12/03/2017 Saturday Kitchen Best Bites


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12/03/2017

Matt Tebbutt takes a look back at some of his favourite recipes and best moments from Saturday Kitchen.


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We've got a feast of fantastic food lined up for you today, so make

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yourself comfortable and stay right where you are.

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Now, over the next 90 minutes, we've got some top chefs, sensational

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food, and a cracking celebrity line-up, too.

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Coming up on today's show, James Martin whips up a genoise

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sponge with blueberry compote and vanilla

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One half of the Hairy Bikers, Dave Myers, is here showcasing

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He's making spring rolls with a difference,

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Morecambe Bay shrimps, marinated in tamarind,

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and serves them with a peanut and lime vinaigrette.

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Anna Hansen sticks to what she knows as

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she cooks up a dish that's all about fusion.

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She marinates sea bass in a chermoula sauce before cooking

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and serving with a quinoa salad and tahini cream.

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Battling it out for omelette challenge glory

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today are Catherine Fulvio and Paul Rankin,

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and Paul is determined to

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Then it's over to Tony Tobin, who's cooking up

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a dish that would be perfect for a Sunday lunch.

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He roasts up a fantastic Chateaubriand and serves

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it with horseradish, potato bread, and roasted roots.

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And finally, comedienne Ruby Wax faces her food

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Did she get food heaven, stuffed roast lamb

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chops with baby vegetables, or her food hell, clotted cream rice

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And you can find out what she gets at the end of the show.

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But first, a chef who not only holds a Michelin

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star and four rosettes, but also has her very own MBE.

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It's Saturday Kitchen favourite Angela Hartnett.

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Angela Hartnett, great to have you on the show.

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We're going to roast off some beautiful corn-fed chicken with some

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garlic, rosemary, and we're going to make a lovely fresh green bean,

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leek and shallot salad, finished with

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Simple food that you can easily cook this

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In season as well, little baby leeks?

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I know, they must be on your farm now, no,

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They're about this sort of size at the moment, yeah.

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So, just season up your chicken nicely.

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You use the maize-fed chicken, don't you, for

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Yeah, just because I think it's got lovely flavour and taste

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and all the rest of it, and I think if you're

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going to have chicken, you've got to have the best.

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You don't want anything that's really

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watery or just doesn't taste of anything.

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And keeping the skin on is quite important as well?

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There's a sink in the back if you want to wash your hands.

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And while that's cooking, we're going to prepare our

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So take a handful of the green beans.

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Now, at the moment you've been actually

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quite quiet, quite unusual to be one of Gordon Ramsay's chefs!

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Well, the Connaught's closed, closed for refurb, so we're closed

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for about eight months now, six to eight months, while...

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The whole hotel, but they're doing such work

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They're going to put a swimming pool in

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there, a spa, which hopefully I'll get to use.

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finished a TV thing with John Burton-Race,

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And your book's very, I mean, in a similar vein to what

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Gennaro's doing there, it goes three generations of sort of...

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It's all about recipes that my grandmother had, that my mother's

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had, stuff we were brought up as children eating.

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I'm really pleased with it, actually.

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I had a quick look, and I must say, it brings memories

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I've got to beat James in the rankings,

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A lot of people said, Italian background, but you

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did the Great British Menu, represented Wales!

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There's a whole community in Italy that emigrated to Wales,

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so that's where my mother was born of Italian parents.

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Everyone said to me, "What are you, Welsh, Italian,

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If someone is health-conscious, because

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my mother will never cook chicken with the skin on it, can you take it

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Yeah, I think it protects it, as well.

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I think it gives it great flavour, it has its natural

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basting because it's naturally fat, so I think you should, personally,

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And how strict, because you know you have to

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cook chicken a certain way, they say it's dangerous if there are pink

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Yeah, you do have to cook it through, but not dry, like a

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lot of people, you know when it gets too dry and that's awful.

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They overcompensate, overcook it, don't

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So, we've got a lovely olive oil, classic olive oil, virgin olive oil,

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white wine vinegar and some chopped shallots, and...

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You've got a bit of mustard in there as well?

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Little bit of mustard, and we're going to add

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Herbs like tarragon and parsley you're going to use, as

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Definitely, I love flat leaf parsley, I think it's fantastic.

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But tarragon's quite a strong herb, as well?

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We're going to keep them quite crunchy, the beans.

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The kind of mistake a lot of people make, that

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classic combination of chicken and tarragon together, they

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overcompensate and put too much tarragon, particularly the dry

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No, I know, tarragon's like that herb, like coriander, that you need

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All right, we're going to put our beans, I kept

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them quite crunchy because we want it nice and light.

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Literally, they have a little bit of a bite to them.

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Then I'm going to put the dressing over them.

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We mentioned your restaurant that's closed, but you've also got another

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Sunny Florida, yes, the one everyone thinks all I do is

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It's based on a beautiful resort in Boca Raton, between Fort

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It's 27 floors up, it overlooks the sea, the

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And it's done by, it's all glass and chrome, it's beautiful.

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What's it like getting food out there, because

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Food you struggle with, you really do.

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I thought in Florida, you would, because it's sunny, you'd get loads

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of fresh vegetables, but we have to have freight a lot

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in, literally FedExed all over the place.

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It's quite scary, actually, you can't get

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Would you agree with that in America?

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My parents actually live in Florida, and the

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thing is certain of the larger big supermarkets when you go to them,

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the produce is always slightly wilted because it's not as fresh as

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you would, say, in the midwest, where a lot of the growing area is.

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But most American stuff is flown in now,

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I suppose the heat can affect it quite

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I'm going to send my parents to the restaurant.

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If I have them ring, they'll get booked in?

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I want to taste the watermelon, you see.

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Just sliced, placed on the beans, bit more of the dressing,

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serve the green beans warm, absorbing the vinegar, absorbing the

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So, beautiful roasted corn-fed chicken breasts on

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a spring salad of leeks and baby green beans.

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I promise you, they haven't been drinking over there yet.

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This is where you get to dive into this.

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When you say Boca Raton, you have to say "Bow-ka".

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I like my vegetables crunchy, that's lovely.

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And also putting the dressing in while the ingredients are still

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It's like when you make a lovely potato salad,

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Has to be warm, you can actually taste the vegetables when

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they are warm as well, much better than when they're cold.

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The vinegar adds a bite to it, doesn't

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we've got beans, we've got leeks in there.

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Would that work with broccoli and that kind of thing?

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Easily, I love crunchy vegetables and I love

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vinaigrettes on stuff, I think it's just perfect.

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You could even do baby carrots, asparagus, so much

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I will give you three Michelin stars, I love that.

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Well, that certainly got everyone talking,

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apart from Gennaro, weirdly, who, for once, was

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Now, coming up, James cooks a genoise sponge with blueberry

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compote and vanilla cream for Lisa Riley, but first

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it's over to Rick Stein, who is hot on the eels of a fish

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that is loved up and down the French Garonne.

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I could have made this journey between the two seas,

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the Atlantic and the Mediterranean, by car, but it's such a noisy,

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troublesome business going that sort of distance by car.

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It's checking in hotels every night, wasting time getting

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into the hotels, moaning about the quality, no hot water,

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Instead, there's just me on this lovely boat, the Rosa.

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But of course it's not just me, we've got the crew filming me

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But, more importantly, we've got the Rosa's crew.

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He's doing a fantastic job, the way he just guides the Rosa

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into those tiny narrow, narrow locks, it's just amazing.

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I just think, "We're going to hit the side!"

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And come in now, I just want you to meet Julie.

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Unfortunately, Julie's bumped her head.

