12/02/2017 The Papers


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12/02/2017

A lively, informed and in-depth conversation about the Sunday papers.


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Hello and welcome to our look at the Sunday papers.

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With me are the broadcaster and journalist Shyama Peireria,

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and Peter Conradi, who's foreign editor at the Sunday Times.

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First up the Observer, it's reporting what it calls

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"unprecedented criticism" by a group of leading retired bishops over

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the Church of England's stance on lesbian, gay

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While the Mail on Sunday looks back at a supposed exchange

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between Diane Abbott and the Brexit secretary David Davis,

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that's said to have happened after the vote to trigger

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The Sunday Telegraph focuses on Commons speaker John Bercow

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and his controversial comments about Donald Trump's visit,

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also mentioning there that the President may go to areas

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of the UK that voted heavily to leave the EU.

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The Sunday Express is also looking ahead to that visit and says

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Mr Trump will "speak to the people" at a stadium rally with the proceeds

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Domestic politics take the lead in the Sunday Times,

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it says secret succession planning is under way for the next Labour

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Thank you both very much indeed for joining us. Let's start with that

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story which makes it to quite a few papers, speculating about what is

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going to happen on Donald Trump's visit. We're hearing on the front

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page of the Sunday Telegraph that he is going to head to the leave

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heartland which we know as the Midlands. Exactly. It's great, isn't

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it? He's thinking that what we in the House of Commons, where can I

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go? What's more trompe like than a big stadium in the Midlands? It'll

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be interesting to see what reception he gets. It isn't unprecedented for

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a state visit to break out of London and speak in a stadium. No, the

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Indian leader came and addressed a rally in Wembley Stadium and Cameron

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came on stage at the end of it, so there is the president. It seems

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curious and at a rally by Donald Trump will be curious. Will Theresa

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May come on at the end with the final icing on the cake? They seem

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to be worried about having Donald Trump in London. What makes me laugh

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is they haven't done the homework because the West Midlands is the

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heartland of Asian populations and black populations, and what was so

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surprising is that these strong Labour strongholds all voted leave

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but they are still Labour strongholds, they are quite

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open-minded people who, for whatever reason, chose to vote to leave. He's

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going to have a lot of trouble filling stadiums unless turkeys

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aren't going to vote for Christmas by going to support a man who's

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going to ban people who look like them. All these people will come

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down to this stadium and have the Toronto case, they will start

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talking in tongues after seeing Mr Trump! You can't imagine it. Once

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they've finished there, they will be passing out at the alter while he is

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speaking. A lot of people will come along to hear him for the novelty

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value. To see this extraordinary phenomenon in the flesh would be...

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I think it would be fascinating. Lots of people will turn out to

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protest, it will turn into a huge event. The best way of protesting

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would be to not turn up, not buy tickets and not be there because the

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fewer people there are, the less of a story it is. If he does speak in

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the West Midlands, assuming you're against Donald Trump and not

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everyone knows, it strikes me the best thing to do is not to go at

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all. It is very good cause, you see. The proceeds will go to the Poppy

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appeal. Are you saying the British Legion will say we will take your

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money? I don't think so, dream on! That's the story the Sunday Express

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has. President plans spectacular UK rally to help war veterans. Donald

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Trump will snub parliament, interesting to see which way round

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that might work. All the proceeds will go to the Poppy appeal. It is

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going to be hugely controversial, isn't it? Before we get carried

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away, this story is in two papers, it is thinly sourced, a lot of

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anonymous people not making very clear what and where we're getting

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this story from so let's see what happens. Our veterans are veterans

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because they fought against people who had policy similar to those

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mooted by Donald Trump and I don't think they'll be wanting his money.

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You suspect, though, the team in Downing Street, having rushed out

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this invitation to Donald Trump rather swiftly compared to those

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other US presidents, and he is hugely controversial since the ban

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which is in trouble in the US courts, you suspect Downing Street

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are going to be working overtime to work out how on earth this visit

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will work without it becoming too hugely controversial. Exactly. As

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you see when Theresa May went over to the States recently, the offer of

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a state visit at such an early stage in the relationship, you can

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understand with Grexit looming we are looking for friends, and there

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is a desperate need to ingratiate ourselves. He's already having to

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backtrack on every single policy that he has raised. He's had to

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accept one China, he's had to go back on the Muslim ban. By then, he

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might be lying on the floor of the White House weeping into his Twitter

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feed, unable to function. Who knows. Wishful thinking, I think. The

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Sunday Telegraph has this story about hackers targeting our kettles.

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The alarming prospect that somebody might find out what time I'm making

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my cup of tea in the morning. It is alarming stuff. It is fridges,

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driverless cars, what will be next? Bread makers, cappuccino machines?

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God knows. Underlying this, there is a serious point. This is all about

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the Security Centre opening up in GCHQ. One of the fears is with the

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Internet of things, all these appliances in the home that connect

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to the Internet, there are ways of getting into these devices from afar

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and turning them around and harnessing all this computing power

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to attack websites, to bring down websites. On a serious note, we have

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seen this happen with the Russians involved in attacks on Estonia, in

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Ukraine also, which, ridiculous as this sounds, you can actually bring

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down websites and do serious damage. This whole issue of cyber security

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is quite a serious one. There was an attack on a French TV station last

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year. I have to say whenever we're talking about terrorist attacks

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anywhere in the West, I always think what they have to do is bring down

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the National Grid, isn't it? We were having this conversation outside

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where we said all you need to do is randomly attack people in cars. Not

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driverless cars but smart cars. You are on Bluetooth, so your car can be

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hacked into. If you did ten random people in a major city, it would be

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chaos. We're not giving people ideas here! That is the way of the future.

