12/02/2017 Saturday Kitchen Best Bites


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12/02/2017

John Torode takes a look back at some of his favourite recipes and best moments from Saturday Kitchen.


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Good morning!

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There's a seriously tasty menu lined up for you on today's show,

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so there's only one thing you need to do,

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and that's sit back and enjoy another serving

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of Saturday Kitchen Best Bites.

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Welcome to the show.

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We have top chefs cooking fabulous food and celebrity guests galore -

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trust me, you won't want to miss any of it.

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Coming up on today's show...

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James Martin serves up a deliciously fresh tuna salad nicoise

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for Alesha Dixon...

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The famous author Adriana Trigiani,

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who also happens to be a pretty good cook,

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makes her Saturday Kitchen debut.

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She cooks up braciole in tomato sauce with green salad

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and oranges with cracked pepper -

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plus another of our favourite Italians, Francesco Mazzei,

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is delivering a dish that is sure to get your mouth watering.

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He serves up wild boar marinaded in liquorice,

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bergamot and spices with turnip tops and a tasty liquorice sauce.

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Battling it out for omelette challenge glory,

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we have Theo Randall taking on Silvena Rowe -

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with only two seconds between them, it's all to play for.

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That's from the days before he made the Guinness Book Of Records.

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Anyway, then it's over to Alyn Williams,

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who's here with his classy version of an all-American feast -

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southern fried chicken.

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The chicken is marinaded in buttermilk

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before being coated in spices and deep-fried,

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and it's served up with a grilled baby gem, sourdough croutons

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and a creamy ranch dressing.

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Absolutely yum.

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And finally, Sue Perkins faces her food heaven or her food hell.

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Did she get her food heaven, hazelnut and chocolate gateau?

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Or did she end up facing her food hell,

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goat's cheese on brioche with redcurrant dressing?

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They both sound delicious.

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You can find out what she got at the end of the show.

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But first it's over to Ben Tish, who's serving up his take

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on a classic Spanish combination - hake, chorizo and clams.

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It's Mr Ben Tish. Great to have you on the show, Ben.

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-Thanks, James.

-Thank you for coming on.

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Pleasure to be here.

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Now, you're influenced heavily - we mentioned the Italian,

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-but the Spanish theme, particularly this dish.

-Yeah.

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Absolutely, yeah.

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-So, it's hake with clams...

-Yeah.

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..spicy chorizo and Arbequina olive oil mash.

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-Sounds good to me.

-Yeah, so it's a take on a Spanish dish -

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it's refined a little bit with the addition of the mash.

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Right, so tell us about this hake, then.

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You want to get that on to start off with, I know you do.

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Yeah, absolutely. So, hake, used loads in Spain and France...

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as we spoke to Daniel about earlier.

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-Yeah, super fish.

-Yeah, really good.

-Really good.

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Cooking it on the bone,

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it's a really good way to cook hake, or any fish, for that matter.

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-Yeah.

-Love cooking fish on the bone.

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Particularly with hake - it's quite delicate, innit, really?

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-It's quite delicate...

-Can fall apart if you overcook it.

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Exactly - but the bone kind of helps that,

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helps keep it all together.

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But does add that flavour in there, as well.

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So, I've got a nice hot pan, and olive oil in there,

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and just added the hake into there.

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This is a cut of meat that you normally find on salmon,

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-it's called a darne, this one...

-Absolutely.

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..cut straight through the centre of the fish.

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Yeah, a darne or a steak,

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as probably a lot of people would know that.

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So, just, like, going in there - thanks, James.

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And just going to get my clams in there now, as well.

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-There we go.

-Yeah.

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Cooking away in there.

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Get rid of that, wash the hands.

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In there you've just got a little bit of olive oil. Just a touch.

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Just a little bit of olive oil in there, that's it.

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Just want to get that going -

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want a nice kind of caramelisation on that.

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Now, we've mentioned that the French like it, as well,

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but was one of the first dishes I learnt to cook in France,

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the hake with the beurre blanc sauce.

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-Yeah, that's correct.

-Yeah.

-And when we went to France, you and I,

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some massive ones on the market in Brittany.

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-Fabulous fish.

-Again, inexpensive. There you go.

-Very tasty...

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I mean, in Italy they kind of use it a lot, as well -

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we have an Italian influence at our restaurants, as well,

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-so, it's used quite a lot in Italy, as well.

-Mm.

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It just seems, in the UK,

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that we just kind of don't get it...

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-So...

-It's the name, you see the name in the UK,

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people don't like the name or the look of the fish, they won't eat it.

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-It's always the cod and the haddock that I think you see...

-Yeah.

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Crazy, innit, really, when you think -

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there's so many great other fish out there.

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-Particularly this one.

-Absolutely.

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So, James, you're peeling some chorizo for me.

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We've got some cooking chorizo here, and this is spicy cooking chorizo.

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It's different to the cured chorizo - it needs to be cooked.

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-Yeah.

-It's great when you're cooking -

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when you cook it down, it releases its paprika oil.

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Well, the word "picante" is what you look for in...

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-Picante, exactly.

-Which is the spice one, innit?

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You get dulce, which is the sweet one,

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-and picante, which is the spicy one.

-Yeah.

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So... Got the clams, they're going nicely, there.

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Turn the hake again, and I'll grab some of that chorizo,

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-James, if I may.

-Now, the difference, like I said,

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the cooking one, you can easily tell the difference.

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-Yeah, it's a lot softer.

-One's like a sausage, and soft...

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-Yeah.

-..the other one's firm.

-Yeah, exactly that.

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-I mean, you CAN cook with the fully cured one...

-Yeah.

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..and it also releases a bit of oil, but this is much better.

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-Kind of what it's about.

-Yeah.

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So, I just want to get that sweating away, there,

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and it'll start to release all its oil on there.

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-That's really good.

-Now, I mentioned the fact that you're a big fish fan

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-with your sea bass. Hake?

-Yes.

-Tried that?

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You know, I'm just trying to think,

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what family of fish is hake from? Or, what - give me some...

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I would've thought it's probably cod or haddock.

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-Yeah, it's a kind of...

-It's called colin in French, and...

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-It's in the cod family, yeah.

-Cod, cod...

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OK, cool. So, if you could peel that potato for me, James,

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-and we're going to get that on.

-Right.

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Just going to turn that again.

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We've got a nice colour on that now. So that's good.

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And then, here, I've got some white wine

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that I'm just going to add into there...

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Now, tell us about these restaurants, then.

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-..and some sherry.

-You first of all came to London when?

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-I came to London, ooh, about 14, 15 years ago.

-Right.

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Started working - um, first job was at the Ritz.

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-Yeah.

-Classic place, did that for a year,

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and then ended up working with Jason Atherton

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at various restaurants.

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Um - sorry, James, just to interrupt, there.

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-So, I'm just steaming that away, there...

-Yeah.

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..and that's going to finish cooking the fish through.

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-Yeah.

-Get the potatoes on, there.

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So, yeah, and then worked at an Italian restaurant called Al Duca,

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which was where I kind of got more into, like,

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the rustic style of things.

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-I'll do that.

-OK, cool.

-You do that one.

-OK, thanks.

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And then, yeah, I had a little detour into Scotland,

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where I worked at a country house hotel up there,

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and I got really in touch with produce and things like that,

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-and moved back to London...

-Big mix and match, then, really.

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Mix and match, exactly.

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And then started at Salt Yard, and it's just gone from there.

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Really got into Spanish cooking.

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These are kind of... Talking about Spanish cooking,

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these are modern tapas restaurants, but they're all different, are they?

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Or they're all roughly different.

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No, there's a theme running through them,

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you know, we specialise in charcuterie cheese,

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-Spain and Italy, as well, not just Spanish.

-Mm.

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And, yeah - kind of tapas,

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but with a modern twist on them.

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Particularly the iberico, innit, that's what you use quite a bit?

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At Opera Tavern restaurant in Covent Garden,

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which we opened a year ago,

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we've kind of we've kind of become famous for fresh iberico meat, so...

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-Yeah.

-Everybody probably knows the ham

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that's carved in Spanish restaurants, the jamon iberico...

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-Pata negra, they call it.

-Pata negra, yeah -

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but the fresh meat is delicious, as well,

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and it can be cooked rather like beef.

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You can cook it medium rare.

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So, we do things like tartares and carpaccios,

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-we do a burger.

-It's quite unusual with pork, like that.

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When you talk about pork and medium rare, people are always a bit...

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Yeah, they're a bit funny -

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and, you know, because of the breeding, because of the diet...

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-And the welfare.

-..and the welfare, exactly that.

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It's actually the cousin of the one in the Pyrenees, the French -

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Noir de Bigorre, it's the cousin of...

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Yeah, exactly that.

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So, and they're wild, you know, there's nothing bad about them.

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You go and you take on - in the forest, in the mountain.

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-Yeah.

-They have a diet of acorns, mainly, don't they?

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-Yeah.

-Yeah, that's exactly what it is -

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and so the meat kind of reflects that.

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-Fabulous.

-It's fatty - it's a little bit like Wagyu beef,

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I don't know if anyone's tried that,

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but it's kind of got that richness going on.

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-Right.

-So, just chopping in a bit of parsley, so, thanks for that, James.

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So, what do you want in this mash?

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OK, so, if you just put me that cream in there, please.

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-Yep.

-Thank you.

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Probably about a third of that butter.

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Salt and pepper in there. I've got the cream and butter,

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and then I'm going to add into the mash some Arbequina olive oil,

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which is a delicious spicy olive oil from Spain.

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Now, talking about olive oil,

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you walk about the supermarkets now...

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-Yeah.

-Oh, my God!

-It used to be Italian, that was it.

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But now you've got stuff from South Africa...

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It's overwhelming. It's overwhelming.

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But you should treat it like wine - they're all very different.

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They're all different, and, in fact,

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this Arbequina olive oil that I'm using

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we use at our restaurants as the table olive oil, the bread -

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and it's the new season olive oil that's come through now,

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so it's a lot stronger than...

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it's a lot stronger than the old season, it's more in-your-face.

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So, it can vary by season,

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as well as by olive oil to olive oil.

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But the Arbequina, of course, is a type of olive itself.

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Yes, yeah, absolutely.

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-And we sell the olives, as well, which are delicious...

-OK.

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..as a table olive.

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OK, so that's going nicely, there.

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I'm just going to turn the hake over.

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All right - and this will take quite quickly to cook,

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cos you're cooking this with a lid on, as well.

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Exactly, so, you've got the steam going on there.

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I'm just going to add some parsley into there.

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That's good. I mean, you're doing a brasserie dish later,

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but this is kind of like the brasserie dishes in France...

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-Yeah, it would be.

-Yeah.

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That sort of classic beurre blanc sauce.

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You can even say it's home cooking,

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because it's kind of a relation, eh?

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You want some lemon in there as well?

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Yes, please, just a squeeze of lemon to sharpen it up.

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And I think...

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-You're about there.

-..we're nearly there. Lovely.

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OK, that looks good, James.

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If you can put me a spoon of that in the middle, that'd be good.

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-There you go.

-Thank you.

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Thanks, James. Very nice.

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Just get my...

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..fish slice.

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So, there's the hake.

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Lovely.

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-Nicely cooked through.

-Do you serve that dish in your restaurant?

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-Er, yeah, we serve...

-Probably not as big as that.

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No, not as big as this!

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All the dishes that we serve are tapas dishes.

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-That's a Yorkshire tapas, that.

-Yeah!

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I did it as a nod to you, James.

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I thought I'd give you...

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-Trust you to say that.

-..a Yorkshire portion.

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But there we go.

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So, you can see all those lovely paprika juices

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have come out of there.

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And you've put the sherry and white wine in this.

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-Sherry and white wine in there, yeah.

-That was dry sherry in there?

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Dry sherry, yeah,

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just gives the sauce a nice kind of bite.

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That's really good.

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This is really popular at the restaurant.

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And sherry's on the up, as well, actually.

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Sherry's well on the up - we sell loads of sherry now.

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OK, so, there you go.

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So, that is roasted hake on the bone with Arbequina olive oil mash,

0:10:290:10:34

clams and chorizo with a sherry sauce.

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-Thank you very much.

-Lovely.

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By a guy with his first time on Saturday Kitchen.

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-Well done.

-Thank you.

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THEY CLAP SOFTLY

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That was pathetic, over there. LAUGHTER

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-We didn't know...

-Just trying...

-Yeah, yeah.

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They just want something to eat - there we go.

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There we go. Dive in.

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-This looks amazing. Wow.

-Mm!

-Look at that.

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-Try that for breakfast.

-Yeah, get that down you.

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It is, it is delicious.

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And that's what you say,

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you can use the different types of chorizo,

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but the idea is to use the soft one, really, when you're cooking.

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Yes, most definitely, yeah.

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And then you just get... All the flavour comes out, and, yeah.

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-Yeah?

-Fantastic.

-You like that? Good.

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I'm usually a bit funny about surf and turf, but...

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-Surf and turf?!

-Yeah.

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Beef and lobster?

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It's got a little bit of chorizo in the sauce...

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It's delicious.

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But that does really well - I mean, white fish, particularly,

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with cod, and they do it with all manner of different combinations...

0:11:260:11:29

-Yes.

-..over in Spain.

-Yeah, yeah, absolutely. Yeah.

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Happy with that?

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Very happy.

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Amazing to think that was Ben's first time on the show -

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he is a natural.

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Coming up, James serves up tuna salad nicoise for Alesha Dixon -

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but first it's over to Rock Stein

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in a clip from his first ever TV series,

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and he's keeping it simple with scallops and mullet.

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People that like food that I respect more than anybody

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are those that understand about simplicity in cooking -

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and nothing sums up simplicity,

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pure, delicious simplicity, better than just a dish of grilled queens.

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Queens are just a type of small scallop,

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and all you have to do is brush them with plenty of butter

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and season them liberally with ground black pepper and salt.

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Then you put them under a hot grill -

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and notice the wonderful smell that actually comes from the shells,

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as well as the scallop meat.

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It's like hot beaches -

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and hot beaches is what it is,

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because all beaches are is bust-up shells.

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These are now well and truly cooked...

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and the next thing I'm going to do is to add some seaweed,

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to put some seaweed on the plate.

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In addition to that lovely smell of the shells,

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I want the lovely smell of seaweed.

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That beautiful ozone smell which I'm going to enhance

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just by heating the seaweed up for a few seconds only

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in some boiling water.

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Because when this comes out,

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you get that, oh, indefinable sort of wonderful smell of seaweed,

0:13:140:13:18

which people love.

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Put the...queens on top of that.

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And having done that,

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I go for the final piece, which is, to me, by far the most important -

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the butter itself.

0:13:340:13:35

I'm very pedantic about beurre noisette.

0:13:360:13:40

I don't use a frying pan,

0:13:400:13:41

I use a saucepan, because a frying pan's black

0:13:410:13:44

and you can't see what's going on in the bottom of the pan.

0:13:440:13:48

With a saucepan, you can,

0:13:480:13:49

particularly if it's got a steel lining, like this one,

0:13:490:13:52

and I need to be able to judge visually

0:13:520:13:54

exactly when the right point to stop the cooking is -

0:13:540:13:57

because if you take it too far,

0:13:570:13:59

you've got burnt butter rather than beurre noisette.

