13/03/2017 The Papers


Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS


13/03/2017

No need to wait until tomorrow morning to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to 13/03/2017. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow.

:00:14.:00:18.

With me are Matthew Syed, columnist at the Times,

:00:19.:00:21.

and Kevin Schofield, editor of PoliticsHome.

:00:22.:00:27.

Welcome to both of you, a look at those front pages first of all.

:00:28.:00:32.

The Times, unsurprisingly, leads on the Scotland First Minister's

:00:33.:00:34.

demand for a second referendum on Scottish independence,

:00:35.:00:36.

calling it an ambush, and reporting that Theresa May

:00:37.:00:38.

is preparing to reject Nicola Sturgeon's bid for two years.

:00:39.:00:43.

A witty play on words from the Metro -

:00:44.:00:46.

"Scots throw a sporran in the works,"

:00:47.:00:49.

reporting that the First Minister's announcement has thrown

:00:50.:00:52.

Downing Street's Brexit plans into chaos.

:00:53.:00:56.

And the Guardian continues the theme,

:00:57.:00:58.

headlining that the Prime Minister's plans

:00:59.:01:00.

have been upstaged by Scotland's First Minister.

:01:01.:01:05.

He Daily Telegraph calls the face-off between the two leaders the

:01:06.:01:11.

new Battle for Britain, and the paper includes quotes from Theresa

:01:12.:01:15.

May accusing next of tunnel vision. And finally the Daily Express, which

:01:16.:01:20.

has focused on the events in Westminster, saying that following

:01:21.:01:24.

the votes in Parliament, pushing through the Article 50 bill, the

:01:25.:01:28.

Queen could sign Brexit into law as early as tomorrow morning. Well,

:01:29.:01:34.

let's take some of those on board in the next few moments, we will start

:01:35.:01:38.

with the i, which leads with the headline, future of the UK in doubt,

:01:39.:01:44.

and it really is, we have got to that point, haven't we? It kind of

:01:45.:01:49.

sums up in a nutshell, really, those of us who covered the first

:01:50.:01:52.

referendum are still trying to get over that experience! Traumatised!

:01:53.:01:59.

Now we are being thrown back into it once more. This was always on the

:02:00.:02:04.

cards, as soon as Britain voted to leave the European Union and

:02:05.:02:10.

Scotland itself voted to remain. This was always likely to happen,

:02:11.:02:15.

but I still think that the timing is pretty significant. I think

:02:16.:02:18.

undoubtedly Nicola Sturgeon has caught Theresa May on the hop, a bit

:02:19.:02:22.

of an ambush, as one of the headline says, and she has taken the upper

:02:23.:02:28.

hand in this debate, but it has got a long way to go, and it will be

:02:29.:02:32.

interesting to see, once Theresa May four minutes a proper response, what

:02:33.:02:39.

she actually she says. -- formulates a proper response. I have to say, I

:02:40.:02:44.

think this is contemptible opportunism, because I understood

:02:45.:02:47.

the last referendum was to be once in a generation. At the time it took

:02:48.:02:51.

place, they knew that Cameron had promised to give a referendum to the

:02:52.:02:56.

whole of the UK on Brexit. And they still said it was going to be once

:02:57.:03:00.

in a generation. It seems to me that the rules of the game was such that,

:03:01.:03:04.

after that referendum, Scotland decided to stay in, they were

:03:05.:03:08.

committed to accepting the majority view of the United Kingdom as a

:03:09.:03:12.

whole. It seems to me that this is opportunistic, and I am not at all

:03:13.:03:15.

surprised that Theresa May is likely to push back, partly on the timing,

:03:16.:03:20.

but if she pushes it back until after the next Scottish elections,

:03:21.:03:24.

it will be difficult for the SNP to trigger the referendum. I mean, this

:03:25.:03:28.

could be a constitutional crisis. Without a doubt, I think it will be.

:03:29.:03:32.

