19/03/2017 The Papers


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19/03/2017

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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This is BBC News with Martine Croxall.

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We'll be taking a look at tomorrow morning's papers in a moment,

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The organisation representing NHS trusts in England has warned that

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frontline services won't be able to meet performance targets set

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by the government over the next year.

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Police have arrested a 33-year-old man on suspicion of the murder

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of a one-year-old boy and the attempted murder of a girl

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of the same age at a flat near Finsbury Park in north London.

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George Osborne's latest job as the editor of

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the London Evening Standard has led to calls for a rethink

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has five roles as well as his job as an MP.

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The plight of the civilians of western Mosul in Iraq.

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Survivors of Islamic State now in desperate need of aid.

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Some residents in Derby have been offered temporary accommodation,

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that's after their homes were damaged when a water mains

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burst sending plumes of water three storeys high.

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Hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be

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With me are Lucy Fisher, senior political correspondent

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for the Times, and Eve Pollard, former Fleet Street editor.

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The FT leads with a report on an apparent deal between the UK

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and Germany to cooperation on defence.

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According to the paper, Theresa May wants to emphasise

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Britain's contribution to European security in a bid

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On its front page the Mirror features a report

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on the threat of famine in parts of Africa.

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The paper has launched an appeal to help thousands of victims.

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The Daily Express's main report is about the Treasury

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considering a drastic cut to pension tax really.

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The paper warns against what it calls a tax raid.

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It says it is needed to fill the coffers

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after the Chancellor's U-turn on National Insurance contributions.

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The Telegraph says the BBC has demanded to be protected

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by new laws that promote its shows over those of rivals,

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arguing that public service broadcasters face a real threat

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of losing out in the wake of the rising number

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And the remote-controlled flying squad

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24-hour police drone unit is to be launched this summer to chase

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criminals and hunt for missing people.

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The Guardian says Donald Trump has come in for strong

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criticism by the former British Ambassador to Washington

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over what he has described

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as unthinkable and nonsensical wiretapping claims.

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The Sun reports that the Grand Tour presenter

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Richard Hammond was badly hurt in a motorbike crash

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It says the TV star had almost died while filming Top Gear 11 years ago.

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And the Times leads on a government crackdown

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on the exploitation of the self-employed,

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saying firms that use these workers to avoid paying sickness,

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pension and maternity benefits are to undergo a review.

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Pretty big selection of stories. We will begin with the Daily Mail,

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takeoff for police drones Edfors it says, a room of controlled flying

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squad will chase criminals and hunt for people. If you've got fewer

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police on the beat, is this the right way to fill the gap? It

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doesn't feel people with the same kind of confidence of these on the

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beat does and we have major issues around privacy, I'm not sure I'm

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comfortable with the idea drones that can save that recorded footage

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and geotag people, that will be kept on file and when you're walking down

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the street a drone could add to our CCTV nation. In some ways the CCTV

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nation already exists and makes us not be great place for terrorists to

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come and all the rest of it because they are aware they will be caught

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on many cameras. On the other hand, I feel the idea of drones doing some

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things would work. I think it's very much countryside forces who feel

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they could be useful to find people who are lost. I can see that that

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would work. But boys and their toys, you can see on a cold day, let's

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launch a drone, let's not go out, and all the paperwork that would

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have to be done and there's a human side that you need from the police

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that won't be there. I'm not saying they can't gather information or

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they can't be useful but the idea of fewer bobbies on the beat must be

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bad. Let's look at the Sun, the one you

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expected me to start with. We other area able to... You are very Fleet

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of foot! Not the front page by page two of the Sun. The Tories urge p.m.

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To cause snap election on the front of the Sunday express, an exclusive

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from Caroline Wheeler. The Prime Minister has always said no to the

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idea of her going to the country before 2020. She has but I think

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things are getting to the stage where I think that she probably

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feels if she had a larger majority, I guess that's where we feel an

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election would put her, she would be able to get things through much

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easier. She's got the problems with Nicola Sturgeon, who said she hasn't

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been elected by anybody. That doesn't help. She's also got

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allsorts of things, grammar schools, allsorts of things, that will be

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challenged by her own side and she's only got a majority of 12, 13? 17 is

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a working majority. There are also concerns about by-elections as a

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result of investigations into election spending. You could resolve

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all of that, could you, by going to the country sooner Prez blew yes,

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certainly you could. The strategic reasons for calling the election

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continue to grow as Jeremy Corbyn's ratings plunge and Labelux in more

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trouble. Looking back at David Cameron and George Osborne, a more

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political team would have gone to the country but Theresa May prides

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herself on not playing games. She said there wouldn't be an election

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and her aides are sticking to that and she won't fall into the trap

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that Gordon Brown did of allowing speculation to arise that it might

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happen. If they going to do it before May the fourth they have to

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be quick to make a decision, not far away. Looking at the Times. May will

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tell bosses to give workers more rights, crackdown on exploitation of

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the self-employed. I remember a couple of weeks ago when there was

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the U-turn eventually on National Insurance contributions, one of the

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arguments for cutting them up in certain classes was there a few

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receipts coming in from taxes from PAYE but this would suggest the

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Prime Minister thinks more people should be regarded as employed. The

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problem is a lot of the wage you get and the ways you get cheaper service