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Of course, the other more immediate future preoccupying everybody is

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Brexit. The Daily Mail has gone to town... I can say this is the

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biggest confrontation wincing over Brexit but this was David Davis, the

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minister in charge of the Brexit process, and his meeting with Diane

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Abbott after the big vote. Which everybody said was a kiss. And the

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Mail on Sunday has finally got the truth which, apparently is that

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David David went to whisper and Diane Abbott's year after she voted

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to trigger an Article 50, thanks for your support. It may have looked

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like he was kissing her but he was saying thanks for your support. That

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was why she said expletive off to him because she was furious. And she

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was following blindly Jeromy. So it was the wrong Piper coming to thank

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her for playing the tune. It sounds like an extraordinary altercation

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because Diane Abbott had missed a previous vote and a lot of her

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colleagues were accused her of having Grexit flew because she never

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really wanted to vote the Brexit, then she felt she had to because the

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Labour leader was urging her to. It is the minute -- malady you get over

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quickly. It is such a trivial story. Is there nothing else happening in

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the world all week for the Mail on Sunday to lead on whether or not

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David Davis tried to give Diane Abbott a hug? It has been a big

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thing on Twitter, accusing him of sexism. What I think is interesting

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is that polarisation, where the idea that somebody who is a Tory can't

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kiss somebody who is Labour... I'm sure if it was Michael Portillo, she

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would've said fine. I'm sure when her son was in the city of London

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School, plenty of MPs at parents evening probably kissed her so it

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was fine. The question is have we got the stage where we can't even

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kiss someone who doesn't think the as you? The texts seem to have been

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the rocketry of Diane Abbott. This is just the Twitter effect, put a

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nonsense. Maybe I'm old-fashioned. A couple more stories. Not on the

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front page of the Sunday Times but looking at Samantha Cameron's new

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role. She is now focusing on her fashion label. Her husband is

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dealing with the childcare. This is great, splashed all over the Sunday

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Times today and in the style section. It is a launch with

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Samantha Cameron's clothing range. It gives us an insight into life at

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the Camerons, which, according to this account, appears to be exactly

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as you'd imagine it to be. He's saying all the things... He's

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spending more time with the children before, they are loving it. She

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comes in the evening and says, I don't think I can do this, darling.

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He says, come on, glass of wine, you can do it. It is very

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upper-middle-class, it delict of life. I think it is lovely, it is

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very posh and Becks. She is now going into fashion so now will

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probably have letters from David Cameron saying, why wasn't I made

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Sir or Lord! I think this is great. It is a great reversal of roles. I

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think it is completely all right for one partner to step back while the

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other partner is making their name. And then for that to happen in

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reverse. I think a wash and go collection from this mother... Is it

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wash and go? Nothing you have to iron, apparently. Also what I like

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anyway is just that she is coming into her own. She was raising four

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children all the time... Obviously, they lost one, sadly, but all the

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time he was a Number Ten, so this is a woman who was on the edge, you

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know? Good for her. And she had to fulfil that almost impossible role

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of Prime minister's wife because it is very difficult to get that one

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right. It is. It is like being a minor royal. If you don't do

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something or nothing, you get blamed for it. If you have some alternative

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career, you are cashing in. Good luck to her. Let's see what Mr may

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does, can't wait to see what he does next. Let's have a look at the

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Sunday people. I'll sue Lotto after ?1 million win. I was too young to

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scoop the jackpot and my life is ruined! Huge sympathy for this

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woman. This is an extraordinary story. This is a play on money

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changed my way of life. It has. And we have this wonderful story of what

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does she do with the money? She won at 17, she bought an ?18,000 purple

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range Rover. What else? Lots of parties in upmarket places, holidays

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and so on. But she isn't happy. She thinks boyfriends are after her for

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her money, friends are treating her in a different way. She just says

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you should have a higher age limit on it because getting a tad 17, you

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haven't got a clue and it can ruin her life, which she claims it has

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because she can only go to upmarket resorts. But it comes after a spat

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in McDonalds. So she's obviously eating with the rest of us. I'm sure

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all of us have had those conversations, what would you do if

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you ?1 million? We talk about the lovely time we'd have. If you've

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gone from a situation where you have very little and then you have huge

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pressure on you, everyone is expecting you to donate to their

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good cause or by the drinks, quite be difficult adjustment make. It's

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obvious it transforms your life. She was coming from not a wealthy

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background, living on a council estate in Edinburgh. To have all

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this money, the positive side is, buried in here, she has bought two

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flats with the money, she's got a new home for herself. It hasn't gone

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completely wrong for her. It is important to just create a

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framework, I think, for the young. And she must continue buying tickets

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because it pays for our heritage and our arts. Thank you both, Peter

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Conradi and Shyama Peireria. Thank you for talking is through the

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Sunday papers. York Minster's own police forces

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been given the same power of arrest as regular constables within the

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cathedral and its boundaries. York Minster is only one of five

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cathedrals in the world

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