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Anyway, she does all our beds, and the doors are a little low

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going into the bedrooms, and she cleans up and serves us,

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and she's very nice, she's very talkative.

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You drink very much last night, didn't you?

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We won't talk about that, actually, if you don't mind?

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And lastly, actually, the most important for me is the galley.

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In here we have Bernard, who's also the boss.

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Bernard, this gastronomic trip from Bordeaux to Marseille,

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No, tres bonne idee, very good idea indeed.

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One of the things I didn't really expect, I have to say,

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is that Bernard turns out to be an extremely good cook.

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I mean, those eels we had last night, just with the garlic

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I think I've got a real lot to learn from you, actually.

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Oh, thank you, you're very kind, but I'm sure

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But, anyway, there you have it, the crew of the Rosa.

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I mentioned earlier, for our very first meal on-board,

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we had a dish of eels cooked by Bernard.

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They came from a friend of his who has been catching eels

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and catfish on the Garron ever since he was a boy.

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The bargemen know every fisherman, winemaker and cheesemaker along

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the way, and I just can't wait to have some more of those eels.

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One thing I've noticed in my travels is that eel traps come

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On the Somerset Levels, they are made beautifully out of willow.

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But here they make them out of old garden fences.

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Actually that's quite a nice sized eel.

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He said the best way of cooking eel was first of all to cook them

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gently in a persillade, a little bit of butter with garlic

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and parsley, or else to put them on a barbecue skewer.

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Slice of eel, slice of pork fat, slice of eel and so on.

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I'm just beginning to get at long last used it on the Garron,

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the gentle way it flows down the river and the

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It's quite unusual to me because I'm used to fishing with Padstow

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fishermen and the waves are tossing this way and that and there

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are cables zipping across the deck and a lot of shouting and all that.

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And the way that he's fishing is just so relaxed

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everything about it is just conducive to contemplation

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One of the things about coming on a trip like this,

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you can read all the cookery books you like, get really boned

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up on French recipes, but then you come out on the barge

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and there's Bernard who does all the cooking here just cooking

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a very simple dish like this eel, which we had the other night.

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First of all what you do is you take the eels and you slice them into two

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inch pieces and then you just dust them in flour.

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I followed it exactly as he said and it turned out

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Before you start frying eel, make a persillade.

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You get finely chopped parsley and garlic.

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Get the garlic, chop it up a little bit first,

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Chop that up, mix the two together, and then chop, chop,

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You take a big frying pan and put a little bit of vegetable oil in.

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Just cook the eel on one side, bring the temperature up

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to about medium and cook gently for about two to three

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Turn the eels over and do precisely the same on the other.

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While that is cooking, if you like, you can just

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In the second frying pan, put a knob of butter,

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one to two ounces in the pan, let it melt, and then throw

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You just want to melt the butter and gently cook the garlic

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Let that cook very gently and now your eels are done.

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This is the nice thing that Bernard does.

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He has got two pans and he empties all the eel into the persillade pan,

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shakes it all about, and then puts everything

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back into the eel pan, so everything is nicely coated

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Then just empty that out onto a serving plate.

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And I like a big slice of lemon with that just

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Now last week's butterfly cake masterclass seems to have been a bit

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of a hit with lots of you so this week I thought I'd show

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you something just as simple, easy to make this weekend at home.

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It's a classic genois sponge and a classic genois sponge

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You'll see the reason why in a minute.

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We've got 200 grams of caster sugar, six medium eggs in here.

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The secret of this is it's nice and light.

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This cake is used in a lot of French patisseries as well and it's used

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The little ladies' fingers you get in tiramisu.

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The basic recipe is this, what we've got in here.

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Six eggs, 200 grams of sugar, and then over

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You keep this mixing for about five or six minutes,

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because this creates the air in the sponge.

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This is straight out of college, really.

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Ideally, you lift this up and you do a figure of eight.

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If the figure of eight is still there when you get to the end,

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that means this is ready and if not you need to keep mixing it.

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You do, you do know what you're doing.

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We're just going to make our little cartouche.

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I don't know why you buy these nowadays.

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You basically measure the size of the tin,

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pop that round, then open it up, and use it on the

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It's only a little bit of grease-proof.

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Incorporating the flour and the butter together.

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We have got plain flour and then we've got butter.

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Now there isn't anything better in the kitchen

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Because this is the key to mixing this together.

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It's how it used to be when you were at college.

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The key to it is if you do it this way, you can incorporate the flour

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much easier and quicker than you can with a spatula.

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What you are trying to do is not knock out the air that

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There's no rising agent in here, no bicarbonate of soda,

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no baking powder, no self raising flour.

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The key to it is make sure it is all mixed together.

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You can see from the texture of the sponge itself it is light.

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You can feel bits of flour in there but it is in essence light

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when it goes in the oven and so of course it will be

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If you have gas at home, about gas mark four, maybe five.

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It wants to go in there for 20 to 25 minutes.

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You can tell when it's ready if you just push the top of it,

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We've got the blueberries and everything else in there.

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You're going to need this because you're busy.

:19:56.:19:57.

You're on the tour and everything else.

:19:58.:19:59.

You've finished the Strictly tour and now you're on something else.

:20:00.:20:04.

We've done the arena tour now and now this is called

:20:05.:20:07.

Still under the Strictly frame but completely different.

:20:08.:20:10.

It's like a musical brought to all the theatres around the country.

:20:11.:20:16.

There is every aspect that people like in the theatre.

:20:17.:20:21.

Acting, singing, dancing, all those concepts.

:20:22.:20:24.

You know the good old-fashioned variety that we don't

:20:25.:20:26.

Craig Revel Horwood has written it and he's produced

:20:27.:20:33.

He wants to bring people that don't necessarily go to the theatre

:20:34.:20:39.

I think I probably did the first tour.

:20:40.:20:49.

But when you walk out in front of Wembley,

:20:50.:20:54.

the O2 Arena, you look up Going, "I shouldn't be here."

:20:55.:20:56.

But this is more like a stage tour, is it?

:20:57.:21:04.

Yes, we're going all over the country.

:21:05.:21:06.

Manchester, my hometown, which will be brilliant.

:21:07.:21:07.

But this is completely different in the sense that people just expect

:21:08.:21:13.

dancing because it's Strictly and it's not.

:21:14.:21:16.

We've got a narrative of my life of how I got there.

:21:17.:21:19.

You find things that you never really knew

:21:20.:21:23.

that went on if you're in Strictly, you see.

:21:24.:21:25.

Then there are other professionals, like Natalie Lowe

:21:26.:21:27.

Obviously they are celebs in their own right, aren't they?

:21:28.:21:31.

Because they are in the series the whole time.

:21:32.:21:34.

It has been running quite a number of years now, hasn't it?

:21:35.:21:36.

Obviously the audience will get to ask all the professionals how

:21:37.:21:41.

they got there and they've all got their own

:21:42.:21:43.

I'm really excited to start rehearsals.

:21:44.:21:47.

Your story in terms of television, did you go to the same acting

:21:48.:21:51.

Yes, we were in the same drama school.

:21:52.:21:56.

And then you ended up working with her later on in life as well.

:21:57.:21:59.

But you got signed up when you were about 12, didn't you?

:22:00.:22:02.

When I got Emmerdale everyone knew who I was because then you're Mandy

:22:03.:22:06.

and of course everyone knows who you are.

:22:07.:22:09.

The casting director saw me in a play at Oldham Coliseum.

:22:10.:22:17.

Mandy was only supposed to be in one episode, you know.

:22:18.:22:20.

They got me in, did the episode, and I think she was a bit popular.

