09/02/2017 Victoria Derbyshire


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09/02/2017

One woman who found hidden cameras around her flat says she was served an eviction notice after she complained to her landlord.


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Hello, it's Thursday, it's 9am, I'm Victoria Derbyshire -

:00:09.:00:10.

A waiting times in English hospitals are longer than ever -

:00:11.:00:17.

leaked figures show last month was the worse since targets

:00:18.:00:20.

We will try to find solutions in the next hour of the programme.

:00:21.:00:29.

Also today, evidence that a new law designed to stop rogue landlords

:00:30.:00:32.

We have an exclusive report on the vulnerable people

:00:33.:00:35.

still being made homeless when they complain about

:00:36.:00:37.

They checked the property, they agreed it was damp and something

:00:38.:00:46.

needed to be done, so they wrote to our landlord and within a week of

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him receiving that, we received a Section 21 is eviction notice to

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pushed under our door. An exclusive report to come.

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Last year we took the former refugee Lord Dubs to visit migrant children

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I'm a refugee, I came to England at the age of six.

:01:09.:01:23.

He campaigned for more to be brought to the UK.

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Today he reacts to a Government decision to stop receiving children

:01:26.:01:28.

under the scheme he championed, calling it "shameful".

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Hello, welcome to the programme, we're live until 11am this morning.

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Do get in touch on all the stories we're talking about this morning -

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If you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate.

:01:42.:01:43.

Our top story today - Accident and Emergency departments

:01:44.:01:46.

in England had their worst waiting time performance last

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month since targets were introduced 13 years ago.

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Provisional figures leaked to the BBC also suggest that record

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numbers of patients have had to wait on trolleys for a bed

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The Department of Health insists the vast majority of patients

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Our health correspondent Dominic Hughes has more.

:02:01.:02:07.

For months now, Accident and Emergency departments

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Last week, the BBC was given exclusive access

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to the Royal Blackburn Hospital, where the pressure

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More patient and a shortage of beds mean long waits.

:02:19.:02:29.

New data leaked from the NHS suggests it's a similar

:02:30.:02:31.

Provisional figures appear to show that last month 82%

:02:32.:02:35.

of patients were treated, admitted, and discharged

:02:36.:02:37.

within four hours - the worst performance

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since the target of 95% was produced in 2004.

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780 patients waited more than 12 hours for a bed after being admitted

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to hospital by a doctor, known as a trolley wait.

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And more than 60,000 waited between four and 12 hours,

:02:55.:03:03.

If the figures are correct, it shows the degree

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Despite huge efforts from 1.4 million staff,

:03:08.:03:12.

the NHS is really struggling to cope with extra demand,

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These figures are the worst since the four-hour A

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They just show how much pressure the service is under.

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The NHS in Scotland is coping better, but similar issues affect

:03:27.:03:29.

Wales and Northern Ireland, symptoms of the pressures building

:03:30.:03:31.

NHS sources acknowledge the system is facing unprecedented demand.

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And these latest figures suggest there is little sign of a respite.

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Dr Faye Kirkland is a journalist who's also still working as a GP.

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How bad is it? They appear to show the worst performance in England

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since records began 13 years ago, so the number of patients, 82%,

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admitted, discharge or transferred towards from A within four hours,

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but the target of 95% of people getting that treatment within four

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hours, to be either admitted, transferred or discharged. I wonder

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if the target doesn't help the Government, then? Occasionally you

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hear conversations about them scrapping or redefining that target?

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The target has not been met since July 2000 15. The Royal College of

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Emergency Medicine has been clear they don't think it should change

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because it is the standard of care expected for patients in the. Thank

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you very much. Ben Brown is in the BBC

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Newsroom with a summary Ben Brown is in the BBC

:04:44.:04:45.

Newsroom with a summary Downing Street is playing down

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a threat from a Government source that the House of Lords could be

:04:54.:04:56.

abolished if Peers try to block Brexit secretary David Davis has

:04:57.:04:59.

called on Peers to 'do their patriotic duty' after MPs

:05:00.:05:02.

overwhelmingly backed the Bill allowing the Government

:05:03.:05:04.

to start the process of leaving Here's our political

:05:05.:05:07.

correspondent Tom Bateman. MPs gave their overwhelming support

:05:08.:05:09.

for Theresa May's plan to get and it got through with a large

:05:10.:05:14.

majority every turn. It has carried out the will

:05:15.:05:28.

of the British people. That's what Parliament

:05:29.:05:30.

has done today. And it's put through a bill

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which is very simple, just 137 words long,

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authorising us to do The Scottish National Party fought

:05:43.:05:44.

the bill all the way. They lost, but they sung

:05:45.:05:51.

the European Union's The threat of a Conservative

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rebellion fell away, but 52 Labour MPs, including shadow

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Cabinet member Clive Lewis, defied Jeremy Corbyn

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to vote against the bill. Mr Lewis resigned moments before the

:06:06.:06:09.

vote. Lib Dems called for

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a referendum on the exit deal. What you have done is allow

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a stitch-up, the 21st century equivalent of

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smoke-filled rooms. 80% of people will be dissatisfied

:06:23.:06:25.

with what is imposed upon them. Theresa May left after

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the vote clearing a first Now the bill goes to the House

:06:29.:06:30.

of Lords, where it may need With us now is our assistant

:06:31.:06:36.

political editor Norman Smith. As Tom was suggesting, all eyes now

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on the House of Lords. And the signs are that the vote in

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the Commons may make the Government's task easier in the

:06:50.:06:53.

House of Lords because Mrs May has secured a stonking great majority,

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more than 370 MPs backing her Brexit Bill and significantly not a single

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amendment passed during the two weeks of debate in the Commons,

:07:03.:07:08.

which means peers will be much more reluctant to try and significantly

:07:09.:07:12.

amend or delay the bill, added to which the Government initially

:07:13.:07:16.

seemed to be taking a pretty hobnailed boot strategy to the House

:07:17.:07:20.

of Lords with Government sources saying, if they seek to frustrate

:07:21.:07:24.

the bill, then they could be signing in effect their own death warrant,

:07:25.:07:27.

because there would be massive pressure to abolish the House of

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Lords. This morning however, a complete rethink. The view in

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Government circles is that sort of language simply risks fuelling

:07:38.:07:41.

opposition in the House of Lords, so now is very different tone from

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Number Ten saying, we understand peers have a legitimate right to

:07:46.:07:50.

debate and scrutinise this legislation, so perhaps a degree of

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nervousness, uncertainty about how to handle the House of Lords.

:07:54.:07:59.

And rumours about the Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn possibly thinking of

:08:00.:08:04.

standing down, swirling around Westminster, he has been stamping on

:08:05.:08:08.

those rumours this morning? This morning Mr Corbyn described

:08:09.:08:14.

such reports as " fake news", absolute nonsense. He said the

:08:15.:08:18.

decision of Clive Lewis, Shadow Business Secretary, to walk, has led

:08:19.:08:23.

people to think that Mr Corbyn could be vulnerable and there is

:08:24.:08:27.

considerable disquiet in the party over his whole handling of the

:08:28.:08:31.

Brexit debate. One of Ed Miliband's closest aides Stu Woodward has just

:08:32.:08:37.

put up a tweet after last night's vote. " no space this feels a bit

:08:38.:08:42.

like Monty Python and the holy Grail when the Black Knight has had his

:08:43.:08:45.

limbs cut off and says, all right, we will call it a draw.

:08:46.:08:51.

" a lot of Labour people think Mr Corbyn has taken the wrong approach

:08:52.:08:57.

to Brexit by backing Mrs May's bill. Norman, thank you.

:08:58.:08:59.

The US Senate has backed one of President Trump's most

:09:00.:09:02.

controversial cabinet nominees, Jeff Sessions, as Attorney General.

:09:03.:09:03.

More than 30 years ago, Mr Sessions was denied

:09:04.:09:06.

a post as a federal judge when he was accused of racism,

:09:07.:09:08.

He will now take charge of the Justice Department and more

:09:09.:09:13.

than 100,000 employees, including 93 US attorneys.

:09:14.:09:22.

New laws introduced last year to protect tenants in England

:09:23.:09:25.

from so-called revenge evictions aren't working, according to MPs

:09:26.:09:27.

A BBC freedom of information request found that there may be hundreds

:09:28.:09:36.

of thousands of tenants afraid to report things like damp,

:09:37.:09:38.

faulty electrics and broken boilers, for fear of being evicted.

:09:39.:09:44.

A Labour peer who campaigned for changes to immigration rules

:09:45.:09:47.

to help unaccompanied migrant children come to Britain,

:09:48.:09:48.

says the Government's decision to stop receiving them is shameful.

:09:49.:09:56.

When the 'Dubs Scheme' was introduced last year,

:09:57.:09:57.

campaigners hoped thousands of children would benefit.

:09:58.:09:59.

By the time the system closes next month, just 350 children

:10:00.:10:02.

It was designed by Lord Dubs, a former refugee who fled Nazi

:10:03.:10:10.

We will be talking to Lord Dubs later this hour.

:10:11.:10:14.

MPs will debate the way the Football Association is run today.

:10:15.:10:17.

The Culture, Media and Sport Committee has tabled a motion

:10:18.:10:19.

of no-confidence in the FA's ability to reform itself.

:10:20.:10:25.

MPs want greater representation for fans, and more diversity in top

:10:26.:10:28.

The mother of an 11-year-old transgender girl who was shot

:10:29.:10:41.

with an air-gun claims her school has not done enough

:10:42.:10:42.

She said five months of bullying has had a "terrible

:10:43.:10:45.

Greater Manchester Police confirmed it's investigating the shooting.

:10:46.:10:49.

The school said it took the attack "very seriously" and had expelled

:10:50.:10:51.

Scientists studying the calls of one of our closest ape relatives say

:10:52.:10:59.

they've revealed the origins of the earliest words.

:11:00.:11:04.

The researchers from Durham and Liverpool John Moores Universities

:11:05.:11:13.

recorded and analysed thousands of orangutan squeaks over

:11:14.:11:17.

years to learn how human language began.

:11:18.:11:21.

That's a summary of the latest BBC News - more at 9.30am.

:11:22.:11:25.

This on Facebook about A waiting times, my husband was left waiting

:11:26.:11:33.

for seven hours in A with a skull fracture before being sent home with

:11:34.:11:38.

no information about the fracture and only paracetamol for

:11:39.:11:40.

excruciating pain. For reasons unknown in the case has been

:11:41.:11:44.

referred to the Ian nose and throat department but it has been five days

:11:45.:11:49.

and he has not heard from them. Your experiences of NAND, positive

:11:50.:11:51.

ones as well, do let me know. If you text, you will be charged

:11:52.:11:55.

at the standard network rate. Let's get some sport

:11:56.:11:59.

with Hugh Ferris. Leicester City's topsy-turvy season

:12:00.:12:04.

continues? After a vote of confidence on

:12:05.:12:08.

Tuesday, a win on Wednesday, Claudio Ranieri is having a good week.

:12:09.:12:12.

Leicester might be struggling in the Premier League but their FA Cup run

:12:13.:12:16.

goes on thanks to a fourth replay win over championship side Derby,

:12:17.:12:21.

who took it to extra time thanks to that deflected free kick. In the

:12:22.:12:25.

extra 30 minutes, two wonderful goals, first double from a new

:12:26.:12:29.

Leicester signing, then a touch of the Ryan digs about this from tamari

:12:30.:12:34.

grape. Leicester are eventually going through to the fifth round

:12:35.:12:38.

with a 3-1 win. They will play Millwall next, but before that their

:12:39.:12:42.

eyes will be on a big Premier League match against Swansea on Monday.

:12:43.:12:49.

MPs are going to debate whether the Football Association is fit for

:12:50.:13:05.

purpose. This will be part of the culture and sport committee.

:13:06.:13:11.

Why are they doing this? Some people may remember as far back as 1966,

:13:12.:13:15.

two things happened that year, winning the World Cup and also the

:13:16.:13:20.

first report into whether the FA should reform, waiting more than 50

:13:21.:13:24.

years for both of those things to happen again. The Government have

:13:25.:13:26.

increased the pressure by threatening to withdraw up to ?40

:13:27.:13:33.

million of public funding for the FA before this meeting today. It

:13:34.:13:37.

appears to boil down to what former FHM and Greg Dyke has called in the

:13:38.:13:45.

last 24 hours " old men" accused of blocking change, I'm sure they would

:13:46.:13:50.

reject that. The FA parliament is made up of 122 members, 92/60, only

:13:51.:13:56.

eight women as well, so the Government is looking for better

:13:57.:13:59.

diversity, better representation of people who play the game on that

:14:00.:14:04.

council and the current chairman Greg Clark has said he will resign

:14:05.:14:08.

if his plans for reform are not accepted when he puts them to the

:14:09.:14:12.

Government in April. The Winter Olympics is a year away

:14:13.:14:17.

and Britain has said it aims to become one of the top snow sports

:14:18.:14:21.

nations. Yes, the governing body for ski and

:14:22.:14:26.

snowboarding, by 2030, would like Britain to be a top five country,

:14:27.:14:31.

said they have got 13 years to do that. Just a year now and will be

:14:32.:14:36.

2018 Winter Olympics. The overall shift emission of all sports says we

:14:37.:14:41.

should be excited about our metal rack micro-medal chances, four is

:14:42.:14:45.

the best Team GB have managed over the years, also in Sochi time out

:14:46.:14:51.

they managed to get four, but he thinks we have a few chances to get

:14:52.:14:55.

on the podium in South Korea. Investment has doubled to more than

:14:56.:14:59.

?27 million over the last four year cycle so you imagine those funding

:15:00.:15:02.

bodies will be expecting something of a return on that investment.

:15:03.:15:06.

Thank you, more throughout the morning.

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Our exclusive film today shows some of the absolutely disgusting

:15:10.:15:11.

conditions that people who live in rented accomodatoin live in.

:15:12.:15:14.

And yet a new law designed to exactly those people from rogue

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That's according to MPs and housing lawyers.

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Faulty electrics, awful damp and broken boilers that don't get

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fixed when it's cold are all things that are officially classed

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as category one hazards which pose a risk to health.

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But many private tenants are worried that if they complain,

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or complain too much, they will be evicted.

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The law in England changed in 2015 to make "revenge evictions" illegal.

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But despite that, figures gathered by Radio 1 Newsbeat through Freedom

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of Information requests show that more than half of local

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councils across England say they haven't stopped any.

:15:48.:15:51.

Here's Dan Whitworth with the exclusive story.

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Damp, mould, faulty electrics and broken windows and boilers that

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don't get fixed when it's cold, they're all classed as category one

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hazards, in other words, they're so bad, they pose a risk

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These are all things that in many cases ,people living in private

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rented accommodation complaint of their landlord

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Helen used to live with her mum, sister and baby daughter

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in a rented home with lots of problems, including damp.

