11/02/2017 Reporters - Short Edition


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11/02/2017

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Welcome to Reporters.

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I'm Karin Giaonone.

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From here in the BBC newsroom, we send out correspondence to bring

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you the best stories from across the globe.

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In this week's programme...

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On the brink of famine.

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We report from Yemen as the United Nations launches

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an emergency appeal for aid.

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The struggle of the smugglers.

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A reporter joins the Kurds desperately trying to make a living

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on the Iraqi border.

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Believe it or not, it is impossible to take a sip.

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They say the black is for the majority people like me.

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The UN has appealed for $2 billion to provide life-saving assistance

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to millions in Yemen, who it says face the threat of famine.

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Almost 3.3 million people are now suffering from acute malnutrition.

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More than 2 million of them are children.

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Aid workers say the situation is catastrophic

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and rapidly deteriorating.

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Now there is a new complication.

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Warplanes from the Saudi-led coalition battling the Houthi rebels

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who control the capital have hit a vital port, which means aid supplies

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cannot be unloaded.

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Nawal Al-Maghafi is one of the few Western journalists to have

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travelled to Yemen in recent months and sent this report.

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Fatima is the face of hunger in Yemen.

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In the six months since we met her, every day has been

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a struggle to get food.

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Her mother says they are barely surviving.

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Fatima is not alone.

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There are over two million children like her.

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90% of Yemen's food is imported and most of it arrives here,

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at what was once its busiest port.

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But all the cranes needed to off-load the ships have been

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bombed by the Saudi-led coalition.

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And the port is barely functioning.

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The Saudis have imposed an aerial and naval blockade,

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controlling all imports to the country.

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They say they are stopping arms from getting to

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the Houthis and their allies.

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But that means that very little food is getting through.

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The World Food Programme has bought new cranes for Hodeda's port

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but we have been told the Saudi coalition has refused to allow them

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in for at least two months.

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These delays in bringing foodstuffs onshore, either

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commercially or humanitarian, means there's less

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available and therefore, the prices will go up.

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From what I've heard, the Saudi argument is that firstly,

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the port is in control of the Houthis, so they are handing

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over cranes to a port that is in control of the rebels.

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They also say that these cranes could be used to off-load arms

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for the rebels and therefore, fuel the fight.

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What would you say to that?

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Those cranes are for WFP.

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Those cranes are brought in and funded for WFP,

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who are the logistics cluster, to bring those food goods off

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ships that are coming in.

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The port is controlled by the same people who have always

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controlled the port, the same as the sea

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offshore is controlled by the Saudi-led coalition.

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So we just want these cranes in so we can do our work,

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to make sure the humanitarian pipeline is a strong

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as it can possibly be.

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The fighting for control of the port has been

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going on for over six months, with neither side winning.

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And it's the most vulnerable that are left suffering.

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Nawal al-Maghafi, BBC News.

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Asotthalom is a village in southern Hungary that you've probably

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never heard of until now.

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Its population is dwindling, but it's hoping to persuade

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white Christian Europeans, who don't like the idea

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of living in a multicultural society to move there.

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The mayor has already banned Islamic dress and gay kissing in public.

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Leslie Ashmall has been to the village where Muslims

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and gays are not welcome.

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Asotthalom, a village on the southern Hungary plains,

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just minutes from the Serbian border where in 2015 10,000 migrants a day

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crossed into Hungary.

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The village population is declining and homesteads stand vacant.

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The mayor here wants to attract foreign investors

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but not just any foreigner.

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TRANSLATION: We primarily welcome people from Western Europe.

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People who would not like to live in a multicultural society.

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We would not want to attract Muslim people.

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What if I was black or gay?

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How would you feel about that?

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TRANSLATION: Asotthalom has a by-law which bans homosexual propaganda.

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We adopted it a few weeks ago.

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Think about this, Europe is small, it cannot take in billions of people

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from Africa and South Asia where there is a population boom.

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This would soon lead to the disappearance of Europe.

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I would like Europe to belong to Europeans.

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Asia to Asians and Africa to Africans.

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Simple as that.

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He is so serious he has introduced local legislation banning public

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displays of affection by gay people, the wearing of Islamic dress

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like the hijab, and he wants to ban the building of mosques.

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And his views are being pushed by a British organisation called

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Knights Templar International.

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The former British National Party leader Nick Griffin is a member

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and the group is advertising smallholdings for sale

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in Asotthalom.

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Hungary is already seen by more and more Western Europeans

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as a place of refuge, a place to get away from the hell

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that is about to break loose in Western Europe.

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There are two Muslims in Asotthalom.

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One of them agreed to speak to us but at the last minute pulled out.

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They have spoken of their fears to Hungarian media in the past

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but other villagers reject the laws are huge concern.

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However, they are the talk of the village pub.

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TRANSLATION: Important issues like this should be dealt

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with by the National government, not local legislation.

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If they take off the veil I'll accept them.

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It does not even matter if they are black, they should

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become Hungarian citizens even if they are

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Muslims or whatever.

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Are you trying to create a white kind of supremacist village?

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I did not use this word white but because we are a white

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European Christian population, we want to stay this...

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Like this, so...

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The refugee crisis has contributed to the anti-immigrant sentiments

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in Europe, like the rise of the

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French Front National and the Dutch Party for Freedom.

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Hungary is no exception.

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To its critics, it was a monstrosity resembling an oil refinery

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more than a museum.

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But as Paris' Pompidou Centre celebrates its 40th birthday this

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week, its reputation as an icon of modern architecture

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is now well established.

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It has been popular with more than 100 million visitors passing

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through its doors since 1977.

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Will Gompertz has been speaking to two of the original architects,

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Richard Rodgers and Renzo Piano about the Pompidou's

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enduring legacy.

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Ah, Paris, beautiful, romantic, and radical.

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A city of revolutions, riots and avant-garde ideas.

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Like the Pompidou Centre, which in 1977 was like an electric

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shock for cultural conservatives.

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A daring, inside out building with its guts on show and weird

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caterpillar escalators crawling up its facade.

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These two self-confessed bad boys were behind its creation.

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Unknown iconoclasts back then, respected pillars of society today.

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They hadn't expected their design to beat the 680 competing proposals.

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And when it did, a steep learning curve awaited.

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It was a miracle, we had court cases against us, everybody hated it,

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nobody had worse press than we did.

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It was only when it opened and people started to line up

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and people started to come in and the figures were

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fantastic, it changed.

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This building was a shift, it was celebrating a shift, a change.

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Yes.

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And when the change occurs in society, it's never

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easy, it's never easy.

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The change was in the air.

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It was in the air of May '68, it was in the air of the time.

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So you've got to have a change.

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We were just simply building the change.

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What were your reference points?

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Where had you seen similar ideas executed?

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It was a cross between New York's Times Square,

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which was full of glitter and so on and sex and all the rest

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of it, but it was lovely because people wanted to get there,

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and the British Museum, a symbol of one of the greatest

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museums of the world, where you could sit down and do

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a deep cultural study.

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Beauty can change the world.

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It can help to change the world, and become a unifying element.

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I think beauty is tremendously underrated.

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It is the glue which pulls us all togetther.

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Their Pompidou was a utopian project where people can

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explore art and ideas.

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A 40-year-old concept that they would argue is even

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more relevant today.

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Will Gompertz, BBC News, Paris.

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That's all from Reporters this week.

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From me, Karin Gionnone, it is goodbye for now.

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A weekly programme of stories filed by BBC reporters from all over the world, ranging from analyses of major global issues to personal reflections and anecdotes.