13/03/2017 Victoria Derbyshire


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13/03/2017

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Hello it's Monday, it's 9.00am, I'm Victoria Derbyshire,

:00:16.:00:17.

This morning: could cancer sniffing dogs save lives and millions

:00:18.:00:21.

I want to tell you something extraordinary with pioneering change

:00:22.:00:32.

on how we diagnose cancer and people living

:00:33.:00:42.

leader Iain Duncan Smith calls with serious

:00:43.:00:45.

And he meets some of the people whose lives have also been saved

:00:46.:00:51.

by dogs trained to spot signs of diabetes.

:00:52.:00:55.

I am going to go to bed and my husband doesn't have to worry when

:00:56.:01:02.

he wakes up in the morning, I will be dead next to him. Simple things

:01:03.:01:07.

like that, it is difficult to put into words, but that is what it's

:01:08.:01:08.

like having magic. We'll bring you the

:01:09.:01:10.

full story shortly. Also on the programme -

:01:11.:01:18.

the final hurdle before the UK officially begins divorce

:01:19.:01:21.

proceedings from the EU gets Tory MPs and peers paving the way

:01:22.:01:35.

for Theresa May to trigger Article 50 as early as tomorrow morning.

:01:36.:01:37.

And aid agencies are warning that time is running out

:01:38.:01:40.

to save an estimated 20 million people facing famine

:01:41.:01:42.

We'll be live in those four affected countries and ask whether the world

:01:43.:01:46.

is doing enough to tackle a humanitarian crisis.

:01:47.:01:54.

We will bring you the latest breaking news and developing

:01:55.:02:08.

stories. We are going to talk about a case in the Supreme Court which

:02:09.:02:12.

could have profound legal implications for policing because it

:02:13.:02:16.

will determine whether officers can be sued by victims if they don't

:02:17.:02:21.

investigate a case adequately. Plus, find out who was in this box and

:02:22.:02:23.

why. Get in touch. Use #Victoria Live and if you text,

:02:24.:02:28.

you will be charged The bill which gives Theresa May the

:02:29.:02:38.

power to trigger the Brexit process enters its final stages in the House

:02:39.:02:41.

of Commons later. Ministers believe they have enough support to overturn

:02:42.:02:46.

the two changes made to the bill by the House of Lords. One guarantees

:02:47.:02:49.

the rights of EU nationals living here. The other, ensures parliament

:02:50.:02:54.

will be given a meaningful vote on any exit deal. Norman Smith is at

:02:55.:02:58.

Westminster. This is almost it, what is likely to

:02:59.:03:08.

happen today, Norman? The truth is, by the end of the day, Theresa May

:03:09.:03:12.

will have got her bill paving the way to leave the EU through

:03:13.:03:15.

Parliament unamended. I said that because talking to rebel Tory MPs,

:03:16.:03:23.

who will get a vote on those two changes proposed by the House of

:03:24.:03:28.

Lords, guaranteeing the right of EU nationals, guaranteeing Parliament

:03:29.:03:32.

vote. They are not in the mood to have a real fight. My sense is, Tory

:03:33.:03:40.

rebels will back down, provided ministers make some reassurance,

:03:41.:03:44.

saying they understand. I think they will back off. When the measure goes

:03:45.:03:49.

back to the House of Lords, although Liberal Democrat peers are talking

:03:50.:03:53.

about getting camp beds in, preparing to stay all night to fight

:03:54.:04:02.

this, hour by hour, the reality is, when you put together Labour peers,

:04:03.:04:05.

crossbench peers, they too will back down which means about midnight or

:04:06.:04:09.

so, I suspect the reason may well have her Article 50 bill. Albeit,

:04:10.:04:14.

this morning Jeremy Corbyn was saying, he still wants parliament to

:04:15.:04:17.

be kept in the loop during the negotiations. We don't have Jeremy

:04:18.:04:28.

Corbyn! Sorry about that. If it goes the way you have just described it

:04:29.:04:35.

today, what, when will Theresa May trigger Article 50, the process for

:04:36.:04:40.

us to begin the negotiations to leave the European Union? The truth

:04:41.:04:44.

is, if anyone says they know when Theresa May is going to trigger

:04:45.:04:48.

