Who Needs Maths?


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Who Needs Maths?

Sanjeev Kohli is on a quest to show that maths is everywhere, even in the most unexpected places. He meets a range of people who all use maths in their everyday lives and jobs.


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Who needs maths? We all need maths!

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Maths is your friend, madam! Who needs maths?

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Who does need maths? Well, you need maths.

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No, no - don't turn around. It's you I'm talking to. You need maths. Why?

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Because maths is in everything that you do, OK?

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It's in your look, in your clothes and your hair.

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It's in the food that you eat. It's in your house where you live.

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It's in your health and your fitness.

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Trust me, I'll prove this to you.

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Maths is all around you - you just weren't looking hard enough. I mean, there's even maths in comedy.

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In a recent poll, right, they discovered that, erm,

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50% of people understand percentages.

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And er, the remaining 83% don't.

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Who needs percentages? You need percentages.

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Percentages are everywhere.

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50% off in the sale.

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50% polyester. 26% fat content.

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13% of the public vote.

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63% of my time watching television and consuming pasties.

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I think I'm 80% sure that I'm a 100% out of shape.

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I'm applying for Celebrity Space Hopper Mathletes,

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which of course, as you know, features 12 celebrities

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pitching their maths skills against each other on a space hopper.

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Could be my chance to meet a regional news presenter.

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The winner gets a 12-month teaching contract and a massive golden space hopper.

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And I want a piece of that.

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Now, it says here on the application form that all competitors will be

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expected to give one 110% effort at all times.

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Is that even possible? Can you give a 110% effort?

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Think I'd better ask someone who knows.

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This is Riccardo, personal trainer to the stars and now me.

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Right, now, erm, maths...

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-Yeah.

-In personal fitness, does it feature, is it a thing?

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It's a massive thing in my industry.

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It's one of the things that's most important cos we have to find out lots of different types of

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percentages, for example, the workout intensity a client can go to.

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We work out percentages when it comes to nutrition.

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And also, there's body statistics as well.

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Pick it up! Pick it up!

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So even in the world of health and fitness, maths is key.

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Keep it going, keep it going!

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Riccardo uses it to work out how hard to push his clients.

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This is hardcore maths.

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Because winners train, losers complain.

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Keep it strong! Up!

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-Are you a winner?

-Yes!

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Right, let's get some claps. Yes!

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Push it! Lovely!

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That's what I'm looking for.

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OK, Sanjeev, our goal is to try and find out what you can lift,

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once and once only, ie your 100% maximum effort. OK?

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-OK.

-And we're going to focus on doing a bench press.

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Riccardo's started me off with just a bar and he reckons lifting this

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is taking about 30% of my effort.

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And as the weights get added on I can feel it getting harder.

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I'm not sure how much more I'm going to be able to lift!

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Three, two, one...and lift.

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HE GROANS

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-There we go.

-OK.

-I got you.

-OK.

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-Whenever you're ready. One time is what we're going for.

-Yeah.

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Ready and....drop.

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Good, now push.

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HE GROANS

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Keep going, keep going, keep going, Do you think you could do one more?

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Shall I try?

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-You can try.

-OK.

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OK. Push, push.

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Mummy! Daddy! Argh!

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-I've got it.

-No, no.

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Well, I did manage to speak some words of Serbo-Croat there

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but I certainly didn't manage to lift that.

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So the point is that that was your 100% maximum effort.

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So showing obviously that 100% maximum effort is all you can do.

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So there you go, point proved.

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You cannot give more than a 100%.

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Yes, despite what the celebrity mathletes folk

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and football managers say, 100% is the maximum.

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Clear? Good. Right, that's plenty of Riccardo.

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Time to make that golden space hopper mine.

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OK, so we're going to have to get you ready for the Celebrity Space Hopper Mathletes.

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-OK. Ready when you are.

-Ready? OK.

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Do you think I'll be able to do this?

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-I think so.

-I'm not so sure.

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-So your maximum heart rate is 178 beats per minute.

-Right.

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What I want to do is, I want you to find out for me

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what 60% of that is?

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106.8, sir!

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Good! OK, round it up to the nearest whole number.