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After months of complaining, we got a firm of solicitors

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in who deal with properties in this state of disrepair.

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They checked the property and agreed it was damp

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So they wrote to our landlord, and within a week of him receiving

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that, we received a section 21 eviction notice pushed

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Telling you, and your family to get out.

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What kind of impact did that have on you and your family?

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We're living about four miles away from each other.

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At the same time, I'd been suffering really bad ill health as well.

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So to have that on top of what I was already

:17:11.:17:12.

going through just completely floored me, and the thought

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of having to live my own that point, I wasn't going to cope.

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So for the first two months of me having this place,

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I never really saw it because I was staying

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on my mum's sofa bed, to keep us together,

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because I couldn't face not being with my mum

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Because of what happened to people like Helen,

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a new rule was introduced in October 2015, to try to stop retaliatory

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or so-called revenge evictions, but exclusive figures gathered under

:17:48.:17:49.

a Freedom of Information request from hundreds of local authorities

:17:50.:17:52.

across England who have the power to stop them, more than half said

:17:53.:17:55.

More than a quarter said they don't record figures,

:17:56.:17:58.

with fewer than one in five councils taking any action.

:17:59.:18:04.

So, we're just following some housing inspectors

:18:05.:18:06.

from Leeds council, who have set up some inspections

:18:07.:18:08.

They deal specifically with rogue landlords,

:18:09.:18:15.

so we've been told to expect some category one hazards,

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things like broken windows, boilers that don't get fixed,

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mould, damp, faulty electrics, things that pose

:18:21.:18:22.

So we will go and have a look and see what we see.

:18:23.:18:35.

What are the type of category one, serious hazards

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It's going to be entry by intruders, because the front door

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There's no security, so anyone can walk into there.

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The boiler is not working so they don't have any

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The electrics aren't working, so pitch dark.

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When you say the kitchen facilities, I mean there is a sink there...

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This is rented out as private rented accommodation

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People paying to rent here, making complaints, nothing happening

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and then they could be under the threat of a revenge eviction

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That's the reason why they are not coming forward to the council

:19:23.:19:26.

Upstairs, there are even more problems.

:19:27.:19:33.

That's damp that's been leaking from outside the guttering.

:19:34.:19:41.

When you look up close to this, I describe that as mould,

:19:42.:19:57.

Clearly it looks terrible, and this is all from a leak outside?

:19:58.:20:07.

It's not been fixed and the water is coming through.

:20:08.:20:12.

Paul has lived here for nearly six years.

:20:13.:20:23.

He didn't want to show his face on camera because he's embarrassed

:20:24.:20:26.

He'd never make repairs, the landlord.

:20:27.:20:29.

The skylight has been broken three or four years.

:20:30.:20:31.

The boiler's been packed in now, just won't fixed it.

:20:32.:20:43.

So we've just heard Paul's story that.

:20:44.:20:44.

The scariest thing about all of this is Paul's story is one of many.

:20:45.:20:48.

There are 9 million people living in private rented accommodation.

:20:49.:20:51.

Of those, 30% are classed as a non-decent standard.

:20:52.:20:59.

Fair enough, that is a pretty exceptionally bad case,

:21:00.:21:07.

but there are many, many people just like Paul, too worried

:21:08.:21:15.

in fact to complain, because if they complain

:21:16.:21:16.

to their landlord, they may get evicted.

:21:17.:21:18.

If they get evicted, they have nowhere else to go

:21:19.:21:21.

Clive Betts is the chair and communities and local government

:21:22.:21:26.

committee so he holds the government to account

:21:27.:21:28.

Bearing in mind more than half of local authorities across England

:21:29.:21:32.

say they haven't stopped any revenge eviction is, is this law working?

:21:33.:21:35.

I can't believe that there are that number of authorities where no

:21:36.:21:39.

one has been subject to a revenge eviction.

:21:40.:21:43.

And we know there are many good landlords out there,

:21:44.:21:46.

who will never be worried about revenge eviction

:21:47.:21:48.

is from, because they won't operate like that.

:21:49.:21:56.

If repairs need doing, they'll carry out them in a proper manner.

:21:57.:21:59.

We talking about here trying to avoid carrying

:22:00.:22:01.

out their responsibilities as a landlord, to keep

:22:02.:22:03.

their properties in a good state of repair, and if that asked

:22:04.:22:05.

a simple question like, will you do will prepare for me,

:22:06.:22:08.

they threaten someone with an eviction to shut them up.

:22:09.:22:10.

They are the landlords we have to get at and they sometimes

:22:11.:22:13.

have the worst properties with people living in

:22:14.:22:15.

That's the biggest challenge for everybody.

:22:16.:22:18.

You have a position of power and influence within Parliament.

:22:19.:22:20.

You are chair of a select committee that is responsible

:22:21.:22:22.

There's a guy living in this flat and his window,

:22:23.:22:26.

What can you say, this chap's name is Paul.

:22:27.:22:30.

The landlord is refusing to fix things like this.

:22:31.:22:32.

What needs to happen there, we shouldn't just be

:22:33.:22:34.

stopping revenge evictions, we should be prosecuted

:22:35.:22:36.

landlords for letting properties in that condition.

:22:37.:22:38.

We got in touch with the Government for comment on this story

:22:39.:22:41.

and a spokesman for the Department for Communities and Local Government

:22:42.:22:43.

They said revenge evictions are rare and because of the new law,

:22:44.:22:49.

it's given local councils all the powers they

:22:50.:22:51.

Back on the road with Leeds Council, our final visit is to Lizzie's home.

:22:52.:22:59.

Faulty electrics, the lights clearly not working...

:23:00.:23:01.

Her landlord is the same as Paul's, who we heard from earlier.

:23:02.:23:04.

Hang on a minute, I don't know if you can see this,

:23:05.:23:08.

but there's a gap about 2-3 centimetres where the

:23:09.:23:10.

It's not just there, it's that whole wall.

:23:11.:23:25.

Again, not pulling anything out, but I can see the damp goes right

:23:26.:23:33.

the way from the skirting board pretty much to the very top.

:23:34.:23:36.

It's unfair and I can't bring people back to the house because I feel

:23:37.:23:39.

embarrassed to bring them back to the house.

:23:40.:23:41.

When I first came here, I didn't want to move

:23:42.:23:44.

in because I saw the state of the front door.

:23:45.:23:46.

I don't really want keep complaining, because he might end up

:23:47.:23:51.

going to me, if you keep complaining, out you go.

:23:52.:23:54.

What would happen to you if you did get evicted,

:23:55.:23:57.

Straight up, didn't miss a heartbeat, worried

:23:58.:24:01.

Yes, because I've been on the streets and it's not nice.

:24:02.:24:05.

I've been on the streets and it is horrible.

:24:06.:24:12.

So that's obviously why you don't want to complain too much,

:24:13.:24:17.

because that's the other option for you.

:24:18.:24:25.

Well. You can find out more about the issue on the BBC News beat

:24:26.:24:31.

website. Let's speak to Labour's Shadow

:24:32.:24:34.

Housing Minister John Healey, and Barbara Dickson who was evicted

:24:35.:24:37.

along with her husband, by their private landlord,

:24:38.:24:41.

after she complained when she found hidden cameras and microphones

:24:42.:24:43.

in her ceiling and floors. Which is the most astonishing story

:24:44.:24:54.

in itself. First of all I would like you to give some reaction to the

:24:55.:24:58.

conditions we saw in that film? I think that's horrific but it's more

:24:59.:25:03.

common than people realise. I think people are being taken advantage of

:25:04.:25:06.

because they are afraid to complain. A lot of people are living like this

:25:07.:25:11.

because of fear, it is then easy difficult to find a replacement

:25:12.:25:14.

place to live so you put up with whatever you have to do. I think it

:25:15.:25:19.

is more common than... I think that's the tip of the iceberg. There

:25:20.:25:24.

have been estimates there are probably 200,000 people who suffer

:25:25.:25:26.

from revenge evictions each year. It's not just about the home. We saw

:25:27.:25:32.

with Helen how it breaks up families. We saw with Liz how

:25:33.:25:36.

frightened people are. Home is where you want to feel safe and warm. It's

:25:37.:25:40.

where you want to retreat to, from the world. It's the heart of all our

:25:41.:25:45.

lives. When people can't even have that sort of basic security, those

:25:46.:25:57.

basic standards, then the law is not working and we have to do a great

:25:58.:26:00.

deal more. We will come back to that in a moment. Barbara, tell our

:26:01.:26:02.

audience what happened. We had a leak coming from our season, it was

:26:03.:26:05.

like a shower level of water coming through on the landlord wasn't

:26:06.:26:08.

around to be able to assist us. My husband climbed into the roof to

:26:09.:26:10.

turn the water off because that's where it was an that's where we

:26:11.:26:13.

found all the cameras and microphones at the house. There was

:26:14.:26:17.

a camera in just about every room in our flat, including our bedroom, the

:26:18.:26:22.

bathroom, everywhere. When you said to the landlord, hello, what did he

:26:23.:26:26.

say? Neuer we got an eviction notice the next day. How many days later?

:26:27.:26:32.

The next day. It was taped to our front door. You might describe that

:26:33.:26:40.

as a revenge evictions? Absolutely, no doubt. You called the police,

:26:41.:26:44.

what did you think they could do? I thought they would investigate the

:26:45.:26:47.

cameras being present or speaking to the landlord but they weren't

:26:48.:26:51.

interested at all. They thought it was a domestic situation and were

:26:52.:26:55.

prepared to intervene. This is before the legislation for

:26:56.:27:02.

empowering councils. If it had been in place would you have gone to the

:27:03.:27:05.

Council and asked for help? I don't think anyone is willing to do

:27:06.:27:09.

anything. Despite this talk about this desire to assist and help

:27:10.:27:13.

people, I think in the end of the land both can go to court and have

:27:14.:27:17.

you removed irrespective of if the council intervene or not. That's

:27:18.:27:19.

where the issue lies. The issue according to Barbara is with

:27:20.:27:24.

councils. People are willing to go to them because they are still

:27:25.:27:27.

scared. Councils have the power is now enshrined in law but they are

:27:28.:27:30.

not using them. People are scared and that is quite clear. It is quite

:27:31.:27:37.

a complicated law. Councils could only have stepped in and Barbara's

:27:38.:27:41.

case if she complained in writing to the landlord, the landlord refused

:27:42.:27:45.

to do anything about it, she then notified formally the council and

:27:46.:27:50.

the council then served an official written improvement notice. That's

:27:51.:27:54.

not complicated, it's really straightforward. May be time

:27:55.:27:58.

consuming. You needed to act quickly. Complications is one part

:27:59.:28:02.

of it. Councils aren't acting when half of them haven't stopped a

:28:03.:28:06.

single revenge evictions. Nobody believes it isn't happening

:28:07.:28:09.

everywhere. I think the real thing is not to try and deal with the

:28:10.:28:15.

symptoms but the causes. That means, I think, new, tougher legal

:28:16.:28:18.

standards for the homes that private landlords rent. It just isn't good

:28:19.:28:24.

enough that we haven't got a law requiring landlords to make sure

:28:25.:28:26.

it's fit for human habitation without some of those problems.

:28:27.:28:31.

Secondly, I think longer minimum tenancies because longer tenancies

:28:32.:28:34.

build in the sort of protections and rights that aren't there in this

:28:35.:28:38.

case. Minimum tenancies is something the government is trying to address,

:28:39.:28:43.

with that housing white paper it published the other day. I want to

:28:44.:28:47.

ask you about the Brexit vote last night. Can I just be clear about

:28:48.:28:52.

that? There is a huge gap between their rhetoric on their record. What

:28:53.:28:55.

they announced this week was that they will work with people who are

:28:56.:29:02.

building new homes, full rent. I know, incentives. That won't help

:29:03.:29:06.

any of the 11 million current renters, it won't help the people in

:29:07.:29:10.

the report that we saw, not just in Leeds but across the country. The

:29:11.:29:12.

government has to be prepared to act. When it was put to the

:29:13.:29:16.

Communities Secretary this week in the House of Commons that we needed

:29:17.:29:21.

this new legal standard requiring homes fit for human standard he

:29:22.:29:24.

described as frivolous and unnecessary. These government

:29:25.:29:27.

ministers don't get what it's like for people. You would expect me to

:29:28.:29:31.

ask about the Brexit vote last night, the historic vote in the

:29:32.:29:35.

Commons. What do you think of your colleagues from Jeremy Corbyn's top

:29:36.:29:38.

team, Clive Lewis, resigning because he could not vote to give the

:29:39.:29:45.

government how to trigger Article 50? He did last week but not last

:29:46.:29:50.

night. What you think? He wants to be able to speak up for his

:29:51.:29:54.

constituents in Norwich and therefore he has resigned from the

:29:55.:29:58.

Shadow Cabinet. If you want to speak for the party nationally from the

:29:59.:30:01.

Shadow Cabinet you have to accept the decision we made, quite rightly,

:30:02.:30:05.

as a national party that we would respect the result of the

:30:06.:30:07.

referendum, respect and recognise the will of the people when they

:30:08.:30:11.

were asked that question about the future and voted for Britain's Lee.

:30:12.:30:15.

This was a very small build we dealt with in the Commons last night,

:30:16.:30:19.

giving the Prime Minister the authority of Parliament to start the

:30:20.:30:23.

negotiations. Some were surprised there weren't more labour rebels.

:30:24.:30:27.

Youth campaign to remain in the European Union. Are you scared now

:30:28.:30:32.

to speak up? No, it's a basic question of respecting the democracy

:30:33.:30:37.

that we supported and respected in the referendum. You can't ask people

:30:38.:30:40.

for their view, get that view and say I'm sorry, we are going to

:30:41.:30:45.

ignore that. It is right that most Labour MPs voted to back this bill.

:30:46.:30:51.

The much bigger role of Parliament comes next, that is about

:30:52.:30:54.

challenging the Prime Minister about the aims for had negotiations,

:30:55.:31:00.

challenged her on how well she's doing and out to people what Britain

:31:01.:31:06.

beyond Brexit looks like. For a Labour Party, we have a very

:31:07.:31:09.

different view of what is needed in the future than the Conservative.

:31:10.:31:14.

Thank you very much. Labour's Johnny Leota Barbara Dickson. Thank you for

:31:15.:31:15.

coming on the programme. A departments are well behind

:31:16.:31:18.

their targets for waiting times. We'll be taking a look

:31:19.:31:26.

at how they are coping And trying to talk about what

:31:27.:31:36.

solutions health professionals might come up with if they were in charge.

