Cure Parkinson's Trust Lifeline


Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS


Cure Parkinson's Trust

Gavin Hastings presents an appeal on behalf of the Cure Parkinson's Trust, the only UK charity solely dedicated to finding a cure for Parkinson's disease.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to Cure Parkinson's Trust. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

14 years ago, my wife and I were told she had Parkinson's.

0:00:070:00:11

It obviously came as a massive shock to us both.

0:00:110:00:14

She wasn't even 40.

0:00:140:00:15

We soon realised that life would never be the same again.

0:00:150:00:19

When Diane was diagnosed,

0:00:210:00:22

our children were both still very young.

0:00:220:00:25

We didn't know how to tell them or whether we should tell them at that stage.

0:00:250:00:28

My mood really dropped once I'd been diagnosed

0:00:280:00:31

and for quite a few weeks I was very low.

0:00:310:00:34

Parkinson's is a degenerative brain disorder

0:00:340:00:37

affecting nearly 130,000 people in the UK.

0:00:370:00:41

While it's mostly diagnosed in people over 60,

0:00:410:00:45

one in 10 patients have early-onset Parkinson's, like Diane.

0:00:450:00:49

She has dealt courageously with the many ways the disease

0:00:510:00:55

has affected her, from the intense muscular pain and stiffness

0:00:550:00:59

to the disturbed sleep and loss of her sense of smell.

0:00:590:01:02

It's frustrating, exhausting and relentless.

0:01:030:01:07

Of course, as a family, we do keep positive

0:01:070:01:10

and we do keep going because we do know there is a chance

0:01:100:01:13

that a cure for Parkinson's is within reach.

0:01:130:01:17

And that's because of a brilliant charity

0:01:170:01:19

called The Cure Parkinson's Trust

0:01:190:01:21

and I want to tell you about the work they do

0:01:210:01:24

because it's become a very important part of our lives.

0:01:240:01:27

The Cure Parkinson's Trust

0:01:290:01:31

was set up by a group of people with Parkinson's.

0:01:310:01:33

They funded trials into treatments with the potential to slow, stop

0:01:330:01:39

or even reverse the disease, which is caused by nerve cells

0:01:390:01:42

dying in the area of the brain which manages movement.

0:01:420:01:46

And they are making some exciting discoveries

0:01:470:01:50

with drugs already used to treat other conditions.

0:01:500:01:53

Professor Tom Foltynie is one of the neurologists collaborating

0:01:550:01:59

with the charity.

0:01:590:02:01

We designed a trial and we found a clear signal

0:02:010:02:04

that one of the diabetes drugs appears to be helpful

0:02:040:02:08

in patients with Parkinson's disease.

0:02:080:02:10

I'm hugely excited about this.

0:02:100:02:13

The work of The Cure Parkinson's Trust is fundamental

0:02:130:02:17

and together we are making important, exciting inroads

0:02:170:02:21

into developing a cure for Parkinson's disease.

0:02:210:02:23

But until that cure is found, some Parkinson's patients

0:02:240:02:28

turn to other methods to alleviate their symptoms.

0:02:280:02:31

Today, Professor Foltynie is with Rachel...

0:02:320:02:36

Come in, come in.

0:02:360:02:37

..who, just six months ago,

0:02:370:02:39

had surgery to put an implant in her brain.

0:02:390:02:42

It's known as deep brain stimulation and helps with movement control.

0:02:420:02:47

What I want to do is to check your balance.

0:02:480:02:50

Are you ready?

0:02:500:02:52

Good.

0:02:530:02:54

Rachel was diagnosed in her late 30s

0:02:540:02:56

and has been living with Parkinson's for nearly ten years.

0:02:560:03:00

I was running with some friends and my right leg used to veer off

0:03:000:03:04

to the right, so I knew that legs didn't do that.