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107.

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Perfect! What's 70% of 130?

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Bring up the tempo. Work it out!

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-91.

-91. Perfect, yes.

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Give me more, give me more!

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You need 80% of the public vote to get into the final of Celebrity Space Hopper Mathletes, OK.

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-We expect 5,600 calls to come in.

-Really?

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Sanjeev, tell me what 80% of 5,600 is.

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4,480 votes.

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That's correct! And...

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and stop!

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Well, I gave 100%, which is all I could give.

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And Riccardo is very impressed.

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In fact he was so impressed he's offered me 33.3% reduction

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in his personal training rate, which is a third.

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It's very reasonable.

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Here's the answer I gave him.

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I once had a 2-week argument with a 90-degree angle.

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Turned out he was right.

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AUDIENCE GROANS

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Angles, angles, who needs angles? Well, you need angles.

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To stand up. To sit down.

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To stand up again.

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To walk.

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To moonwalk.

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Look here, I can't moonwalk. The point is, every time you move, you're using angles.

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You don't even know it. Check this out.

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Right angle!

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And er...

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Acute angle!

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Do you know what else is cute? This haircut.

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It's a new style that I'm thinking of showcasing.

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But I don't know, I don't think I can get away with that any more.

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Besides, the whole palm tree thing is very last year.

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No, no, I think I need to rethink my look and who better to

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help me out than top hair professor, Mr Sharz Din.

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-Sharz, how are you?

-Very good, thank you very much. How are you?

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I'm not too bad. So, maths and hair.

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Surely two completely mutually exclusive separate worlds?

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Not at all. Erm, what's very interesting

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about that is that we actually use maths all the time, particularly geometry.

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And the most important part of it, of course,

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is the understanding of angles.

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OK, so could you maybe talk me through specifically how you

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use angles in hair and at the same time sort out my barnet?

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Why don't we have a little look at a couple of models

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-and see how angles work on the head shape?

-OK, sounds good.

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This is the lovely Helen.

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-Hello. And who's this chatterbox here?

-Er, this is er, Sally.

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To be honest I've been giving Sally a really good scalp ritual

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for two minutes and I'm getting nothing back off her. Are you all right, love?

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Anyway, what are we going to do today, then?

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Well, first of all, what we're going to do is an iconic haircut

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called the graduated bob.

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And it starts off at the back, shorter at the nape,

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rounder at occipital bone travelling into a horizontal line

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-to complement the jaw.

-OK, so it's a genuine combination of different angles.

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It certainly is. Are you ready to get started?

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Are you ready to go? I'll take that as a yes.

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Whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa! Stop right there!

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-What?

-It's not looking quite how it should, is it?

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I'm not hearing HER complain.

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Why don't you put your scissors down, and I'll show you how we work with angles?

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Bit harsh.

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We've sectioned Helen's hair off.

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-Into two right angles, I notice.

-Very good.

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And two right angles coming together make that section perpendicular.

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OK.

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Now, how we start is,

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if we imagine the jaw is horizontal or at zero degrees...

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Yeah.

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And that would make that angle 90 degrees,

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I'm going to cut Helen's hair at 45 degrees, right in between.

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Now after that, the angle then becomes less and less

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or more ACUTE as I work around the head.

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You're stepping down, down, down, down, more and more acute

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as you work around the head and then you finally hit zero.

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-Very good. Excellent.

-Wow, who knew there was so much maths in hair?

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Check the skills. The man is simply a wizard with the scissors

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but he couldn't do this without the maths to back it up.

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Maestro, it's beautiful! Look at all the angles!

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-It's nice how it all combines.

-So can you repeat that trick with your angle skills

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and do something with this?

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We can try.

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Right, Sanj, this is your new look.

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Vertical, 45 degrees, horizontal.

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What do you think?

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I think it's the future of hair.

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You've actually created a new hairstyle.

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-I've even got a name for it.

-What's that?

-The protractor!

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I don't understand, right, I keep putting up

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the volume on my television and it's still the same size.

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# Pump up the volume, pump up the volume, pump up the volume, check it out... #

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WHO NEEDS VOLUME? Sorry, you need volume.