:31:37.:31:39.

Labour peer and former child refugeee Lord Dubs reacts

:31:40.:31:46.

to a Government decision to stop receiving children under

:31:47.:31:51.

the scheme he championed, calling it 'shameful'.

:31:52.:31:52.

We will speak to him live in the next half an hour.

:31:53.:31:53.

Here's Ben in the BBC Newsroom with a summary of today's news.

:31:54.:31:55.

Accident and Emergency departments in England had their worst waiting

:31:56.:31:58.

time performance last month since targets were

:31:59.:31:59.

Provisional figures leaked to the BBC also suggest that record

:32:00.:32:04.

numbers of patients have had to wait on trolleys for a bed

:32:05.:32:07.

The Department of Health insists the vast majority of patients

:32:08.:32:10.

Tomorrow on the BBC News Channel, we'll be answering your questions

:32:11.:32:23.

and listening to your suggestions on how the NHS can tackle

:32:24.:32:26.

the looming financial shortfall and deal with the challenges that

:32:27.:32:28.

obese and ageing parts of the population are

:32:29.:32:30.

We'll be getting experts to answer your questions and respond

:32:31.:32:33.

Please get in touch by text or send an email or contact us

:32:34.:32:42.

via Twitter using the hashtag #BBCAskThis.

:32:43.:32:45.

Downing Street has attempted to play down an earlier threat

:32:46.:32:47.

by a Government source that the House of Lords could be

:32:48.:32:51.

abolished if peers tried to block the Government's bill to begin

:32:52.:32:53.

Last night, the Commons backed the legislation

:32:54.:32:56.

More than 50 Labour MPs defied Jeremy Corbyn

:32:57.:33:10.

New laws introduced last year to protect tenants in England

:33:11.:33:17.

from so-called "revenge evictions" aren't working, according to MPs

:33:18.:33:20.

A BBC Freedom of Information request found that there may be hundreds

:33:21.:33:25.

of thousands of tenants afraid to report things like damp,

:33:26.:33:28.

faulty electrics and broken boilers, for fear of being evicted.

:33:29.:33:30.

The mother of an 11-year-old transgender girl who was shot

:33:31.:33:32.

with an air-gun claims her school has not done enough

:33:33.:33:35.

She said five months of bullying has had a "terrible

:33:36.:33:38.

Greater Manchester Police confirmed it's investigating the shooting.

:33:39.:33:45.

The school said it took the attack "very seriously" and had expelled

:33:46.:33:48.

An Australian man has survived spending hours struggling

:33:49.:33:52.

to keep his nose above water after his excavator

:33:53.:33:56.

Daniel Miller had been riding the machine at his remote property

:33:57.:34:08.

north of Sydney, when the edge of the dam gave way

:34:09.:34:10.

and he was pinned down by the three-tonne excavator.

:34:11.:34:18.

He said he adopted a yoga pose and spent the whole time

:34:19.:34:21.

thinking about his wife and their two young children.

:34:22.:34:23.

That's a summary of the latest BBC News - more at 10am.

:34:24.:34:26.

Some comments about slum landlords, Kenneth says, why our local MPs not

:34:27.:34:33.

naming and shaming them? Sean says, the film was magnificent, a la it is

:34:34.:34:50.

the tip of the iceberg, it is like Victorian times.

:34:51.:34:50.

Your own experiences are welcome, we will talk more on that after 10am

:34:51.:34:50.

and we will feed your experiences will talk more on that after 10am

:34:51.:34:51.

into that conversation if you get in touch with us.

:34:52.:34:52.

Let's get the sport now. Leicester are flirting with

:34:53.:34:54.

relegation in the Premier League but they are through to the fifth round

:34:55.:34:57.

of the FA Cup after beating Derby 3-1. This deflected free kick forced

:34:58.:35:13.

the extra period. This goal was matched by Demaret grey. It sends

:35:14.:35:17.

them to the fifth round, and a tie with Millwall.

:35:18.:35:21.

MPs will debate the Football Association's failure to reform

:35:22.:35:24.

following a vote of no-confidence. Parliament will examine whether the

:35:25.:35:28.

FA is fit for purpose as it currently stands.

:35:29.:35:31.

Britain is aiming to become one of the world's top five skiing and

:35:32.:35:35.

snowboarding nations by 2030. The Winter Olympics in South Korea start

:35:36.:35:39.

a year today, Great Britain could achieve its best ever games

:35:40.:35:43.

according to UK Sport. And Tiger Woods has said he will

:35:44.:35:48.

never feel great game. He has had two back operations, coming back

:35:49.:35:52.

from 15 months out after the last one. He had to force out of the

:35:53.:35:56.

Dubai Desert Classic because of back spasms and admitted there have been

:35:57.:35:59.

times he did not think it would be able to return to golf.

:36:00.:36:02.

Those are the headlines, more after 10am.

:36:03.:36:05.

Waiting times in A departments in England are longer than ever.

:36:06.:36:07.

Anecdotal reports of patients on trolleys,

:36:08.:36:10.

waiting hours to be seen, have now been backed up

:36:11.:36:14.

And they're the worst since targets were introduced 13 years ago.

:36:15.:36:22.

On Monday, an audience of 80 NHS staff and patients from around

:36:23.:36:24.

the UK joined our programme to talk about the state of the NHS.

:36:25.:36:28.

We invited doctors, patients, nurses and politicians to come

:36:29.:36:30.

together and discuss where things are going wrong, and what the future

:36:31.:36:32.

I'm representing the senior tier of commissions on the shop floor in

:36:33.:36:40.

saying we cannot provide safe care any more for patients. We are being

:36:41.:36:44.

forced to make really dangerous decisions every day, the pressures

:36:45.:36:48.

are unfathomable and we are heartbroken, exacerbated and

:36:49.:36:52.

demoralised. The NHS must be managed by people that have been within the

:36:53.:36:56.

system, that know the system and they understand the system. I a

:36:57.:37:02.

brother who has spent an extra five weeks in hospital and an extra five

:37:03.:37:08.

weeks in a nursing home when he has actually got home of his own, he

:37:09.:37:13.

just needs his social care package to be able to go back to where he

:37:14.:37:18.

wants to be, back in the home. It must so frustrating. Very. We need

:37:19.:37:26.

more GPs, we need more doctors, we need more funding. In my case,

:37:27.:37:30.

talking for old people, we shouldn't have to go and queue up for half an

:37:31.:37:36.

hour or an hour to get to see a GP. We would like consistency,

:37:37.:37:42.

stability. We don't want to be changing doctors every time we go to

:37:43.:37:46.

the surgery. Three years ago I was diagnosed with depression, anxiety,

:37:47.:37:49.

unfortunately the NHS could do nothing for me, I had to spend ?4000

:37:50.:37:53.

of my own money, without spending that money, I'm not lying, I'm not

:37:54.:37:58.

sure if I would be here today. This concept of charging is already

:37:59.:38:02.

happening, 6000 people a year kill themselves. Every time we run a

:38:03.:38:06.

programme, one person will have killed themselves. We have to take

:38:07.:38:12.

mental health seriously and commit to spend the money we say we will

:38:13.:38:15.

commit because we are not doing it. On the 8th of October, my

:38:16.:38:18.

26-year-old daughter went into hospital to have her baby, and she

:38:19.:38:23.

died during childbirth. The baby, they wanted us to switch off the

:38:24.:38:30.

machine the same day she died, she survived, she is 16 months, she has

:38:31.:38:35.

a Grade three brain injury and she is blind. I just want to say that we

:38:36.:38:42.

didn't anticipate that happening. She walked into hospital, she went

:38:43.:38:46.

on the 7th of October, she was sent home. We were told that if everybody

:38:47.:38:52.

came in at one centimetre dilated then the hospital wards would be

:38:53.:39:01.

full. She had an underlying problem which was seen on three scans and

:39:02.:39:06.

not acted upon because they were not sure what it was. That cost her her

:39:07.:39:14.

life. And I would just like to... I would like to say that... How many

:39:15.:39:23.

lives are going to go? My name is Jess, I'm an A doctor. I have to

:39:24.:39:27.

agree with you, I stand on the front I'm the person who gets assaulted,

:39:28.:39:32.

sexually assaulted in NAND by drug people. I was a medical student, you

:39:33.:39:36.

see us on TV, we go and get drunk all the time, I have never ended up

:39:37.:39:41.

in A, none of us have, and I have never left my friends behind on the

:39:42.:39:45.

side of the road drug, which people do now. We should be charging them!

:39:46.:39:51.

It costs inordinate amount of money, ?300 every time we send LAS to pick

:39:52.:39:57.

somebody up of the side of the road. Just walking into NAND is ?100 to

:39:58.:40:02.

register you, it is a waste of money and it is ridiculous. I was then

:40:03.:40:06.

told the drugs I need are not funded by the NHS in Wales. They are

:40:07.:40:10.

currently funded in England but are being withdrawn from England as

:40:11.:40:13.

well. I'm having to fund raise to pay for the drugs to keep me alive

:40:14.:40:15.

to be here for my children. Some examples of things

:40:16.:40:18.

going wrong - by the way, there were some very positive

:40:19.:40:20.

stories too, but today We've brought together Maria Gilroy,

:40:21.:40:22.

a senior site nurse practitioner, Eren Ozagir, the founder

:40:23.:40:36.

of Push Doctor which puts patients and doctors in touch over the web,

:40:37.:40:38.

and Sarah Gorton the deputy head Huge question, if you were in charge

:40:39.:40:48.

of the NHS in England, where would you start? The first thing to say is

:40:49.:40:53.

the NHS is full of great teams... We absolutely know that, we take that

:40:54.:40:58.

as read. But even winning teams struggle in difficult circumstances

:40:59.:41:01.

and the odds are definitely stacked against them so it is time for a

:41:02.:41:05.

change of tactics. I think there are three things that could really

:41:06.:41:08.

change the situation. Give me your first one and let's see what the

:41:09.:41:12.

others think. The first is a difficult conversation about

:41:13.:41:16.

funding. In the very short-term, an immediate cash injection to get us

:41:17.:41:18.

through what used to be called Winter pressure and is now

:41:19.:41:22.

year-round normal pressure for the NHS. Secondly, it is to talk about

:41:23.:41:27.

longer term sustainable funding solution for the NHS. So that is a

:41:28.:41:32.

conversation between politicians of all parties and voters? We talked

:41:33.:41:39.

about this on Monday, do we look at increasing national Insurance

:41:40.:41:41.

contributions, at increasing income tax, and be bothered, it is the

:41:42.:41:46.

wrong question, it is things about the Government, don't build a just

:41:47.:41:49.

do, don't replace Trident. Where are you on that? For me, funding is

:41:50.:41:55.

important but to be think about it in a different way, efficiencies and

:41:56.:41:58.

application, we are a technology business and we bring technology to

:41:59.:42:02.

medics and help them operate more efficiently. Here is one example,

:42:03.:42:07.

they could place set in the current system in a simple way and increase

:42:08.:42:10.

the number of GP appointments which in theory should reduce the number

:42:11.:42:14.

of people heading to A particularly over Christmas. 46,000

:42:15.:42:20.

GPs in the UK, we have reduced admin Time from 45%, which is the time

:42:21.:42:25.

spent on paperwork in the NHS, to just 9%, which frees up two

:42:26.:42:29.

appointment and hour per doctor, in a day half a million GP appointments

:42:30.:42:33.

that could be back online for patients to come and interact with a

:42:34.:42:42.

doctor and start to solve the issues or at least talk to someone and get

:42:43.:42:45.

the advice they need. That is the technology option, what did you

:42:46.:42:48.

think? On Monday we were speaking about social care and Jon Ashworth

:42:49.:42:51.

said about bringing the funding forward but that was agreed by the

:42:52.:42:56.

Conservative MP that was there and I think that is an emergency response

:42:57.:43:01.

and has to happen. So, like Sarah, short-term cash injection. More

:43:02.:43:06.

broadly, what do you think? We have to look at Stav, recruitment and

:43:07.:43:10.

retention. Over the last year, stuff like nurses and doctors are

:43:11.:43:14.

completely demoralised, treated really badly by the Government. What

:43:15.:43:19.

would you do in terms of boosting morale, if you were England's Health

:43:20.:43:24.

Secretary? I would reverse the mistakes Jeremy Hunt has made, bring

:43:25.:43:29.

bursaries back for nursing. Junior doctor contract, go back to the

:43:30.:43:34.

table, it is not working. We have had a huge exodus of doctors out of

:43:35.:43:38.

the country since this contract... I'm not sure we have had a huge

:43:39.:43:42.

exodus, I know people threatened to leave. I think we have, I think it

:43:43.:43:51.

is evident, I go and see my consultant and last time I went I

:43:52.:43:54.

waited 2.5 hours, which does not bother me, it is a busy clinic, and

:43:55.:43:59.

when I went in she said, I'm sorry, we cannot get any middle grades,

:44:00.:44:04.

like registrar, below registrar, that are not on a training number.

:44:05.:44:09.