0:13:590:14:02

"Beurre noisette" means "nutty" in French,

0:14:020:14:04

and that's what I'm after - a sort of nutty flavour.

0:14:040:14:07

Another pedantic point of mine is...

0:14:070:14:10

Not quite there, but nearly.

0:14:100:14:13

..is I put the lemon juice, which always goes with noisette,

0:14:130:14:15

actually on the scallops, not in the butter.

0:14:150:14:19

Now, that...is plumb right.

0:14:190:14:22

Lovely, lovely flavour.

0:14:220:14:23

Quite dark, but not burnt.

0:14:230:14:25

And, finally, a little finely chopped parsley...

0:14:330:14:35

..to complete the dish.

0:14:380:14:40

That is delicious.

0:14:420:14:44

I think I might just pop one into the old mouth there.

0:14:440:14:48

Mm.

0:14:480:14:50

This is one of the first seafood dishes I ever had in Brittany.

0:14:500:14:53

Never forgotten it.

0:14:530:14:55

Really understood about simplicity and things then.

0:14:550:14:58

You can't beat just a properly made, simple butter sauce like that.

0:14:580:15:02

This is perfection.

0:15:120:15:14

I wouldn't want to be anywhere else in the world -

0:15:140:15:16

I wouldn't want to be in Australia or Tahiti or Barbados, or anywhere.

0:15:160:15:21

It's such a perfect evening,

0:15:210:15:23

so still it's like a timeless image, to me,

0:15:230:15:26

of everybody's best memories of Cornwall -

0:15:260:15:29

but actually it IS timeless,

0:15:290:15:31

because Brian and his family have been fishing here

0:15:310:15:34

for mullet and bass for generations.

0:15:340:15:37

I don't know anything else.

0:15:400:15:42

That's my problem.

0:15:420:15:43

I've done it since I was eight years old,

0:15:430:15:46

brought up in a river, fishing with nets.

0:15:460:15:49

I've been a fisherman since I left school, so...

0:15:490:15:51

I don't know nothing else -

0:15:510:15:53

I couldn't go and work in an office or something like that.

0:15:530:15:56

Just have one - I think we've got one fish just jumped over the net.

0:15:560:16:00

I think it possibly could be a mullet.

0:16:000:16:01

Do you see it splashing there?

0:16:010:16:03

Yeah, going like crazy, isn't it?

0:16:030:16:04

'Grey mullet are normally rather muddy estuary fish,

0:16:040:16:07

'but these bay mullet - well!'

0:16:070:16:09

They're a nice size, aren't they?

0:16:090:16:10

This is a typical bay mullet, this is.

0:16:100:16:13

-Nice and big.

-Yeah.

-Clean.

-Clean, yeah. Exactly.

0:16:130:16:15

-CHILD:

-And they've got another one!

0:16:150:16:16

Grey mullet is a wonderful fish -

0:16:200:16:22

it's so firm, it's so nice to feel,

0:16:220:16:24

like all fresh fish, it's nice to feel.

0:16:240:16:27

Stale fish feels soft, feels soggy -

0:16:270:16:29

fresh fish feels like a piece of elastic.

0:16:290:16:32

Feel like just going like that.

0:16:320:16:34

Anyway, let's get on with the dish.

0:16:340:16:36

A simple Tuscan sauce

0:16:360:16:38

with some green olive oil, some garlic, some red chillies,

0:16:380:16:42

some lemon juice and some sea salt.

0:16:420:16:44

So, first of all, the garlic.

0:16:440:16:46

Now, I'm using this Japanese mandolin,

0:16:460:16:48

which you've got to be extremely careful with -

0:16:480:16:50

every chef that uses it cuts themselves once,

0:16:500:16:52

but you never do it again.

0:16:520:16:54

It says in Japanese on one side and English on the other,

0:16:540:16:56

"Watch your fingers."

0:16:560:16:57

So, that's exactly what I'm doing.

0:16:570:17:00

The most sensible thing to do is not actually to...

0:17:000:17:02

-Ow,

-BLEEP!

0:17:020:17:03

So, I'm chopping the garlic with a sensible thin bladed knife.

0:17:050:17:08

Next to the chilli.

0:17:080:17:10

I take the seeds out and also put the chilli

0:17:100:17:13

into a tiny bit of vinegar,

0:17:130:17:15

just to slightly decrease the heat,

0:17:150:17:18

because otherwise the sauce will be too hot.

0:17:180:17:21

I just want a suggestion of chilli here -

0:17:210:17:23

not a sort of massive blast of it.

0:17:230:17:25

If you can hear some noise in the background at the moment,

0:17:250:17:28

it's just the sound of a Japanese mandolin

0:17:280:17:31

being thrown into the rubbish skip just outside the back door.

0:17:310:17:35

So, first, assembling the sauce, this wonderful, wonderful olive oil.

0:17:350:17:39

It's... Oh, gosh.

0:17:390:17:41

It's great, actually.

0:17:410:17:42

It's almost nicer to sniff than to taste, but only just.

0:17:420:17:45

Then the garlic...

0:17:450:17:47

and finally this chilli.

0:17:470:17:50

Just a little bit of the chilli, which I've soaked in vinegar.

0:17:500:17:52

That's all there is to the sauce.

0:17:520:17:54

"Call that a sauce?" I hear you say -

0:17:540:17:56

but the simple things in life are often the best.

0:17:560:17:59

So, now, to cook the fish,

0:17:590:18:01

it's a good idea to put some oil on the bars first of all,

0:18:010:18:04

as a sort of belt and braces measure,

0:18:040:18:06

to make sure the fish doesn't stick.

0:18:060:18:07

I've also greased the fish with olive oil

0:18:070:18:10

and a little bit of thyme and some salt.

0:18:100:18:12

I can use the charcoal grill just to warm this olive oil sauce through,

0:18:120:18:16

because I don't want to heat it right up,

0:18:160:18:18

because it will drive off all those beautiful, volatile flavours

0:18:180:18:22

in this Tuscan olive oil.

0:18:220:18:23

Now, that fish is done on that side, now.

0:18:230:18:25

Look at how that's getting so white and firm now.

0:18:250:18:28

Bit more of a baste with some of this thyme and olive oil mix,

0:18:280:18:31

and some salt,

0:18:310:18:32

and flip it over - and it's so quick, this,

0:18:320:18:34

it's a beautiful hot charcoal grill, this.

0:18:340:18:37

There we are. The sauce, I'm sure, will be just about...

0:18:370:18:40

ready to take off. Yes, it's nicely warmed through. Great.

0:18:400:18:43

And if you're wondering why we're using blue plasters in the kitchen,

0:18:430:18:46

it's so you can see them in the food.

0:18:460:18:48

On to the assembly.

0:18:480:18:50

Just lift that up gently,

0:18:500:18:51

cos once it's cooked it's very, very delicate.

0:18:510:18:53

Take some of this delicious sauce.

0:18:530:18:55

Just a little bit - don't want too much,

0:18:570:18:59

don't want to fill everybody up with olive oil calories.

0:18:590:19:03

Some of this sea salt for crunchiness.

0:19:030:19:07

Nice crunch against that softness - and now the taste.

0:19:070:19:10

Now, that is seriously good.

0:19:130:19:15

That is the sort of dish

0:19:150:19:16

that I like to give to people who don't like fish -

0:19:160:19:19

lots of Cornish people don't eat fish.

0:19:190:19:22

Give them something like this, they would be converted immediately.

0:19:220:19:25

It's amazing to think that Rick's first ever TV series was that.

0:19:300:19:34

What a star.

0:19:340:19:35

Funnily enough, the very first time I cooked on television,

0:19:350:19:38

I did a classic fish dish, too -

0:19:380:19:39

much like Rick, it's very simple - but without the Japanese mandolin.

0:19:390:19:43

I remember, I cooked something for the Bee Gees, would you believe?

0:19:430:19:45

-And now I'm going to cook it for you.

-Cool!

0:19:450:19:47

-I'm privileged.

-It's a salad nicoise -

0:19:470:19:49

or a classic tuna nicoise, and it's really so simple to make.

0:19:490:19:52

As I say, classic - but the word nicoise comes from Nice,

0:19:520:19:54

but it can vary.

0:19:540:19:56

You can use broad beans in it, it can vary

0:19:560:19:58

-so much with what ingredients actually goes in the nicoise.

-Yeah.

0:19:580:20:00

But fundamentally, you've got potatoes, which I've got over there,

0:20:000:20:03

tomatoes, beans, olives, eggs, a little bit of lettuce in mine,

0:20:030:20:06

I've obviously got some tuna, but it can vary -

0:20:060:20:08

you can put anchovies, sardines, white fish -

0:20:080:20:10

-anything, whatever's caught along the coast of Nice.

-Mm-hm.

0:20:100:20:13

We've got some anchovies, here, for our dressing, egg yolk,

0:20:130:20:16

bit of mustard, lemon and garlic.

0:20:160:20:17

So, the first thing I'm going to do, fire off straight away,

0:20:170:20:20

is then just take our tuna

0:20:200:20:21

and just cut this into a nice-sized portion, really.

0:20:210:20:25

Going to use these trimmings, here, which are a little bit sinewy -

0:20:250:20:28

-I use these for fishcakes, really, these ones.

-Oh!

0:20:280:20:31

Season it up with some salt and pepper...

0:20:310:20:33

That's a lot of salt.

0:20:330:20:34

Little bit less salt...

0:20:340:20:36

LAUGHTER

0:20:360:20:38

Little bit less pepper.

0:20:410:20:44

Olive oil.

0:20:440:20:45

The Bee Gees didn't complain, back then!

0:20:470:20:49

They just got what they were given.

0:20:490:20:51

Right, there we go. There's...

0:20:510:20:53

Move that to one side.

0:20:530:20:55

No wonder mine tastes bland.

0:20:550:20:57

Is that what you told your dad?

0:20:570:20:58

Cos your dad was a bit of a keen cook - and he still is.

0:20:580:21:00

-My dad's an amazing cook.

-A bit of a keen cook, yeah.

0:21:000:21:02

Like he never really cooked,

0:21:020:21:03

because obviously his partner cooked for him...

0:21:030:21:05

I'm not surprised, with you telling him what to put in it!

0:21:050:21:08

He was staying... My dad lives in Thailand,

0:21:090:21:12

but he was staying with me before he went there,

0:21:120:21:13

and I literally had him, you know, summoned to the kitchen -

0:21:130:21:17

and he's fantastic at cooking Jamaican food,

0:21:170:21:19

obviously, cos that's where he's from,

0:21:190:21:21

but he cooks amazing Thai food, as well.

0:21:210:21:23

You say summoned to the kitchen -

0:21:230:21:25

because that's what your new partner wants to be,

0:21:250:21:27

is that what you were saying?

0:21:270:21:29

You want to go out with a chef, is that right?

0:21:290:21:31

Well, it would be good... I don't have to go out with a chef,

0:21:310:21:33

-but it would be good if he could cook.

-Right, OK.

0:21:330:21:35

-It's quite important.

-It's quite important. There you go.

-Mm.

0:21:350:21:37

-Just don't put enough salt...

-Yeah, don't put too much...

0:21:370:21:39

-Less salt next time.

-Lots of pepper.

0:21:390:21:41

What kind of food did he used to cook you? Jamaican food, or...?

0:21:410:21:44

My dad - like I said, my dad's a great cook,

0:21:440:21:45

but he didn't really cook a lot.

0:21:450:21:48

-My nan's the better cook - my dad's mum...

-Yeah.

0:21:480:21:51

..and, you know, we grew up eating things like curried goat and...

0:21:510:21:54

-Curried GOAT?

-Curried goat, pig's tail...

0:21:540:21:57

-Pig's tail soup, jerk chicken...

-Pig's tail?

-Ackee and saltfish...

0:21:570:22:00

What on earth do you do with pig's tail?

0:22:000:22:02

Well, you put it in a soup -

0:22:020:22:03

what the English would call stew, Jamaicans would call soup.

0:22:030:22:06

So, you could have lamb soup -

0:22:060:22:08

-traditionally you use, like, neck of lamb...

-Yeah.

0:22:080:22:12

..chicken, pig's tail... Pig's tail's great!

0:22:120:22:15

-Pig's tail's great?

-Yeah!

-I'm sure it is.

0:22:150:22:17

It's lovely, it's really tasty.

0:22:170:22:18

Ackee and saltfish, which is, like, the Jamaican national dish...

0:22:180:22:21

-Right.

-..which is really lovely...

0:22:210:22:24

and lots of, you know, yams and...

0:22:240:22:26

-dumplings...

-I mean, you've travelled all over the world -

0:22:260:22:28

so, you've mentioned all these sort of things

0:22:280:22:30

-that you were brought up on...

-Yeah.

0:22:300:22:31

-Mm.

-You must have tried some...

-Yeah.

-..weird stuff on your travels.

0:22:310:22:34

What's the most weirdest thing you've ever tried?

0:22:340:22:37

I think the weirdest thing I ever tried was when I was with Mis-Teeq

0:22:370:22:41

-and we were out in Norway...

-Yeah.

0:22:410:22:43

..recording our album. They used to have a chef come in to the studio -

0:22:430:22:47

to save time, you didn't waste any time when you were recording -

0:22:470:22:50

and they'd cook these lovely meals for us every day,

0:22:500:22:52

but then, one day, I was eating this meat, and it was gorgeous,

0:22:520:22:55

and I was like, "Oh, can I have seconds?

0:22:550:22:56

"This is so nice,"

0:22:560:22:57

and then Su-Elise said to me, "You know you're eating reindeer?"

0:22:570:23:00

I said, "No!" I thought it was a joke -

0:23:000:23:02

and then we got back to the hotel,

0:23:020:23:03

she said, "Alesha, you really was eating reindeer,"

0:23:030:23:05

and I was really disturbed by it,

0:23:050:23:07

cos I was like, "Oh, my God, I've just ate Bambi!"

0:23:070:23:10

It was like...

0:23:100:23:11

No, that's a deer - that's not reindeer.

0:23:110:23:13

Oh!

0:23:130:23:14

-OK, same thing.

-You've eaten Rudolph, instead - not Bambi.

0:23:140:23:17

But either way, it was just like...

0:23:190:23:21

It was beautiful meat,

0:23:210:23:22

but I'm quite particular about the meat that I eat.

0:23:220:23:24

I don't like to eat veal and rabbit and all those kind of things,

0:23:240:23:27

but my favourite food, I think, outside of, you know,

0:23:270:23:31

English food, Jamaican food, is probably Japanese.

0:23:310:23:33

-Really?

-Yeah.

0:23:330:23:34

But you mentioned your band, as well -

0:23:340:23:36

how did it all start for you?

0:23:360:23:37

Because obviously we mentioned at the top,

0:23:370:23:39

you're quite an accomplished athlete, and a dancer -

0:23:390:23:43

how did the singing start?

0:23:430:23:45

Well, I left college when I was about 18, and then I...