You are right, I don't see the benefit for Theresa May in agreeing

:03:33.:03:37.

to have a referendum while she is also trying to get through the

:03:38.:03:44.

minefield of Brexit, so on the one hand you would be carrying of

:03:45.:03:47.

discussions with 27 other member states, trying to get the best

:03:48.:03:51.

possible deal for Britain, while at the same time trying to fight a

:03:52.:03:54.

battle to keep the country together. I don't see why she would agree to

:03:55.:03:58.

do that, because it is in her gift to decide whether or not to give the

:03:59.:04:02.

Scottish Parliament the power to hold a referendum, and it would be

:04:03.:04:07.

madness to do it well Brexit is rumbling on. Of course, the next

:04:08.:04:10.

argument would be that she has a mandate as a result of the Scottish

:04:11.:04:14.

elections that were most recently held, because she had put in a

:04:15.:04:18.

manifesto, if there is a material change in the relationship between

:04:19.:04:24.

Britain and, well, Scotland and the UK as a result of Brexit, she can do

:04:25.:04:29.

it again. That manifesto was a bit of slippage in itself, because

:04:30.:04:34.

material change is open to all sorts of interpretations. They were not

:04:35.:04:39.

saying, during the first independence campaign, that we will,

:04:40.:04:43.

if we lose, introduced into the next manifesto, a clause saying that if

:04:44.:04:47.

there is any material change... They were all saying, it is once in a

:04:48.:04:51.

generation, come what may, and I felt that was unfair. I was in

:04:52.:04:56.

favour of Remain as a voter, and I campaigned for it when I could. But

:04:57.:05:01.

I accept the result of that too. If you are going to have a fair fight,

:05:02.:05:04.

you have to abide by the rules and not try to weasel your way out of

:05:05.:05:09.

it, and Jude processes such an important concept, because then you

:05:10.:05:13.

can plan, have some certainty when you are casting your ballot. -- due

:05:14.:05:20.

process is. It seems to me that this is a corrosive effect, I do not

:05:21.:05:24.

think it is good for democracy. What is the Metro take on it? I said a

:05:25.:05:31.

witty headline in the run through a moment ago, I am not sure that it

:05:32.:05:34.

necessarily stands up to that examination. I am not sure that will

:05:35.:05:39.

be the front page in the Scottish edition! Is there a Scottish

:05:40.:05:43.

edition? I believe there is, I believe they usually have a

:05:44.:05:48.

different front page, and Scots throw a in the works, a bit of a

:05:49.:05:54.

tortuous pun. -- throw a temporary. Anyway, leaving the headline aside,

:05:55.:05:59.

it just shows you, all the front pages are dominated, on a day when

:06:00.:06:04.

the Article 50 bill is passed, a massive enough story in itself,

:06:05.:06:08.

ordinarily that would be the front page, but Nicola Sturgeon's faces

:06:09.:06:12.

staring out from every single front page. So it shows you it has been a

:06:13.:06:17.

massive PR win for her. No doubt what the Scottish Daily Mail thinks

:06:18.:06:21.

about it, not only have they got a headline which is pretty clear, they

:06:22.:06:26.

have got comment on the front page. It is very neutral, very difficult

:06:27.:06:30.

to know what the editorial line is(!) They are going strongly with

:06:31.:06:35.

the line that May may turn down the idea that Nicola Sturgeon has of

:06:36.:06:40.

having the referendum before Brexit. But this is going to be

:06:41.:06:43.

extraordinarily divisive, not just the campaign between those who want

:06:44.:06:46.

to remain part of the UK and those who do not, but those who feel that

:06:47.:06:50.

this is a betrayal of an earlier pledge to stick by the first result.

:06:51.:06:55.

The other thing to bear in mind is uncertainty, we already have

:06:56.:06:58.

uncertainty in England because we don't know the terms of Brexit, but

:06:59.:07:01.

at least there is a general expectation we will leave the single

:07:02.:07:06.

market, probably the customs union, there will hopefully be a free-trade

:07:07.:07:11.

deal. His Mrs in Scotland don't not this point whether they will be in

:07:12.:07:15.

the UK, whether they will be in the EU, whether they will be in the

:07:16.:07:18.

single market, whether they will be in the customs... They don't even

:07:19.:07:21.

know what the currency is going to be, extraordinary uncertainty with

:07:22.:07:26.