:22:21.:22:23.

Next thing they brought me back for a few more episodes.

:22:24.:22:26.

Then there I was seven years later, seven wonderful years.

:22:27.:22:33.

Suranne and me worked together on Scott And Bailey,

:22:34.:22:35.

which was brilliant, because I had to beat her up.

:22:36.:22:38.

We are really good friends in real life.

:22:39.:22:40.

And then you come straight out of that and then you go straight

:22:41.:22:45.

The best thing about my career is everything has been so different.

:22:46.:22:53.

I love my acting, hosting was good, and then musical

:22:54.:22:55.

It's nice to do a variation of stuff.

:22:56.:23:01.

And while you're doing that, if that wasn't enough as well,

:23:02.:23:05.

tell us about the new TV show that you're doing.

:23:06.:23:08.

Yes, I'm currently filming George Gently for BBC,

:23:09.:23:10.

It's all set in the 50s and 60s, and doing the period stuff,

:23:11.:23:17.

We are filming that and it comes out later in the year,

:23:18.:23:22.

Yes, 12th of June we start, we open in Plymouth.

:23:23.:23:31.

Then we go on tour all round the country for two months.

:23:32.:23:34.

You can traditionally do raspberries and strawberries,

:23:35.:23:43.

that kind of stuff, but when you look at these

:23:44.:23:46.

in the pan, they just look fantastic and you know it is going to taste

:23:47.:23:50.

That is basically just the sugar, the water,

:23:51.:23:54.

Bring it to the boil, cook it for ten minutes,

:23:55.:23:58.

take it off, and then we have a little compote here.

:23:59.:24:01.

I think the sponge really makes it as well.

:24:02.:24:18.

There's something about a genois sponge.

:24:19.:24:19.

Always a bit tricky for me personally.

:24:20.:24:26.

It's a thing that as chefs we kind of forget.

:24:27.:24:33.

You take it for granted when you learn it.

:24:34.:24:36.

Clean the knife as we go otherwise you get marks on it.

:24:37.:24:45.

Of course, for those people who don't know it,

:24:46.:24:54.

It was your birthday yesterday so happy birthday.

:24:55.:25:10.

I won't ask how old you are because we can't afford that many candles.

:25:11.:25:24.

Well, I hope you're going to be practising your genois after that.

:25:25.:25:27.

He makes it look so simple, doesn't he?

:25:28.:25:29.

Today we are taking a look back at some of the tastiest recipes

:25:30.:25:33.

from the Saturday Kitchen archives and there are still loads of dishes

:25:34.:25:35.

Up next, one half of The Hairy Bikers, Dave Myers,

:25:36.:25:40.

and James seems to have his hands full on this one as Dave just can't

:25:41.:25:44.

When you've finished playing with the oranges,

:25:45.:25:55.

We are doing Morecambe Bay shrimp and tamarind spring rolls.

:25:56.:26:01.

To go with that, a little kind of lime and peanut vinaigrette.

:26:02.:26:04.

You can't say things like that at nine o'clock in the morning!

:26:05.:26:08.

First off, I like spring rolls, I like fried things.

:26:09.:26:18.

So we need to make the basis for that.

:26:19.:26:21.

Lovely Morecambe Bay shrimps, little brown shrimps.

:26:22.:26:23.

They are great for Singapore noodles because they have loads of flavour.

:26:24.:26:28.

Famous for potted shrimps up in Morecambe.

:26:29.:26:33.

The butter and the mace and all that.

:26:34.:26:35.

I like them with a bit of lime zest and black pepper.

:26:36.:26:38.

So what is the difference between a shrimp and prawn?

:26:39.:26:43.

Shrimps are very different, aren't they?

:26:44.:26:46.

The Mediterranean ones you can eat with the shell

:26:47.:26:49.

I always thought shrimps could absorb liquid like butter

:26:50.:26:53.

They taste of nothing, a lot of them.

:26:54.:26:57.

Can I have a couple of centimetres of galangal?

:26:58.:27:02.

Yeah, it's spicy, it's lemony, its aromatic.

:27:03.:27:08.

I used to go out with a girl like that.

:27:09.:27:13.

Bash your lemongrass first to introduce the flavours.

:27:14.:27:16.

I knew when I woke up this morning it was going to be like this.

:27:17.:27:23.

These give it the citrus flourish and overtones and undertones

:27:24.:27:34.

Now add to that a bit of spice, chilli.

:27:35.:27:42.

Apart from when you are biking all over the world, you live

:27:43.:27:45.

I do, I live on a place called Roa Island, which is 22 houses

:27:46.:27:51.

and no trees because nothing will grow there.

:27:52.:27:53.

You've got the salt marsh lamb, we've got the salt marsh lamb

:27:54.:28:13.

in Cumbria, sea bass, good fish, shrimps.

:28:14.:28:15.

I've got some tamarind which is like the core of the dish.

:28:16.:28:32.

If you can't find tamarind, use lemon.

:28:33.:28:34.

Yes, and the pod is put into a paste.

:28:35.:28:47.

No, that's fine because I don't want it too liquid.

:28:48.:28:51.

It's lovely with chicken breast sandwiches and nice best butter.

:28:52.:29:11.

Ideally I would have left the tamarind to soak

:29:12.:29:23.

with the saki for an hour or so and it would infuse.

:29:24.:29:26.

You can taste this and if it is too sour, put some sugar in.

:29:27.:29:29.

This is like back to being a student.

:29:30.:29:49.

When you're doing eggy wash, use plenty of egg.

:29:50.:29:56.

Egg's like glue and then you have a fair chance

:29:57.:29:59.

Don't put too much filling in because they will blow up.

:30:00.:30:21.

I can't believe, looking at your biography, that you used

:30:22.:30:23.

And then the other part of it was you were a make-up artist.

:30:24.:30:31.

I was a car park attendant and I applied for anything I could.

:30:32.:30:35.

The BBC took me on as a trainee make-up artist.

:30:36.:30:45.

But the references for the make-up artist was from

:30:46.:30:47.

They said his tonnage is ace and his timekeeping is excellent.

:30:48.:31:00.

Just making these little spring rolls.

:31:01.:31:03.

You can do them in spring roll wrappers but we had these little

:31:04.:31:08.

The wrappers we had were all dried up and it was like trying

:31:09.:31:12.

Another trick, once you've done them...

:31:13.:31:15.

Put them in the fridge for an hour because the egg will stick.

:31:16.:31:25.

If you don't do that, they will explode.

:31:26.:31:27.

James has some we made earlier which have been

:31:28.:31:29.

You'll have to go on the website to follow this recipe

:31:30.:31:39.

because I forgot it already but go on.

:31:40.:31:41.

Palm sugar is best but we haven't got any.

:31:42.:31:54.

It's because you went home with your Adobe.

:31:55.:32:15.

The network giveth and they taketh away.

:32:16.:32:19.

We used that policeman's truncheon in Mexico.

:32:20.:32:43.

We serve this on a bed of watercress, ideally

:32:44.:32:48.

with samphire as well, which has salt and pepper.

:32:49.:32:50.

Morecambe Bay shrimp and tamarind spring rolls with lime

:32:51.:33:02.

If you can follow that, you're better than me.

:33:03.:33:08.

Sometimes they pick them by hand and they taste much better.

:33:09.:33:35.

If you pressure hose the husks of, it takes off all the flavour.

:33:36.:33:38.

I have to say I have never been big on shrimps

:33:39.:33:55.

Now, they look delicious but you may have to check the website

:33:56.:34:06.

Now over to the king of TV cooking, it's the captivating Keith Floyd.