0:23:450:23:50

I mean, I'm from Welwyn Garden City, which is quite a small town,

0:23:500:23:52

and I was really interested in doing street dancing,

0:23:520:23:55

but there wasn't really anything in my area,

0:23:550:23:57

so I kind of went up to Bond Street and did a street dancing class

0:23:570:24:00

on a Sunday, just to keep fit and, you know, for enjoyment,

0:24:000:24:03

and I was approached by a lady called Louise Porter,

0:24:030:24:06

who asked me if I sang - and I said,

0:24:060:24:08

"Well, I love to sing,

0:24:080:24:09

"but I've never considered it as a career," because, obviously,

0:24:090:24:11

you know, I'd planned on being a teacher -

0:24:110:24:13

when you're, you know, 18 and you're from a small town,

0:24:130:24:16

you don't know how to get into the music industry.

0:24:160:24:18

-It's like trying to get to Mars.

-Yeah.

0:24:180:24:20

It's a completely different world,

0:24:200:24:22

and she had a production company, started developing songs with me,

0:24:220:24:26

I met Sabrina and Su-Elise at a rehearsal studio down in Fulham,

0:24:260:24:30

and we, you know, we practised and rehearsed and was developing

0:24:300:24:34

as a band for a good four years before we signed our first deal...

0:24:340:24:37

-Yeah.

-..and I suppose it was kind of fate, really,

0:24:370:24:39

that one of our songs was overheard by Tin Tin Out, a song called Why...

0:24:390:24:43

-Yeah.

-..and Inferno Records, at the time, fell in love with it,

0:24:430:24:47

and they signed us, just on hearing the song, and...

0:24:470:24:50

-The rest is history.

-Yeah, the rest is history.

0:24:500:24:52

And, of course, famous for Strictly Come Dancing, now.

0:24:520:24:56

-Yes, we have that in common!

-I know a little bit about that.

0:24:560:24:58

What else have you been doing?

0:24:580:25:01

Well, I've just back from Japan, cos my album,

0:25:010:25:03

that never got released in the UK, is being released there

0:25:030:25:07

on the 20th of Feb, so I've been out there promoting -

0:25:070:25:10

and eating a lot of beef.

0:25:100:25:12

Oh, my God, I think I ate sukiyaki every night.

0:25:120:25:14

-It's good stuff over there.

-It's amazing.

0:25:140:25:17

So, I was in food heaven there, and most of this month, and March,

0:25:170:25:21

I was in the studio recording a new record,

0:25:210:25:24

which I would like to be out by the summer.

0:25:240:25:26

-There you go.

-Yeah.

0:25:260:25:27

And because you've talked over the entire one of my recipes,

0:25:270:25:30

people will have to go onto the internet now

0:25:300:25:32

to find out what the hell I was cooking!

0:25:320:25:34

You was asking me the questions!

0:25:340:25:36

Just recap - I've made a dressing with...

0:25:360:25:38

I've made a dressing with egg yolks, little bit of mustard...

0:25:380:25:41

-Have you washed your hands?

-Yes!

0:25:410:25:43

LAUGHTER

0:25:430:25:45

I'm joking!

0:25:450:25:46

That does look good, though.

0:25:470:25:49

Yeah, that's all right.

0:25:490:25:50

SHE LAUGHS There's...

0:25:500:25:53

-Sorry, you can kick me off the show if you want.

-No, no, it's fine.

0:25:530:25:55

Keep going. Right, we've got some...

0:25:550:25:57

Can I just come here every Saturday?

0:25:570:25:58

Look, we've just made a dressing, all right?

0:25:580:26:00

We've made a dressing...

0:26:000:26:02

-Yeah.

-..with egg yolks...

0:26:030:26:04

-Just eat it. Right.

-OK.

0:26:040:26:06

It's the only time I get a word in edgeways.

0:26:060:26:07

It's the only time I'm quiet!

0:26:070:26:09

Egg yolks, mustard, anchovy, olive oil, salt and pepper -

0:26:090:26:12

and then try that, with a little pink bit of tuna.

0:26:120:26:15

Pink bit of tuna. I do love egg.

0:26:150:26:17

-You like egg?

-Mm!

0:26:170:26:19

Don't put as much salt on it as I did, next time.

0:26:190:26:22

What do you reckon?

0:26:230:26:25

You should be a chef.

0:26:250:26:26

You never tire of hearing Alesha's laugh - it's so infectious.

0:26:310:26:35

Today, we're taking a look back at some of the tastiest recipes

0:26:350:26:38

from the Saturday Kitchen archives -

0:26:380:26:40

and there's still loads of inspiring dishes to come.

0:26:400:26:43

Up next, author and cook Adriana Trigiani.

0:26:430:26:46

Now this was her first appearance on the show -

0:26:460:26:49

but trust me, you'd never know.

0:26:490:26:51

Not only has she written seven bestselling novels,

0:26:510:26:54

but she's about to direct her first film,

0:26:540:26:56

and has just released a brand-new cookery book

0:26:560:26:58

full of classic Italian recipes from her New York childhood.

0:26:580:27:02

She's flown in from America especially for us,

0:27:020:27:05

and it's brilliant to have her on Saturday Kitchen -

0:27:050:27:07

-it's Adriana Trigiani. TRIGGiani?

-Tri-giani.

0:27:070:27:10

-Trigiani. There you go.

-OK, first thing. ..

0:27:100:27:12

-Lovely, what are we cooking?

-OK, first, a little safety -

0:27:120:27:14

I have a four-year-old, move those...

0:27:140:27:17

You know, don't hang your handles over...

0:27:170:27:19

-Don't hang your handles over the stove.

-Yeah.

0:27:190:27:20

-OK, fire away - what are we cooking?

-We're making braciole...

-Yeah.

0:27:200:27:23

..and braciole is basically a pesto infused meat roll

0:27:230:27:27

-that we make in a classic tomato sauce...

-Yeah.

0:27:270:27:30

-..and then we slice it thinly...

-Yeah.

0:27:300:27:32

..and then we're going to make some blood oranges in a Venetian salad

0:27:320:27:35

that my grandmother really served with practically every meal.

0:27:350:27:38

And this is in your book, as well, isn't it?

0:27:380:27:40

This is in my book. First thing, get that meat nice and...

0:27:400:27:43

What kind of meat is this?

0:27:430:27:45

Well, I think this is a sirloin...

0:27:450:27:47

-Yeah.

-..and we've been hitting it all day,

0:27:470:27:50

-so it's in good shape.

-OK!

0:27:500:27:52

-Yeah.

-We just pretend that, you know, it's somebody we don't like.

0:27:520:27:54

-All right, now...

-This is the filling.

0:27:540:27:56

I'd like you to take these...

0:27:560:27:57

-Yeah. This is parsley.

-This is parsley...

-Yeah.

0:27:570:28:00

-..and basil.

-Yeah.

-We say bay-zel, but...

0:28:000:28:02

-You know.

-Basil.

-Basil.

-OK.

0:28:020:28:04

So, go ahead - if you would chop that up really fine for me,

0:28:040:28:07

and put that here.

0:28:070:28:08

-And this is breadcrumb.

-Yep.

0:28:080:28:11

-If you wouldn't mind...

-Fresh breadcrumbs.

-Yeah.

0:28:110:28:13

-Fresh breadcrumb.

-Yeah.

0:28:130:28:14

-And Parmesan cheese.

-Yeah.

0:28:140:28:17

It's beautiful - and that goes in here, too.

0:28:170:28:19

-Lovely.

-You know what? I can help.

0:28:190:28:21

That's all right, I'll keep going. You're all right.

0:28:210:28:23

Really, you're not going so fast. Let me help you.

0:28:230:28:25

You're a little slow.

0:28:250:28:27

-I'm going as quick as I can.

-Well, it's not fast enough, James.

0:28:270:28:30

-All right, OK.

-OK, it's a show. Here we go. OK.

0:28:300:28:33

-You know why Italian girls can cook?

-Why's that?

0:28:330:28:36

Well, they want to keep their men faithful,

0:28:360:28:39

so they really learn how to do this -

0:28:390:28:41

at least we know if we can cook well,

0:28:410:28:42

we can keep them home one night a week, you know?

0:28:420:28:44

-LAUGHTER

-You know?

0:28:440:28:46

-Are you married, James?

-I'm not married, no.

0:28:460:28:48

-You're not?!

-No.

0:28:480:28:50

You're such a catch! Why aren't you married?

0:28:500:28:52

Oh, I just run.

0:28:520:28:53

-You just run?

-Yeah, I run very quickly.

0:28:530:28:56

-Well...

-In the opposite direction.

0:28:560:28:57

-When somebody mentions marriage, I'm off.

-Really?

-Yeah.

0:28:570:29:00

Well, you should change that,

0:29:000:29:01

because it would be nice to see if you...

0:29:010:29:05

-You should read some of our tabloid newspapers!

-Yeah...

0:29:050:29:08

Shh!

0:29:080:29:10

A man that can cook -

0:29:100:29:11

it's the greatest thing in the world.

0:29:110:29:13

-OK, what have you got in there? You've got the cheese.

-Yes, cheese.

0:29:130:29:15

-How many cloves of garlic do you want in there?

-You know what, guys,

0:29:150:29:18

just put olive oil in - I'm kind of liberal with it, cos I love it.

0:29:180:29:21

-Right.

-Then I use my hands.

0:29:210:29:22

OK, go ahead - you're doing great.

0:29:220:29:24

-Thank you very much.

-OK, now it's like you're in a kitchen.

0:29:240:29:26

OK, take off your wedding rings - world's tiniest handcuff -

0:29:260:29:29

-and then just get in here.

-LAUGHTER

0:29:290:29:31

See what I mean?

0:29:310:29:33

-I know!

-See what I mean?

0:29:330:29:34

OK, so, now be very... Folks at home, be very liberal with this.

0:29:350:29:40

I like it really stuffed well,

0:29:400:29:42

and I also love, as an extra, sometimes,

0:29:420:29:45

if you feel like it, pignoli nuts - but we did it sort of simply.

0:29:450:29:48

-Then roll...

-Pignoli nuts?

-Yeah. Then you roll...

0:29:480:29:51

..these bundles, OK?

0:29:530:29:54

You roll them like this, and then you take two strings...

0:29:540:29:57

Oh...

0:29:590:30:00

LAUGHTER

0:30:000:30:02

It's really fine. It doesn't matter. It doesn't matter.

0:30:020:30:06

But if you're doing the breadcrumbs runs like that, I would do this,

0:30:060:30:09

-if you forget, just make it wet.

-They'll be fine like that.

0:30:090:30:14

They're going to be delicious. It smells great.

0:30:140:30:17

-So the new roll them, just like so.

-Look at that.

0:30:170:30:22

Now, is this a very traditional Italian or Italian New York...

0:30:220:30:26

You know what? This is barese.

0:30:260:30:28

There's all different parts of Italy and lately what's gotten hot

0:30:280:30:32

is the area on the Adriatic Puglia and this is, um...

0:30:320:30:36

This is a traditional peasant dish, but you had this on fancy holidays.

0:30:380:30:43

You didn't have this on... See, I'm a messy cook, you're not.

0:30:430:30:45

Look how neat it is here. I feel bad.

0:30:450:30:47

I'm going to have to stay and clean and then repaint the set.

0:30:470:30:50

OK, here we go. You just tie up these bundles.

0:30:500:30:53

-I'll look after that for you.

-OK.

0:30:530:30:55

Now you're going to cook them with the strings on them.

0:30:550:30:57

-What did you just find?

-Nothing.

-My ring?

0:30:570:30:59

That's a sign of my husband's love, so I need that back.

0:30:590:31:04

OK, now, we take this out.

0:31:040:31:07

This is a pork bone that we just had to thicken up the sauce, OK?

0:31:070:31:11

So, the sauce is what we've got here.

0:31:110:31:13

-You've got tomatoes or to-may-toes.

-To-may-toes or tomatoes, yeah.

0:31:130:31:16

Puree. Bit of water. What are the spices that you've got in here?

0:31:160:31:18

OK, they're Italian seasonings.

0:31:180:31:20

I see black pepper, I see oregano and some garlic salt.

0:31:200:31:24

-And, you know, when we wrote the cookbook...

-Yeah.

0:31:240:31:26

..you know I grew up in Big Stone Gap, Virginia.

0:31:260:31:29

We were the only Italians, they called us I-talians,

0:31:290:31:31

so when we were there, you couldn't get the New York Italian seasonings.

0:31:310:31:36

-Just place them gently.

-With your sister?

-Yeah.

0:31:360:31:38

-You wrote the book with her.

-My sisters and my mom.

0:31:380:31:41

-We use sometime the dried herbs.

-And the book's called?

0:31:410:31:45

-Cooking With My Sisters.

-Cooking With My Sisters, there we go.

0:31:450:31:49

All right, look, you have a little thing here,

0:31:490:31:51

this will help me a little bit.

0:31:510:31:52

And just bathe them in there and it cooks through

0:31:520:31:55

and you can do variations, OK, so if you like raisins,

0:31:550:32:00

the Sicilians will put raisins in this, which is delicious.

0:32:000:32:03

I've had it with aubergine like that once.

0:32:030:32:05

OK, you could. We never ate eggplant in our house,

0:32:050:32:09

-which you call aubergine.

-Yeah

0:32:090:32:10

Because it made my father sick, so we never ever had eggplant.

0:32:100:32:14

Cos, you know, my father was the boss of the whole house.

0:32:140:32:17

Obviously if we didn't eat what he didn't want to eat,

0:32:170:32:20

it didn't get eaten.

0:32:200:32:21

Now, over here...they're done, they're gorgeous.

0:32:210:32:25

-We can cut them up.

-Now while you're doing that, I'll prepare our salad.

0:32:250:32:28

-While you're doing that, I'll do that.

-OK.

0:32:280:32:31

-Now blood oranges...

-You understand all this?

-Yeah.

0:32:310:32:33

Cos we were talking earlier. Yeah, it's very simple,

0:32:330:32:36

the blood oranges, now this is a Venetian thing.

0:32:360:32:39

See, my family is from four parts of Italy.

0:32:390:32:42

Now the cuisine is very different in those areas obviously but

0:32:420:32:47

this blood orange kind of salad, my grandmother, who's Venetian,

0:32:470:32:53

would serve with everything and it's very simple but you never...

0:32:530:32:58

I've never seen it in a restaurant, you know,

0:32:580:33:00

we make at home all the time and it's very simple...

0:33:000:33:03

You peel and slice your blood oranges thin and you can use

0:33:030:33:06

a regular orange if you want to, and then you take a little pepper,

0:33:060:33:11

-I see a little grinder there. OK.

-I'll just dress some leaves for you.

0:33:110:33:15

Really give it a nice dose of pepper. That's important.

0:33:150:33:20

And then you take the best olive oil you've got,

0:33:200:33:22

extra virgin is always good, and then you drizzle over the top

0:33:220:33:28

and you serve it at room temperature. That's important too.

0:33:280:33:31

You know, the Italians don't like anything cold.

0:33:310:33:34

You know, don't refrigerate your tomatoes,

0:33:340:33:36

-don't refrigerate your oranges.

-I'll put that out

0:33:360:33:39

for you to slice your lovely delicious cooked beef.