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and things is not to pay all the social costs of full-time staff. I

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do think you will get people who will be working with no pensions, no

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maternity benefits and all the rest of it. That may be a problem for

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them. On the other hand it will push up the costs of technology, all

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these other industries, where people are being asked to act as sole

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traders and not pay PAYE so inflation will just carry on going

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up. I wonder if this is an indication of what Theresa May will

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do when it comes to workers' rights post Brexit when some people have

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been concern if we don't have the protections of the European court of

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justice those workers' rights could be eroded. Yes, things like the

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working Time directive, things that are protected because they are in EU

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law. She has suggested they would be transposed to domestic statutes but

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this is slightly more about the changing nature of workers, the gig

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economy has risen with delivery and technology companies, many people I

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don't think even started off trying to get round to stop so many

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receipts going to the Treasury, but it certainly is the case now that

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that is happening. There's been a widespread review to look at how

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these people when they do get older, how for example their pensions are

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paid. Let's look at the Guardian. Tramp attacked by former UK envoy

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over wiretapping claims. -- Trump. The president accused of peddling

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falsehoods and endangering UK US relations. This is Peter Weston got.

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Diplomatic language is always quite bland to the rest of us, but by

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diplomatic standards, this is a fairly stinging criticism? The

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President of America doesn't use diplomatic language, does he? It is

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a free for all. He does have to be careful, the Donald, when he starts

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mentioning countries... Apparently this was first raised on Fox News.

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By a fine legal mind. Exactly. Then it wormed its way into the White

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House that way. But you've got to be careful if you start saying GCHQ are

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tapping your phones even if the ex-president asks for it. Diplomacy

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is full of tact and double language, I'm afraid that will have to come

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back. The Republicans have said really the White House owes Britain

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an apology. But how many people really believe every word Donald

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Trump says any more if they ever did? The biggest question, what do

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his voters believe, do they believe him, that is the crowd he is playing

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to. I think this will do. That's the case, when you look at Steve Bannon,

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some advisers around him, and their connections to these very brash,

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shout the media websites, what game is he playing by making these

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outlandish claims -- shouty. Obama was there, he is there now, he has

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won, get on with it, that's what you've got to do. The FT, Liz Truss

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tells judges to woo the people as extra scrutiny may be in place after

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the court of justice. She's telling the judiciary they will have to

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expect and cope with and respond to more criticism of their actions and

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explain themselves more. I think there will be a lot of angry judges

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tomorrow. Already there's a problem with recruiting judges who have to

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take a pay cut from being very well-paid QCs to become a judge.

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They expect the Lord Chancellor, who has sworn an oath, to protect them,

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not telling them think you're backing they have to explain

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themselves to the public and to the media -- finger wagging. There's an

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argument for better education about rule of law, separation of powers,

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what the independent judiciary do, but the place for that is the

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classroom, not for judges to have to go out and explain the often

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incredibly complex decisions and framework in which they work. I

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think in a way... Judges are very special people, they are very

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interesting. They are slightly removed from the world. The idea of

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asking a judge to do a double page bread in a tabloid newspaper, tell

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us about your likes and dislikes -- double page spread. It's highly

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unlikely! It has worked very well with British law that they are...

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Occasionally they are a bit to separate, once Edwina Currie did her

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biography and it appeared in the autobiography and the newspaper, and

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I remember the Chief Justice at the time said, what did she do that for?

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And I said, I think about ?1 million! They are very much not

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attached to the world in a way but perhaps they are attached to the

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cases they hear. I can't see them settling down with a woman's

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magazine to say, this is what we do every day. Maybe they will be put

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under pressure to explain their decisions. Let's look at the

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Telegraph for the final couple of stories, BBC demand top billing in

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law. This is James Purnell, director of radio and education, saying the

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BBC should have greater prominence in the TV guides we have on our

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screens these days. It's not just the BBC that is asking for this, it

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is public service broadcasters generally and there's an amendment

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going into the digital economy Bill this week which, if it passes, would

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enable that. I find this whole idea slightly anachronistic because the

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way I consume TV is through going on websites, directly to iPlayer or my

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Netflix account, but I appreciate many people in their living room

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still have a TV and a removed control. Do you not have one? I do,

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but it is a modern one that is linked up to the Web and my laptop,

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it has a button on the run of control that says Netflix. Does it

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do the ironing? It doesn't yet. I will have one when it does! That's

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his problem, you have a whole younger generation who look at TV in

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a whole new way. I sympathise most with him because radio doesn't get

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much coverage at all and he is head of radio at the BBC. There's an

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argument if you provide good content people will find it wherever it is.

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Finally, why happy workers take a breather. Advice from happiness

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guru, Max Strong, coming to us tomorrow on the UN international day

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for happiness. What shall we do on the UN international day of

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happiness? Maypole dancing? It is literally going outside and taking a

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break. In a nice polluted corner of town. I think we need it now. I

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spent so many hours each day glued to my computer, to have a reminder

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in the modern yoga mindfulness held the 21st century, this is the

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modern-day fag break. Taking the dog for a walk will suffice, as I do

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everyday! That's the papers for tonight. Thank you to Lucy and Eve

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for coming in. All the papers are online and on iPlayer in case you

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missed it. Coming up next, the Film Review.

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