:34:07.:34:33.

It's a long haul to New Mexico and a man's bones get a little shaky

:34:34.:34:36.

on the old Santa Fe trail, not to mention the throat

:34:37.:34:39.

has a certain dry ticklish feel against it.

:34:40.:34:41.

But to satisfy my producer's thirst for bizarre locations,

:34:42.:34:43.

I told the BBC wardrobe department I was coming to New Mexico to film

:34:44.:34:49.

in a cowboy town and I wanted a Lone Ranger outfit.

:34:50.:34:52.

Anyway, cowboy cooks were no exception to any other kind of cook.

:34:53.:34:58.

They were well into organisation and the most important thing

:34:59.:35:00.

after a long day's ride across the plain was to

:35:01.:35:03.

give the boys something really good to eat.

:35:04.:35:05.

So Chuck, as he would be called, would have a really good,

:35:06.:35:08.

The essential things a travelling cook would need.

:35:09.:35:10.

Baby wipes for his fingers at the end of a hard day,

:35:11.:35:13.

Californian wine, cookery book, charcoal fuel lighter

:35:14.:35:15.

Because they were into FM rock, they would probably

:35:16.:35:18.

Anyway I've got to do this really serious cooking sketch because I am

:35:19.:35:22.

You've all seen Blazing Saddles and they did those funny jokes

:35:23.:35:26.

about pork and beans and stuff, but I'm going to cook

:35:27.:35:29.

Historically slightly different because we use black beans.

:35:30.:35:32.

It was only really introduced into American food in the last 30

:35:33.:35:35.

or 40 years so it's an update of an old dish.

:35:36.:35:39.

First of all, Clive, diced shoulder of pork.

:35:40.:35:41.

Then swing round to your right where we've got our black beans

:35:42.:35:44.

which have been soaked in water overnight and then boiled

:35:45.:35:46.

for about two hours until they are nice and tender.

:35:47.:35:49.

The thing that flavours and influences this dish

:35:50.:35:55.

is something very important to New Mexico, the chilli.

:35:56.:35:59.

These very hot but also sweet little chillies,

:36:00.:36:01.

which I've chopped up here also with some garlic.

:36:02.:36:04.

This is all going to be cooked in a kind of a sauce.

:36:05.:36:08.

It is going to be thickened with blue flour and red chillis, OK?

:36:09.:36:17.

Because the Americans like their things a bit tasty,

:36:18.:36:19.

a bit spicy, it's also going to have a little honey

:36:20.:36:22.

The other thing that's very important when you're

:36:23.:36:27.

cooking on the range is to have a little sip yourself.

:36:28.:36:30.

I always prefer the Kentucky Fried Gentlemen.

:36:31.:36:32.

We've got a bit of wandering around to do here, Clive, so stay with me.

:36:33.:36:37.

Let us first of all get oil, walk round here, over

:36:38.:36:39.

the stove, bit of oil in, and we put our meat in.

:36:40.:36:42.

If I had an assistant, that would be taken away from me.

:36:43.:36:45.

It will season and seal down in the proper way.

:36:46.:37:01.

They do make life really difficult for me.

:37:02.:37:09.

He's done it before and he loves these fresh air sequences,

:37:10.:37:12.

but my eyes are streaming from the smoke.

:37:13.:37:14.

We're at 7000 feet of altitude, so if I'm looking a bit wobbly it's

:37:15.:37:17.

not because I've had too many Kentucky Fried Gentlemen,

:37:18.:37:26.

because I haven't had enough, there is a definite effect

:37:27.:37:29.

on your head, the clear air, the mountains, the snow

:37:30.:37:31.

The crushed chillies go in there like that along with some

:37:32.:37:38.

And then the juice strained off the black beans is mixed into that.

:37:39.:37:42.

There's a lot of wind but we can't help that.

:37:43.:37:44.

Then over here, Clive, I've got to put the black beans in.

:37:45.:37:53.

This is a good way of stretching the meat, of course.

:37:54.:37:58.

It makes it a very economical dish by adding the pulses.

:37:59.:38:04.

It just takes some of that heat away from the chilli.

:38:05.:38:12.

That needs about two hours over wood mark three.

:38:13.:38:21.

I know you've all got these kind of stoves and chuck wagons

:38:22.:38:24.

Every waiter, cook or bartender in Santa Fe is only temporarily

:38:25.:39:04.

They're just waiting for Spielberg to hit town.

:39:05.:39:07.

So if you can't wait, cook or sing, you hang out there anyway in case

:39:08.:39:11.

the opera calls you up, Santa Fe being the Sadler's Wells

:39:12.:39:13.

Here is one of me with the make-up lady putting the final touches

:39:14.:39:18.

the opera calls you up, Santa Fe being the Sadler's Wells

:39:19.:39:23.

# Then Mantua, then Padua and we open in Venice!

:39:24.:39:46.

This is my show but this is your town and if you don't like it,

:39:47.:40:01.

Al and Boots and their dog Tarquin just happen to be taking time

:40:02.:40:05.

out from being waiters, I mean stuntmen, to give us a hand.

:40:06.:40:08.

Very nerve-racking this kind of thing.

:40:09.:40:16.

They've got rods or whatever they call them.

:40:17.:40:18.

Is it silver bullets or is it all right?

:40:19.:40:30.

It could use a little bit more chilli.

:40:31.:40:43.

It's just that she wants to be private.

:40:44.:40:59.

Santa Fe is also the capital of American chic.

:41:00.:41:12.

There are more artists here than St Ives.

:41:13.:41:16.

It's also the second oldest town in America and it was first settled

:41:17.:41:19.

I love this especially composed music by my old chums

:41:20.:41:24.

Anyway, the silver and turquoise mines around here provide

:41:25.:41:34.

the Indians with all they need to create this brilliant jewellery.

:41:35.:41:37.

Not that I'm that interested in it but I just thought

:41:38.:41:39.

And at least it saves me from rabbiting on about architecture.

:41:40.:41:43.

But I'm here in Santa Fe really not only for the fashion but also

:41:44.:41:47.

to take on the Mayor, Sam Pick.

:41:48.:41:48.

a noted cook, in an international chilli cook-off.

:41:49.:41:52.

the second oldest city in the United States,

:41:53.:41:58.

and the only capital in the United States

:41:59.:42:00.

But we make the best chilli that you are ever going to see and I'm

:42:01.:42:09.

honoured to represent my community in this very serious chilli cook-off

:42:10.:42:12.

which I have been preparing for the last 12 years.

:42:13.:42:15.

I don't like the sound of any of this.

:42:16.:42:25.

Look, Clive, I've got bottled chillies, but the Mayor has got

:42:26.:42:29.

hand dried ones probably from his mother's garden.

:42:30.:42:31.

He's got the advantage of a special chilli chopper.

:42:32.:42:34.

Right, chilli is made using the best sirloin beef, OK?

:42:35.:42:47.

It isn't minced beef and stuff like we see in England.

:42:48.:42:49.

You also have chopped onions, chopped carrots, fresh chilli.

:42:50.:42:53.

You also have at this time of year some frozen chilli which I've cooked

:42:54.:42:57.

up already in chicken stock with onions.

:42:58.:43:03.

Finely chopped garlic, oregano, dried, we would have had fresh

:43:04.:43:05.

if we could have got it but this is March, black pepper, bay leaves,

:43:06.:43:11.

and to thicken my ultimate sauce, a rue made of butter and flour.

:43:12.:43:14.

Now the rest is down to God and a large Kentucky Fried Gentleman

:43:15.:43:17.

which my assistant has failed to provide this morning

:43:18.:43:19.

so I'm going to have to do this really Straight.