0:33:390:33:41

I'll just dress my salad here. There we go. Bit of that.

0:33:410:33:45

And all you do...

0:33:480:33:49

You see how the bundles have...

0:33:490:33:52

They've cooked through, they're nice and moist,

0:33:520:33:56

they look gorgeous and then we're going to snip that string off.

0:33:560:33:59

I think my great aunt choked on the string once.

0:33:590:34:02

My sister was in charge and really messed it up.

0:34:020:34:06

So how long does take to cook, roughly? About 15 to 20 minutes?

0:34:070:34:11

That's right.

0:34:110:34:12

Something like that. And your sauce, cook it longer.

0:34:120:34:15

We cook our sauce for hours. It could be cooking four hours easily.

0:34:150:34:19

-We're going to snip of our...

-Give it a little snip.

0:34:190:34:21

-..string and two of those.

-Mm-hm.

0:34:210:34:24

And see that cheese and that pesto, it holds it all together.

0:34:240:34:28

-They smell superb, I have to say.

-You know what's so funny?

0:34:280:34:33

When you eat in restaurants,

0:34:330:34:34

you never realise really all that goes into this, right?

0:34:340:34:38

And you do it so well, and you're neat as a pin.

0:34:380:34:41

I can't understand - you're so neat - why you're not married.

0:34:410:34:44

-I mean, you're not the typical sloppy guy.

-Aren't I?

-No.

0:34:450:34:48

No, cos I'm too busy cleaning up after you got, that's what it is.

0:34:480:34:54

There you can see it, you can see that delicious filling there.

0:34:540:34:58

Adriana, that looks fantastic. So remind us what that dish is again?

0:34:580:35:02

OK, that's called braciole and this is the blood orange salad.

0:35:020:35:06

Very simple.

0:35:060:35:07

All the way from New York.

0:35:070:35:09

Lovely, lovely, lovely. APPLAUSE

0:35:140:35:16

A round of applause, that's a first, see? There you go.

0:35:160:35:19

I think they're just happy that I made it through.

0:35:190:35:22

-Have a seat.

-Thank you.

0:35:220:35:23

-I'll give you that.

-Thank you.

0:35:230:35:25

You're getting fed this time, aren't you?

0:35:250:35:27

Bet you can't wait till the end of this.

0:35:270:35:29

Dive in and tell us what do you think.

0:35:290:35:31

-The blood orange, superb. Bang in season now as well.

-Yeah.

0:35:340:35:37

I think with the orange and the tomato, osso buco is often finished

0:35:370:35:42

-with a bit of citrus, so the oranges work well with tomato.

-Yeah.

-Oh!

0:35:420:35:47

Is that scrumptious?

0:35:480:35:50

If you're a vegetarian, you just take that filling and use

0:35:500:35:54

a dense pasta, like the bowties or tagliatelle,

0:35:540:35:58

something thick and you take that and you just make your pasta.

0:35:580:36:02

And there's, like, secrets to making the pasta -

0:36:020:36:05

don't ever rinse it,

0:36:050:36:06

a lot of people do, that ruins it, al dente, don't cook it too long.

0:36:060:36:10

You sort of learn.

0:36:100:36:11

And you put it in the pan and you cover it with cheese first,

0:36:110:36:15

so the cheese adheres and then your olive oil and then put that filling

0:36:150:36:19

on top of it, people will go crazy.

0:36:190:36:21

What can I say?

0:36:260:36:27

What a tasty looking dish and what a lovely velvet jacket, James.

0:36:270:36:30

Love that one.

0:36:300:36:32

Now, I think it's about time we treated ourselves

0:36:320:36:34

to a little Keith Floyd, don't you?

0:36:340:36:36

Here he is.

0:36:360:36:37

I am driving the ultimate "dream machine" - a Corvette Stingray '7.

0:37:020:37:07

Seven litres under the bonnet!

0:37:070:37:09

I've got my pots and pans and my knives because I'm on the BBC maxi-break of a lifetime!

0:37:090:37:14

I'm going to take you to Louisiana, Memphis, New Orleans, Florida,

0:37:140:37:19

California - from shining sea to shining sea!

0:37:190:37:22

To try the food, the music, the blues, the rock and roll,

0:37:220:37:25

the awhopabaloobam of American gastronomy! Let's go for it!

0:37:250:37:29

MUSIC: The Star Spangled Banner

0:37:400:37:44

The Bayou, Louisiana, is the gastronomic heartland of the southern states,

0:38:280:38:33

home of crawfish and file gumbo,

0:38:330:38:35

and lots of other dishes immortalised in rock 'n' roll songs.

0:38:350:38:38

Amongst these stunted trees, destroyed coincidentally

0:38:380:38:41

by Hurricane Floyd, no relation of course,

0:38:410:38:44

you can feel the spirit of General Jackson,

0:38:440:38:46

who beat the living daylights out of the Brits

0:38:460:38:49

at the Battle of New Orleans in 1815.

0:38:490:38:51

That curious machine is a mud-bug harvester!

0:38:580:39:01

Mud-bugs are what the locals call crawfish - an aggressive, lobster-like crustacean

0:39:010:39:06

that lives in the same swamps that produce the wild rice they ultimately meet on a plate.

0:39:060:39:10

This symbol of Louisiana cuisine is farmed in vast quantities

0:39:100:39:14

here in the Mississippi Delta,

0:39:140:39:16

and those not eaten by these winged predators, I'm sorry I don't know

0:39:160:39:19

what they're called, end up in pots with Cajun spices and garlic,

0:39:190:39:22

spreading the gastronomic spirit of Louisiana right across the States.

0:39:220:39:25

As my Cajun chum explained so succinctly...

0:39:250:39:27

HE MUMBLES

0:39:310:39:33

'By the way, he was only scaring those birds, though he eats the occasional one.

0:39:330:39:36

'Anyway, onto cooking sketch number one, with a guy who irritated the hell out of me,

0:39:360:39:40

'but he cooks a great jambalaya, so he can't be all bad!'

0:39:400:39:44

I've got trouble on my hands here, this is Chris, he knows everything

0:39:440:39:47

about Cajun cooking and he's going to teach me to make a jambalaya -

0:39:470:39:49

the classic dish of this Louisiana swamp region.

0:39:490:39:51

Chris, what are all these ingredients here for a start?

0:39:510:39:54

Well, Floyd, before we get started with ingredients,

0:39:540:39:56

I wanna tell you something. One thing about a man making jambalaya

0:39:560:39:59

in South Louisiana - it's an important part of our diet

0:39:590:40:01

and I'm going to tell you something right now before you go too far.

0:40:010:40:03

Told you I was going to have trouble with this guy.

0:40:030:40:05

If you mess up, I got something to handle you! Is that fair enough?

0:40:050:40:09

-That's fair enough!

-If you mess up my jambalaya for the people sitting out here,

0:40:090:40:13

we are gonna settle the odds up.

0:40:130:40:15

That's all I wanted you to know.

0:40:150:40:16

We'll keep that back down in the background.

0:40:160:40:18

Let's talk about the ingredients.

0:40:180:40:20

Let's talk about what I put in this pot.

0:40:200:40:22

-Remember what I dropped in here? You thought it was lard.

-I did.

0:40:220:40:25

-That's alligator fat.

-Alligator fat?

0:40:250:40:27

That's all it was. Not much more than that but really, it was lard.

0:40:270:40:30

Lard has a good flavour. SIZZLING

0:40:300:40:33

-Can you hear that pot sizzling?

-Yeah.

0:40:330:40:35

-It's time to drop that sausage in.

-All of it?

-Yeah.

0:40:350:40:38

I'm gonna give you the spoon from here on out and you can do

0:40:380:40:41

all the work you wanna do. How's that? Huh?

0:40:410:40:44

God! I'll be eating a meal here that somebody else cooked for a change.

0:40:440:40:47

-How long do we cook this for?

-What we're going to do right now,

0:40:470:40:49

we're going to cook this down

0:40:490:40:51

-until we get some of the oils out of the sausage.

-Right.

0:40:510:40:53

That's all we're trying to do right now.

0:40:530:40:55

-This is hot sausage. You like hot sausage?

-I like hot sausage.

-Good, good, good.

0:40:550:40:58

-The flavour of this sausage is gonna carry the pot of this jambalaya.

-Right.

0:40:580:41:02

That's the flavour that's going to carry it.

0:41:020:41:04

Be careful with that. Don't break 'em all up! Just hit 'em lightly.

0:41:040:41:08

Don't disturb them. There you go.

0:41:080:41:10

Let it saute for a few minutes.

0:41:100:41:12

All we're looking for right now is to get some of the oils out.

0:41:120:41:15

By getting the oils out, it lubricates something you don't know nothing about.

0:41:150:41:18

While that's happening there, what's in there, then?

0:41:180:41:20

-You really wanna know?

-I really wanna know what's in there.

0:41:200:41:23

-Mississippi river water.

-Mississippi river water?

0:41:230:41:26

-We get a lot of good chemicals come down our river.

-Yeah.

0:41:260:41:28

This has very good flavour in it. That's all that is.

0:41:280:41:31

Now I'm telling you, look here.

0:41:310:41:32

Let me tell you what I really have in here.

0:41:320:41:34

I've got chicken stock and a little kitchen bouquet.

0:41:340:41:38

Kitchen bouquet, right.

0:41:380:41:40

-I know you're familiar with that.

-Sure. That's a bouquet garni.

-Right.

0:41:400:41:44

They give you a good colour and a great flavour.

0:41:440:41:48

We're gonna add a little trinity in here.

0:41:480:41:50

-You know what trinity is?

-I can see it now.

-What is it?

0:41:500:41:54

-It's green peppers, celery and onions.

-That's all that it is. That's exactly right.

0:41:540:41:58

This is a basic seasoning group we use in South Louisiana,

0:41:580:42:01

whether we're making a jambalaya,

0:42:010:42:04

whether we're making a gumbo or a Creole. This is the basic seasoning group that we use.

0:42:040:42:08

We're gonna add this to the pot.

0:42:080:42:10

I'll tell you what else you can add to this dish right now.

0:42:100:42:13

-You can put a little bit of chicken in.

-Already?

-Yeah, go ahead.

0:42:130:42:17

Drop it in. Heat it up real good.

0:42:170:42:19

-Does that look like chicken to you?

-Well, I don't trust you any more...

0:42:190:42:22

What do you mean, you don't trust me? Would I lie to you?!

0:42:220:42:26

-You flew in from England!

-I think you might!

0:42:260:42:28

-I think you might!

-This is what we had the back part of.

0:42:280:42:33

That was a little bit we had left in the freezer.

0:42:330:42:35

-That's a big chicken!

-That's a big chicken, huh?

0:42:350:42:38

How do you like the looks of this baby? You think you can open him up?

0:42:380:42:41

-I wouldn't think so.

-Go right ahead.

-Oh, my Lord!

0:42:410:42:43

-Floyd, I would not put alligator meat in this pot. You know why?

-Why?

0:42:450:42:49

-Alligator is 6.95 a pound!

-Right.

-Pretty expensive.

0:42:490:42:54

-We're using raccoon today.

-Raccoon!

-Don't you prefer raccoon?

-Oh, dear!

0:42:540:43:01

-Rocky Raccoon!

-Rocky Raccoon!

0:43:010:43:04

-How's that looking?

-That's looking very good.

0:43:040:43:06

-Fa-a-antastic! How about dropping a little garlic in there?

-Garlic...

0:43:060:43:11

This guy's learning how to cook. He's finally learning real food.

0:43:110:43:15

Real, real food, that's what he's learning now.

0:43:150:43:18

Hey, this stock's boiling up away here now.

0:43:180:43:22

-You see how the chicken base has come to the surface?

-Sure.

0:43:220:43:25

-Now it's time to pour it in the pot.

-This pot?

-The handles aren't hot.

0:43:250:43:29

And now in we go with the stock.

0:43:290:43:32

-Do you know a Cajun philosophy for making a jambalaya?

-No.

0:43:320:43:36

You have no idea.

0:43:360:43:38

If it walks, crawls, swims or flies

0:43:380:43:40

and you can catch it, you can put it in that pot! How's that, huh?

0:43:400:43:45

What about the rice? When does that go into the whole thing?

0:43:450:43:48

We've to bring this to a boil,

0:43:480:43:50

-but we need to add a little salt and there.

-Salt? Which is where?

0:43:500:43:52

-Put about two teaspoons of salt in there.

-Is that this salt?

-No.

0:43:520:43:55

-Leave that alone. Don't even touch that.

-This is called Joe's stuff.

0:43:550:43:59

-No, that's salt.

-That's salt.

-I just used Joe's bottle.

0:43:590:44:02

That's pretty close. I'd put a little bit more in there.

0:44:020:44:05

-A little bit more.

-You're cooking five cups of rice.

0:44:050:44:07

-Right, OK, it needs a bit more then.

-That's what I'm getting at.

0:44:070:44:10

We'll stir this in.

0:44:100:44:12

-Now, get back to the alligators.

-I'd love to get back to them.

0:44:120:44:17

They eat anything that gets in their way.

0:44:170:44:19

Female alligators that have baby alligators,

0:44:190:44:22

that's probably the meanest creature you ever run across in your life.

0:44:220:44:26

-Worse than the mother-in-law, in fact.

-Well, I don't know,

0:44:260:44:28

my mother-in-law... The first job I ever had was taming alligators.

0:44:280:44:32

You ever tried to tame an alligator?

0:44:320:44:34

I used to have to stand there and run my hands through the mouth

0:44:340:44:38

once I got it open.

0:44:380:44:39

You know who got me that job? My mother-in-law.

0:44:390:44:42

I quit that real quick. I realised what was going on.

0:44:420:44:45

Shall I put the rice in?

0:44:450:44:47

Yeah, that's boiling. What we're going to do now,

0:44:470:44:49

we're going to put the lid on, lower the fire, now lower it real low.

0:44:490:44:52

I am not looking to bring it back to a boil.

0:44:520:44:55

How are we coming here?

0:44:550:44:57

-Let's see what we've got here, Floyd.

-Very low. How about there?

0:44:570:45:00

Oh, there you go.

0:45:000:45:03

All I want is a simmer. That is perfect. I'll tell you what.

0:45:030:45:06

-Have you cooked before?

-No.

0:45:060:45:08

Well, why do they call you Floyd On Fish?

0:45:080:45:12

I'm just curious. That's all.

0:45:120:45:15

What we've to do now, Floyd, we have to time that for ten minutes.

0:45:150:45:18

-Can you tell the time?

-Like nine cans of that and that's ready.

0:45:180:45:22

No, no, one can. This is a quarter can. I need a whole can of Dixie.

0:45:220:45:26

How much do you have left in yours?

0:45:260:45:28

Oh, yeah, we can time it by that.

0:45:280:45:30

By the time you finish that and I finish this,

0:45:300:45:32

ten minutes will be up, then we're going to turn our jambalaya off.

0:45:320:45:35

At that point right there,

0:45:350:45:36

we have to let this thing sit for about 20 minutes.

0:45:360:45:39

-This rice will cook itself, right in the pot and that's what's nice about it.

-OK.