Other people in different oncology department said the same thing to

:44:10.:44:15.

me. They cannot get the staff. If the Government reversed the decision

:44:16.:44:18.

on nursing bursaries, for example, it would not fill the hole now,

:44:19.:44:23.

would it? It might in 12 months, 24 months, three, four years. What

:44:24.:44:29.

about now, what could you do today? It is Catch-22, to be honest. We

:44:30.:44:33.

could say, let overstaffed, make provision for having too many staff

:44:34.:44:38.

in the hope we will get a number that is workable. But we simply

:44:39.:44:44.

don't have those staff available now. It is temp staff, then? We

:44:45.:44:52.

don't have them available. We have 55,000 people from EU countries

:44:53.:44:55.

working in Health and Social Care Committee all of those people are

:44:56.:44:58.

not sure of their status so confirming that they have the right

:44:59.:45:02.

to stay would definitely help. Sorting out problems with the

:45:03.:45:06.

bursary, doing something to make staff feel valued, so from all, I

:45:07.:45:11.

was talking to a big group of health workers yesterday from different

:45:12.:45:14.

types of jobs and the stories they are all telling are the same. They

:45:15.:45:19.

are working too many hours, they are scared because they are constantly

:45:20.:45:27.

working at full pressure and they are scared about the decisions they

:45:28.:45:30.

are making and not having enough time to do their job properly and

:45:31.:45:32.

safely any more, and they are constantly working long shifts under

:45:33.:45:37.

unbearable pressure, and that used to be just seasonal, it used to be

:45:38.:45:41.

for a few weeks each year, and now it is almost like we are in some

:45:42.:45:46.

kind of Narnia where we are in permanent winter and the NHS is

:45:47.:45:47.

running on those conditions. More staff, bring back bursaries for

:45:48.:45:57.

nursing. We've talked about technology, what else? I think for

:45:58.:46:03.

me the idea that doing the same things, some of the suggestions are

:46:04.:46:07.

to do things we've done in the past, is on and off of the step change to

:46:08.:46:11.

make a dramatic difference to the system. On the treaty before there

:46:12.:46:15.

was a lady saying, we need people from inside the system to come up

:46:16.:46:18.

with solutions. That's not always the case. If you keep internalising

:46:19.:46:23.

the problem, you will end up with very similar answers. Not to go back

:46:24.:46:32.

to the tech thing but having an entrepreneurial approach and

:46:33.:46:33.

allowing private companies to come in, who have run huge amount of

:46:34.:46:36.

numbers of people through shops and stores and online retail, actually

:46:37.:46:43.

can think about problems the NHS are having differently alongside

:46:44.:46:46.

managers. The problem at the moment is nobody is really up for that. The

:46:47.:46:51.

minute a private company stepped in to offer advise the public and NHS

:46:52.:46:56.

think we are going to private the NHS. That's not the point, we have

:46:57.:47:03.

to be open to new thoughts on skills. Sarah, do you acknowledge

:47:04.:47:08.

that in the private sector there are some people with brains, who have

:47:09.:47:11.

ideas, who could help the NHS run better? The NHS is constantly

:47:12.:47:17.

learning organisation. That's one of the good things about it. Are you

:47:18.:47:21.

happy about that? One of the things that could be done immediately is to

:47:22.:47:25.

allow staff that work in the NHS, they are constantly frustrated

:47:26.:47:28.

because they don't have the opportunity to contribute ideas

:47:29.:47:33.

about how their service can run better. Do you acknowledge there are

:47:34.:47:36.

people in the private sector... We can always learn and take the best

:47:37.:47:40.

from the world. You are asking a question about things that can be

:47:41.:47:43.

done immediately, today. I think one of the really important lessons is

:47:44.:47:47.

we are now experiencing the start of the austerity in health budgets. We

:47:48.:47:53.

are facing another three years of cuts. So something that could be

:47:54.:47:57.

done immediately is to say OK, it goes no further and we will cancel

:47:58.:48:00.

the cuts are coming. We have ?22 billion worth of so-called

:48:01.:48:06.

efficiency savings. At these are the figures just out. The A figures

:48:07.:48:12.

for December from NHS England. Official figures just published.

:48:13.:48:20.

86.2% patients were admitted, transferred or discharged from A

:48:21.:48:24.

within four hours of arrival. That is below the 95% standard. That is

:48:25.:48:30.

less than the figure of 88% recorded in November. Which you were

:48:31.:48:36.

expecting, presumably? Yes, I would have expected. OK. Even our tiny

:48:37.:48:42.

conversation now shows how difficult it is. Agreed? Hazard yes. Thank you

:48:43.:48:48.

all of you for coming on the programme, thank you.

:48:49.:48:51.

"Shameful" - that's how the peer Lord Dubs describes the decision

:48:52.:48:53.

of Britain not take any more unaccompanied child migrants

:48:54.:48:56.

So far, 350 such children have been able to come to Britain.

:48:57.:49:03.

The so called Dubs amendment, designed by the Peer who's

:49:04.:49:05.

a former child refugee, aimed to help some of the estimated

:49:06.:49:11.

90,000 unaccompanied migrant children across the continent.

:49:12.:49:16.

Last year for this programme Lord Dubs and Rabbi Harry Jacobi, visited

:49:17.:49:24.

the Calais migrant camp and met two lone children

:49:25.:49:30.

seeking asylum in the UK, aged 10 and 12.

:49:31.:49:32.

The camp has since been disbanded by the French authorities.

:49:33.:49:36.

I'm a refugee and I came to England at the age of six.

:49:37.:49:40.

With the help of a translator, the boys aged ten and 12 explain

:49:41.:49:47.

He's complaining that it's been eight months now,

:49:48.:49:53.

and he's very upset that no one's bothered or asked us how

:49:54.:49:55.

That's why we are here, to ask you how you are.

:49:56.:50:02.

They said they now had little contact with relatives,

:50:03.:50:09.

who'd paid smugglers to bring them to Europe.

:50:10.:50:13.

One of them told the visitors what happened to his dad.

:50:14.:50:17.

The Taliban, Taliban killed his father.

:50:18.:50:24.

They made it to France in car boots, the back of lorries

:50:25.:50:27.

Scared of older men, scared of French police and tear gas,

:50:28.:50:33.

the boys said they would keep trying to get on lorries bound for England.

:50:34.:50:39.

And Lord Dubs is here now, along with Martha Mackenzie

:50:40.:50:42.

Lord Dubs, your reaction to the decision? I am bitterly, bitterly

:50:43.:50:53.

disappointed. There was no need for this. We had a scheme. I visited

:50:54.:51:00.

some of the Greek refugee camps in January. The situation there is

:51:01.:51:04.

pretty desperate. There are children there who need something better than

:51:05.:51:07.

the freezing cold and no help or support. I think it is a very

:51:08.:51:10.

disappointing decision and I think the government have gone back on

:51:11.:51:14.

their word. They assured me at the beginning they would axe at the

:51:15.:51:17.

letter and spirit of the amendment and they haven't done that. Meaning

:51:18.:51:31.

they -- meaning what? They should simply do it whilst there was a

:51:32.:51:34.

need. I never said we should take all the children in Europe, all I

:51:35.:51:37.

said was we should take some of them. The government have done very

:51:38.:51:41.

little. They say this wasn't the only route to helping vulnerable

:51:42.:51:47.

children. In the last year alone, "We have provided refuge or other

:51:48.:51:51.

forms of leave to more than 8000 children.". Well, yes, but there are

:51:52.:51:57.

over 90,000 unaccompanied child refugees in Europe. The point of the

:51:58.:52:00.

amendment was to help those. The ones that have come here, have come

:52:01.:52:04.

here possibly even legally and we wanted a legal means for

:52:05.:52:09.

unaccompanied child refugees to find safety, that was the purpose of the

:52:10.:52:13.

amendment. It is there as an amendment on the statute books, I

:52:14.:52:17.

believe in good faith. The government started implementing it

:52:18.:52:20.

and now they've decided, for very poor reasons, to stop the scheme

:52:21.:52:23.

altogether. What would be those reasons?

:52:24.:52:28.

The reasons they've stated is local authorities are not able to find,

:52:29.:52:32.

not willing or haven't got the money to find more foster parents who

:52:33.:52:36.

would provide families for these children. I know from local

:52:37.:52:41.

authorities that others are willing, if asked again, to step up to the

:52:42.:52:45.

mark. I've had e-mails from foster parents saying they are willing to

:52:46.:52:49.

take refugees. It isn't true that the local authorities are not

:52:50.:52:50.

supporting this. OK. Martha, what do you think of

:52:51.:52:57.

this decision? We are also very disappointed.

:52:58.:53:00.

Disappointed that the numbers are so small. To echo what Lord Dubs has

:53:01.:53:06.

said, this can't be the end of the government's work for unaccompanied

:53:07.:53:09.

children in Europe. We would urge them to go back to local authorities

:53:10.:53:14.

and see if they can take any more children. And also there are a lot

:53:15.:53:17.

of children in Europe who have family members in the UK and they

:53:18.:53:20.

have a legal right to be reunited with those family members. I know is

:53:21.:53:25.

very hard for to do that. The UK should stay in Greece and Italy make

:53:26.:53:29.

sure those children in the long term can come to the UK safely. You say

:53:30.:53:36.

there are small numbers. The government say last year we

:53:37.:53:40.

transferred over 900 unaccompanied children to the UK from Europe,

:53:41.:53:45.

including more than 750 from France as part of the UK's support for the

:53:46.:53:50.

Calais camp Clarence. I think there two things are. A big

:53:51.:53:56.

part of those transfer the children from Calais Howard family links

:53:57.:54:04.

here. If they stepped up that level of ambition in Greece and Italy,

:54:05.:54:07.

they could bring over many more children who have family links here.

:54:08.:54:12.

I think again, as Lord Dubs said, the scale of the problem is very

:54:13.:54:17.

large. We know there are around 2500 unaccompanied children in Greece at

:54:18.:54:20.

the moment and 90% of all children who arrived in Italy last year were

:54:21.:54:24.

unaccompanied. This isn't a problem that's going away. I'm going to ask

:54:25.:54:30.

you, Lord Dubs, to tell us again about your rescue and the difference

:54:31.:54:34.

it made to you as a child. I know there will be some people watching

:54:35.:54:38.

who are saying, look, we can't look after all of these children, however

:54:39.:54:45.

much we want to. Thank you. In 1938-39, Britain took 10,000

:54:46.:54:50.

unaccompanied child refugees from Germany, Austria and Czechoslovakia.

:54:51.:54:52.

I came from Prague. The ones from Prague were organised by Luke

:54:53.:54:57.

Winton. I think if they hadn't come to Britain I think all of us would

:54:58.:55:00.

have not survived the Holocaust. That was a route to safety. I have

:55:01.:55:05.

to say, Britain is a country that was incredibly welcoming, gave me a

:55:06.:55:10.

enormous opportunities, for which I am always enormously grateful. I

:55:11.:55:12.

would like to feel other children who are having a terrible time in

:55:13.:55:19.

camps across Europe could come to you England and have the same

:55:20.:55:23.

opportunities I've been given. Martha McKenzie, I'm going to push

:55:24.:55:28.

back on the figures, this local authorities. The number of asylum

:55:29.:55:32.

seeking children in England increased by 4000 last year and a

:55:33.:55:37.

vast majority are providing support for these young people. You are

:55:38.:55:41.

telling a very different story. We understand the need to consult with

:55:42.:55:44.

local authorities. There has to be space for these children and they

:55:45.:55:47.

have to be cared for properly. What is critical is those safe routes to

:55:48.:55:52.

get the UK. A lot of those children will have arrived spontaneously on

:55:53.:55:55.

their own, falling into the hands of people traffickers, smugglers, some

:55:56.:55:59.

even died en route to the UK. The Dubs amendment scheme made sure they

:56:00.:56:03.

were not just brought Hibbert safely. Yes. What we saw during the

:56:04.:56:08.

Calais camp clearances the number of children arriving spontaneously fell

:56:09.:56:13.

down. We have to make those safe routes for children to get here so

:56:14.:56:17.

they are not risking their lives. Thank you both very much for talking

:56:18.:56:19.

to us. And at about 10.30am,

:56:20.:56:23.

Labour are asking an urgent question about the closure of the child

:56:24.:56:28.

migrant scheme, we'll bring Scientists studying the animals

:56:29.:56:30.

say their eavesdropping has shed light on the origin of human

:56:31.:56:53.

language. The latest news and sport in a

:56:54.:56:55.

moment. Let's get the latest weather

:56:56.:56:57.

update - with Carol. I wish I could but a cold day today.

:56:58.:57:11.

A lot of cloud on some of that is producing wintry showers. Not

:57:12.:57:16.

everywhere. This area of high pressure is blocking fronts coming

:57:17.:57:20.

in from the Atlantic, dragging cold air from the continent across our

:57:21.:57:23.

shores. If you look at the squeeze on those isobars it's telling us it

:57:24.:57:27.

will be pretty windy, especially in the West. The winds in the

:57:28.:57:30.

north-west will slowly come down through the day. In western parts of

:57:31.:57:34.

the UK we will see some sunshine with one or two exceptions. Central

:57:35.:57:38.

and eastern areas, we have the cloud and wintry showers. Over the next

:57:39.:57:49.

few days the drill will be down the east coast of Scotland and England

:57:50.:57:52.

you are likely to see a mixture of rain and or sleet. Come inland and

:57:53.:57:55.

that becomes a mixture of sleet and or snow. The showers, not everyone

:57:56.:57:58.

will see them. Today there will be a lot of dry weather around. Quite a

:57:59.:58:03.

grey day and a cold today. Maximum temperature in London will be four

:58:04.:58:07.

Celsius. The cloud continues as we drift towards Bristol. In parts of

:58:08.:58:11.

Devon and Cornwall, some sunshine but not immune to the odd shower.

:58:12.:58:15.

For West Wales we are also looking at some sunshine but the rest of

:58:16.:58:19.

Wales will be fairly cloudy and it will feel cold. Northern Ireland,

:58:20.:58:23.

bright spells, fewer showers this afternoon and some sunny spells.

:58:24.:58:27.

Through the evening and overnight we hang onto this keenly easterly wind

:58:28.:58:32.

coming off the cold continent. Still a lot of cloud and wintry showers.

:58:33.:58:35.

Clear skies across north-west Scotland and West Wales means here

:58:36.:58:39.

there will be some frost, meaning you could have to scrape your

:58:40.:58:42.

windscreen first thing in the morning. Elsewhere, with the cloud

:58:43.:58:47.

on the breeze, although subzero temperatures, it is still going to

:58:48.:58:50.

feel pretty cold. You may not see that frost. Tomorrow, windy, the

:58:51.:58:56.

wind coming off the continent. Down the east coast through central

:58:57.:59:01.

areas once again we have the combination of cloud, rain, sleet

:59:02.:59:06.

and snow. Up to six centimetres, in the Northern Isles, just over two

:59:07.:59:09.

inches. Despite the fact those are the kind of temperature values you

:59:10.:59:12.

may see on your thermometer, with the wind it will feel cold.

:59:13.:59:19.

Into Saturday, organised band of rain, sleet and snow coming from the

:59:20.:59:22.

east. It will be drifting further west. Note how the wind has changed

:59:23.:59:31.

more of north-easterly. That will exacerbate cold feel of the weather

:59:32.:59:35.

which at best we are looking at between 4-5 or maybe six.

:59:36.:59:39.

Sunday, Sunday it's going to feel raw. Dragging him this cold wind

:59:40.:59:46.

from the near continent. There will be a lot of dry weather around on

:59:47.:59:52.

Sunday, some brighter skies, a little sunshine in Scotland and

:59:53.:59:55.

Northern Ireland but we will still have that mixture of wintry showers.

:59:56.:59:59.

Along the east coast a mixture of rain and sleet and as we push

:00:00.:00:03.

inland, we're looking at a mixture of some snow and also some sleet

:00:04.:00:07.

showers as well. It certainly isn't getting warmer in the next few days.

:00:08.:00:13.

Hello, it's Thursday, it's 10am, I'm Victoria Derbyshire.

:00:14.:00:19.

December was bad but it looks like January was the worst month

:00:20.:00:21.

for A delays in England since records began.

:00:22.:00:23.

The BBC has seen figures showing record numbers of patients left

:00:24.:00:26.

waiting on trolleys for more than 12 hours for a hospital bed.