:43:20.:43:22.

Keith is absolutely right that if you get the best meat, that

:43:23.:43:44.

What I'm doing today is using pork actually.

:43:45.:43:48.

Pork with the liquid is the way to do it.

:43:49.:43:50.

In New Mexico they often use it the next morning instead

:43:51.:43:53.

of using the water like I'm going to be doing today,

:43:54.:43:55.

use that liquid, which really makes people enjoy it.

:43:56.:43:57.

You don't have to worry so much about the spices,

:43:58.:44:00.

because when you're pressure cooking this particular pork,

:44:01.:44:02.

you can put in garlic salt, you can put in salt and onions.

:44:03.:44:05.

Unfortunately when you are a small city like we are, you can't afford

:44:06.:44:09.

I've left the seeds in because I want to get this up

:44:10.:44:27.

Despite all the fun, this is a serious competition,

:44:28.:44:49.

and I am trying to beat the mayor here, but with all simple dishes,

:44:50.:44:52.

You can't just pour liquid onto that right now.

:44:53.:44:55.

You must let the onions sweat, let the meat sweat, let

:44:56.:44:58.

As with all good cooking, patience is essential.

:44:59.:45:02.

I'm going to chop the tomatoes a little fine.

:45:03.:45:07.

I asked a very important and leading chef if I could put some

:45:08.:45:12.

tomatoes in and he said, "If you put tomatoes in, sunshine,

:45:13.:45:15.

The record will properly reflect there will be no tomatoes

:45:16.:45:22.

put in this chilli even as we are speaking.

:45:23.:45:25.

We are still reducing the onions and the carrots and the meat

:45:26.:45:36.

and the garlic and the oregano and the pepper that's in there,

:45:37.:45:41.

and shortly my special secret ingredient, which are these

:45:42.:45:44.

brilliant extra strong peppers given to me by a famous chef who has won

:45:45.:45:48.

this competition on the odd occasion, which I've already

:45:49.:45:50.

cooked off with onion and some chicken stock.

:45:51.:45:54.

Still toying with the idea of throwing those

:45:55.:46:01.

I think I'm trying to let the judges know subliminally that if they see

:46:02.:46:12.

tomatoes and they want to continue holding their job in our city,

:46:13.:46:15.

it might be a good idea to vote right and vote often.

:46:16.:46:18.

I will probably in the next two or three minutes

:46:19.:46:20.

make a major decision about whether we will do that.

:46:21.:46:25.

Because I didn't precook my meat, know what I mean!

:46:26.:46:30.

I had to put it in raw and it takes that little bit longer.

:46:31.:46:34.

I guess that's the English way and I guess Sam's

:46:35.:46:36.

I can see that you have made an excellent decision

:46:37.:46:41.

It looks as though it is finishing at the right time

:46:42.:46:46.

It is now 12:20 Central Floyd Time, as we say in America,

:46:47.:46:55.

and mine won't be ready for another 45 minutes.

:46:56.:46:59.

So this is when we allow the director to dream up some

:47:00.:47:04.

wonderful cutaway sequence of the meat bubbling on the stove.

:47:05.:47:07.

You won't be bored and you will come back and join us when it's

:47:08.:47:10.

Film producers everywhere, don't forget Clint is going into politics

:47:11.:47:44.

and I'm available as the meanest cook in town.

:47:45.:47:50.

We have come to the denouement, the critical moment,

:47:51.:47:53.

an hour and a half has gone by, and where is Clive?

:47:54.:47:56.

I know the shot is beautiful and all the rest of it but we have

:47:57.:48:02.

The Mayor has got to be beaten hands down, I feel.

:48:03.:48:07.

Come and see what we've been doing, if you don't mind.

:48:08.:48:10.

I've got some finishing touches to do to this,

:48:11.:48:12.

assuming that the lynch mob, I mean the judges, are all gathering

:48:13.:48:15.

over there and I have to finish off this dish.

:48:16.:48:17.

This is not the way they do it here but it is the way I do it.

:48:18.:48:21.

It is just to get a little bit more liquid into the pot.

:48:22.:48:30.

You know, I've marvelled at this and I think that is a wonderful dish

:48:31.:48:43.

and I think where the compliments ought to go is to the people

:48:44.:48:46.

in England who have a feel for the interaction of the foods.

:48:47.:48:51.

You are looking at a product which is basically not something

:48:52.:48:55.

we would do in the south-west, but we probably would if we knew how

:48:56.:48:58.

to do it, and there are very few people that have that talent.

:48:59.:49:02.

We are seeing it demonstrated here today.

:49:03.:49:07.

You haven't had a great deal of experience with chilli

:49:08.:49:09.

but you are right there in the middle of it and you know

:49:10.:49:12.

what needs to be done to make a tasty meal and that's

:49:13.:49:15.

Let's look at yours because yours is so different.

:49:16.:49:20.

Mine is a more simplistic thing as befitting a politician that

:49:21.:49:23.

He precooked his meat because he knew full well that 7000

:49:24.:49:30.

feet above sea-level things take much longer to cook.

:49:31.:49:35.

If I do lose badly no one in this town will see it because I will see

:49:36.:49:42.

what I can do with our censorship with the one or two television

:49:43.:49:45.

It's heated up, it's thick enough, the pork is there.

:49:46.:49:53.

American Mayors don't potter around in chains giving away

:49:54.:49:58.

Of course these unbiased judges are his employees.

:49:59.:50:09.

To paraphrase Tom, nothing could be done because he was the Mayor's

:50:10.:50:12.

We feel like we have a very special stew here.

:50:13.:50:34.

On behalf of the academy, ladies and gentlemen,

:50:35.:50:43.

The winner in the envelope is the Mayor.

:50:44.:50:50.

I would like to thank all of my employees for judging

:50:51.:50:52.

I would presume that when I went to England,

:50:53.:51:01.

the same treatment might be given to me that we have just taken care

:51:02.:51:04.

We are just honoured that you came to Santa Fe to give us a chance

:51:05.:51:10.

to let you know how our chilli is done and I am sure when you go

:51:11.:51:14.

to your room tonight you are going to be very upset.

:51:15.:51:17.

Bonsoir, au revoir, ciao, auf weidersehn,

:51:18.:51:23.

And I'm sure you'll all agree when I say there is no such

:51:24.:51:30.

As ever on Best Bites we are looking back at some

:51:31.:51:37.

of the most memorable recipes from the Saturday Kitchen archives.

:51:38.:51:39.

Still to come on the show, Catherine and Paul go head to head

:51:40.:51:42.

in the omelette challenge, and Paul's eyes firmly

:51:43.:51:44.

Tony Tobin cooks a hearty dish that is sure to make you feel

:51:45.:51:51.

He makes delicious horseradish flavoured Irish potato breads

:51:52.:51:54.

and roasted root vegetables, all served up with a perfectly

:51:55.:51:57.

And Ruby Wax faces her food heaven or food hell.

:51:58.:52:05.

Did she get her food heaven, stuffed roasted lamb

:52:06.:52:08.

Or her food hell, buttercream rice pudding with caramelised pineapple?

:52:09.:52:14.

You can find out what she got at the end of the show.

:52:15.:52:18.

Next up the amazing Anna Hansen who is cooking sea bass

:52:19.:52:21.

in a traditional African sauce with a sprinkling of her trademark

:52:22.:52:24.

Welcome to the show, your first time on the show.

:52:25.:52:28.

We are cooking sea bass which we are going to marinate

:52:29.:52:31.

Yes, and it has fresh turmeric, garlic, caraway.