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Volume is the measure of the space taken up by three-dimensional objects.

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And pretty much all of your possessions are three-dimensional objects.

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Your hat, your cat, your bat. It doesn't even have to rhyme with hat.

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Everything you own takes up space. How much space? VOLUME?

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I mean, look, I've got no space left in this room.

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It's just full of junk I don't even use any more. Look. Legs!

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I've got a perfectly good pair in my trousers.

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What have I got? Yes!

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This, 100 copies of this.

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The Sanjeev workout plan. Why didn't that sell?

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Space hopper. I take the bus now.

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What else? Ukulele...

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Why didn't that career take off? The old ball pit.

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I mean, phff, the number of nights I've spent in that.

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But I need to get rid of it all. I need to free up some space. I need to put all this stuff up in storage

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and frankly it's too big a job for one man.

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I think I'm going to need some help.

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And this is why I keep this man, Gavin, in my cupboard.

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Gavin, you are, are you not, an expert in volume?

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-I am.

-How so?

-I run a removals and storage company

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and for every job we do, we need to have an accurate volume of the job

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so we know what's going to fit in boxes, or what's going to fit in our vans and containers.

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So, can I ask you, using that volume brain, to hazard a guess as to the

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total volume of the stuff I need to take out of here and put in storage?

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Total volume...including the furniture is five million

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cubic centimetres or five cubic metres.

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Now that's a lot of cubic centimetres

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but will it all fit in Gavin's wee van?

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Now let's start with the ball pit, yeah? Erm, I'm actually quite sad to see this go.

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I've got quite attached to this. I even gave all the balls a name, so that one's called Derek.

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-OK, right, can you help me work out the volume of this ball pit, please?

-Sure.

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What have you got?

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-80 centimetres.

-And I also have 80 centimetres.

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Er, but it is a cuboid so we need to measure the height as well, don't we?

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We do indeed. And the height's 30 centimetres.

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OK so that's 80 x 80 x 30.

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So it's a 192,000 cubic centimetres. Is there room in your van for this?

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-Plenty!

-OK, let's take it, come on!

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Gavin's van only holds five cubic metres.

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Let's hope his estimate of my stuff is right. Or it could be two trips!

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-Gavin, check me out! I've found some old clothes.

-Nice!

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But maybe we should stop monkeying around and get this stuff packed.

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-Fair enough, have you got something we could put this in?

-Yeah, we could put it in here.

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Do you remember how to calculate the volume of a cylinder?

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Yes, I do. Er, we need some measurements, don't we?

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We need to measure the height of the cylinder first of all.

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The height is 48 centimetres.

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OK and then we need the radius, so if you can do the diameter.

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The diameter is 46 centimetres.

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Which means the radius is half the diameter, which is 23 centimetres

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so now I've got an equation.

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So that's 79,730.88 cubic centimetres of my old clothes. In you go!

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The success of Gavin's business relies on accurate volume calculations.

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The wrong measurement of even the smallest objects can make or break a job.

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Right, I think that's everything packed. I think we've done it.

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Everything except for the sticky notes!

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Oh, disaster! Have we not accounted for these?

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Can we get these in your van? Better measure them. That's er, 7.6 centimetres...

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..by 7.6 centimetres by... by 7.6 centimetres!

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-Yeah, I think we can squeeze it in.

-Oh, thank Harry Styles!

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Right, come on. Let's get this stuff into the van. Come on!

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Great. Gavin was right. It did all fit into his wee van.

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Happy days! But even happier days because get this...

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I don't have to move it any more

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because I found a brilliant empty room to store it all in!

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How did I miss it? Honestly, I'm so unobservant sometimes.

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There's only one question remains. Does it have enough volume?

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You cannae trust these people, right, that want to make all the measurements metric.

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Honestly.

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Give them an inch and they take 1.609344 kilometres.

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Measurement. Who needs measurement? Well, we all need measurement.

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You measure everything. You measure time. You measure...

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distance. You measure space.

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You measure trousers.

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I could go on. The point is, it's hard to get a measure on how much we need measurement.

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I've been invited a very important party tonight

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so I've been clothes shopping.