:00:27.:00:33.

Brexit is causing friction in the Labour party.

:00:34.:00:36.

But leader Jeremy Corbyn insists the resignation of shadow business

:00:37.:00:43.

secretary Clive Lewis for voting against the Brexit bill

:00:44.:00:45.

Meanwhile the Government say it is the patriotic duty of peers not to

:00:46.:00:50.

oppose Brexit. Chucked out for complaining about

:00:51.:00:58.

the housing conditions. Rogue landlords are still evicting

:00:59.:01:06.

tenants who complain about poor housing conditions,

:01:07.:01:08.

despite a new law aimed The smell inside this room is vile.

:01:09.:01:15.

When you look at this, I would describe it as mould, dump. It

:01:16.:01:17.

smells bad. Here's Ben in the BBC Newsroom

:01:18.:01:20.

with a summary of today's news. New figures from NHS England show

:01:21.:01:29.

that in December 86% of patients were admitted,

:01:30.:01:31.

transferred or discharged from A

:01:32.:01:36.

within four hours of arrival. That's well below the standard

:01:37.:01:38.

of 95%, and below November's Provisional figures leaked

:01:39.:01:41.

to the BBC suggest that last month the figure went down

:01:42.:01:50.

to 82%, the lowest since The Department of Health insists

:01:51.:01:52.

the vast majority of patients Downing Street has attempted to play

:01:53.:01:56.

down an earlier threat by a Government source

:01:57.:01:59.

that the House of Lords could be abolished if peers tried to block

:02:00.:02:02.

the Government's bill to begin Last night, the Commons

:02:03.:02:04.

overwhelmingly backed the legislation

:02:05.:02:14.

without any amendments. More than 50 Labour MPs defied

:02:15.:02:15.

Jeremy Corbyn and voted The Shadow Home Secretary Yvette

:02:16.:02:17.

Cooper is asking an urgent question in the Commons this morning

:02:18.:02:22.

on the closure of the programme to welcome

:02:23.:02:25.

unaccompanied child refugees. When the Dubs Amendment

:02:26.:02:26.

was introduced last year, campaigners hoped thousands

:02:27.:02:28.

of children would benefit. By the time the system closes next

:02:29.:02:31.

month, just 350 children will have It was designed by Lord

:02:32.:02:34.

Dubs, who's described There was absolutely no need for

:02:35.:02:51.

this. We had a scheme, I visited some of the Greek refugee camps in

:02:52.:02:57.

January, the situation there is pretty desperate. There are children

:02:58.:03:01.

there and need something better than the freezing cold and no help and

:03:02.:03:05.

support, so I think it is a very disappointing decision and edit the

:03:06.:03:07.

Government have gone back on their word.

:03:08.:03:09.

New laws introduced last year to protect tenants in England

:03:10.:03:11.

from so-called "revenge evictions" aren't working, according to MPs

:03:12.:03:13.

A BBC Freedom of Information request found that there may be hundreds

:03:14.:03:18.

of thousands of tenants afraid to report things like damp,

:03:19.:03:21.

faulty electrics and broken boilers, for fear of being evicted.

:03:22.:03:28.

The mother of an 11-year-old transgender girl who was shot

:03:29.:03:30.

with an air-gun claims her school has not done enough

:03:31.:03:33.

She said five months of bullying has had a "terrible

:03:34.:03:36.

Greater Manchester Police confirmed it's investigating the shooting.

:03:37.:03:40.

The school said it took the attack "very seriously" and had expelled

:03:41.:03:43.

British scientists studying the calls of one of our closest ape

:03:44.:03:56.

relatives say they've revealed the origins of the earliest words.

:03:57.:04:02.

The researchers recorded and analysed thousands

:04:03.:04:03.

of orangutan squeaks over several years to learn how

:04:04.:04:06.

We will be speaking to the lead author of that research in the next

:04:07.:04:11.

hour. An Australian man has survived

:04:12.:04:12.

spending hours struggling to keep his nose above water

:04:13.:04:15.

after his excavator Daniel Miller had been riding

:04:16.:04:17.

the machine at his remote property north of Sydney when the edge

:04:18.:04:28.

of the dam gave way, and he was pinned down

:04:29.:04:31.

by the three-tonne excavator. and spent the whole time thinking

:04:32.:04:38.

about his wife and their I went to a very, almost robotic

:04:39.:04:51.

state of dust, count to 60, don't think about six hours, think about

:04:52.:04:57.

60 seconds 60 seconds, moved my arms, readjust, count to 60 again,

:04:58.:05:03.

another 60 seconds. Move my arms, readjust, just wait and try to be

:05:04.:05:09.

calm and logical. I watched cricket climb up a piece of grass two hours.

:05:10.:05:13.

I was stuck, there was nothing I could do. Lucky man.

:05:14.:05:15.

That's a summary of the latest BBC News - more at 10.30am.

:05:16.:05:19.

Thank you for your comments about your experience of A Figures out

:05:20.:05:28.

today showing that the target for four hours waiting in A was not

:05:29.:05:32.

met in December and January. Allianz text said, my son, six years of age,

:05:33.:05:37.

waited three hours in A with a fractured wrist and was sent home

:05:38.:05:41.

without painkillers. Three days later we went as a GP and were sent

:05:42.:05:46.

back to A for an x-ray. There are positive stories, Janet

:05:47.:05:49.

says, my husband has terminal cancer and we have had three occasions of

:05:50.:05:55.

going to A in Scotland, on each occasion we have had caring staff

:05:56.:05:58.

who have dealt with us as promptly as possible, sometimes we have to

:05:59.:06:05.

wait, we are patients after all. Why don't be less urgent cases display

:06:06.:06:08.

some patience and be grateful that we have a caring service.

:06:09.:06:13.

Bridge says, I work in a busy A department and suggest the people

:06:14.:06:16.

who attend with a nonemergency should be charged. There are no

:06:17.:06:20.

facilities for after-care for elderly patients and mental health

:06:21.:06:23.

patients because of bed-blocking. There is nowhere to send patients

:06:24.:06:32.

that do need admitting. If anyone has watched the programme Hospital

:06:33.:06:38.

on BBC Two, it shows this, it makes me stressed just to watch.

:06:39.:06:45.

Coming up, after a transgender people in Manchester was shocked by

:06:46.:06:48.

fellow people with an airgun, we will hear from her mother. Before

:06:49.:06:50.

that, the sport. Derby manager Steve McClaren seems

:06:51.:06:52.

to think so after he made eight of the 18 overall changes

:06:53.:07:01.

in their defeat to Leicester So neither team appeared

:07:02.:07:03.

to fancy the extra game, but it still turned out to be

:07:04.:07:06.

an entertaining one. Andy King put Leicester ahead before

:07:07.:07:09.

Abdoul Camera's deflected Leicester restored their lead

:07:10.:07:11.

through substitute Wilfred Ndidi, his first goal for the club,

:07:12.:07:14.

and Demarai Gray's superb solo goal secured their place

:07:15.:07:16.

in the fifth round. Tonight was about the squad, injured

:07:17.:07:37.

players coming back and getting the game, just giving them minutes.

:07:38.:07:42.

Towards the end of the season, when it is going to be important for us,

:07:43.:07:46.

we need everybody. We missed our opportunity in the first game, we

:07:47.:07:50.

didn't want the replay but it was a great game, fantastic support from

:07:51.:07:54.

our fans, and I couldn't fault the players.

:07:55.:07:57.

We want to do well in all the competition where we play. Of course

:07:58.:08:05.

we want to go forward in the FA Cup. The Premier League is not so good

:08:06.:08:10.

but we have to stay in the Premier League and for us now that is the

:08:11.:08:11.

focus on Sunday. MPs will debate the Football

:08:12.:08:13.

Associations "failure It follows a motion of no confidence

:08:14.:08:15.

in the governing body. Parliament will examine

:08:16.:08:24.

whether the FA is fit for purpose. Last July, sports minister

:08:25.:08:26.

Tracey Crouch said the governing body would lose its ?30-?40 million

:08:27.:08:33.

of public funding if Britain is aiming to become one

:08:34.:08:35.

of the world's top five skiing In exactly a year's time

:08:36.:08:39.

the Winter Olympics start in South Korea and the Team

:08:40.:08:50.

GB chef de mission says Great Britain can

:08:51.:08:54.

achieve its best ever Games. The current record medal haul

:08:55.:08:59.

is four in 1924 and at Achieved in part by

:09:00.:09:02.

Jenny Jones' bronze and she thinks the team can go

:09:03.:09:13.

at least one better. Dave Riding is getting great

:09:14.:09:21.

results. There are athletes getting podium result over this winter,

:09:22.:09:24.

which has been awesome, and in skiing you have got James Woods, who

:09:25.:09:30.

just won, Katie Ormerod came second at Air And Style, so I think it is

:09:31.:09:32.

achievable. Tiger Woods has admitted

:09:33.:09:34.

he will "never feel great" again. He returned to golf

:09:35.:09:37.

after more than a year out in December following a second

:09:38.:09:41.

major back operation. But had to pull out of the Dubai

:09:42.:09:45.

Desert Classic earlier this He also revelaed there have been

:09:46.:09:48.

times he didn't think he'd be That is all for now, the headlines

:09:49.:10:04.

after 10:30am. Let's go to Westminster when Norman

:10:05.:10:07.

has the latest on Brexit and whether the House of Lords Ultravox banner

:10:08.:10:12.

in the works. Is it all go for Brexit, do you believe, Norman

:10:13.:10:13.

Smith, political Guru? My sense is Mrs May has her foot on

:10:14.:10:22.

the gas and is in cruise control. Look at what happened in the

:10:23.:10:27.

Commons, the majority she got for her Brexit Bill are humongous. Last

:10:28.:10:33.

night she got 370, and if you think there were hundreds of amendments

:10:34.:10:37.

put down to the bill, not a single one got past, so now that it goes to

:10:38.:10:43.

the House of Lords, if you are at Pier, you are thinking, gosh, cannot

:10:44.:10:47.

really oppose this because it got such a stonking majority in the

:10:48.:10:51.

Commons. More than that, the Government is trying to crank up the

:10:52.:10:57.

pressure on peers with dire warning sounded last night, one Government

:10:58.:11:00.

source sending a text to journalists saying that if peers sought to

:11:01.:11:04.

frustrate Brexit then there would be an overwhelming demand for the House

:11:05.:11:09.

of Lords to be abolished, and that is what we were hearing from other

:11:10.:11:13.

mid loyalists like the Tory MP James cleverly this morning.

:11:14.:11:15.

When the British people voted in huge numbers -

:11:16.:11:18.

the largest popular mandate in British political history -

:11:19.:11:25.

for the Lords to try and undermine or subvert that will put them

:11:26.:11:28.

in a constitutionally very, very difficult place.

:11:29.:11:31.

I think there are a lot of people there who understand

:11:32.:11:38.

the implications of trying to distort or delay or even

:11:39.:11:40.

Could they really get rid of the Lords over this?!

:11:41.:11:47.

I was trying to get my phone out but I am too slow! The reason is this

:11:48.:11:52.

morning I was sent text messages by Downing Street in effect saying,

:11:53.:11:55.

hang on, we didn't mean to say we were going to abolish the House of

:11:56.:12:00.

Lords, actually we are relaxed about the House of Lords scrutinising and

:12:01.:12:03.

debating this bill. The reason for that is they know full well if they

:12:04.:12:08.

go round threatening to land a blow on the House of Lords, that will

:12:09.:12:13.

backfire, many peers will think, OK, we will be difficult if that is the

:12:14.:12:17.

attitude you are going to take! So now we are seeing the Government

:12:18.:12:20.

backtracked from that initial threat, although to be there to

:12:21.:12:24.

David Davis, the Brexit Secretary, last night he struck a different

:12:25.:12:25.

mode. These bloodcurdling things are

:12:26.:12:33.

silly. Below is an important institution, I expected to do its

:12:34.:12:37.

job and do its patriotic duty and give us the right to go on and

:12:38.:12:39.

negotiate that the relationship. And what is the state of the Labour

:12:40.:12:46.

Party this morning, would you say? Gosh, where to begin. A lot of

:12:47.:12:54.

Labour people are very, very angry that they have ended up in a

:12:55.:12:58.

position where they have effectively backed the Government, and although

:12:59.:13:00.

Jeremy Corbyn ordered his MPs to do that there was a revolt by about 50

:13:01.:13:05.

Labour MPs. Significantly we had Clive Lewis, yesterday we had him

:13:06.:13:10.

coming out of his house and issuing that statement saying he was

:13:11.:13:12.

thinking about what he was going to do and it was all very difficult,

:13:13.:13:17.

but he has now resigned. That has sparked a lot of question marks

:13:18.:13:21.

about whether there could be a move against Mr Corbyn again. I don't

:13:22.:13:25.

think that is likely in the short-term but it has just started

:13:26.:13:31.

that whole this morning. Mr Corbyn, when he was pressed earlier today,

:13:32.:13:38.

again insisted he thinks he took the right decision to back Brexit.

:13:39.:13:40.

Look, the majority of Labour MPs voted to trigger Article 50.

:13:41.:13:47.

50-odd voted against it, mainly on a basis of a strong

:13:48.:13:49.

My argument is it was a national vote, it was a national referendum

:13:50.:13:54.

On all the other campaigning points, there is unity.

:13:55.:14:04.

Let me finish with this, it made me laugh. This is a tweak here from a

:14:05.:14:12.

guy called Stuart Wood, who used to be basically Ed Miliband's

:14:13.:14:15.

right-hand man, lamenting where Labour is.

:14:16.:14:27.

I think that gives you a sense of the feeling amongst many people that

:14:28.:14:34.

really, over Brexit, they made a bit of a hash of it.

:14:35.:14:35.