0:45:390:45:43

They call New Orleans "the Big Easy".

0:45:510:45:54

It's a city that likes to sleep late and party hard.

0:45:540:45:56

Once extremely prosperous,

0:45:560:45:58

the failing oil and shipping industries have left their scars

0:45:580:46:01

on this most European of American cities.

0:46:010:46:03

It reminds me of a cross between Avignon, Seville and Liverpool.

0:46:030:46:07

The streets rattle to streetcars

0:46:070:46:10

and rock with the jazz that fills the food-scented air in this humid city.

0:46:100:46:14

These flags flying for Mardi Gras, Fat Tuesday as you know,

0:46:160:46:20

owe their colours to a British Victorian touring theatre group playing Lear,

0:46:200:46:24

dear, dear Lear, at the local theatre.

0:46:240:46:26

And the organisers of the first carnival borrowed their costumes

0:46:260:46:30

for the carnival king and queen,

0:46:300:46:32

so it's all down to Shakespeare really.

0:46:320:46:35

Laissez les bons temps rouler.

0:46:370:46:39

"Let the good times roll" is the motto of this naughty place,

0:46:390:46:41

the home of Tennessee Williams, A Streetcar Named Desire,

0:46:410:46:45

Cat On A Hot Tin Roof, etc, etc. I could go on,

0:46:450:46:47

but I'm more into Faulkner, another great Southern writer.

0:46:470:46:51

New Orleans is a superstitious city - palm readers, witches,

0:46:520:46:55

diviners and clairvoyants of all kinds hang out on the streets

0:46:550:46:59

and in dubious little studios, but with its Indian, French,

0:46:590:47:02

Spanish and slaving heritage, it's not surprising.

0:47:020:47:04

# I love you, baby, and I want you to be my girl. #

0:47:040:47:09

Along with fortune-telling and music,

0:47:090:47:11

your Big Easy native is never happier than when eating beignets,

0:47:110:47:14

a French style doughnut in the Cafe du Monde,

0:47:140:47:17

the hangout of musicians, artists,

0:47:170:47:19

tourists and potpourri of New Orleans' demi-monde.

0:47:190:47:23

Ah, I hope you like these little jewels of commentary,

0:47:270:47:30

they're quite important really.

0:47:300:47:32

Anyway, the central grocery store at the turn of the century

0:47:320:47:35

or thereabouts created the famous muffuletta sandwich,

0:47:350:47:37

presumably by Senor Muffuletta.

0:47:370:47:39

They are slices of salami,

0:47:390:47:41

ham and Swiss cheese smothered in olive oil and pickle.

0:47:410:47:43

Do you really like them?

0:47:430:47:45

# Yes, I do

0:47:450:47:46

# Yes, I do

0:47:460:47:48

# Yes, I do

0:47:480:47:52

# And I want you to be my gi-i-irl. #

0:47:520:47:58

I'm not keen on being a tourist and wild horses wouldn't drag me

0:48:070:48:10

on to anything called a Creole Queen.

0:48:100:48:13

I should tell you all about the Mississippi but this isn't

0:48:130:48:15

a look at life and all I know about is that it's very long,

0:48:150:48:18

very wide and the Americans like it very much and if it wasn't here,

0:48:180:48:22

there wouldn't be jazz in the world.

0:48:220:48:24

In the French Quarter,

0:48:260:48:28

you can't move two paces without being tempted to eat something,

0:48:280:48:30

the Creole and Cajun dishes of this place make it the mecca

0:48:300:48:33

of American cuisine.

0:48:330:48:35

Louisiana is rich in produce of all kinds,

0:48:350:48:37

a bit like Provence really

0:48:370:48:39

and its spicy, tasty, uncomplicated dishes

0:48:390:48:41

are a menu-weary gastronaut's dream.

0:48:410:48:44

Now, take, for instance, the oyster po' boy prepared by my chum,

0:48:470:48:50

Lia Chase. "A po' boy?", I hear you cry.

0:48:500:48:53

People say, "That's for a po' boy," because

0:48:530:48:56

he doesn't have very much money and he has to buy

0:48:560:48:59

something that is a lot of food and cheap and can go far

0:48:590:49:03

and the po' boy was a kind of cheap sandwich, you know.

0:49:030:49:06

That is good.

0:49:120:49:13

Then you want to put just a little pickle on there,

0:49:130:49:16

give it a little dash here.

0:49:160:49:19

Nobody comes to New Orleans without getting an oyster po' boy.

0:49:190:49:22

They'll come here to get it when they hear.

0:49:220:49:24

Sometimes I've had people right off the plane, right here,

0:49:240:49:26

"Give me my oyster po' boy,"

0:49:260:49:28

and when they're going back, taking the oyster po' boy with them.

0:49:280:49:31

When my daughter was pregnant, she's in Los Angeles,

0:49:310:49:34

"Send me an oyster po' boy."

0:49:340:49:35

It's what we call an oyster loaf, you know.

0:49:350:49:37

We put the whole bread, ship it to her, an oyster loaf,

0:49:370:49:40

and people never go home without them

0:49:400:49:42

and they're really typical New Orleans.

0:49:420:49:44

You haven't come to New Orleans unless you eat an oyster po' boy.

0:49:440:49:46

SIREN WAILS

0:49:480:49:50

Because the BBC couldn't afford a taxi,

0:49:500:49:53

I flagged down this passing police car and later hitched

0:49:530:49:55

a ride on this fire engine to visit one of New Orleans' most famous

0:49:550:49:58

restaurants, K-Paul's Kitchen, run by my new chum, Paul Prudhomme,

0:49:580:50:02

who believes passionately that cooking is not only good for

0:50:020:50:04

the soul but for the sanity of America.

0:50:040:50:08

Many of our psychiatrists in this country recommend that a family that is under stress,

0:50:080:50:14

where both members are working,

0:50:140:50:15

that have tremendous stress during the week,

0:50:150:50:18

should cook together on weekends because it's relaxing and enriching.

0:50:180:50:22

You can make your life better.

0:50:220:50:23

There's nothing in the world that you do more than eating.

0:50:230:50:27

You don't change your clothes or brush your teeth more often.

0:50:270:50:31

You eat more than you do anything else.

0:50:310:50:34

I think America is finding its... its eating sphere

0:50:340:50:37

and its eating enjoyment and its eating love.

0:50:370:50:39

We're at the head of it in Louisiana because we've been living that way

0:50:390:50:44

for the last hundred years,

0:50:440:50:46

so we have this huge amount of different dishes to offer America and the whole world.

0:50:460:50:52

Cajun and Creole is where it's at!

0:50:520:50:56

This is the time in the programme where I have to convince my hosts,

0:50:560:50:59

in this case Paul, that I know about cooking myself.

0:50:590:51:01

He told me to make him some smothered, Cajun-style okra.

0:51:010:51:07

So I have. I've prepared a sunshine tray of Louisiana food.

0:51:070:51:12

Starting from your left, Clive, we have onions, mixed bell peppers,

0:51:120:51:17

chopped okra, or lady's fingers, as we call them in England,

0:51:170:51:22

skinned, de-pipped and chopped tomatoes, chicken stock,

0:51:220:51:27

Louisiana sausage and butter.

0:51:270:51:30

Swing over to the left of the pan and you can see the first stage

0:51:300:51:34

of my dish going along here - onions, peppers and okra going ahead there in butter.

0:51:340:51:38

Into that we put some more of this magic Cajun mixture -

0:51:380:51:43

the pink wonder, as it's come to be known amongst our crew here.

0:51:430:51:48

Stir that round a little bit, so the dish absorbs the flavours.

0:51:480:51:52

I'd still like to put more butter in that.

0:51:520:51:56

Paul is watching me with an eagle, eagle eye!

0:51:560:52:00

With great interest!

0:52:000:52:02

So, into that, some tomato.

0:52:020:52:06

What we're going to try to do, we've got that lot starting to cook

0:52:080:52:13

and we're going to kind of relay it all again on top,

0:52:130:52:17

so that the food's going to cook in different textures and flavours,

0:52:170:52:22

hopefully. More onions in, more peppers in,

0:52:220:52:25

and now some more okra in. OK.

0:52:250:52:27

Some more of the Cajun magic onto that.

0:52:270:52:33

That's probably a bit too much, but it doesn't really matter.

0:52:330:52:36

Stir round. I'll have to employ some magical television stuff here,

0:52:360:52:41

because if I cook this on camera it will last for about 35 minutes.

0:52:410:52:45

Right now, can I have a quick word with my viewers?

0:52:450:52:49

OK. Lots and lots of minutes have gone by.

0:52:490:52:52

Right, back to the pot again.

0:52:520:52:54

Bit of sausage. This is a spicy sausage. We pop that in.

0:52:540:53:00

Then we're going to add a bit of this wonderful chicken stock.

0:53:000:53:06

How heartening. Back to me again, Clive, if you would. I was amazed at the sophistication of the cooking

0:53:060:53:12

when I came to America.

0:53:120:53:14

I didn't expect to find reduced chicken stock.

0:53:140:53:16

It's really good news, it's wonderful!

0:53:160:53:18

Back into there.

0:53:180:53:19

OK, that has been bubbling for not really long enough

0:53:240:53:28

but I want to add some more tomato,

0:53:280:53:30

because this is okra smothered in tomato.

0:53:300:53:32

Put that in. Plenty of tomato in this.

0:53:320:53:37

Right, now you just stay with that, Clive.

0:53:370:53:39

Just keep looking at that for the next 35 minutes. OK?

0:53:390:53:44

The proof of the pudding is in the eating.

0:53:480:53:51

Mine is the one with the wooden spoon in it,

0:53:510:53:55

and Paul's more mature, more reduced looking one, has the metal spoon.

0:53:550:53:58

All you have to do to see where I've gone wrong, where I've gone right,

0:53:580:54:01

is to taste it, I suppose.

0:54:010:54:03

-Can I try yours?

-Yes, and I'll try yours.

-OK.

0:54:030:54:05

You really did a wonderful job!

0:54:090:54:12

Matter of fact, since we're identifying them

0:54:120:54:15

by the spoons, we'll switch spoons there!

0:54:150:54:18

The taste comparison is very, very close.

0:54:180:54:23

There's a little more depth in the one

0:54:230:54:26

that's cooked a long time, but this is good.

0:54:260:54:30

Really, you've done a super job.

0:54:300:54:32

Love that man.

0:54:360:54:38

Simply fantastic.

0:54:380:54:40

As ever on Best Bites, we're looking back at some of our favourite

0:54:400:54:44

recipes from the Saturday Kitchen archives.

0:54:440:54:46

Still to come on today's show...

0:54:460:54:48

The fantastic Theo Randall takes on the formidable Silvena Rowe

0:54:480:54:51

in the omelette challenge,

0:54:510:54:52

and with Theo only two seconds ahead of Silvena on the board,

0:54:520:54:56

it promises to be a close one.

0:54:560:54:58

Adam Williams is here to deliver an American favourite.

0:54:580:55:01

He serves up Southern fried chicken in marinated buttermilk

0:55:010:55:05

with sourdough croutons and creamy ranch dressing

0:55:050:55:08

and Sue Perkins faces her food heaven or her food hell.

0:55:080:55:10

Did she get food heaven, hazelnut chocolate gateaux?

0:55:100:55:13

Or did she end up facing her food hell,

0:55:130:55:15

goat's cheese on brioche with redcurrant dressing?

0:55:150:55:18

You can find out what she's got at the end of the show.

0:55:180:55:21

Now time for Francesco Mazzei,

0:55:210:55:23

who's loving the liquorice with his tasty take on wild boar.

0:55:230:55:27

-We've got boar on the menu.

-Very, very nice.

0:55:290:55:32

We marinate it fast.

0:55:320:55:35

We're going to marinate this first with these ingredients here.

0:55:350:55:39

We've got liquorice, smoked paprika, bergamot orange

0:55:390:55:41

and we're going to save these beautiful turnip tops.

0:55:410:55:44

In essence it's really simple, classic Italian food,

0:55:440:55:46

but just the marinade is the key.

0:55:460:55:48

The marinade is the key. If you chop all the ingredients

0:55:480:55:50

I can do the turnip tops in the meantime.

0:55:500:55:52

If people can't get boar, wild boar is often a lot darker than this,

0:55:520:55:56

but people if can't get it, you're looking at a good piece of pork?

0:55:560:56:00

Good piece of pork will do but it also works pretty well with game,

0:56:000:56:05

venison or something like that.

0:56:050:56:08

It would work very well with this beautiful marinade

0:56:080:56:12

you are doing now.

0:56:120:56:14

-Now last time we saw you you had opened the cafe.

-We opened the cafe.

0:56:140:56:17

Still going from strength to strength?

0:56:170:56:19

The cafe is getting stronger and stronger. Just at the back of L'Anima in Worship Street, EC2A.

0:56:190:56:23

-Can I say more?

-Yeah!

-It's doing very well.

0:56:230:56:26

It's a bit different than L'Anima.

0:56:260:56:29

We are doing a bit more informal.

0:56:290:56:31

Lovely pizza, great pasta, fantastic rabbit stew

0:56:310:56:35

and we've also got a deli next to it, which sells food, fantastic Italian ingredients.

0:56:350:56:41

You mentioned rabbit stew because they're classics.

0:56:410:56:44

Boar itself is used for a lot of classic dishes in Italy.

0:56:440:56:47

Of course, especially if you go to Tuscany with the beautiful pappardelle cinghiale.

0:56:470:56:52

One of the classics. Basically you cook the meat slowly, slowly.

0:56:520:56:58

A big chunk of meat and then you just flake it and toss it in pasta.

0:56:580:57:02

What would you use for that? Shoulder or something like that?

0:57:020:57:04

Definitely shoulder.

0:57:040:57:07

OK, so we've got all this, beautiful turnip tops which we call cime di rapa in Italy.

0:57:070:57:12

-Cime di rapa?

-Cime di rapa.

0:57:120:57:15

Then I've got some lovely liquorice here,

0:57:150:57:17

and some stock, and, to make James happy, some lovely butter.

0:57:170:57:21

That's going to go in at the end! You've got quite strong herbs.

0:57:210:57:24

We've got sage and rosemary, that kind of stuff.

0:57:240:57:26

Yeah, as I said, it's a lovely, bold piece of meat.

0:57:260:57:29

You can give them lots of flavour and lots of strength.

0:57:290:57:32

Some pepper as well.

0:57:320:57:33

Pepper going in there as well.

0:57:330:57:35

And then lots of olive oil which I'm going to get for you.

0:57:350:57:38

Now liquorice, the combination of that,

0:57:380:57:41

you mentioned it with game and I've seen it done with duck and a little bit with fish,

0:57:410:57:45

but it is actually quite strong so you've got to be careful with it.

0:57:450:57:47

It's very strong and it's very sweet so you have to be very careful.

0:57:470:57:50

Usually you have to play with a bit of acidity.

0:57:500:57:53

That's why bergamot, the orange juice into it.

0:57:530:57:55

So gives this a great balance.

0:57:550:57:58

Is this particularly southern Italian?

0:57:580:58:00

It is southern Italian with my twist. It's very good.