0:03:040:03:08

And I was very lucky, I saw my neurologist really quickly

0:03:080:03:11

and he knew straight away as I stood up from the chair

0:03:110:03:14

in the waiting room that I had it, Parkinson's disease,

0:03:140:03:17

because I was so slow, I had a masked face,

0:03:170:03:20

my arm didn't swing, so he knew straight away.

0:03:200:03:24

It just was a bit of a shock to me.

0:03:240:03:27

Rachel's symptoms gradually increased

0:03:310:03:33

and severely affected her family life.

0:03:330:03:36

We couldn't plan holidays,

0:03:360:03:38

we couldn't do normal things like go swimming,

0:03:380:03:41

I couldn't even go to the shops,

0:03:410:03:44

I couldn't pick up the kids in the car, reliably.

0:03:440:03:47

Like my wife Diane,

0:03:470:03:48

she opted for the brain operation to ease her symptoms.

0:03:480:03:52

At the moment my movement is a lot more reliable.

0:03:520:03:55

However, I know that it's really just controlling my symptoms

0:03:550:03:59

and that the Parkinson's is still getting worse.

0:03:590:04:02

The trouble is, the surgery doesn't stop the progression

0:04:030:04:06

of Parkinson's disease.

0:04:060:04:08

Over time, balance issues, problems with speech and swallowing

0:04:080:04:12

and problems with memory and thinking

0:04:120:04:14

can become more and more of an issue and this is why we need to develop

0:04:140:04:18

a cure that is going to either slow down, stop

0:04:180:04:22

or even reverse the progression of Parkinson's disease

0:04:220:04:25

and that is exactly what The Cure Parkinson's Trust is about.

0:04:250:04:28

Each person with Parkinson's has their own experience

0:04:280:04:32

of its progression.

0:04:320:04:33

It makes you unable to do things as fast as you would like to do them.

0:04:330:04:37

Simple things like cleaning the bath,

0:04:370:04:39

I wanted to do it quicker but I couldn't. My hands wouldn't move.

0:04:390:04:43

Writing Christmas cards took me much longer than normal

0:04:430:04:46

so I had to get friends round to help me do these things.

0:04:460:04:48

People often associate Parkinson's with unpredictable jerky movements.

0:04:500:04:54

However, the reality is, it's more like stiffness and rigidity.

0:04:540:04:59

People take a combination of drugs in order to move more freely.

0:04:590:05:04

However, as time marches on, these drugs become less effective

0:05:040:05:08

and this can give people exhausting fluctuations in their movement.

0:05:080:05:13

David was diagnosed six years ago aged only 29

0:05:140:05:18

and has to manage a daily rollercoaster of symptoms

0:05:180:05:21

as well as the side effects of medication

0:05:210:05:24

that constantly come and go.

0:05:240:05:26

We use the term patient to describe people with Parkinson's

0:05:260:05:29

and that's indeed what we're not, we're not patient,

0:05:290:05:32

we need better treatments now, better support to find a cure.

0:05:320:05:36

Without the money to fund that, it's never going to happen.

0:05:360:05:40

Today, David has to balance the effects of the disease

0:05:400:05:44

and his drugs simply to carry on with daily activities.

0:05:440:05:48

Until recently, he worked as a teacher

0:05:480:05:51

at a sixth form college in Bolton.

0:05:510:05:53

The biggest problem you have with working is that everybody

0:05:530:05:56

has to be in at a certain time of the day, finish at a certain time.

0:05:560:05:59

I had classrooms of 30 children and that was a massive challenge for me,

0:05:590:06:03

to the point whereby my symptoms started to interfere with that

0:06:030:06:06

and I made the conscious decision to think, something has to change.

0:06:060:06:10

David now has a fulfilling role in the college's website

0:06:100:06:13

and marketing department.

0:06:130:06:15

He's also a blogger and advocate,

0:06:160:06:18

active in the community of people with Parkinson's online.

0:06:180:06:22

And he's refused to allow Parkinson's to stop him pursuing

0:06:250:06:28

his passion for music.

0:06:280:06:30

Believe it or not, I play the piano. I really do.