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Hit the sales and er, you know what it's like.

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You go sale shopping and sometimes you buy stuff that doesn't quite fit.

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Clearly measurement is the issue here

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so I need to find someone who can do some clothes maths.

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And this is Elle. She seems stressed.

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Sorry, she's a seamstress.

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Yeah! I make and alter clothes.

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So do you think you can rescue these clothes and make me

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look sharp for this party and also, is there any maths involved in that?

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Well, maths is really important in dressmaking and altering clothes. Erm, measurement is key.

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And erm, when you get measurements wrong this is kind of what can happen.

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For example, this is far too big across the shoulders.

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And that's a little bit long in the sleeve.

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And then the trousers, you can see they're a bit snug and erm,

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a tad short. Erm...

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You've got a good eye.

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-What, er, is your inside leg measurement?

-Er, 34 inches?

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34 inches?

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Well, most of the time I work in centimetres.

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86. Just over 86 centimetres.

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-OK.

-It's quite long. So if I could ask you to hold that there.

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And you can see that these trousers are only 73 centimetres,

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which is far too short.

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-That's really quite short, isn't it?

-Yeah...

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Can these be rescued, then?

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Well... The only thing I could do is add some more material on to the bottom.

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Erm, but it would be different material

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and it would be quite an interesting look.

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I think I'll give that a miss.

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-Are you sure?

-Yeah, I think so. So, erm,

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-trousers for the bin, you think?

-I'm afraid so.

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OK. Right, OK, well, fair enough. Move on. Jacket.

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The jacket. Because the jacket's bigger, it's easier to make things smaller so you can take fabric out.

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So you can think then that you will be able to make this jacket look immeasurably sharp for the party?

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I'm pretty sure there's something we can do.

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So fashion isn't just about the look.

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The maths is crucial, too.

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Elle needs to be spot-on with her sums.

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One centimetre either way and I could be in fashion Alaska.

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Elle's taking care of my jacket to make sure

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I look dangerously good for the party tonight.

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Good enough even to justify a hat! Only one problem.

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I've got a massive head. Huge!

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Seriously, it's got its own moon and everything.

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This is the question.

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Do we have the maths to find a hat big enough for this watermelon?

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This is Pea. She's a milliner.

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That doesn't mean she's in a higher tax bracket,

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it means she makes hats from scratch, which is very impressive.

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OK now, be honest. You're the expert. Is there a hat for this bonce?

0:17:490:17:53

Absolutely, Sanjeev. There's hats for everybody these days!

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A hat for everyone, she says.

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I'm not sure she knows what she's letting herself in for.

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Wow!

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All right, now see that's what I'm talking about. Yeah, I like that.

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-Er, do you think maybe though, you could make it in a different material or something?

-Absolutely!

0:18:130:18:18

Luckily this style is one-size-fits-all.

0:18:180:18:21

Now, let's see where the maths comes in.

0:18:210:18:25

This is the crown of the hat, Sanjeev.

0:18:250:18:27

In order for me to work out how much wire I need,

0:18:270:18:30

I need to know the circumference of this circle.

0:18:300:18:33

Oh, the circumference.

0:18:330:18:34

Ah, so you'll be measuring the diameter of the circle.

0:18:340:18:36

-Yep, the diameter is 12 centimetres.

-Magic.

0:18:360:18:40

This gives me a chance to showcase my very favourite equation.

0:18:400:18:44

To work out the circumference,

0:18:440:18:45

Pea needs to multiply pi by the diameter.

0:18:450:18:48

But that's not the only measurement Pea needs for her business to be a success.

0:18:480:18:54

It's very time consuming, this hat-making business, isn't it?

0:18:540:18:57

Yeah, it really is.

0:18:570:18:58

So on average, how long would it take to make a hat?

0:18:580:19:01

I would probably be spending about 30 minutes

0:19:010:19:03

on a consultation with someone.

0:19:030:19:06

Possibly, 45 minutes pattern cutting.

0:19:060:19:08

And then, maybe three and a half hours making a hat?

0:19:080:19:12

-That's four hours and 45 minutes in total.

-Yeah.