0:58:000:58:05

And of course, where I come from, Calabria,

0:58:050:58:07

there is this big factory which makes the best liquorice in the world.

0:58:070:58:10

Soulful.

0:58:100:58:12

We'll get that on.

0:58:120:58:13

What I'm going to get you to do is get this one sealing.

0:58:130:58:18

-I'll do that for you.

-You've got this one.

0:58:180:58:20

So I've made the marinade here.

0:58:200:58:21

This one has been here for 12 hours.

0:58:210:58:23

-What cut is this?

-It's a loin. A beautiful loin.

0:58:230:58:25

You can use fillet as well if you want but it's a beautiful loin.

0:58:250:58:30

How long would you marinate it for?

0:58:300:58:33

12 hours. Overnight.

0:58:330:58:36

You can't re-use that marinade?

0:58:360:58:38

You can if you want but I will say use the marinade once

0:58:380:58:42

and chuck it away.

0:58:420:58:44

That keeps a lovely green colour

0:58:440:58:47

and of course we've got salt here

0:58:470:58:49

which is very important to keep the green.

0:58:490:58:52

You've trimmed these turnip tops, trimmed the base of them.

0:58:520:58:55

So it cooks quicker. It gets nice and tender.

0:58:550:58:58

And of course you get rid of the hard skin

0:58:580:59:01

which are on the side of it.

0:59:010:59:02

-I'm going to move that out of the way.

-Thank you very much.

0:59:020:59:07

I know you want to get these turnip tops cooking as well.

0:59:070:59:10

-I'll move this pan over here.

-Thank you very much for that.

0:59:100:59:14

-Great stuff. You've used this before on the show.

-I've used it before.

0:59:150:59:18

You've got a bit of crushed garlic,

0:59:180:59:21

-you want to get that started in some olive oil, yeah?

-Yeah.

0:59:210:59:24

OK. So this is to sear the turnip tops.

0:59:240:59:28

Flour the oil with a bit of garlic

0:59:290:59:32

until it gets nice and golden and then we add the turnip tops,

0:59:320:59:35

we pan-fry them.

0:59:350:59:37

Look at that, beautiful boar here.

0:59:370:59:39

A busy week for you as well at the moment,

0:59:390:59:42

next week particularly doing this big charity dinner.

0:59:420:59:45

-I did it already.

-You did it already!

0:59:450:59:48

It's going to be on Monday, it's fantastic.

0:59:480:59:51

It's a fund for leukaemia, it's 20 top chefs, including me,

0:59:510:59:54

if you believe that. I know you don't believe that.

0:59:540:59:57

This is Monday?

0:59:570:59:59

Monday night.

0:59:591:00:01

It's going to be a great night for us and it's great to be part of it.

1:00:011:00:05

All the chefs are busy Monday night in the UK cos I've got

1:00:051:00:08

a charity dinner with Michael Caines and Pierre Koffmann on Monday as well.

1:00:081:00:13

-So who's cooking then?

-Don't know on Monday night!

1:00:131:00:16

It goes in the oven for about seven minutes

1:00:161:00:19

and then of course we let it rest.

1:00:191:00:21

-If you can do this for me.

-Straight in the oven, in the pan.

1:00:211:00:25

So the oven's set about 400 Fahrenheit,

1:00:251:00:29

about 200 degrees centigrade, gas five, six degrees.

1:00:291:00:32

Something like that.

1:00:321:00:34

I'm going to get this off now. Out of the water, keeps a lovely green colour.

1:00:341:00:39

If that wasn't enough, you've got a cookery book lined up.

1:00:391:00:42

It's going to be out in September, please watch out for that.

1:00:421:00:45

It is South Italian cooking called Mezzogiorno,

1:00:451:00:48

so I'm not allowed to say any more about that.

1:00:481:00:50

-That's all!

-It's going to be great because it talks about

1:00:501:00:56

mamma cooking with chef hands

1:00:561:00:58

but it really talks about South Italy, so it talks a lot

1:00:581:01:00

about liquorice, about bergamot, about spicy 'nduja

1:01:001:01:03

as you have had on the show as well.

1:01:031:01:06

September it's out and I'm looking forward to it.

1:01:061:01:11

Right, now, we've taken the juices from the boar here

1:01:111:01:15

and then this is where we're going to make a sauce,

1:01:151:01:18

but explain to us what we've got going on here.

1:01:181:01:20

We've taken the garlic out and then we're going to pan-fry it

1:01:201:01:23

until it's nice and brownish.

1:01:231:01:25

That was the garlic that's gone in.

1:01:251:01:27

That's it.

1:01:271:01:28

In the meantime we put in some liquorice liquor here.

1:01:281:01:32

Liquorice liquor.

1:01:321:01:34

-And a little bit of liquorice powder.

-OK.

1:01:341:01:38

A lot of people will be able to get the liquorice sticks

1:01:381:01:41

so how could they incorporate this?

1:01:411:01:44

The liquorice stick you can probably put in the marinade

1:01:441:01:47

but for the sauce you need that.

1:01:471:01:48

You can use liquorice paste, which is quite difficult to find here,

1:01:481:01:51

but you can find it in Italy.

1:01:511:01:54

I show you...

1:01:541:01:56

-That was smoked paprika you put in there.

-Smoked paprika.

1:01:561:01:59

What was the other spice you popped in there?

1:01:591:02:01

Black aniseeds. It goes beautiful with liquorice.

1:02:011:02:04

Then chicken stock. Let it reduce a bit.

1:02:041:02:09

Turnip tops here.

1:02:091:02:12

Very nice.

1:02:121:02:13

-The idea is just getting some colour on this.

-It's what you want.

1:02:131:02:17

-A bit of smoke, a bit of flavour.

-Flames!

1:02:171:02:19

-Homage.

-More flames!

1:02:191:02:21

We are going to make this dish very wild for you!

1:02:211:02:24

Very wild!

1:02:241:02:26

Turnip tops on the side now.

1:02:261:02:30

I'll get the sauce ready. You want a little bit of butter in here.

1:02:301:02:33

A little bit of butter, not too much butter.

1:02:331:02:35

-One?

-That's fine.

-Two.

1:02:351:02:38

-I knew that.

-I'll just put one in.

1:02:381:02:41

-We're reducing this down to thicken it.

-Yes, please.

1:02:411:02:45

And look, nice and rested. Cooked all the way through. Perfect.

1:02:451:02:48

This is how you want your boar.

1:02:481:02:51

-How long have you cooked that for then?

-About seven minutes, 195.

1:02:511:02:56

A little bit of orange juice going in the sauce.

1:02:561:02:59

To give it acidity a bit.

1:02:591:03:00

You can pass through the strainer.

1:03:001:03:04

That's going to go in there.

1:03:041:03:05

-Then we've got...

-Ready when you are.

-Beautiful turnip tops.

1:03:051:03:11

Cime di rapa, as we say in Italy. Fantastic vegetables.

1:03:111:03:15

I tell you what's really good as well, cavolo nero as well with this.

1:03:151:03:18

Cavolo nero is fantastic, very Tuscan.

1:03:181:03:21

This is South Italian, but, yes, will go very well with it.

1:03:211:03:24

-That looks wild.

-Beautiful.

1:03:241:03:28

Savage!

1:03:281:03:31

-Ready when you are.

-I'm going to put this beautiful pork right on top.

-Bring it over here!

1:03:311:03:34

Oh, my God, look at that.

1:03:341:03:37

Fantastic.

1:03:371:03:39

Little bit of salt, pepper.

1:03:391:03:41

-Thank you, chef.

-There you go, there's your spoon.

-Fantastic.

1:03:411:03:45

Give you another spoon because your mother will be phoning up.

1:03:491:03:53

I don't even wash my hands yet!

1:03:531:03:56

What you've got here is just on top of the boar,

1:03:561:04:00

on top of the turnip tops

1:04:001:04:01

because they're quite bitter.

1:04:011:04:03

This is the essence of Italian food, simplicity.

1:04:031:04:06

Simplicity and ingredients on a plate.

1:04:061:04:08

Ladies and gentlemen, marinade boar with bergamot and liquorice with turnip tops.

1:04:081:04:12

-Smells delicious.

-Grazie.

1:04:121:04:15

Smells delicious and now it's going to taste delicious as well.

1:04:191:04:24

The food just keeps coming, you see!

1:04:241:04:27

I get the feeling you're quite liking this show!

1:04:271:04:29

He's taking a picture, that's a first.

1:04:291:04:32

What I'm most interested in, these are turnip tops.

1:04:321:04:35

Mixed with the liquorice thing,

1:04:351:04:37

I want to see what's happening with that.

1:04:371:04:39

The sweetness mixed with the bitterness of the turnip tops

1:04:411:04:44

is ridiculous...ly wonderful.

1:04:441:04:47

Mm! Wow!

1:04:471:04:49

-Is it wild enough?

-That's wild!

1:04:491:04:52

Looks like full marks from Gregory, there.

1:04:571:04:59

Good idea, Francesco.

1:04:591:05:00

Now it's omelette challenge time and squaring up at the hobs,

1:05:001:05:03

we have Theo Randall taking on the ever-excitable Silvena Rowe.

1:05:031:05:07

And with both of them looking to better their times,

1:05:071:05:10

this will be quick.

1:05:101:05:12

All the chefs that come on battle it out against the clock,

1:05:121:05:15

and each other, to test how fast they can make a three-egg omelette.

1:05:151:05:17

It's started already. Silvena, you have a pretty good time.

1:05:171:05:20

-35 seconds.

-Yeah.

-Pretty respectable.

1:05:201:05:22

Can you beat Allegra with that, our fastest woman on the board?

1:05:221:05:26

In style, any day, darling!

1:05:261:05:27

-25 seconds.

-Double whammy.

1:05:271:05:29

I did say to ring. I meant just the omelettes!

1:05:291:05:31

You know what they say about caviar.

1:05:311:05:33

-Caviar is good, but what is better? More caviar.

-Well, there you go.

1:05:331:05:35

Theo, pretty respectable, 33 seconds.

1:05:351:05:37

I think we're in for a quick time today.

1:05:371:05:39

-Think so?

-Usual rules apply.

1:05:391:05:40

Remember, too, Weakest Link. That's all I have to say to you.

1:05:401:05:43

-Usual rules apply.

-Whatever you want.

1:05:431:05:45

-Good luck.

-Usual rules apply.

1:05:451:05:46

Three-egg omelette, I'll taste them to make sure they're omelettes, not scrambled egg.

1:05:461:05:50

Time starts when I say, stops when the omelette hits the plate. Ready?

1:05:501:05:53

Got my fork here, handy. Three, two, one, go.

1:05:531:05:55

Oh, God.

1:05:551:05:57

Oh, he's doing it slightly different.

1:05:591:06:02

-He's copying me.

-LAUGHTER

1:06:021:06:04

-Copying me.

-Will it work?

1:06:041:06:05

Cos most of the people who do this, the omelette sticks to the pan.

1:06:051:06:09

Now, this could work, or it could...

1:06:091:06:12

It's happening, it's happening.

1:06:151:06:16

We've got kind of like a cross between scrambled eggs and...

1:06:161:06:19

-It's...

-That's...

1:06:191:06:21

Oh! Hello!

1:06:211:06:23

That's it!

1:06:231:06:25

Silvena...?

1:06:251:06:27

Oh, there we go.

1:06:291:06:31

-This is not finished quite yet.

-It's supposed to be on the plate.

1:06:311:06:34

-Oh!

-LAUGHTER

1:06:341:06:36

-That's why!

-You see? That's a big...

1:06:361:06:38

-Double whammy.

-How much is that?

1:06:381:06:40

This is the best beluga, darling.

1:06:401:06:42

Is that a ten-second reduction?

1:06:421:06:45

That's about 1,000 quid in there.

1:06:451:06:47

Right, let me have a taste of this one.

1:06:471:06:49

Well, we call it omelette,

1:06:491:06:51

or we call it very, very mellow, soft...

1:06:511:06:52

I wouldn't call it a seasoned omelette.

1:06:521:06:54

HE CLEARS HIS THROAT

1:06:541:06:56

Tell me how seasoned my one is now.

1:06:561:06:58

And I will feed you if you want some of the best...

1:06:581:07:00

Let's have a little of that.

1:07:001:07:02

-No, I don't need feeding.

-Food of the gods.

1:07:021:07:04

It's probably the best omelette I've had...this morning.

1:07:051:07:08

LAUGHTER

1:07:081:07:10

That's good enough for me!

1:07:101:07:12

Right. So, Silvena... Are you on the leaderboard?

1:07:121:07:15

-No, I've not done it, yet.

-Oh! That would be interesting.

1:07:151:07:18

-Well done, well done!

-Well, James...

1:07:181:07:21

-Think you've done it quicker?

-..I tried my best, but you know,

1:07:211:07:23

-like those male chefs.

-Do you think you did it quicker?

1:07:231:07:26

No, but I used more... I used double whammy caviar.

1:07:261:07:29

-You did it...

-Come on, come on...

1:07:291:07:32

-35 seconds was this one.

-Yeah.

1:07:321:07:34

-You did it in 34 seconds.

-Oh, good.

1:07:341:07:36

One second, not bad, not bad.

1:07:361:07:37

-One second.

-Not bad.

1:07:371:07:39

So about the same position. Theo...

1:07:391:07:41

Well, it's got to be better, hasn't it?

1:07:411:07:43

Yeah, but is the omelette better, is the question.

1:07:431:07:46

You think you beat your time?

1:07:461:07:47

Where is he? So many people on here, I've lost him...

1:07:471:07:50

There he is. 33 seconds.

1:07:501:07:52

Pretty quick.

1:07:521:07:53

But he's been practising. Six seconds quicker.

1:07:531:07:56

-27 seconds.

-Hey!

1:07:561:07:58

Up there with Mr Michael Caines. Pretty respectable.

1:07:581:08:00

-APPLAUSE

-Thank you.

1:08:001:08:02

Next time you go to his restaurant, just don't buy that.

1:08:041:08:06

Don't order the omelette!

1:08:061:08:08

Respectable times from both of them, there, and for once,

1:08:121:08:15

both omelettes looked...edible.

1:08:151:08:17

Well, slightly edible, anyway.

1:08:171:08:19

Now time for Alyn Williams, who is here to deliver

1:08:191:08:22

some American-style fast food with a twist.

1:08:221:08:25

Up next is the brilliant and Michelin-starred Alyn Williams.

1:08:251:08:28

Alyn, what are you making for us today?

1:08:281:08:30

-So, we've got chicken.

-OK.

1:08:301:08:32

Chicken thighs.

1:08:321:08:33

-We are going to marinate these in buttermilk.

-OK.

1:08:331:08:37

Typically, I would do this overnight,

1:08:371:08:39

so I've got some that I've already marinated.

1:08:391:08:42

Do you want me to get on with the...?

1:08:421:08:44

-Yeah, you can cut the baby gem in half.

-OK.

1:08:441:08:47

Cut the radishes in half,

1:08:471:08:48

and then we've got some sourdough bread, there,

1:08:481:08:51

that we're making some nice croutons with,

1:08:511:08:53

sourdough croutons that you can just break up, there, as well.

1:08:531:08:56

So, where did this come from? I mean, it's a very American dish.