Thank you, Norman. We've been speaking to the mother,

:14:36.:14:39.

whose 11-year-old transgender child was bullied for months and shot

:14:40.:14:44.

with a ball bearing gun A new law designed to help protect

:14:45.:14:47.

people renting homes from rogue landlords isn't working,

:14:48.:14:52.

say MPs and housing lawyers. Things like faulty electrics,

:14:53.:14:55.

damp and broken boilers that don't get fixed when it's cold

:14:56.:14:56.

are all things that are officially classed as category one hazards

:14:57.:14:59.

which pose a risk to health. But many private tenants are worried

:15:00.:15:01.

that if they complain too much, The law in England changed in 2015

:15:02.:15:04.

to make "revenge evictions" illegal. But, despite that change,

:15:05.:15:15.

figures gathered by Radio 1 Newsbeat through Freedom of Information

:15:16.:15:17.

requests show that more than half of local councils across England say

:15:18.:15:19.

they haven't stopped any. Damp, mould, faulty electrics

:15:20.:15:26.

and broken windows and boilers that They're all classed as category one

:15:27.:15:29.

hazards, in other words - they're so bad that they pose

:15:30.:15:41.

a risk to people's help. And they are all things that this

:15:42.:15:45.

man from Leeds City Council's rogue landlords unit

:15:46.:15:48.

is all-too-familiar with. That's all damp that has been

:15:49.:15:49.

leaking from outside You might expect tenants

:15:50.:15:53.

to complain about problems That's partly because they

:15:54.:15:56.

fear being forced out A practice known as revenge

:15:57.:16:00.

eviction, something This is rented out as

:16:01.:16:05.

private accomdation. People paying to rent here,

:16:06.:16:09.

making complaints, nothing is happening and then they could be

:16:10.:16:14.

under the threat of a revenge That is the reason why people

:16:15.:16:17.

are not coming forward And that's exactly what happened

:16:18.:16:20.

to Helen, she was living with her mum, sister and baby

:16:21.:16:24.

daughter in a rented home with lots It was horrible, after months

:16:25.:16:27.

of complaining we got a firm of solicitors in who deal

:16:28.:16:31.

with properties in these They checked the property,

:16:32.:16:33.

they agreed that it was damp and something needed to be done,

:16:34.:16:41.

so they wrote to our landlord and instructed that work needed

:16:42.:16:44.

to be done on the property and within a week of him receiving

:16:45.:16:46.

that we received a section 21 eviction notice pushed

:16:47.:16:50.

under our door. Because of what happened to people

:16:51.:16:56.

like Helen a new law was introduced in October 2015

:16:57.:17:00.

to try and stop retaliatory, But, exclusive figures gathered

:17:01.:17:02.

in a Freedom of Information requests to hundreds of local authorities

:17:03.:17:11.

right across England, which have the power to stop them,

:17:12.:17:13.

show that more than half And fewer than one in five have

:17:14.:17:16.

taken any action at all. We're talking about landlords

:17:17.:17:24.

who are trying to avoid carrying out their responsibilities

:17:25.:17:27.

as a landlord, to keep their properties in a good state

:17:28.:17:31.

of repair, and if asked a simple question like: "Will you a do repair

:17:32.:17:34.

for me?", they threaten someone They are the landlords

:17:35.:17:37.

we have got to get out. They're going to be in the worst

:17:38.:17:41.

properties sometimes people living So, that's the biggest

:17:42.:17:43.

challenge for everybody. The Government says prevent

:17:44.:17:46.

evictions are rare and that because of the new law it's given

:17:47.:17:49.

local councils all the powers Thankfully for Helen,

:17:50.:17:51.

she was able to find a new home. My landlord is great,

:17:52.:17:56.

I can't complain about him. I don't have to contact him

:17:57.:18:01.

unless something does pop up. We can speak to Giles Peaker,

:18:02.:18:04.

former chair of the Housing Law Carolyn Uphill, Chairman of

:18:05.:18:14.

the National Landlords Association. And Kate Webb Shelter's

:18:15.:18:18.

head of policy. And Sarah Ryan who has an experience

:18:19.:18:36.

to share with us. We had a bathroom that was leaking into our kitchen

:18:37.:18:39.

downstairs. Essentially when we asked for it to be repaired, the

:18:40.:18:44.

landlord took about two weeks and then when I really pushed and said,

:18:45.:18:49.

you do have an obligation to do this, that afternoon we were served

:18:50.:18:53.

with a section 21 notice asking us to leave. How did you react? It was

:18:54.:18:59.

really frightening, actually, because about two weeks previous I

:19:00.:19:04.

had extended my fixed term tenancy for six months. It was clear to me

:19:05.:19:08.

the reason she had served that notice was because I asked for the

:19:09.:19:14.

repairs to be made. You will know that revenge evictions are illegal

:19:15.:19:21.

now. Yes. But it appears either people aren't telling councils when

:19:22.:19:24.

they have an issue with our landlord or councils aren't doing what they

:19:25.:19:27.

are supposed to do under the legislation that gives them the

:19:28.:19:30.

power to clamp down on rogue landlords. Yes, well I was in a bit

:19:31.:19:34.

of a predicament because I'd actually moved to a new area from

:19:35.:19:39.

where I grew up. When I went to the local council for where I live now

:19:40.:19:48.

they said I they had no obligation to help me. When I contacted the old

:19:49.:19:55.

council they said they didn't have an obligation to help me either

:19:56.:20:00.

circus Catch-22. Is this law ineffective? It's not widely being

:20:01.:20:03.

used. Does that mean it's not being used or councils have got their head

:20:04.:20:08.

round it yet? That are two problems, the threshold in the law, the

:20:09.:20:13.

council has to serve an improvement notice or emergency repairs notice

:20:14.:20:19.

before retaliatory eviction happens. The second problem is that councils,

:20:20.:20:23.

for one reason or another, are not taking action. I think a lot of the

:20:24.:20:28.

time it is resources. Environmental health departments, some of them

:20:29.:20:33.

haven't even got environmental health problems any more and they

:20:34.:20:37.

are reluctant to serve notices. Let me bring you in from Shelter, why is

:20:38.:20:44.

networking? The law is only the first step to tackle the most

:20:45.:20:47.

extreme cases. I agree that it comes down to lack of resources and very

:20:48.:20:50.

few people going through the formal process. But the law is trying to

:20:51.:20:56.

push water uphill. We have a law that says you can evict people for

:20:57.:21:00.

no reason whatsoever, so until we tackle that it will be very easy for

:21:01.:21:04.

landlords to use evictions in this way, to evade looking after their

:21:05.:21:09.

properties and tenants. You are German of the National landlords

:21:10.:21:14.

Association. We know revenge evictions are pretty rare, affect

:21:15.:21:17.

about 2% of tenancies but when they happen they are devastating, aren't

:21:18.:21:22.

they? Certainly they are. What Sarah's story reveals if a landlord

:21:23.:21:26.

who doesn't respond to repair where there is a leak going from the

:21:27.:21:31.

bathroom through the ceiling to the kitchen is a poor investor and a

:21:32.:21:34.

fall to themselves could eventually that will do major damage to the

:21:35.:21:38.

property. But that is no consolation to Sarah, who was evicted? Obviously

:21:39.:21:43.

under the new law she shouldn't be able to be evicted because that's

:21:44.:21:47.

what the law is designed to protect, to avoid. What this story is really

:21:48.:21:51.

about is a lack of enforcement. Councils have the powers to deal

:21:52.:21:55.

with these issues and if they would use them, they could drive the

:21:56.:21:58.

rogues out of the sector, which we certainly would like to see and I

:21:59.:22:03.

think sensible and responsible landlords would as well. Would you

:22:04.:22:07.

agree with that, Giles? Councils have the power, the government would

:22:08.:22:12.

say they have... You shake your head in disagreement. May have some

:22:13.:22:15.

important powers and the government, to their credit, had given them much

:22:16.:22:20.

more powers, but it's still not enough to write this imbalance. You

:22:21.:22:27.

are raising eyebrows. I would agree, to be honest. I think there are,

:22:28.:22:34.

certainly with the retaliatory eviction laws, there is a very

:22:35.:22:38.

narrow time window in which the council can take a step towards this

:22:39.:22:42.

not happening, about three months. To inspect and decide whether to

:22:43.:22:46.

serve a notice, to serve the formal notice that timescale for

:22:47.:22:50.

overstretched and under resourced departments, it just doesn't happen.

:22:51.:22:53.

Let me read this e-mail from Agnes. We live in a bungalow five bedrooms

:22:54.:23:00.

or with damp, note central heating. A boarded-up window. The ceiling is

:23:01.:23:07.

mouldy and damp because there is no ventilation. We have asked the

:23:08.:23:10.

landlord on several occasions to fix these things but time and time again

:23:11.:23:14.

he says he will put our rent up if he has to come and sort it out. We

:23:15.:23:17.

are in fear of getting evicted if we take things further and we've lived

:23:18.:23:22.

in this state for years, because of that fear. What can we do? Please

:23:23.:23:28.

help. Let me ask you from the National landlords Association,

:23:29.:23:31.

clearly broken landlord, what Agnes do? Follow the new law. They should

:23:32.:23:37.

report the matter to the landlord in writing, that's the first step. If

:23:38.:23:40.

the landlord doesn't give a reasonable response within 14 days,

:23:41.:23:44.

which is a plan of action to put things right, they should report the

:23:45.:23:48.

matter to the council. Damp can be a category one hazard, the council can

:23:49.:23:53.

issue enforcement action. In the meantime, the council cannot survey

:23:54.:23:57.

section 21 notice to remove the tenant. Let's keep this in

:23:58.:24:01.

proportion, because they sensible investor does not actually want to

:24:02.:24:06.

lose a reliable, paying tenant. They want to maintain the property they

:24:07.:24:10.

have invested in. So this isn't a problem with the majority of

:24:11.:24:14.

landlords, it's a minority of rogue landlords and council should

:24:15.:24:19.

enforce. Giles? It's not necessarily a small problem. The government's

:24:20.:24:23.

figures showed 20% of the private sector doesn't meet standards. 2%

:24:24.:24:32.

revenge evictions? 2% have been evicted or threatened but the

:24:33.:24:34.

proportion of homes that don't meet the standard is much higher. But

:24:35.:24:38.

going back to Agnes' problem, the question is why is about what Agnes

:24:39.:24:43.

should do? Why aren't the government stepping in and giving tenants

:24:44.:24:46.

genuine security and why are we building more high-quality homes, so

:24:47.:24:50.

people like Agnes don't feel stuck somewhere where they can't afford an

:24:51.:24:53.

alternative on the conditions they are living in a absolutely

:24:54.:24:57.

appalling? The government would say they are trying to address those

:24:58.:25:00.

issues with the housing White Paper we spoke about earlier this week.

:25:01.:25:05.

Sarah, what is your situation now? We have actually managed to buy a

:25:06.:25:08.

house. We were in the process at the time of buying, which is why we

:25:09.:25:12.

extended our tenancy but we nearly lost it because we had nowhere else

:25:13.:25:16.

to live for that six-month period. Good luck with the house. We were in

:25:17.:25:20.

the process at the time of buying, which is why we extended our tenancy

:25:21.:25:24.

but we nearly lost it because we had nowhere else to live for that

:25:25.:25:26.

six-month period. Good luck with the house-buying. Thank you for coming

:25:27.:25:27.

on the programme. Thank you all. Police in Greater Manchester say

:25:28.:25:31.

they're investigating after a young transgender schoolgirl was shot

:25:32.:25:33.

with a ball bearing The 11-year-old girl was not injured

:25:34.:25:35.

but her parents say it's just the latest incident of extreme

:25:36.:25:44.

bullying that their daughter has suffered for five months

:25:45.:25:46.

because she's transgender. The girls mum, who's asked not to be

:25:47.:25:51.

named, has been speaking to BBC Radio Manchester

:25:52.:25:53.

about the moment she found out Last week I went to the school at

:25:54.:26:07.

11:30am, because I had a prearranged meeting because of an incident that

:26:08.:26:10.

had happened on Monday. They then told me that my child had been shot

:26:11.:26:16.

by a BB gun by another pupil. When I finally saw my child, she came into

:26:17.:26:20.

the room, she was shaking, she sat on the chair rocking and staring

:26:21.:26:24.

into space. I was completely shocked when I saw her. I spoke about what

:26:25.:26:29.

had happened and I said I was calling the police, they hadn't

:26:30.:26:33.

called the police. I also said, why didn't you phone me sooner? I found

:26:34.:26:37.

out it happened at 9:15am, so this was over two hours later that I

:26:38.:26:41.

found out my child had been shot with a BB gun. Physically she wasn't

:26:42.:26:45.

unhurt but mentally and emotionally this has had a huge impact on her.

:26:46.:26:50.

Our child came home to us in December, after a particularly bad

:26:51.:26:54.

week of bullying at the beginning of December, and said to us that she

:26:55.:26:57.

couldn't take any more, she was going to throw herself off a bridge.

:26:58.:27:02.

That is the worst word that any parent could ever hear. I remember

:27:03.:27:06.

when she told us that she didn't feel she was in the right body. I'd

:27:07.:27:11.

read up on the suicide rates of young people who were transgender

:27:12.:27:14.

and I said, the first thing I said was, my child will not be one of

:27:15.:27:16.

those children who killed themselves. Goodness me.

:27:17.:27:22.

With me now is Susie Green, she's the CEO of the charity Mermaids,

:27:23.:27:25.

which supports parents of transgender children.

:27:26.:27:27.

Without breaking any confidences, tell us more about this horrific

:27:28.:27:35.

case? The family came to Mermaids a couple of years ago about how to

:27:36.:27:38.

support their child. They had been dealing with their child stating

:27:39.:27:42.

they weren't really a boy, were a girl and became involved with the

:27:43.:27:48.

parents group. Up until secondary school, things went very well. She

:27:49.:27:53.

transitioned primary, it was supported really well the school

:27:54.:27:56.

were really good. Going into secondary school bullying started

:27:57.:28:00.

almost immediately. The effect it had on the family was horrendous. It

:28:01.:28:06.

started at a low level, escalated and then mum went into school, talk

:28:07.:28:11.

to pupils and it seemed to quieten down but then we've had some really

:28:12.:28:16.

negative press regarding parents of transgender children over the last

:28:17.:28:20.

few months and we've seen a direct escalation since then. This family

:28:21.:28:25.

is in bits. It's horrendous. There's nothing worse than hearing your

:28:26.:28:29.