0:06:300:06:33

I find it's a really good way to help me keep dextrous and moving

0:06:330:06:37

in terms of my hands.

0:06:370:06:39

It also keeps you engaged cognitively.

0:06:420:06:45

# Rain, rain go away

0:06:450:06:49

# Save it for another day... #

0:06:500:06:53

I wrote that song about my son George.

0:06:530:06:55

Life's going to get worse and harder but don't grow up too fast

0:06:550:06:59

and let me enjoy it while I still can, you know?

0:06:590:07:02

# The clouds may come but I'm not ready yet... #

0:07:030:07:08

Knowing The Cure Parkinson's Trust is out there doing the work

0:07:090:07:12

they're doing, founded by people with PD like myself,

0:07:120:07:15

is so comforting because I know that hopefully in the future,

0:07:150:07:18

through better funding and research,

0:07:180:07:21

they can find a better outcome and a cure for me and others.

0:07:210:07:24

The Cure Parkinson's Trust needs us to do our bit

0:07:240:07:27

so that they can continue to fund that vital research.

0:07:270:07:31

Rachel certainly is in no doubt about the value of raising awareness

0:07:310:07:35

and money for the charity.

0:07:350:07:37

A friend of mine and myself, we cycled from London to Paris

0:07:370:07:41

a few years ago and we raised thousands of pounds

0:07:410:07:44

and it's great to know that every penny

0:07:440:07:47

goes to finding a cure for Parkinson's disease.

0:07:470:07:49

The cure Parkinson's trust is determined to find a cure

0:07:500:07:53

for this devastating disease.

0:07:530:07:55

Already they have six clinical trials underway

0:07:550:07:58

and with your support we can help fund another three.

0:07:580:08:02

These trials have the potential to change

0:08:020:08:05

the course of the disease forever.

0:08:050:08:07

And every donation you make can help give people like Rachel,

0:08:070:08:11

David and Diane the chance of a life without Parkinson's.

0:08:110:08:16

So please give what you can.

0:08:160:08:18

To give by phone, call 0800 011 011.

0:08:190:08:23

Calls are free from mobiles and landlines.

0:08:230:08:26

You can also donate £10 by texting DONATE

0:08:260:08:29

to 70121.

0:08:290:08:31

Texts cost £10 plus your standard network message charge

0:08:310:08:35

and the whole £10 goes to The Cure Parkinson's Trust.

0:08:350:08:39

For full terms and conditions or to make a donation online,

0:08:390:08:43

visit the Lifeline website at bbc.co.uk/lifeline

0:08:430:08:48

Or if you'd like to post a donation,

0:08:480:08:50

please make your cheque payable to The Cure Parkinson's Trust

0:08:500:08:54

and send it to FREEPOST BBC Lifeline Appeal,

0:08:540:08:57

writing The Cure Parkinson's Trust on the back of the envelope.

0:08:570:09:01

-Thank you.

-Yes, thanks so much indeed.

0:09:010:09:04

Gavin Hastings presents an appeal on behalf of the Cure Parkinson's Trust, the only charity in the UK solely dedicated to finding a cure for Parkinson's disease. Founded by people living with Parkinson's, the charity funds clinical trials of potential new treatments to slow, stop and reverse the disease.

Gavin's wife Diane was diagnosed with Parkinson's in 2003, aged just 39. Since then, the family have thrown themselves into fundraising activities. Every penny donated to the cause goes towards research into new treatments with the potential to cure this devastating and all-consuming disease, which can cause muscular pain, stiffness, slowness of movement and balance problems.

The charity's research work is an inspiration to people like David Sangster, who was diagnosed six years ago, when he was 29. Like the founders of the Cure Parkinson's Trust, he feels a sense of urgency about funding more research to try and find a cure. 'We use the term patient to describe people with Parkinson's and that's indeed what we're not. We're not patient! We need better treatments now! Better support to find a cure. Without the money to fund that, it's never going to happen'.