the Scottish economy is tanking, is that too strong a word? A bit

:07:27.:07:30.

strong, but the economic case has weakened since the last referendum,

:07:31.:07:34.

but the political case is strengthened, and I think that is

:07:35.:07:37.

the gamble that Nicola Sturgeon is taking, that the political case will

:07:38.:07:42.

trump the economic case, because as you say, the economic case is much

:07:43.:07:46.

weaker, the oil price has tanked, we can definitely say that. We were

:07:47.:07:52.

predicting a second oil boom at the time of the last referendum, and

:07:53.:07:56.

that has proven not to be the case. Till with politics, the other big

:07:57.:08:00.

talking point, Brexit, of course, various boats have gone in favour of

:08:01.:08:07.

the Government tonight. -- various votes. This is a leaked document

:08:08.:08:12.

which really reveals what, I think, we already knew which is the complex

:08:13.:08:16.

structure that we are currently trying to disentangle ourselves

:08:17.:08:20.

from, given the vote to leave the EU. They are saying that there will

:08:21.:08:24.

have to be new laws covering immigration, tax, agriculture,

:08:25.:08:32.

trade, data protection, six bills for benefits, reciprocal health

:08:33.:08:35.

arrangements, in addition to the Great Repeal Bill! There is a huge

:08:36.:08:40.

amount of negotiation of disentanglement, it is an

:08:41.:08:44.

extraordinarily complex thing that has to take place. David Davis, of

:08:45.:08:48.

course, is heading this up, and this just underlines what kind of thing

:08:49.:08:53.

we have got ourselves into. And all of that will involve votes, the Lord

:08:54.:08:58.

is getting involved, potential amendments, that is the potential

:08:59.:09:01.

complication. Absolutely, and a lot of MPs and peers, obviously the

:09:02.:09:07.

Government is in a minority in the House of Lords, who will be using

:09:08.:09:10.

this legislation as an opportunity to delay, frustrate the process. So

:09:11.:09:16.

the notion that they will be able to not only agree a divorce deal with

:09:17.:09:21.

the rest of the EU, but also agree free-trade arrangements within the

:09:22.:09:25.

two year period, when you are also trying to do that, it seems fanciful

:09:26.:09:34.

to me. And Scottish independence as well, a monumental period in front

:09:35.:09:39.

of us. Let's end with something less controversial, namely a photograph

:09:40.:09:42.

of Her Majesty the Queen on the front of the express, this is from

:09:43.:09:46.

the Commonwealth Day Evans today, which of course heralded the start

:09:47.:09:52.

of the baton relay head of the Commonwealth Games. Yes, quite a big

:09:53.:09:59.

story, 2022, Durbin, who had previously been the agreed hosts for

:10:00.:10:03.

that, they are no longer going to be the hosts. -- Durban. I think there

:10:04.:10:10.

may be a bid from Liverpool, it gives me an opportunity to chip in

:10:11.:10:14.

with the fact that I won a Commonwealth gold medal in

:10:15.:10:18.

Manchester, I know you want to discuss the tactics are used in the

:10:19.:10:23.

final! But I will tell you one thing, it is very different from the

:10:24.:10:27.

Olympics, great camaraderie, and in the build-up to all of that, they

:10:28.:10:32.

think of it as an anachronism, but it is a really uplifting experience,

:10:33.:10:37.

and quite a good spectacle too. In 2014, back to Scotland, in Glasgow,

:10:38.:10:45.

it came right after, no, it was just before the independence referendum,

:10:46.:10:50.

so you had the whole place in the firm and anyway, and then a

:10:51.:10:53.

Commonwealth Games, it was fantastic. Any medals or prizes?

:10:54.:11:01.

Honestly, I think I got a swimming badge! Bronze, probably! In the

:11:02.:11:08.

interest of studio harmony, I wanted to give you the opportunity! Thank

:11:09.:11:12.

you very much for the time being, thanks to both of you, you can join

:11:13.:11:18.

us again at 11:30, and you can see the front pages online on the BBC

:11:19.:11:21.

News website. For the moment, goodbye.

:11:22.:11:25.

No need to wait until tomorrow morning to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.