24:510:24:53

on the wall next to an art work.

0:24:530:24:56

The Singh twins have come a long way since that first trip to India.

0:24:560:25:01

But, as they have always done in the past, they aren't afraid

0:25:010:25:04

to push new boundaries.

0:25:040:25:06

The ideal would be to have all of the works augmented

0:25:060:25:08

in the same way as this piece.

0:25:080:25:10

I think this would be a real showcase for the exhibition.

0:25:100:25:13

But to have all the works with the ability to be experienced

0:25:130:25:16

in the same degree and magical experience would be fantastic.

0:25:160:25:20

The possibilities are endless because once you have done one

0:25:200:25:23

series of work you can apply that same technology to another series

0:25:230:25:25

of work and it can just go on forever really.

0:25:250:25:30

Honestly it is amazing how that artwork comes to life.

0:25:320:25:34

Inside Out is back next Monday.

0:25:340:25:36

Goodbye.

0:25:360:25:39

The week's strongest stories from the BBC's Inside Out teams - with exclusive, striking and human reports from across England.