:52:32.:52:35.

We have never had this on the show that that is what it looks like.

:52:36.:52:47.

Readily available at any Asian type supermarket.

:52:48.:52:49.

And then I am going to be doing pickled lemons?

:52:50.:52:51.

They are speedy preserved lemons, not the real deal,

:52:52.:52:55.

And we have got our seeds which we will get onto in a minute.

:52:56.:53:00.

I will get these on first of all because I know

:53:01.:53:03.

you want to get your marinade on for the fish.

:53:04.:53:05.

Looking at the ingredients here, your influences are taken

:53:06.:53:07.

Is that the people you have worked for and your travels?

:53:08.:53:17.

It is a combination of things really.

:53:18.:53:19.

New Zealand is a pretty young immigrant nation

:53:20.:53:21.

so there are lots of different things going on down

:53:22.:53:25.

And then I worked with Fergus Henderson at the French House

:53:26.:53:32.

Dining Room and he kind of taught me.

:53:33.:53:36.

That was my first real cooking job and he taught me,

:53:37.:53:39.

I don't know, how to make simple things taste amazing.

:53:40.:53:41.

And then I met Peter Gordon and he taught me to just try anything out.

:53:42.:53:45.

Yes, bold and fresh and nothing is overworked.

:53:46.:53:55.

We have the lemons, which I have just peeled.

:53:56.:54:03.

We are using zest for this because traditionally

:54:04.:54:05.

Cover it in lemon juice and add a good whack of salt.

:54:06.:54:12.

You want it to taste salty like a preserved lemon.

:54:13.:54:17.

Just let that bubble away for a few minutes on quite a low heat.

:54:18.:54:20.

Probably better to wear gloves or something otherwise you look

:54:21.:54:28.

Mustard seed, fennel seed, green mango powder, black onion seed...

:54:29.:54:49.

Curry leaves, pumpkin seeds and sunflower seeds.

:54:50.:54:56.

We have a whole room the size of this studio!

:54:57.:55:19.

The modern pantry, it is about the ingredients

:55:20.:55:26.

in the modern day pantry and trying to familiarise people

:55:27.:55:29.

And it is also about having lots of fun.

:55:30.:55:35.

There are a lot of ingredients but your food is quite light, not heavy.

:55:36.:55:38.

I don't spend a lot of time cooking things for hours or with loads

:55:39.:55:46.

That is one of my favourite ingredients.

:55:47.:55:56.

Most of my dishes find a curry leaf in them.

:55:57.:55:59.

Explain what is going in this marinade.

:56:00.:56:04.

Coriander, parsley, turmeric, I am quickly adding some lemon zest

:56:05.:56:07.

This is the Moroccan style influence, this one.

:56:08.:56:20.

Show us what is going in there because I am

:56:21.:56:22.

Basically I have put the sea bass in there.

:56:23.:56:34.

It has shallots and all the other ingredients but you need to let it

:56:35.:56:37.

marinade for 20 minutes before you cook it.

:56:38.:56:39.

Best not to leave it for too much longer because the lemon juice

:56:40.:56:42.

If you didn't want to use fish you could use chicken.

:56:43.:56:46.

Caramelised red onions with sherry vinegar.

:56:47.:57:10.

I am trying to get you to follow this.

:57:11.:57:13.

These are the seeds with all the different spices.

:57:14.:57:18.

There may be a lot of ingredients but the smells coming off

:57:19.:57:20.

The first time we have had these on the show.

:57:21.:57:36.

This is a tomatillo, a member of the gooseberry family.

:57:37.:57:39.

You can eat them raw or they are great in Japanese

:57:40.:57:49.

and things and they have got a really fresh, tangy

:57:50.:57:52.

They are from the gooseberry family because of this round the edge.

:57:53.:57:56.

You could probably use cape gooseberries.

:57:57.:58:05.

But actually a bit of green mango would be really nice as well.

:58:06.:58:09.

Explain to us what quinoa is because I love this stuff.

:58:10.:58:25.

It is a relative of the corn family which was originally

:58:26.:58:31.

It is an incredibly nutrient rich grain.

:58:32.:58:42.

You can either use stock or just plain water.

:58:43.:58:45.

It is always dried, so you need to cook it.

:58:46.:58:56.

And you can toast it a little bit in your pot before you add

:58:57.:59:05.

the liquid and that just gives it an extra nutty flavour.

:59:06.:59:08.

Just seeing if there is anything else!

:59:09.:59:21.

Even though quinoa is relatively new here it has been grown

:59:22.:59:23.

for thousands of years in South America.

:59:24.:59:25.

It is really good for people who can't take rice.

:59:26.:59:29.

It is very high in protein and gluten-free as well.

:59:30.:59:31.

I've added a small amount of sweet smoked paprika.

:59:32.:59:55.

So if people are going to go out and buy this,

:59:56.:00:09.

the ingredients, this afternoon, it might be ready by Wednesday.

:00:10.:00:11.

Really simple and delicious dressing.

:00:12.:00:16.

Sesame seed paste and lemon juice and I'm going to add water

:00:17.:00:24.

This is great on lamb chops or, I don't know,

:00:25.:00:34.

That is just mixed together, just with water?

:00:35.:00:56.

My goodness, we forgot an ingredient!

:00:57.:01:12.

Traditionally, you would do them with salt.

:01:13.:01:20.

Oh, I forgot to put that in the salad.

:01:21.:01:48.

I will just scatter it across the top.

:01:49.:01:54.

I couldn't have made those leaves better myself.

:01:55.:02:17.

While you put that on, I'll just check to see

:02:18.:02:25.

Chermoula sea bass, quinoa and preserved lemon,

:02:26.:02:34.

tomatillo salad, spiced seeds and tahini cream.

:02:35.:02:38.

It's a record, but I have to say, and I've tasted this in rehearsal,

:02:39.:02:51.

It is amazing how you get your inspiration from all these different

:02:52.:03:01.

countries and put it together on one plate.

:03:02.:03:03.

The taste of it, with that salad and everything else.

:03:04.:03:10.

Right, now time for the Omelette Challenge.

:03:11.:03:30.

This week Catherine Fulvio and Paul Rankin go head-to-head

:03:31.:03:33.

and Paul has only one thing on his mind - reach first place.

:03:34.:03:36.

Three egg omelette cooked as fast as you can.

:03:37.:03:42.

Mr Rankin, you were the centre of our leaderboard at one

:03:43.:03:45.

point in the old studio, but we have Lawrence Keogh,

:03:46.:03:47.

He keeps texting me every week smiling and being smug.

:03:48.:03:55.

It is the concentration on their faces.

:03:56.:04:19.

I was telling Catherine that you get some of the world's greatest chefs

:04:20.:04:52.

coming in here they all get carried away with the omelette

:04:53.:04:55.

More worried about the omelette than anything else today!

:04:56.:04:59.

Do you think you are going to make it onto our board, bear in mind

:05:00.:05:13.

the talent that is on here, with that omelette?

:05:14.:05:18.

You did it it in 26.76 seconds which wouldn't put you there,

:05:19.:05:25.

but it does put you in good company with Michel Roux Senior

:05:26.:05:28.

I don't think that is the fastest omelette.

:05:29.:05:48.

Might get me up around there but it is close.

:05:49.:05:53.

You did it, and I'm going to put it on with that, you did it, in fact,

:05:54.:06:01.

To say that chefs are not competitive at all...

:06:02.:06:21.

Up next, it's the talented Tony Tobin with a dish

:06:22.:06:36.

that is a perfect match for a Sunday lunch.

:06:37.:06:39.

If you haven't decided what you are having later,

:06:40.:06:41.