1:08:561:08:58

It is. I lived in America for a while.

1:08:581:09:02

I did several ski seasons, and I lived in Colorado,

1:09:021:09:06

and I really got into, certainly, things like...

1:09:061:09:09

Really tasty American food, things like the fried chicken.

1:09:091:09:12

The dressing that we are making today is a ranch dressing,

1:09:121:09:14

which I think is probably my favourite dressing in the world.

1:09:141:09:17

Just really aromatic and really, really tangy and tasty.

1:09:171:09:22

This is not, sort of, typical of what you serve, though, is it?

1:09:221:09:24

It's not typical of what I would serve,

1:09:241:09:26

but it's the sort of thing that I like to cook at home,

1:09:261:09:28

-or the sort of thing I enjoy to eat with the kids.

-Sure.

1:09:281:09:32

Cos you're quite big into your, sort of, vegetarian menus

1:09:321:09:37

-and what-have-you in the restaurant, right?

-That's right, yeah.

1:09:371:09:40

We have a dedicated vegetarian menu.

1:09:401:09:43

-A tasting menu and an a la carte menu.

-Right.

1:09:431:09:46

I mean, do you get a lot of vegetarians?

1:09:461:09:48

Or do you get people that just fancy a meat-free evening?

1:09:481:09:52

Loads of vegetarians.

1:09:521:09:54

We've got quite a reputation, now, for our vegetarian menus.

1:09:541:09:59

We have a lot of people coming, full tables of vegetarians,

1:09:591:10:04

so not just, sort of, the odd one.

1:10:041:10:06

We'll have a table of five and they're all vegetarian.

1:10:061:10:08

I mean, do you find that quite hard?

1:10:081:10:10

I always think you have to work harder with vegetarian food.

1:10:101:10:12

Not really. I think it's just about expanding your mind, really,

1:10:121:10:17

because there's so many vegetables, so many things that you can use.

1:10:171:10:20

I mean, the repertoire of ingredients is vast.

1:10:201:10:24

-Mm...

-You know, we saw that with Martin,

1:10:241:10:25

what he was cooking earlier on.

1:10:251:10:27

And it's just about not restricting yourself

1:10:271:10:30

to meat and fish and not relying on that protein to inspire you.

1:10:301:10:35

So how did that come about?

1:10:351:10:37

Well, my wife is vegetarian.

1:10:371:10:38

-Oh, right.

-Bless her.

1:10:381:10:40

Did you know that when you met her?

1:10:401:10:42

I didn't, not the first time,

1:10:421:10:44

otherwise I may not have spoken to her.

1:10:441:10:46

LAUGHTER

1:10:461:10:48

But she soon turned me round.

1:10:481:10:51

We used to go out to really nice restaurants, often,

1:10:511:10:53

and she would always come away disappointed,

1:10:531:10:57

because, you know, quite often,

1:10:571:10:59

chefs wouldn't pay too much attention

1:10:591:11:01

to the vegetarian dishes and...

1:11:011:11:03

Presumably, she is now spoilt.

1:11:031:11:05

-So now...

-You still can't go anywhere else.

1:11:051:11:07

Well, exactly. She just comes to my restaurant, now.

1:11:071:11:10

We've got another one, now. We can go to Ceviche.

1:11:101:11:12

-Yay!

-It's quite, sort of, vegetarian-heavy?

1:11:121:11:15

Well, a lot of fish, a lot of meat as well, but...

1:11:151:11:18

Yeah, we love our vegetables, so...

1:11:181:11:21

-A lot of corn dishes - gorgeous.

-Right, OK.

1:11:211:11:23

So, what I've got here, I've made...

1:11:231:11:26

This is a dredge, so basically,

1:11:261:11:28

I've marinated the chicken in the buttermilk,

1:11:281:11:31

so the buttermilk, the acids and the enzymes of the buttermilk

1:11:311:11:34

then break down the protein.

1:11:341:11:35

-It's acidic, right, the buttermilk?

-Yeah, very acidic. And you've got...

1:11:351:11:39

It breaks down the protein of the chicken,

1:11:391:11:42

or any meat, really, that you...

1:11:421:11:44

-And how long do you marinate it for?

-I like to do it overnight.

1:11:441:11:47

-Right.

-So I marinate it overnight and it becomes super-tender.

1:11:471:11:51

I am just dredging that in this. This is a mix of flour.

1:11:511:11:54

I've got gram flour, which is chickpea flour, in there, also.

1:11:541:11:58

And why are you using that?

1:11:581:11:59

I find chickpea flour is a really nice, light crunch -

1:11:591:12:02

when you deep fry it, it's nice and crunchy.

1:12:021:12:04

-OK.

-It's not heavy, like regular flour.

1:12:041:12:07

-Right.

-But I've also got celery salt and garlic powder and onion powder

1:12:071:12:11

in there as well, so it's really a lot of flavour, loads of taste.

1:12:111:12:14

So, what were you doing in the States?

1:12:141:12:16

Were you cooking, or...?

1:12:161:12:17

I did cook. I was a chalet boy.

1:12:171:12:20

-Really?

-In a ski resort up in Colorado.

1:12:201:12:22

-Oh, OK.

-Yeah.

-Are you a big skier?

1:12:221:12:24

-I'm a snowboarder.

-Oh, are you?

-Yeah. One of them.

-OK.

1:12:241:12:29

OK, that's a bit of a dirty word, for me, to be honest.

1:12:291:12:33

-I like...

-They always try to take me out when I'm skiing.

1:12:331:12:36

-Could have been me.

-LAUGHTER

1:12:361:12:38

-You make a point of it? Is that what you're saying?

-I do my best!

1:12:381:12:41

-Letting it down for all snowboarders everywhere.

-Absolutely.

1:12:411:12:43

-So, if you pop those in...

-OK.

1:12:431:12:45

And then just going to season that lightly,

1:12:461:12:49

a little bit of salt in there, and in here...

1:12:491:12:52

So, we've got breadcrumbs in there,

1:12:521:12:54

and they are eventually going to go in with the lettuce as well,

1:12:541:12:56

so with the lettuce, I've just got, again, a little bit of olive oil.

1:12:561:12:59

-Yeah.

-Just a tiny bit of butter.

1:12:591:13:02

Just get it nice and brown.

1:13:021:13:04

I'm going to season the lettuce.

1:13:041:13:06

But what I do is I season through the leaves,

1:13:061:13:09

-so I pull the leaves out...

-Oh, right.

1:13:091:13:11

And I put the salt in, right in between the leaves,

1:13:111:13:14

and you end up with a much tastier lettuce, then.

1:13:141:13:18

OK. So you are, kind of, layering it up,

1:13:181:13:20

make sure it gets throughout.

1:13:201:13:22

Yeah. So, my butter has melted, now,

1:13:221:13:24

and what I want is to get some colour on one side,

1:13:241:13:26

and that sort of roasted flavour in there.

1:13:261:13:29

But I don't want to completely cook the lettuce.

1:13:291:13:31

I want it nice and crunchy and fresh as well.

1:13:311:13:33

OK, let's flip the... Don't want to burn these.

1:13:331:13:36

Right...

1:13:361:13:38

-So now making the..

-Chicken is looking good.

1:13:381:13:40

-Yeah?

-Brown. Shall I lift it?

1:13:401:13:41

You can. If you lift it out, let it rest for a minute,

1:13:411:13:44

and then we'll pop it back in again for a few seconds, crisp it back up.

1:13:441:13:48

-So, this is my ranch dressing...

-Mm-hm.

-..which is...

1:13:481:13:51

-So, what in that?

-It's 50-50 sour cream and mayonnaise,

1:13:511:13:57

so half and half.

1:13:571:13:58

And then I've got, again, some onion powder, garlic powder...

1:13:581:14:01

Right.

1:14:011:14:03

Some smoked paprika, should be...

1:14:031:14:08

So, lots of the kind of spices...

1:14:081:14:10

Yeah, and herbs, and really, lots of black pepper.

1:14:101:14:14

-Yeah.

-And lots of dill.

1:14:141:14:17

-OK.

-It's kind of the essential herb ingredient

1:14:171:14:20

you put into a ranch dressing, dill.

1:14:201:14:22

Those sort of dressings I've seen in American cookbooks,

1:14:221:14:26

they're very, sort of, heavy on dried ingredients.

1:14:261:14:30

A lot of dried herbs and spices...

1:14:301:14:34

They like...

1:14:341:14:35

they like things like dried dill, they like cinnamon

1:14:351:14:38

they like these sort of flavours.

1:14:381:14:39

I think, sort of, fairly pronounced flavours.

1:14:391:14:42

Do you want these turned?

1:14:421:14:43

No, I'm going to keep them like that,

1:14:431:14:45

so if the croutons are ready...

1:14:451:14:47

It's a Southern type of dish, yeah?

1:14:471:14:49

And it's a Southern type of dressing.

1:14:491:14:51

Yeah - well, ranch dressing,

1:14:511:14:52

I think, originated in the South, but it's one of those things

1:14:521:14:55

that is so hugely popular that it's everywhere.

1:14:551:14:57

-Right.

-Right.

1:14:571:14:59

Vinegar in there, too.

1:14:591:15:00

Are you done with the herbs?

1:15:001:15:02

All sorted, all done.

1:15:021:15:03

-There's your plate.

-Lovely.

1:15:031:15:06

I'm going to put the croutons in with the...

1:15:061:15:08

-In there?

-In there. I've got a...

1:15:081:15:11

-The chicken is looking good.

-Yeah, good.

1:15:121:15:15

So, we can drain those off in a second.

1:15:151:15:17

Got some parsley going in there.

1:15:171:15:19

So this becomes a bit of a dressing as well.

1:15:191:15:22

-And some lemon juice in with it.

-OK.

1:15:221:15:25

Looks like a very famous chicken restaurant chicken.

1:15:291:15:32

-Does it?

-Yeah. Which is a good thing.

1:15:321:15:34

-I wouldn't like to say...

-A good thing.

1:15:341:15:36

That's what you'd want to try and recreate at home.

1:15:361:15:38

-A little bit of salt?

-Yeah, a touch of salt.

1:15:381:15:40

A touch of salt, not too much.

1:15:401:15:42

-I'm quite bad for salt.

-If you're cooking this at home

1:15:441:15:47

and you haven't got fresh herbs, could you use dried herbs?

1:15:471:15:50

I know you wouldn't at the restaurant.

1:15:501:15:51

Well, these are fresh herbs that I've dried.

1:15:511:15:53

-Yeah.

-But you can use dried herbs. I prefer to do that.

-Yeah.

1:15:531:15:56

Dill isn't always easy to get hold of, is it?

1:15:561:16:00

So, this buttermilk, if you couldn't get hold of that -

1:16:001:16:03

but it is quite widely available - you could use yoghurt, right?

1:16:031:16:05

-Absolutely.

-Same kind of enzymes in it.

1:16:051:16:07

Similar thing. Tell you what I'm going to do.

1:16:071:16:09

I'm going to cut... Because these are quite big,

1:16:091:16:11

-I'm going to cut these in half.

-There you are, chef.

1:16:111:16:14

-OK.

-But if you were going to use yoghurt,

1:16:141:16:16

you don't want to leave it in too long.

1:16:161:16:18

That needs a bit more. They need a bit more cooking.

1:16:181:16:20

-Yeah?

-Yeah.

-OK.

-More cooking.

1:16:201:16:21

I tell you what, let's... If I slice these...

1:16:211:16:25

-That's a good one.

-Yeah, that'll be all right.

1:16:271:16:29

All this sort of Southern cuisine, Creole, New Orleans, Cajun,

1:16:311:16:37

it's just all buzzing, it's all exciting, as well.

1:16:371:16:39

-I mean...

-It is, it is a bit new, isn't it?

1:16:391:16:42

It's a bit fresh.

1:16:421:16:44

-But it's all tasty.

-A lot of flavours.

1:16:441:16:46

-A lot of tastes in there.

-It is tasty.

1:16:461:16:47

-OK.

-OK, are we ready, then?

1:16:471:16:49

Right, they're good, so...

1:16:531:16:56

Great family recipe, it looks like, as well.

1:16:561:16:58

It's a good, fun recipe. It's lovely, the kids love it.

1:16:581:17:01

-Yeah, I bet.

-Yeah. They love it.

1:17:011:17:04

Anything from a deep fat fryer.

1:17:041:17:06

I have a mantra, my mantra is,

1:17:061:17:09

"Bacon, butter and batter make everything taste better."

1:17:091:17:13

-LAUGHTER

-You say that quickly and many times?

1:17:131:17:17

I do my best. So, there you go.

1:17:171:17:20

-Beautiful.

-There you go, and some radishes...

1:17:201:17:23

Deep-fried chicken, you've got the radishes...

1:17:231:17:25

-Health food going on, there!

-Exactly, those are your five a day.

1:17:251:17:28

Fantastic. Remind us what that is.

1:17:281:17:30

So, you've got Southern fried chicken

1:17:301:17:32

with classic ranch dressing, baby gem,

1:17:321:17:35

sourdough croutons and radishes.

1:17:351:17:37

Beautiful. Nice one.

1:17:371:17:38

Right, let's go and see what they think.

1:17:431:17:46

Tuck into that, Alistair.

1:17:461:17:48

-Sure that chicken is done now?

-Well, we'll soon find out!

1:17:481:17:50

I've got a 16-week tour coming up, I can't be off!

1:17:501:17:53

Let us know tomorrow.

1:17:531:17:55

"Bacon, butter and batter make everything tastes better."

1:18:001:18:04

What a mantra. I like it.

1:18:041:18:05

Now, when Sue Perkins came to the studio

1:18:051:18:08

to face her food heaven or food hell,

1:18:081:18:09

she had a hankering for hazelnuts.

1:18:091:18:11

But would she have to give in to goat's cheese? Let's find out.

1:18:111:18:15

It's that time of the show to find out whether Sue

1:18:151:18:17

will be facing food heaven or food hell.

1:18:171:18:19

Food heaven would be this mass of ingredients,

1:18:191:18:21

that you're probably used to seeing.

1:18:211:18:22

-It's home.

-It's hazelnuts, we've got some ground hazelnuts, here,

1:18:221:18:26

turned into a wonderful cake

1:18:261:18:27

with a chocolate cake as well, coffee meringue.

1:18:271:18:30

Alternatively, it could be the dreaded food hell over here -

1:18:301:18:32

a pile of goat's cheese transformed into a nice little salad.

1:18:321:18:35

-Hm.

-It was down to these two, really.

1:18:351:18:37

It was 2-1 to people at home.

1:18:371:18:39

Francesco...

1:18:391:18:40

..liked goat's cheese.

1:18:411:18:43

That would put it level.

1:18:431:18:46

It was up to Marcus.

1:18:461:18:47

-Thankfully, he's been kind to you.

-I don't have a sweet tooth.

1:18:471:18:50

You've got food heaven because of Marcus, you see? There you go.

1:18:501:18:53

-Mwah!

-Right, lose this, out the way.

1:18:531:18:55

What we're going to do is make a nice sort of sponge with this.

1:18:551:18:58

-Great.

-You've probably made plenty of sponges.