0:19:120:19:16

I look at the time it's taken to make the hat

0:19:160:19:18

and then I look at the cost of the materials.

0:19:180:19:21

And then I'll come up with the final price for the completed hat.

0:19:210:19:25

Whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa! Am I getting charged for this?

0:19:250:19:30

Well, Pea had to give me the hat for free because Elle sewed

0:19:300:19:33

the money into the jacket pocket after she did this lovely fitting. Result! I'm off to a party!

0:19:330:19:37

See you later!

0:19:370:19:39

What did, what did, what did zero to say eight?

0:19:420:19:46

Nice belt.

0:19:460:19:48

Area. Who needs area? Well, we all need area.

0:19:510:19:54

Area defines the size of the surface.

0:19:540:19:56

And we all live on surfaces. Unless you're hovering.

0:19:560:19:59

Are you hovering? No. Are you hoovering?

0:19:590:20:03

Well, clearly not, judging by the state of your room. How long has that apple been there?

0:20:030:20:07

If you are hoovering, though, you're hoovering a carpet. A surface. A surface that requires material.

0:20:070:20:12

How much material? Area.

0:20:120:20:15

This bathroom is minging. Don't worry, it's not mine!

0:20:150:20:18

Like I would use a bathroom like this.

0:20:180:20:19

No, it's my mate's and I've decided to give it a secret makeover.

0:20:190:20:23

I've arranged for her to be away for the day and I'm going to transform this space and hopefully make her

0:20:230:20:27

cry as well, because, well, all the best makeover shows do, don't they?

0:20:270:20:30

I've got tiles, I've got paint.

0:20:300:20:34

What I don't have is any idea if I've got too much or not enough of that stuff.

0:20:340:20:38

I don't have much time but thankfully help is at hand.

0:20:380:20:41

-This is Steven. How are you doing, Steven?

-Hi there. How are you?

0:20:410:20:43

-Now you're a tiler by trade, aren't you?

-Yes, I am.

-So is maths something you use every day?

0:20:430:20:47

Yes, we use it every day. We use it for pricing jobs and measuring jobs.

0:20:470:20:50

So is area your specialist area?

0:20:500:20:53

Yes, we need to work out how many tiles we need.

0:20:530:20:55

OK. Good, so, you can help me to work out

0:20:550:20:58

if I've got enough of THIS to cover all of this.

0:20:580:21:00

-Yes, I can do.

-Cool. Let's do some magic!

0:21:000:21:05

OK, Steven, where do we start?

0:21:120:21:14

We need to work out where you want to tile.

0:21:140:21:16

OK, well, here's my vision. OK. I'm thinking tiles from the bath up to the rail.

0:21:160:21:22

-How far along do you want to go?

-Well, again, part of my vision is that I want to contain the

0:21:220:21:26

aquatic space so I'm thinking just actually to the edge of the bath.

0:21:260:21:29

-Then we'll need to measure the length by the height.

-OK.

0:21:290:21:32

-Well, do you want to the length and I'll do the height?

-Fine.

0:21:320:21:35

So the length is 170 centimetres

0:21:360:21:39

and the height is 96 centimetres.

0:21:390:21:41

Right, good so that's us worked out the area that needs to be tiled so do we have enough tiles?

0:21:430:21:47

Yes, I think so but we'll need to measure the area of one tile to see if I've got enough.

0:21:470:21:50

OK, right. Well, I'll hold the tile if you can do the measuring.

0:21:500:21:56

It's 15 centimetres by 15 centimetres.

0:21:560:21:58

OK. So the area of one tile is length times breadth, which is

0:21:580:22:02

15 centimetres by 15 centimetres which is...

0:22:020:22:04

225 square centimetres.

0:22:070:22:09

(That's very good...)

0:22:090:22:10

So to work out how many tiles we need,

0:22:100:22:12

we divide that area by the area of that.

0:22:120:22:15

That's correct, yes.

0:22:150:22:19

Right, so we need 72.5 tiles. What does that mean?

0:22:230:22:26

What we'll need to do now is we need to add 10% for waste

0:22:260:22:29

or breakages which is about 80 tiles.

0:22:290:22:32

-OK, so that's something that you normally do?