Right, up first is a man who began his culinary career

:06:42.:06:47.

cooking with the legends like Brian Turner and

:06:48.:06:49.

It is not surprising he now runs his very own successful

:06:50.:06:54.

collection of restaurants all over Surrey, it is Tony Tobin.

:06:55.:06:56.

We are going to do roast Chateaubriand.

:06:57.:07:01.

I'm going to get it nice and hot, fry it and I've got a tray

:07:02.:07:10.

My mum used to call them potato scones.

:07:11.:07:19.

Put a little bit of bicarb and flour.

:07:20.:07:23.

I thought it would go really nice with the beef on Sunday.

:07:24.:07:36.

Tell us about the Chateaubriand as well.

:07:37.:07:37.

There are three main cuts of fillet, aren't there?

:07:38.:07:40.

The Chateaubriand is like the head of the fillet and after that

:07:41.:07:46.

becomes the real fillet where you cut your

:07:47.:07:48.

And then the little bit on the end is called the fillet mignon

:07:49.:07:53.

Just whack that on there and rub the oil on.

:07:54.:07:58.

If you could start peeling those vegetables, chop them

:07:59.:08:00.

I love rosemary with beef, especially roast beef.

:08:01.:08:07.

The Tobins love roasted Chateaubriand.

:08:08.:08:08.

We've got some sweet potato, some parsnips,

:08:09.:08:24.

This is a great way to do it, particularly...

:08:25.:08:29.

Tomorrow, you might have a few more guests turning up

:08:30.:08:32.

Rather than pans boiling all over, roasted veg, so much easier.

:08:33.:08:37.

What I am going to do though, before I roast them,

:08:38.:08:41.

I've got a pan of water with a little bit of salt,

:08:42.:08:44.

I'm going to get on with these potato cakes.

:08:45.:08:48.

It is potato boiled, peeled and boiled.

:08:49.:08:51.

It is dry mash, that is what I call it.

:08:52.:08:59.

I am just going to sprinkle my pan with some flour because we would

:09:00.:09:04.

normally think to put oil in the pan to fry them, but we are going

:09:05.:09:09.

to first cook them on the flour and they get that nice mottled look

:09:10.:09:13.

This is different to bubble and squeak or something like that.

:09:14.:09:20.

You have actually put bicarb in there.

:09:21.:09:22.

Talking of beef, I need to turn that.

:09:23.:09:30.

I suppose these cakes, you could leave them plain,

:09:31.:09:32.

if you want to do them with something else.

:09:33.:09:35.

You could put herbs, different herbs in them.

:09:36.:09:38.

Sage is nice with chicken, if you are going to do it with chicken.

:09:39.:09:49.

Is this what you are having tomorrow?

:09:50.:09:50.

Actually, it is what I was going to have tomorrow,

:09:51.:09:53.

but there has been a few requests for some pork.

:09:54.:09:57.

Really nice, particularly with pork, you could use celeriac.

:09:58.:10:01.

Roasted celeriac is absolutely fantastic.

:10:02.:10:20.

If you whack those into the pan to blanch.

:10:21.:10:22.

You see this has come to almost like a dough which is why

:10:23.:10:27.

I think my mum calls it potato bread.

:10:28.:10:29.

Then, literally, just into little round balls and flatten them off.

:10:30.:10:31.

I suppose you could do this today, if you wanted to do these

:10:32.:10:34.

for tomorrow, you could make these up, place them in the fridge.

:10:35.:10:37.

In advance, just to save a little bit of time on Easter Sunday.

:10:38.:10:40.

If you could just put that beef into the oven for me, James.

:10:41.:10:49.

Are you going to transfer it onto a different kind of tray?

:10:50.:10:53.

I've got a roasting tray in the oven and that's really because we've got

:10:54.:10:56.

the pan nice and hot, searing off there.

:10:57.:10:58.

If we were to put it onto a cold tray and go in the oven,

:10:59.:11:02.

Just keeps the whole cooking process going.

:11:03.:11:05.

We will put some honey on them and some butter.

:11:06.:11:13.

The oven is on 450 which is about 225.

:11:14.:11:21.

I'm going to make a little bit of gravy or sauce.

:11:22.:11:28.

Drain the veg off there, into a tray, a little bit of honey,

:11:29.:12:02.

a little bit of butter on there, salt and pepper, get that going.

:12:03.:12:05.

I've got some red wine into the pan that we have

:12:06.:12:07.

The last time you were on, you were just about to

:12:08.:12:16.

It was an old Post Office and sorting office in Banstead, Surrey.

:12:17.:12:31.

We have got a 35-seater cafe at the front, 100-seater brasserie

:12:32.:12:35.

behind and 50-seater kind of fine dining upstairs.

:12:36.:12:37.

I thought you might say, you are looking really good today.

:12:38.:12:45.

A bit of black pepper, a bit of salt.

:12:46.:12:51.

A bit of salt, a bit of black pepper, and then just in the oven.

:12:52.:12:55.

Like you say, it is almost like a one dish wonder

:12:56.:12:57.

for your vegetables, they are all in together,

:12:58.:12:59.

This is great with fish as well and it is wonderful with anything.

:13:00.:13:12.

If you are going to do it with fish, if you add some tomato,

:13:13.:13:16.

just in the last five, six minutes, it really...

:13:17.:13:18.

I love eating tomatoes with fish, roasted tomatoes.

:13:19.:13:22.

Right, James, I am just going to get rid of this flour.

:13:23.:13:25.

I am going to whack in some butter and then you put them back

:13:26.:13:30.

in and cook them in the butter and then they become nice and rich.

:13:31.:13:33.

Just to really upset you, I am going to put

:13:34.:13:46.

Now you get that really nice kind of golden brown colour

:13:47.:13:59.

and you will see what I mean by those potato cakes.

:14:00.:14:02.

You see that bicarb, it really starts to puff them up.

:14:03.:14:06.

I suppose you could have them for breakfast, couldn't you?

:14:07.:14:11.

You could put horseradish in there as well for breakfast.

:14:12.:14:17.

Let us get some of this onto my plate.

:14:18.:14:24.

It is important to leave this beef to rest, isn't it?

:14:25.:14:33.

I will pour the juices in the pan for you.

:14:34.:14:40.

You know sometimes you have that kind of rawness

:14:41.:14:48.

With a lot of rest, it turns to that beautiful rareness

:14:49.:14:58.

because what happens is, when we roast it, it is a muscle

:14:59.:15:01.

so it gets all upset and uptight like that.

:15:02.:15:03.

Your muscles would get upset if I chucked you in a frying pan.

:15:04.:15:08.

Then this lovely red wine sauce just over the beef.

:15:09.:15:21.

There you have roasted Chateaubriand with horseradish potato cakes

:15:22.:15:26.

How about roast beef and potato cakes for breakfast?

:15:27.:15:41.

It is like very fancy potato bread and I grew up eating potato bread.

:15:42.:15:52.

I've never had Chateaubriand in my life.

:15:53.:15:56.

I've had a lot of beef but I've never had it.

:15:57.:16:01.

Melt in your mouth, I promise you that.

:16:02.:16:07.

It is the head of the fillet, the larger end.

:16:08.:16:18.

It is not ideal for cutting steaks because the steaks are odd shapes.

:16:19.:16:21.

My mum has been making those since I can remember.

:16:22.:16:26.

The great thing about all of that, particularly if people are worried

:16:27.:16:36.

tomorrow with Easter and more people coming in, most of that

:16:37.:16:38.

And with the vegetables all happening at the same time

:16:39.:16:44.

in one tray, so we have got one tray with vegetables, one tray with meat

:16:45.:16:48.