1:18:581:19:01

But we're going to do this one slightly differently.

1:19:011:19:03

We are going to make it with meringue and sabayon base,

1:19:031:19:06

cos whenever you add hazelnuts to anything, it firms...

1:19:061:19:09

-It weighs it down.

-Weighs it down, yeah, exactly that.

1:19:091:19:12

So we are going to whip up this. If you can then mix me...

1:19:121:19:15

-I will, sir.

-..a small amount of double cream.

1:19:151:19:17

That works for me. That's why it's food heaven.

1:19:171:19:19

-The icing sugar...

-..and the hazelnuts.

1:19:191:19:21

And the hazelnuts... We've got this paste.

1:19:211:19:24

If you can make sure you get all of it out of there.

1:19:241:19:26

Then put it in here.

1:19:261:19:28

If you can crack the eggs, please, Marcus, in there, that'd be great.

1:19:281:19:31

Thank you very much. Then I'm going to start by whipping this up.

1:19:311:19:34

-That's brandy in there.

-Very good, too!

1:19:341:19:36

-Happy with that? Have you tried it?

-Yeah.

-All right.

1:19:361:19:39

-Can you pop me the butter in here?

-Yeah.

1:19:391:19:43

And the reason why we put butter in a cake

1:19:431:19:45

is to keep it nice and moist, see?

1:19:451:19:47

The idea being the hazelnuts will dry it out.

1:19:471:19:50

The meringue helps it, but the butter will keep it moist.

1:19:501:19:52

-Why are you cooking the butter first?

-We'll just melt it.

1:19:521:19:55

-OK.

-Cos I'm not... This is...two types of sponges.

1:19:551:19:58

This is, I think, the lighter one, really.

1:19:581:20:01

Like an Italian...

1:20:011:20:02

Yeah, that's the lighter one, really.

1:20:021:20:05

So, we whisk this up and then, in here, I've got my icing sugar.

1:20:051:20:10

That's going to go in.

1:20:111:20:12

I use icing sugar instead of caster sugar,

1:20:121:20:14

again, to make it a little bit lighter.

1:20:141:20:17

We're going to throw that in.

1:20:171:20:18

In we go with the icing sugar and the meringue, here.

1:20:181:20:20

Whisk this up.

1:20:201:20:22

Not too much, cos the air is going

1:20:241:20:26

to come out of this mixture here, all right?

1:20:261:20:28

-Yeah.

-And then all we do, egg yolks and...

1:20:281:20:31

-See these whole eggs.

-Yeah.

-In we go with the flour.

1:20:311:20:34

-In we go with the hazelnuts.

-Look at that.

1:20:341:20:37

In we go with the butter, like that.

1:20:371:20:39

Then if I get a...

1:20:391:20:41

If you can bring me over the tin, please, Marcus,

1:20:411:20:43

that would be great, thank you.

1:20:431:20:45

Then all we do is we throw this lot in.

1:20:451:20:47

Now, I'm sure you've seen this 100 times before,

1:20:471:20:50

but you've got to get this mixture in the oven as quick as possible.

1:20:501:20:53

How come it takes you, like, a couple of minutes?

1:20:531:20:55

We do two whole days in a tent with somebody doing this,

1:20:551:20:57

and then they drop it on the floor!

1:20:571:20:59

That's what always happens.

1:20:591:21:01

I've been a pastry chef for many, many years, that's the thing.

1:21:011:21:04

So, we literally just pour this mixture in,

1:21:041:21:07

but the key to it is speed, I always think, but...

1:21:071:21:10

You need to get that in the oven, which Marcus is going to do.

1:21:101:21:13

Straight in the oven, please, mate. That goes in for about 20 minutes

1:21:131:21:17

and then, over here, we've got our sponges.

1:21:171:21:20

-Now, I've got a chocolate one...

-Yeah.

-..which I've made.

1:21:201:21:23

Similar sort of way.

1:21:231:21:25

Then we've got our hazelnut one, which we've made, like that.

1:21:251:21:29

Now, it will rise up and collapse, but when you see it,

1:21:291:21:33

it's very, very delicate, when you slice it,

1:21:331:21:36

and it's fantastic with this.

1:21:361:21:38

-Smells really good.

-Hopefully, you'll like it.

1:21:381:21:40

I am going to like it. You know I am.

1:21:401:21:42

-Hopefully, we've got our cream nearly ready.

-Nearly there.

1:21:421:21:45

If you can get the cake stand as well, Marcus, that'd be great.

1:21:451:21:48

-We'll bring this across.

-Mm-mm.

-There we go.

1:21:481:21:51

We can then thinly slice this, so...

1:21:511:21:53

Have we got a serrated knife anywhere?

1:21:531:21:55

There we go.

1:21:551:21:57

We can start off with this one first.

1:21:571:21:59

This is the chocolate one.

1:21:591:22:00

Keep your fingers out of the way, obviously. It's easy...

1:22:001:22:02

What's wrong?

1:22:021:22:04

It's good, no, it's perfect. It's perfect.

1:22:041:22:07

-You're checking the crumb structure!

-Yeah, I'm just...

1:22:071:22:10

Yeah, just the density there, of crumb. Oh, it's good.

1:22:101:22:13

-So, this is like an Opera cake.

-Similar, yeah.

1:22:131:22:16

And then we put this on it.

1:22:161:22:18

See, the quick tip, next time you're doing the series,

1:22:181:22:21

anybody that is about to join this new series of the Bake Off,

1:22:211:22:25

I always find that Mary Berry likes a brandy.

1:22:251:22:28

Mary Berry likes to start early with a brandy.

1:22:281:22:32

Exactly. LAUGHTER

1:22:321:22:34

I wasn't going to say that, but... Yeah.

1:22:341:22:35

Just constantly topping up with Mary.

1:22:351:22:37

-Constantly topping up.

-The flask that she's got with her?

1:22:371:22:40

Her blood type is actually vodka.

1:22:401:22:42

I'm jesting. No, I love Mary, as does the nation.

1:22:421:22:46

-She is an absolute star.

-What's not to love?

1:22:461:22:48

Hopefully, she'll be watching this and checking to see if I'm doing it right.

1:22:481:22:51

What people don't know is that Paul is actually about five foot tall

1:22:511:22:54

and wears a Cuban heel.

1:22:541:22:56

He is the Tom Cruise of...

1:22:561:22:57

Well, you know, you're friends with Paul.

1:22:571:22:59

-He is a delightful man.

-He is.

1:22:591:23:01

-He's like Thumbelina.

-LAUGHING: Thumbelina.

1:23:011:23:04

The Thumbelina of the cake world.

1:23:041:23:06

Right, we are going to slice this.

1:23:061:23:07

-He's going to kill me.

-He is, he is.

1:23:071:23:10

He's actually going to attack.

1:23:101:23:12

Look at that. You could read a newspaper through that.

1:23:121:23:14

-That's the idea.

-I don't know why you'd want to...

1:23:141:23:16

Then we'll layer this up with more... Mary, if you're watching...

1:23:161:23:19

LAUGHTER

1:23:191:23:21

There you go.

1:23:211:23:22

And a bit more of this - this is hazelnut cream,

1:23:221:23:24

this is the hazelnut puree we've got in here with icing sugar.

1:23:241:23:28

You've got to try this, this is fantastic.

1:23:281:23:30

The secret of this is don't make it too sweet.

1:23:301:23:32

So nice.

1:23:321:23:34

Don't make it too sweet.

1:23:341:23:35

Now, we were talking earlier about your programme.

1:23:351:23:37

We never mentioned the name of it.

1:23:371:23:39

You were too busy taking the mick out of my bandana.

1:23:391:23:42

It was a loving pastiche. It was not taking the mick.

1:23:421:23:45

-I've actually managed to burn my arm as well...

-Have you?

1:23:451:23:47

Lightly toast the sleeve.

1:23:471:23:50

It's called Heading Out and it's on next Tuesday, Tuesday week.

1:23:501:23:52

Tuesday week. We'll be watching it.

1:23:521:23:54

A little bit more...

1:23:541:23:56

-There will be a test afterwards.

-And a bit more of this.

1:23:561:23:59

In the fridge, guys, you've got a bowl of mixture in the fridge.

1:23:591:24:04

If you can grab us that...

1:24:041:24:06

And all we do...

1:24:061:24:08

The secret... You enjoying that, or something?

1:24:081:24:10

It's just whipped cream, icing sugar...

1:24:101:24:12

This is essentially what I do for ten weeks of the Bake Off.

1:24:121:24:15

-Is it?

-I just sit there with a massive mixing bowl

1:24:151:24:17

and just...yeah, eat.

1:24:171:24:18

Lift that over. Now, don't worry about this.

1:24:221:24:24

-Icing sugar.

-At this stage, all the audience would go...

1:24:241:24:27

THEY GASP Don't worry.

1:24:271:24:29

Cos then, we take this. This is Italian meringue.

1:24:291:24:32

-And you can let this go cold, if you want.

-Yeah.

1:24:321:24:35

This is Italian meringue and butter...

1:24:351:24:37

-The best, of course.

-..whisked into it.

1:24:371:24:39

So do you serve this with a gastric band, this particular...?

1:24:391:24:42

This needs a government health warning, this one.

1:24:421:24:45

It is...

1:24:451:24:46

Now, if you want to ice it, you see...

1:24:461:24:49

-What, another layer?

-Well, you can do, if you want.

1:24:491:24:51

But I kind of like... I always think...

1:24:511:24:53

You know, on your show, you would go round the edge

1:24:531:24:56

and make it all fancy.

1:24:561:24:57

This is the sort of stuff that people want to do at home

1:24:571:24:59

and you want to just literally, just...look at that.

1:24:591:25:02

-Oh, that looks good.

-Over the edge.

1:25:021:25:04

-Mmm...

-I'm just actually speechless.

1:25:061:25:08

Have you got some grated chocolate, please, guys?

1:25:081:25:10

-Oh, look!

-We'll use a little bit of this.

1:25:101:25:12

-We can do some, if you want.

-No, no, a little bit of this.

1:25:121:25:15

-Oh...

-Now, the secret of this is this...

1:25:151:25:19

Meringues.

1:25:191:25:20

-Indulgent, isn't it?

-And marshmallow.

1:25:231:25:26

What pattern are you going for?

1:25:261:25:27

I'm not, I'm just random, this is random.

1:25:271:25:29

-Random, Sue.

-Chaos theory.

1:25:291:25:30

No, it's just random.

1:25:301:25:32

That's one too many, now.

1:25:321:25:34

Less is more. Less is...

1:25:341:25:36

-I've had to get it out.

-You've ruined it, now, look!

1:25:361:25:39

I had to delve into the lake of butter.

1:25:391:25:40

-Then we've just got that in there.

-Just getting that sugar high, now.

1:25:401:25:44

Really coming up.

1:25:441:25:46

The producer was saying you really love your desserts,

1:25:461:25:48

so how do you stay so slim?

1:25:481:25:49

Well, basically, I eat during Bake Off,

1:25:511:25:53

put on 3st, and then don't eat for the rest of the year.

1:25:531:25:55

Oh, right! LAUGHTER

1:25:551:25:56

Like the Blue Peter tortoise, I just paint my name in Tippex

1:25:561:25:58

on the back and then go into hibernation.

1:25:581:26:00

-Right, and then...

-Little toadstools.

1:26:001:26:03

Right, now, watch this.

1:26:031:26:04

Watch, watch...

1:26:041:26:06

What's going to happen now?

1:26:061:26:07

-Watch this.

-I'm watching! Literally, I'm watching.

1:26:071:26:10

Oh, it's very oozy, isn't it?

1:26:111:26:13

Yeah, this is how it should be. Boozy...

1:26:131:26:16

Boozy and oozy.

1:26:161:26:18

Oh...

1:26:181:26:21

-Look at that!

-Oh, nice.

1:26:211:26:23

And if you want to be a bit fancy...

1:26:231:26:26

-Sprinkles!

-A bit of that on the top.

1:26:261:26:29

That's very... Can I have a mushroom?

1:26:311:26:33

You can have a mushroom.

1:26:331:26:36

You can have two, there you go. Tell us what you think of that.

1:26:361:26:38

The way that you make this cake, you could, of course,

1:26:381:26:40

leave that icing to go cold and spend a lot more time icing it

1:26:401:26:43

and all that kind of stuff, but I actually like...

1:26:431:26:45

It's one of those cakes that you just want to eat

1:26:451:26:47

and go back in and have it again.

1:26:471:26:49

It's very nice. It's really nice.

1:26:491:26:51

Well, the key to this is...

1:26:511:26:52

It is a twist on the Opera, obviously,

1:26:521:26:54

but you would put a chocolate topping over the top of that.

1:26:541:26:57

But I think with that sort of coating and stuff like that,

1:26:571:26:59

it's wonderful.

1:26:591:27:01

I love it. Really good.

1:27:011:27:03

Is it a good bake?

1:27:031:27:05

Ask Mary and Paul. I'll eat it and say it's delicious.

1:27:051:27:07

-LAUGHTER

-Really good.

1:27:071:27:09

I'm an eater, not a tester.

1:27:091:27:11

So...

1:27:111:27:13

That's like tar, look at that!

1:27:131:27:16

But it's a bit like, sort of...that coffee essence.

1:27:161:27:19

The topping, by the way -

1:27:191:27:20

forgot to mention, a bit like your programme -

1:27:201:27:23

it's a bit like a...

1:27:231:27:24

It's an Italian meringue.

1:27:241:27:25

It's whipped egg whites, sugar, water,

1:27:251:27:28

sugar and water that you bring to the boil.

1:27:281:27:29

Add onto the whipped egg whites. You had coffee essence.

1:27:291:27:32

Don't add coffee, ie, an espresso,

1:27:321:27:35

because it'll soften the mixture too much, as I've done there!

1:27:351:27:38

Then we've got some butter, which we fold into it.

1:27:381:27:40

But the colder you leave it, the better it is,

1:27:401:27:42

and the firmer the icing will go as well.

1:27:421:27:45

But the recipe is on the website.

1:27:451:27:47

-I think you need that, after today.

-Yeah, yeah.

-Well done. Well done.

1:27:471:27:50

Tell us what you think of that.

1:27:501:27:52

I'm not a great fan of this sort of...

1:27:521:27:53

-Oh, I like it.

-You like this?

1:27:531:27:54

It's nice and raisin-y It's like melted raisins, isn't it?

1:27:541:27:58

Probably...

1:27:581:27:59

And also, it's always at its most fabulous before midday.

1:27:591:28:02

-Exactly.

-Of course.

-Cheers.

1:28:021:28:04

What a mess,

1:28:091:28:10

but a delicious-looking, oozy, boozy, wonderful mess,

1:28:101:28:13

I'll give you that, James.

1:28:131:28:15

Well, I'm afraid that's it for this week's Best Bites.

1:28:151:28:17

I hope you've enjoyed taking a look back

1:28:171:28:19

at some of the delicious recipes that we've picked out for you today.

1:28:191:28:22

Have a great week and I'll see you again very soon.

1:28:221:28:25

John Torode takes a look back at some of his favourite recipes and best moments from Saturday Kitchen.