Child say they don't want to be alive. I've been through that myself

:28:30.:28:33.

with my own daughter and that's what they are now facing. Every school is

:28:34.:28:36.

supposed to have an anti-bullying policy. This is failing in this

:28:37.:28:42.

particular case, clearly. Clearly. And I think as well, the

:28:43.:28:50.

anti-bullying policies schools have very rarely addressed transgender

:28:51.:28:53.

pupils or how to deal with transgender pupils in schools are

:28:54.:28:56.

often completely at a loss of what to do. So they avoid it, rather than

:28:57.:29:04.

dealing with that. I know that one incident that the mum has reported

:29:05.:29:07.

back to the parents group, an older boys that they were going to beat up

:29:08.:29:10.

their daughter and they were allowed to do so because she was a boy and

:29:11.:29:15.

not really a girl. The school said they couldn't do anything about that

:29:16.:29:18.

because there were no witnesses. Wow. When this particular girl

:29:19.:29:24.

arrived at this secondary school, was she open about the fact she was

:29:25.:29:28.

transgender? I know some children transition from primary to secondary

:29:29.:29:32.

without telling anybody. They just arrived as a girl or a boy with a

:29:33.:29:35.

new name. She arrived as a girl and with her

:29:36.:29:40.

new name and that's what was on the register, but she wasn't, she was

:29:41.:29:45.

open, because there were a number of pupils who had gone up from primary

:29:46.:29:49.

school with her, so new about her history. One girl actually went up

:29:50.:29:54.

to her one time in the corridor and whispered to her, I know you're not

:29:55.:30:00.

really a girl, I know you're really a boy. Then this young girl then

:30:01.:30:04.

basically stood and shouted out, just so everybody knows, I'm

:30:05.:30:09.

transgender. She's an incredible child. This has had a real impact on

:30:10.:30:14.

her emotional health. We have a statement from school. We are not

:30:15.:30:17.

naming the school to protect the girl's identity. This matter has

:30:18.:30:22.

been treated very seriously and the pupil who fired the ball bearing gun

:30:23.:30:26.

has been permanently excluded. We wish to send a message out to our

:30:27.:30:30.

community that this behaviour is completely unacceptable and will

:30:31.:30:33.

result in removal from our school. We've enlisted the support of a

:30:34.:30:37.

national organisation to help pass further with training of staff... Is

:30:38.:30:45.

that you? They say Stonewall, they were

:30:46.:30:47.

contacted but haven't done any work with the school. We are talking

:30:48.:30:51.

about going in and doing some training but it hasn't been arranged

:30:52.:30:55.

yet. We have met with the parents of the pupil to apologise to see what

:30:56.:31:00.

we can do further a school. I think if they'd have addressed the earlier

:31:01.:31:04.

incidents with far more severity, this probably wouldn't have got to

:31:05.:31:07.

the stage it's that now. Zero tolerance. Absolutely, zero

:31:08.:31:11.

tolerance. That's what it should. Anyone dealing with this sort of

:31:12.:31:16.

level of hate crime, and that's what it is, I hate crime, it shouldn't be

:31:17.:31:19.

tolerated under any circumstances and this has been allowed to just

:31:20.:31:24.

escalate as it has. If it had been dealt with properly in the beginning

:31:25.:31:27.

of this child wouldn't have been damaged so badly by. Thank you very

:31:28.:31:32.

much, thank you for talking to us. Susie Green, the CEO of the charity

:31:33.:31:37.

Mermaids, a charity that supports parents of transgender children.

:31:38.:31:45.

This is the scene in the House of Commons now where the shadow home

:31:46.:31:48.

secretary Yvette Cooper is shortly to ask an urgent question

:31:49.:31:51.

on the closure of the programme to welcome child refugees

:31:52.:31:53.

Known as the Dubs Amendment, we spoke to Lord Dubs earlier, the peer

:31:54.:32:01.

who campaigned for this to be introduced he told us he's really

:32:02.:32:03.

disappointed that the scheme is going to be closed at the end of

:32:04.:32:08.

March. As soon as Yvette Cooper stand up,

:32:09.:32:11.

we will cross back live to the Commons.

:32:12.:32:12.

A waiting times in English hospitals are longer than ever.

:32:13.:32:16.

We'll be getting some of the political reaction.

:32:17.:32:21.

scientists studying the animals say their eavesdropping has shed

:32:22.:32:26.

light on the origin of human language.

:32:27.:32:33.

With the news, here's Ben in the BBC Newsroom.

:32:34.:32:37.

New figures from NHS England show that in December 86%

:32:38.:32:40.

of patients were admitted, transferred

:32:41.:32:42.

or discharged from A within four hours of arrival.

:32:43.:32:45.

That's well below the standard of 95%, and below November's

:32:46.:32:48.

Provisional figures leaked to the BBC suggest that last month

:32:49.:32:55.

the figure went down to 82%, the lowest since

:32:56.:33:00.

Figures also suggest record numbers of people waited longer than 12

:33:01.:33:08.

hours for a hospital bed. The shadow Home Secretary Yvette

:33:09.:33:21.

Cooper is raising an urgent question about the closure of the programme

:33:22.:33:25.

to welcome unaccompanied child refugees. It was hoped thousands

:33:26.:33:29.

would benefit but by the time the programme closes next month only 350

:33:30.:33:34.

will have benefit. Lord Dubs told this programme the decision is a

:33:35.:33:35.

complete U-turn. New laws introduced last year

:33:36.:33:38.

to protect tenants in England from so-called "revenge evictions"

:33:39.:33:40.

aren't working, according to MPs A BBC Freedom of Information request

:33:41.:33:42.

found that there may be hundreds of thousands of tenants afraid

:33:43.:33:47.

to report things like damp, faulty electrics and broken boilers,

:33:48.:33:49.

for fear of being evicted. Downing Street has attempted to play

:33:50.:33:53.

down an earlier threat by a Government source

:33:54.:33:56.

that the House of Lords could be abolished if peers tried to block

:33:57.:34:00.

the Government's bill to begin Last night, the Commons

:34:01.:34:03.

overwhelmingly backed the legislation

:34:04.:34:07.

without any amendments. More than 50 Labour MPs defied

:34:08.:34:08.

Jeremy Corbyn and voted An Australian man has survived

:34:09.:34:12.

spending hours struggling to keep his nose above water

:34:13.:34:23.

after his excavator Daniel Miller had been riding

:34:24.:34:25.

the machine at his remote property north of Sydney when the edge

:34:26.:34:32.

of the dam gave way, and spent the whole time thinking

:34:33.:34:35.

about his wife and their That's a summary of the latest

:34:36.:34:40.

news, join me for BBC Leicester might be flirting

:34:41.:34:44.

with relegation in the league, but they're through to the FA Cup

:34:45.:34:54.

5th round today after beating Andy King put Leicester ahead before

:34:55.:34:57.

Abdoul Camera's deflected Leicester restored their lead

:34:58.:35:02.

through substitute Wilfred Ndidi, his first goal for the club,

:35:03.:35:09.

and Demarai Gray's solo goal secured MPs will debate the Football

:35:10.:35:12.

Associations "failure It follows a motion of no confidence

:35:13.:35:19.

in the governing body. Parliament will examine

:35:20.:35:23.

whether the FA is fit for purpose. Britain is aiming to become one

:35:24.:35:30.

of the world's top five skiing The Winter Olympics in South Korea

:35:31.:35:33.

start a year today, and the Team GB Chef de Mission says

:35:34.:35:39.

they can beat their best medal haul Tiger Woods has said

:35:40.:35:42.

he will "never feel great" again. He's just come back from a second

:35:43.:35:48.

back operation but pulled out of the Dubai Desert Classic

:35:49.:35:51.

earlier this month He also admitted there have been

:35:52.:35:53.

times he didn't think he'd be Those are the headlines for now,

:35:54.:35:58.

more later on. We will go back to the Commons when

:35:59.:36:13.

Yvette Cooper asked that question about the closure of the Dubs scheme

:36:14.:36:18.

to bring unaccompanied child migrants to the UK, as soon as she

:36:19.:36:21.

stands up to speak we will cross back there.

:36:22.:36:28.

More now on this morning's top story, the official A figures

:36:29.:36:31.

for England in December were the worst since records began

:36:32.:36:34.

Our Health Editor Hugh Pym is here to explain what these figures mean.

:36:35.:36:39.

These are the benchmarks, that 95% of patients should be assessed

:36:40.:36:47.

within four hours and that has been missed for more than a year, so

:36:48.:36:51.

people have got used to that, but we learned that in December it was a

:36:52.:36:58.

figure of 86.2, the worst since these records began in 2004 and the

:36:59.:37:03.

target was introduced. Overnight the BBC had a leak on provisional

:37:04.:37:07.

figures for January which showed it will be even worse, suggested it

:37:08.:37:12.

was, at 82%. These are the official figures saying December was pretty

:37:13.:37:15.

bad, we gather from what we have heard from our sources that January

:37:16.:37:19.

will be even worse. Is there any possibility that the

:37:20.:37:25.

target could be scrapped all redefined so that it doesn't look as

:37:26.:37:28.

bad? Work is going on to redefine it

:37:29.:37:32.

because what ministers are saying is, given the huge volume of

:37:33.:37:35.

patients coming in, some of whom don't need to be there, is there a

:37:36.:37:40.

better way of measuring it? They want to come up with something that

:37:41.:37:43.

measures urgent cases and how many are treated and assessed within four

:37:44.:37:47.

hours, but it is being made clear that if they scrap the target I have

:37:48.:37:51.

been referring to it would look like they are trying to evade the problem

:37:52.:37:54.

so I think they will keep it and come up with an extra one.

:37:55.:37:58.

I am going to interrupt go back to the House of Commons to hear Yvette

:37:59.:38:07.

Cooper asking about the dubs scheme. Secretary of State for the Homeland

:38:08.:38:10.

Department, secretary Amber Rudd. Mr Speaker, the Government takes the

:38:11.:38:17.

plight of asylum seeking children extremely seriously. That is why we

:38:18.:38:22.

pledged over ?2.3 billion in aid to the Syrian conflict, our largest

:38:23.:38:25.

ever humanitarian response to a single crisis. The UK has

:38:26.:38:30.

contributed significantly to hosting, supporting and protecting

:38:31.:38:32.

the most vulnerable children affected by the migration crisis. In

:38:33.:38:38.

the year ending September 2016 week granted asylum or another form of

:38:39.:38:47.

leave to over 800 children. Of the 4400 children settled through the

:38:48.:38:50.

Syrian vulnerable persons resettlement scheme so far, around

:38:51.:38:56.

half our children. Within Europe in 2016 we transferred over 900

:38:57.:38:59.

unaccompanied asylum seeking children to the UK. This included

:39:00.:39:04.

more than 750 from France as part of the UK's support for the Calais camp

:39:05.:39:11.

clearance. And I'm proud that as Home Secretary the UK played such a

:39:12.:39:17.

key role in supporting the French to safely and compassionately close the

:39:18.:39:22.

camp. Yesterday, the Government announced that in accordance with

:39:23.:39:25.

section 67 of the immigration act, we will transfer the specified

:39:26.:39:31.

number of 350 children pursuant to that section who reasonably meet the

:39:32.:39:35.

intention and spirit behind the provision. This number includes over

:39:36.:39:40.

200 children already transferred under section 67 from France, and I

:39:41.:39:46.

want to be absolutely clear, the scheme is not closed. As required by

:39:47.:39:51.

the legislation, we have consulted with local authorities on their

:39:52.:39:54.

capacity to care for unaccompanied asylum seeking children before

:39:55.:39:59.

arriving at the number, and we're grateful for the way which local

:40:00.:40:02.

authorities have stepped up to provide places to those arriving,

:40:03.:40:07.

and we will continue to work closely to address capacity needs. The

:40:08.:40:11.

Government has always been clear that we do not want to incentivise

:40:12.:40:15.

perilous journeys to Europe, particularly by the most vulnerable

:40:16.:40:19.

children. That is why children must have arrived in Europe before March

:40:20.:40:25.

20 2016th to be eligible under section 67 of the immigration act.

:40:26.:40:29.

The obligation was accepted on the basis that the measure would not

:40:30.:40:51.

act as a pull factor for children to Europe and would be based on local

:40:52.:40:55.

authority capacity. The Government has a clear strategy and we believe

:40:56.:40:57.

that this is the right approach. Here in the UK we have launched the

:40:58.:41:00.

National transfer scheme and significantly increased funding for

:41:01.:41:01.

local authorities caring for unaccompanied asylum seeking

:41:02.:41:03.

children by between 20 and 28%. The Government has taken significant

:41:04.:41:05.

steps to improve an already comprehensive approach and we

:41:06.:41:07.

provide protection to thousands of children this year and I am proud of

:41:08.:41:10.

this Government's active approach to helping and sheltering the most

:41:11.:41:12.

vulnerable, and that is a position that will continue. Yvette Cooper.

:41:13.:41:18.

Last week the Prime Minister said, on refugees, this Government has a

:41:19.:41:22.

proud record of support and long may it continue. This week, the

:41:23.:41:26.

Government cancelled the Dubs scheme after it had been running for less

:41:27.:41:30.

than six months. She said it hasn't closed but will she confirm what it

:41:31.:41:34.

said in a statement yesterday that once those 350 children are here,

:41:35.:41:40.

that is it, it is closed? Where does it say in the Hansard debates that I

:41:41.:41:44.

have hear from our debates on the Dubs Amendment that we will only

:41:45.:41:46.

help lone child refugees for six months? Where does

:41:47.:42:07.

it say that instead of the 3000 that Parliament debated, we will help

:42:08.:42:10.

only a tenth of that number. Where does it say that when we get the

:42:11.:42:13.

chance we will turn our backs once again? It doesn't, because we did

:42:14.:42:15.

not say that at the time. The Home Secretary knows that what she is

:42:16.:42:18.

doing is shameful. Not only has she closed the programme but also

:42:19.:42:20.

cancelled the fast-track Dublin scheme to help those with family

:42:21.:42:22.

that are here. The Home Secretary did good work in autumn last year

:42:23.:42:25.

and I commended her for it, to help those in Calais and make sure that

:42:26.:42:28.

we could take as many children as possible. But she also knows most of

:42:29.:42:31.

those have family here already and they were entitled to be year. She

:42:32.:42:34.

said local councils can't do more, the truth is many local councils

:42:35.:42:35.

have said they can with more support or more time. It takes time

:42:36.:42:55.

to set up the schemes and they should not be closed down so

:42:56.:42:58.

quickly, and there are still so many Children In Need of help. She knows

:42:59.:43:00.

there are thousands in Greece in overcrowded accommodation or

:43:01.:43:02.

homeless, or in Italy, still at risk of human trafficking. Teenagers in

:43:03.:43:04.

French centres being closed down, they have nowhere left to go. She

:43:05.:43:07.

talked about clearing Calais, they are heading back to Calais, back to

:43:08.:43:09.

Dunkirk, back to the mud, the danger, back to the arms of the

:43:10.:43:12.

people traffickers, the smugglers, the exploitation, abuse,

:43:13.:43:14.

prostitution rings, back into the modern slavery that this parliament

:43:15.:43:19.

and this Government has pledged to end.

:43:20.:43:21.

Yvette Cooper making a point to the Home Secretary Amber Rudd, Yvette

:43:22.:43:25.

Cooper is a Labour MP and chair of the Home Affairs Select Committee.

:43:26.:43:42.

We will keep listening across to the conversation and more on that story

:43:43.:43:42.

throughout the day here on BBC News. We will talk to another Labour MP

:43:43.:43:45.

now about the accurate three issue. -- about the A issue. Luciano

:43:46.:43:52.

Berger is on the Health Select Committee. Leaked figures show that

:43:53.:43:59.