We do that a lot with the vegetables, because of the kids,

:16:49.:16:52.

The first time he has kept his mouth shut!

:16:53.:17:01.

Really simple but a really effective crowd pleaser.

:17:02.:17:07.

When Ruby Wax came to the studio to face her food heaven or food

:17:08.:17:11.

hell, she was longing for lamb but would she have to resign

:17:12.:17:14.

Right, it is time to find out whether Ruby will be facing food

:17:15.:17:21.

What do you think these lot have decided?

:17:22.:17:31.

I think they are not going to make me eat rice.

:17:32.:17:34.

First thing, we are going to do our lamb but I am going to make

:17:35.:17:44.

a stuffing for our lamb and we will use this,

:17:45.:17:46.

If you can do me some Parisian potatoes, please, Henry.

:17:47.:17:58.

We have these classic French, I thought I would do something

:17:59.:18:01.

If you can prepare me the chicken mousse?

:18:02.:18:05.

We are going to quickly just pop that in there.

:18:06.:18:15.

The idea is that we fry this just to give it a little bit

:18:16.:18:18.

You can do something with that, if you want.

:18:19.:18:24.

Now I remember why cooking is so fun.

:18:25.:18:34.

We are going to do a sauce in this one.

:18:35.:18:37.

I will actually get the lamb we are going to do and I will show

:18:38.:18:41.

We will get the lamb out first of all.

:18:42.:18:44.

Why don't I just eat it straight in my mouth?

:18:45.:18:49.

Because we are going to use this straightaway, there is no real

:18:50.:19:01.

We will obviously use this straightaway.

:19:02.:19:03.

We are just doing one thing at a time.

:19:04.:19:07.

We are going to show you how to make these.

:19:08.:19:13.

We are just going to colour them first.

:19:14.:19:52.

Then we are going to cook them in water.

:19:53.:19:56.

Rather than just cook them in water, we are going to cook them with this.

:19:57.:20:01.

Right, I don't even want to know how you made that.

:20:02.:20:16.

Take this straight in the oven and these chops only take

:20:17.:20:31.

The veg we are going to get on in a second.

:20:32.:20:39.

You can actually buy this from the supermarket.

:20:40.:20:57.

We are going to cook this in the style of Vichy

:20:58.:21:18.

which is water, butter, sugar and we use our

:21:19.:21:20.

I have never seen this much activity.

:21:21.:21:23.

This is a town in France, they actually cook their veg like this.

:21:24.:21:26.

Well, the town of Vichy which is famous for Vichy mineral water.

:21:27.:21:31.

We in south London say it is tap water.

:21:32.:21:39.

A bit of butter in there, sugar, salt and we cook these down.

:21:40.:21:42.

I like the rack, I don't know if its friend is anything I'd

:21:43.:21:50.

On the rack of lamb, there are generally seven ribs.

:21:51.:22:04.

If you go to the butchers, this is what we call French trimmed.

:22:05.:22:20.

the bowler is cleaned at the top and the bone here is removed. Slice it

:22:21.:22:31.

through into chops. When you asking for it, the French trim. They will

:22:32.:22:42.

not believe I know what that is! Lovely lamb here. Theo has made our

:22:43.:22:53.

mousse, the chicken, cream, salt and pepper and mushrooms. You cool it

:22:54.:22:59.

down at all. I will look busy. A tiny bit more water. I have got it.

:23:00.:23:08.

Tiny bit more. The idea of this, as it cooks, the water evaporates and

:23:09.:23:13.

creates a sauce at the end. You do not need the thing? You eat the veg!

:23:14.:23:27.

Oh, baby! This is the mushroom, little ten tee. What world is that

:23:28.:23:44.

from? -- little homage. You can explain why this is from. It is the

:23:45.:23:52.

fact lining from the stomach, very fine spidery fat. From which animal?

:23:53.:24:05.

The cow. Do not try liposuction at home! It is spidery fat, brilliant

:24:06.:24:11.

for wrapping things and holding things together. It keeps the lamb

:24:12.:24:24.

most. Do you go to the butcher and ask for fat? I will not be checking

:24:25.:24:34.

that one out! You can fill this with... More butter? The theme of my

:24:35.:24:47.

cooking. More of this. There is a hospital just around the corner, it

:24:48.:24:52.

is fine! The sauce is coming down, we cook the potatoes, they create

:24:53.:24:57.

the glaze again. Parisian potatoes are done like this. The meat glaze,

:24:58.:25:06.

sugar, water, it is done. Keep the colour of the veg, no need for ?15.

:25:07.:25:18.

That is good. -- 15 pounds. I cannot look at that! It is right homage on

:25:19.:25:27.

the top. You can do saddle of lamb at the top as well. -- it is fat on

:25:28.:25:36.

the top. You put them in the fridge. You need to leave them to firm up. I

:25:37.:25:40.

will give you those to go home with. Thank you. I will wear them as a

:25:41.:25:46.

rings. Leave them in the fridge for an hour. When you pan fry them, they

:25:47.:25:52.

are good. Pan fry them for a minute to get colour on them. Can you pick

:25:53.:26:00.

me some chervil and chop some? Is this it? Watch your fingers! I have

:26:01.:26:11.

seen how you guys do that, it is so sexy. I am watching my fingers, they

:26:12.:26:16.

probably only add to the taste! Where do I put the chervil? In

:26:17.:26:25.

there. In the potatoes as well! You can use chives. Have you tried

:26:26.:26:30.

chervil? Taste this. It will not burn my mouth? No. It is aniseed.

:26:31.:26:39.

That is good. Very difficult to grow in the garden. Look how it is

:26:40.:26:43.

reducing down and glazing the veg. It is a miracle! It is not, it is

:26:44.:26:50.

just reduction of water! Finish off the sauce with a little bit more

:26:51.:26:57.

butter... I am only joking! Have we got any left? A little bit of glaze

:26:58.:27:07.

in those. Those are lamb chops? We have the veg over here. We can take

:27:08.:27:18.

the veg... Can I hire all of you? This is fantastic! This lot are

:27:19.:27:28.

really cheap! A few bits of fresh English asparagus which I know you

:27:29.:27:34.

like. A bit of turnip. A few more bits of carrot. Fantastic. Nice and

:27:35.:27:42.

simple. Three of those chops. Have you ever cut yourself? No, but I

:27:43.:27:48.

have burned myself a few times. Today? That is my revenge. Do not be

:27:49.:27:56.

shy, Theo. Is that a Yorkshire three? These are the glazed

:27:57.:28:05.

potatoes. That is good. And the sauce over the top. Can you grab

:28:06.:28:10.

knives and forks. Are we all eating this? You get to go first. You go

:28:11.:28:21.

first. Over the top. Dive into that. Look at that! Lovely. Glasses

:28:22.:28:30.

please. It will not taste nice with this. Happy with that? It is a bit

:28:31.:28:40.

hot! It is good. How was the inside of the stomach? That was on that?

:28:41.:28:52.

Oh, OK! Delicious. Really. I honestly thought she would get a

:28:53.:28:57.

face full of fire extinguisher for a minute. Sadly, that is all we have

:28:58.:29:01.

time for. I hope you have enjoyed taking a look back at some of the

:29:02.:29:03.

delicious dishes. I know I # You can shake an apple

:29:04.:29:06.

off an apple tree # Shake-a, shake-a, sugar

:29:07.:29:18.

but you'll never shake me

:29:19.:29:23.

Matt Tebbutt takes a look back at some of his favourite recipes and best moments from Saturday Kitchen.