-Every time.

0:22:320:22:34

-OK, well, that's good news because 80...we have 80, so we can get cracking.

-Yes.

0:22:340:22:38

OK, good - let's get started then!

0:22:380:22:39

-Right, these are all meant to be white.

-Yep.

0:22:420:22:44

Er, well, this wasn't part of the vision.

0:22:440:22:47

Right, do you know what, though? Let's get creative.

0:22:470:22:50

Right, OK. Tell me what you think of this, OK? So we still have the white in the middle...

0:22:500:22:54

-Yes.

-But, we use these tiles to sort of create a border round there.

0:22:540:22:59

-Do you think that might work?

-Yes, just tile the perimeter in yellow then?

-Aha.

-Yes.

0:22:590:23:03

-But do we have enough of these tiles to do that?

-We should do, yes.

0:23:030:23:07

Steven's quick maths confirms I've got enough tiles for my border.

0:23:070:23:10

Result!

0:23:100:23:11

Wish I'd had his maths skills when I bought the paint.

0:23:110:23:13

Turns out I've got enough for the bathroom, the kitchen and a small car.

0:23:130:23:18

Oooh! My pal's going to love this!

0:23:190:23:22

That's me finished.

0:23:290:23:30

Well, I've just heard my friend is on her way back now

0:23:380:23:40

and I genuinely, genuinely think we're going to see tears. Oh, yeah.

0:23:400:23:46

FRIEND SCREAMS

0:23:460:23:48

I always wear my glasses when I'm doing decimals.

0:23:510:23:55

Don't see the point otherwise.

0:23:550:23:58

AUDIENCE GROANS

0:23:580:24:00

Who needs ratios and fractions? Well, you need ratios and fractions.

0:24:070:24:11

You use them all the time!

0:24:110:24:12

Give me half a minute.

0:24:120:24:13

Can I have half rice, half chips?

0:24:130:24:15

A third of my class are halfwits - which is the same as saying

0:24:150:24:18

half of my class are third wits, mathematically speaking.

0:24:180:24:22

One place you'll definitely need your ratios and fractions though, is in the kitchen.

0:24:220:24:28

So here's the deal. I've got a pile of mince, the size of my head.

0:24:280:24:31

That's a lot of mince. So I'm going to have some friends round for dinner tonight.

0:24:310:24:34

20 people are coming. Yeah, I've got 20 friends.

0:24:340:24:37

16 are from an agency but the point is I've decided to cook

0:24:370:24:40

a big old pot of chilli for 20.

0:24:400:24:43

What am I going to need to make chilli for 20?

0:24:430:24:45

Well, I think the first think I'm going to need is a bit of help....

0:24:450:24:48

-Hello, Emili!

-Hi, Sanjeev.

-How are you?

-I'm very well, thanks.

0:24:480:24:51

Good. Is maths something you would use in your everyday professional life?

0:24:510:24:54

Absolutely! Every single day, whether I realise I'm doing it or not, I'm always using maths.

0:24:540:24:59

-So what's the most you've ever catered for?

-Oh, I've catered for anything from one person to 1,001!

0:24:590:25:04

Cool, so you could cope with 20.

0:25:040:25:06

I think I can cope with 20.

0:25:060:25:07

All you need is confidence in your recipe and some maths!

0:25:070:25:13

Well, I've got my mum's secret chilli recipe here

0:25:130:25:15

although I clearly got it from a website.

0:25:150:25:17

Rumbled, Mum!

0:25:170:25:19

But this recipe's only for four people.

0:25:190:25:21

Oh, and we're catering for 20.

0:25:210:25:23

Ah, so oh, right, so what now, then?

0:25:230:25:26

Well, I guess we scale up from four to 20.

0:25:260:25:29

So what we're doing then is, it's er, multiplying everything by five.

0:25:350:25:38

-Yep.

-OK. I think I can cope with that.

0:25:380:25:41

So it's er, 500 grams of mince times five is 2,500.

0:25:410:25:45

600 grams chopped onions.

0:25:470:25:49

OK, so two tins of tomatoes.

0:25:510:25:53

-OK, so that's easy.

-Two times five.