January is even worse than December. How do you respond? These are the

:44:00.:44:03.

barometer of our health service and these figures are the worst and it

:44:04.:44:07.

began in 2004 and shines a spotlight on how desperate it is across the

:44:08.:44:10.

NHS system for hundreds and thousands of people across the

:44:11.:44:14.

country. Would it be different if Labour was in power? Most certainly

:44:15.:44:18.

it would. The decisions that have been made since 2010, whether it is

:44:19.:44:27.

the cuts we have seen to social care, the reorganisation of the NHS,

:44:28.:44:29.

which cost billions of pounds and has created pressure in the system,

:44:30.:44:32.

all the cuts we have seen elsewhere which mean that people turn up at

:44:33.:44:35.

accident and emergency because they find themselves in a crisis or find

:44:36.:44:41.

themselves in an acute physical health condition, it is where people

:44:42.:44:46.

end up. I saw it myself first-hand when I was in A a few weeks ago.

:44:47.:44:54.

What happened? I was told to go by my GP because of a suspected clot on

:44:55.:44:58.

the long, I am pregnant, as you can see, and found myself waiting for

:44:59.:45:03.

over 5.5 hours before I was put on a trolley, so I will be in the

:45:04.:45:07.

statistics that come out next month. I was kept in A for over 20 hours.

:45:08.:45:14.

How long were you on a trolley? In the waiting room for 5.5 hours, then

:45:15.:45:19.

on a trolley, I came around 8pm and it was not until 8am the next day

:45:20.:45:25.

that I was put on a bed. I have heard first-hand from the staff,

:45:26.:45:28.

talking amongst themselves at the shift changeover, you heard them

:45:29.:45:32.

saying how, in their view, it was unsafe on that evening that I had

:45:33.:45:37.

been in A The triage nurse herself said to me that they were

:45:38.:45:41.

not able to meet their own safety procedures. I was 30 weeks pregnant

:45:42.:45:47.

at the time and they told me how normally I would be taken straight

:45:48.:45:50.

through but unfortunately because of the volume of people there, many

:45:51.:45:57.

ambulances that were waiting to admit people into hospital, it was

:45:58.:46:01.

totally overflowing. Are you all right? I'm fine thank you, yes. You

:46:02.:46:07.

only have to look at programmes we have seen on the BBC across the past

:46:08.:46:11.

week to know that this is the reality on the ground, we have seen

:46:12.:46:15.

the goalposts move, 2004 when the A waiting time targets was set up

:46:16.:46:21.

at 90%, the coalition Government reduced it down to 95%, you heard

:46:22.:46:26.

from your health editor how the Government may move the goalposts

:46:27.:46:29.

again. What we need is a focus on what to do to fix the problem,

:46:30.:46:31.

rather than mass kit. I want to ask about the historic

:46:32.:46:41.

night in the Commons last night, historic night for Theresa May and

:46:42.:46:45.

the Brexit bill. You voted against it, against Jeremy Corbyn's

:46:46.:46:49.

instructions. Labour failed to amend the bill at all. There were loads of

:46:50.:46:54.

amendments. Your party is in a mess over it, aren't they? I put my name

:46:55.:46:59.

to many amendments, the majority of which we voted on last night for

:47:00.:47:04.

many hours. One in particular was clause 11, the specific pledge that

:47:05.:47:09.

even those constituents of mine who voted to leave the EU tell me was

:47:10.:47:14.

one of the motivating factors that led them, this pledge of ?350

:47:15.:47:21.

million for the NHS, very relevant to the discussion. And it failed. It

:47:22.:47:25.

failed. I represent a constituency in the city of Liverpool, 50% voted

:47:26.:47:31.

to remain and for the figures that have been extrapolated, it was

:47:32.:47:34.

higher for my own constituency. I've seen first-hand the benefit of what

:47:35.:47:38.

being in the European Union means for us, in terms of investment and

:47:39.:47:42.

jobs. I don't think anyone has a mandate, irrespective of what the

:47:43.:47:46.

decision was by the country, to lead us down a path that was the economic

:47:47.:47:51.

ruin. Rex is happening, it is going to happen. But the challengers,

:47:52.:47:57.

terms of... One of the reasons I made the decision, it was a

:47:58.:48:01.

principled decision and I respect those who had different principles

:48:02.:48:05.

and voted in different ways. One of the reasons was essentially Article

:48:06.:48:10.

50 will now be triggered and it is a time-limited moment. I'm very

:48:11.:48:14.

concerned we are not in anyway or shape prepared to content with the

:48:15.:48:18.

realities and challenges we will face as the country, to negotiate

:48:19.:48:22.

our way down this path. Thank you very much, Luciana Berger, thank you

:48:23.:48:24.

for coming on programme. We will talk about that with

:48:25.:48:26.

scientists in the next few minutes. MPs will today debate a motion

:48:27.:48:35.

of 'no confidence' into how Greg Clarke, the Chairman of the FA,

:48:36.:48:38.

which is England's football's governing body, says he'll resign

:48:39.:48:45.

if they don't back his reform plans. I spoke to Damian Collins,

:48:46.:48:50.

who's the chairman of an influential group of MPs sitting on the Culture,

:48:51.:48:52.

Media and Sport Committee, and former FA executive

:48:53.:48:55.

Adrian Bevington, About if Parliament should get

:48:56.:49:02.

involved in this. The running of the FA in England,

:49:03.:49:05.

what does it have to do with you and your colleagues? We were invited by

:49:06.:49:10.

three former chairman of the football Association and Chief

:49:11.:49:13.

Executive 's to propose legislation to reform the FA. There has been

:49:14.:49:16.

debate for many years about the need for the FA to reformat and

:49:17.:49:20.

restructure. The chairman saying it is impossible for the FA to reform

:49:21.:49:23.

itself because it requires lots of big interest in trouble giving up

:49:24.:49:26.

hours they enjoy and they won't do that. So they offend the only way

:49:27.:49:31.

you can restructure or read from the FA as if legislation is passed to.

:49:32.:49:35.

You worked for the English FA for many years, are the former chairman

:49:36.:49:40.

right? The only way to change the FA is for the government to introduce

:49:41.:49:44.

legislation? Well, I'd like to see Greg Clark being given the chance to

:49:45.:49:57.

actually propose reforms he's been working on, before we try and sign

:49:58.:50:01.

off on that lets give the current chairman chance to deliver. Is there

:50:02.:50:06.

any reason to think Greg Clark can deliver when Greg Dyke couldn't,

:50:07.:50:11.

David Bernstein couldn't and various other men?. There is an air of

:50:12.:50:14.

confidence coming from within the FA at the moment with regards to this.

:50:15.:50:19.

I've spoken to various people. I believed the deadline everyone was

:50:20.:50:22.

working to is towards the end of March, beginning of April, which is

:50:23.:50:28.

what the sports minister says. Greg has been all over the country

:50:29.:50:31.

meeting with the stakeholders. There is a real commitment within the FA,

:50:32.:50:36.

that has been for a long time, to improve much needed diversity,

:50:37.:50:41.

especially FA council level. We need many more women involved, both that

:50:42.:50:48.

council and at board level. Damian Collins, your own sport select

:50:49.:50:53.

committee is much smaller than the FA Council, about the same size as

:50:54.:50:58.

the FA board. What is the make up of your own committee? We only have one

:50:59.:51:01.

woman on the committee. Is everyone white? Yes, everyone white and only

:51:02.:51:08.

one woman. Why I do the right people to debate this? This issue goes back

:51:09.:51:12.

years in Parliament. Why are you the right people to debate this? We are

:51:13.:51:16.

the sports committee of Parliament, we have put forward proposals in the

:51:17.:51:23.

past. You don't represent the population either. I wish there were

:51:24.:51:28.

more women on the committee and in Parliament. That is a side issue.

:51:29.:51:32.

There is no dispute across Parliament about the proposals we've

:51:33.:51:35.

put forward. The reason we are having the debate today is to say we

:51:36.:51:38.

have strong views, lots of people have strong views, let's ask the

:51:39.:51:41.

whole of the House of Commons if they agree with us, that legislation

:51:42.:51:45.

is the only way to reform the FA? Do they agree with the former FA

:51:46.:51:50.

chairman that you can only reform it with registration? The final fought

:51:51.:51:56.

with you, the German Greg Clark has upped the stakes and said he will

:51:57.:52:00.

resign as chairman if he fails to deliver the reforms he wants to get

:52:01.:52:04.

through. -- the chairman Greg Clark. What are the chance of him getting

:52:05.:52:08.

those reforms through? I hope he doesn't resign. I'm increasingly

:52:09.:52:11.

confident from what I've been told that the work he's doing internally,

:52:12.:52:16.

across the game and also the working relationship he has with Tracy

:52:17.:52:19.

Crouch will not lead to that. I hope we can continue with Greg Clark as

:52:20.:52:24.

chairman in a much more diverse FA, following on with the good work they

:52:25.:52:28.

already do, which is often forgotten. Thank you both very much

:52:29.:52:29.

for coming on the programme. Richard Conway joins us. If they

:52:30.:52:38.

don't reform, what could they do? Any sporting body that receives

:52:39.:52:43.

lottery funding public funding could lose that if they don't meet new

:52:44.:52:49.

requirements. That means gender diversity on boards, boards being

:52:50.:52:53.

the decision-makers. Money could be taken away from the FA and given to

:52:54.:52:59.

other organisations. The big question for the men on the

:53:00.:53:03.

councillors do they care about that? The FA can live without that money.

:53:04.:53:06.

That is what is at stake. Greg Clark has to convince the FA councillors

:53:07.:53:10.

that they really need to change otherwise is cash could be gone.

:53:11.:53:12.

Thank you very much, Richard. The developments in evolution

:53:13.:53:21.

between humans and our ape ancestors Now, scientists may have uncovered

:53:22.:53:23.

the origins of human language. Researchers from Durham and

:53:24.:53:26.

Liverpool John Moore Universities spent years eavesdropping

:53:27.:53:28.

on Orangutans, and they analysed more than 5,000 of their "kiss

:53:29.:53:30.

squeaks" that sound like this. We can speak to Professor Serge

:53:31.:53:34.

Wich, a Primate Biologist at Liverpool John Moore University

:53:35.:53:53.

who is the lead author in the study. Hello professor, good morning. What

:53:54.:54:04.

is that kiss squeak, what are they saying to each other when they make

:54:05.:54:07.

that noise? They say several things to each other. They can say, I am

:54:08.:54:12.

from this particular population. It gives information about who they

:54:13.:54:16.

are, whether they are male or female and also a little bit about the

:54:17.:54:20.

context in which they make the sound. It provides quite a bit of

:54:21.:54:24.

information in a very odd sounding sound. Yeah. What does it have to do

:54:25.:54:31.

with the way we speak? Well, all our words were made of

:54:32.:54:35.

Constance and vowels. A lot of our research has focused on fouls and we

:54:36.:54:40.

always thought most of the information is in vowel sounds. Now

:54:41.:54:52.

this is a consonant sound, a lot of information about population and

:54:53.:54:57.

context. It means early on in our revolution the consonant sounds

:54:58.:55:00.

might have been important to relay messages. OK, I'm not sure I quite

:55:01.:55:06.

understand that Professor. I'm sorry. Are you saying the kiss

:55:07.:55:13.

squeaks are consonants? We always thought they did not contain much

:55:14.:55:18.

information, that they were basically like an alarm call, just

:55:19.:55:22.

saying, I'm afraid or something like that, but now we've discovered there

:55:23.:55:28.

is as much information on these as in some of the vowel sounds that

:55:29.:55:34.

primates make. That means we look at a different way of how these might

:55:35.:55:38.

have been combined by our early ancestors. Right, I understand now.

:55:39.:55:47.

So that obviously illustrates all potentially illustrates how our

:55:48.:55:51.

language evolved? Yes, exactly. Because it's sort of a

:55:52.:55:56.

mystery how those early phases of language and evolution happened,

:55:57.:56:02.

were there first consonants or vowels, how are they combined and

:56:03.:56:07.

what were the information being conveyed by the sounds? Now we think

:56:08.:56:14.

they were combined in a way to make a message redundant, so, in a way,

:56:15.:56:18.

the same message was repeated twice, both in a vowel sound or in a

:56:19.:56:24.

consonant sound, because the consonant contained so much

:56:25.:56:27.

information as well. Are the orangutans saying anything else...

:56:28.:56:31.

Could they be saying any other things apart from I'm a male, I'm

:56:32.:56:37.

here and I'm ready to reproduce if you want? They have a large number

:56:38.:56:41.

of sounds that they used in a whole array of contacts. These differ

:56:42.:56:46.

between populations. For instance the sound a mother uses to call an

:56:47.:56:51.

infant differs between populations. It's like a dialect. The sounds that

:56:52.:56:55.

they make when they built a nest every evening differ between

:56:56.:56:59.

populations as well. Those are dialects as well. Thank you very

:57:00.:57:03.

much, Professor. Thank you for coming on the programme.

:57:04.:57:09.

Yesterday we told you the High Court in Malawi had granted madonna

:57:10.:57:14.

permission to adopt twins from the country. Today she has posted this

:57:15.:57:19.

picture on social media. Let's take a look. Confirming she has adopted

:57:20.:57:24.

the little girls. She says she is overjoyed that they are now part of

:57:25.:57:28.

her family and also said, "I'm deeply grateful to all of those

:57:29.:57:31.

allowing that make this possible and I asked the media du Preez respect

:57:32.:57:36.

our privacy during this transitional time. " thank you to Mark, a

:57:37.:57:43.

landlord who said, I'm fed up of attacks on landlord, you need to

:57:44.:57:48.

balance the views so you reflect how many tenants neglect properties and

:57:49.:57:53.

refuse to pay rent and landlord tough to put up with this for many

:57:54.:57:58.

months while strike to remove them and are left with bills of thousands

:57:59.:58:03.

of pounds to repair the damage. With no chance of making good the

:58:04.:58:08.

damage is. Most landlords are conscientious and provide decent

:58:09.:58:10.

properties for decent tenants but coverage in the media is almost

:58:11.:58:14.

always biased, in favour of tenants rights. A quick one from Andrew, I'm

:58:15.:58:19.

not sure the main issue is lack of enforcement. Personally I would

:58:20.:58:22.

think mainly people don't know about this law that protects tenants in

:58:23.:58:25.

that way. Thank you for those, we are back

:58:26.:58:29.

tomorrow at 9am. Business life is next,

:58:30.:58:31.

When author Sir Terry Pratchett died,

:58:32.:58:36.

They called on Death to give Terry back.

:58:37.:58:41.

One woman who found hidden cameras around her flat says she was served an eviction notice after she complained to her landlord.

Plus, with A&E waiting times at their worst on record, health experts give their solutions to the crisis.