0:25:530:25:55

-Ten!

-That's it, you got it!

-Ten tins of tomatoes, OK.

0:26:010:26:05

Ah, right, now. That wee guy's a fraction.

0:26:060:26:09

One-and-a-third cans of kidney beans.

0:26:090:26:12

-A bit more tricky.

-Yeah, why don't...

0:26:120:26:14

What we could do, we could empty a can of kidney beans,

0:26:140:26:17

count them and times that by five.

0:26:170:26:20

That's crazy talk. Are you scared of a little fraction?

0:26:200:26:23

I'm not scared of fractions!

0:26:230:26:25

-Put in six and a bit.

-Six and a bit? OK.

0:26:310:26:35

-Red peppers.

-Red peppers. Ten cloves of garlic.

0:26:360:26:42

And one stock cube times five. Five stock cubes. OK, next up is the extra-hot chilli paste.

0:26:420:26:48

And that's another fraction.

0:26:480:26:50

Yeah, this is crucial because I get this wrong and we're spending the night in A&E, ha-ha!

0:26:500:26:55

Argh!

0:26:550:26:56

So five times 2.5. So that's 12.5 teaspoons of extra-hot chilli paste.

0:26:560:27:01

-That's a lot of chilli paste, isn't it?

-Well, 20 is a lot of people.

0:27:010:27:05

Fair enough, OK.

0:27:050:27:08

When it comes to cooking, it's not just recipe and technique.

0:27:080:27:12

There's maths in that pot.

0:27:120:27:15

Top kitchen work, Emili.

0:27:150:27:16

Er, that's the food in good shape, the chilli bubbling away there

0:27:160:27:19

like, er, two pots of mince with other stuff in it.

0:27:190:27:23

Hopefully in the right ratio.

0:27:230:27:24

Er, but what about drinks for my wee soiree?

0:27:240:27:28

Well, er, funny you should ask.

0:27:280:27:30

Well, I'm a sophisticated kind of guy. Kind of know minor royalty.

0:27:340:27:37

I eat fruit you probably never even heard of.

0:27:370:27:39

So I want a sophisticated drink.

0:27:390:27:41

I'm going for a non-alcoholic cocktail that's one I invented myself.

0:27:410:27:45

I call it the Jazzy Handbag.

0:27:450:27:47

It's four parts cola, two parts orange juice,

0:27:470:27:49

one part chicken stock. Mmm!

0:27:490:27:52

So I'm thinking a litre of this taste sensation per guest.

0:27:520:27:56

20 guests - and er, not forgetting myself,

0:27:560:27:58

that's 21 one litres of Jazzy Handbag.

0:27:580:28:02

Who said I can't throw a party?

0:28:020:28:03

Ahhhh!

0:28:110:28:12

That's perfection. The chicken really dances on the tongue.

0:28:190:28:22

So all we need now is guests.

0:28:220:28:25

Now as you can see, I've invited them at 7.30 on Saturday

0:28:250:28:29

and the time now is...

0:28:290:28:31

..quarter to, that's 15 minutes to nine on...

0:28:310:28:36

Friday.

0:28:360:28:37

Do you like chilli?

0:28:400:28:42

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:28:540:28:56

Comedian, and lover of all things mathematical, Sanjeev Kohli asks Who Needs Maths? He is on a quest to show that maths is everywhere, even in the most unexpected places.

Meeting a range of people who all use maths in their everyday lives and jobs, Sanjeev enlists them to help him solve a few problems. When it comes to getting fit for an audition for a new TV show, personal trainer Ricardo is on hand to talk through the maths of health and fitness. Professor of hair, Sharz, gives Sanjeev a lesson on angles as he creates a new style and it is volume expert Gavin with his wee van that Sanjeev turns to when he has storage problems.

Sanjeev discovers there is even maths in our clothes when he buys some ill-fitting bargains at the sales. And, luckily, tiler Steven is to hand when he gives a bathroom a makeover. Plus cook Emili shows Sanjeev you need more than herbs and spices to cook a chilli for 20 friends. Maths is all around us. There is even maths in comedy. And if you don't know it or can't see it yet - you're just not doing your sums right!