Article 50, I think they are telling a porky. The only person who really

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knows, really knows is Theresa May herself. I am guessing, but I think

:04:54.:04:58.

she will be waiting to see how the debate goes today. The mood of

:04:59.:05:04.

Parliament. She will also want to see the reaction in tomorrow's

:05:05.:05:10.

papers. I feel personally, she will go sooner, rather than later, maybe

:05:11.:05:14.

even tomorrow, just to show she is on the front foot, pressing ahead,

:05:15.:05:18.

got momentum and is not hanging around until the end of the month.

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My gut instinct is she will go sooner rather than later and back

:05:24.:05:25.

could be tomorrow. Joanna is in the BBC

:05:26.:05:27.

Newsroom with a summary A British man has been jailed

:05:28.:05:29.

for six years in Indonesia, over the killing of a policeman

:05:30.:05:34.

on the island of Bali. Our South East Asia Correspondent,

:05:35.:05:39.

Jonathan Head is following What more can you tell us about this

:05:40.:05:50.

case, Jonathan? It is a disturbing and baffling case in some ways.

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David Taylor was a DJ living in Australia. He was visiting Bali with

:05:56.:06:02.

his Australian girlfriend, Sarah, last August. They had just arrived.

:06:03.:06:07.

On the beach that night they had an altercation with a police officer,

:06:08.:06:11.

who they believe was involved in taking Sarah,'s bag. That

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altercation ended up in a fight in which David Taylor struck the

:06:20.:06:23.

policeman several times, apparently with a bottle and other items and

:06:24.:06:27.

then left him, although took his credit cards and his phone. The

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policeman later died on the beach where he was left. The couple were

:06:33.:06:37.

apprehended a couple of days later. In the end they were not charged

:06:38.:06:41.

with murder, they were charged with assault, leading to death. That is

:06:42.:06:46.

what he has been convicted. We understand he is not going to

:06:47.:06:51.

contest the sentence I think he may view, given the outcome of his

:06:52.:06:57.

fight, there were apparently 42 injuries on the policeman, getting a

:06:58.:07:00.

six-year sentence might be considered lenient. His girlfriend,

:07:01.:07:05.

Sarah Connor may appeal her sentence. She argued she only tried

:07:06.:07:09.

to intervene in the fight to stop it, but was convicted of being an

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accessory and got four years in prison. It is a strange case. There

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doesn't seem to be any reason why in incident turned out as violently as

:07:19.:07:22.

this one did. The sentence today won't surprise anybody. Thank you,

:07:23.:07:25.

Jonathan. Rail staff from three firms

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across England have started 24-hour strikes in a dispute over

:07:30.:07:31.

the role of guards. The RMT's 30th strike day

:07:32.:07:33.

in its dispute with Southern over plans for driver-only-operated

:07:34.:07:36.

trains, has spread to Guards and drivers working for

:07:37.:07:37.

Merseyrail and Northern are taking Rail bosses argue it's

:07:38.:07:41.

about modernising services Police are launching

:07:42.:07:45.

an unprecedented appeal at the Supreme Court

:07:46.:07:52.

against a ruling it failed the victims of one of the UK's

:07:53.:07:55.

most dangerous rapists. Judges said Scotland Yard had

:07:56.:07:58.

breached the human rights of two women because officers didn't

:07:59.:08:00.

properly investigate John Worboys who was jailed for life in 2009

:08:01.:08:02.

after committing more The outcome of the case

:08:03.:08:05.

could have profound legal A trusted Black Cab driver,

:08:06.:08:10.

but one of the country's John Worboys attacked more than 100

:08:11.:08:21.

women over six years, hunting them down late at night

:08:22.:08:25.

in London with an elaborate trick. He'd show off a bag of cash claiming

:08:26.:08:28.

it was a big gambling win and offer Few of his victims could entirely

:08:29.:08:32.

remembered what happened next Few of his victims could entirely

:08:33.:08:38.

remember what happened next and police did not take

:08:39.:08:41.

their complaints seriously. One of his victims from 2007

:08:42.:08:42.

had her account dismissed. Had the officers who looked

:08:43.:08:45.

at my case taken my allegations seriously, they would've found

:08:46.:08:48.

substantial pieces of evidence. They didn't do that,

:08:49.:08:51.

and as a result, so many more women The botched investigation led

:08:52.:08:54.

to a landmark ruling by the High Court that Scotland Yard

:08:55.:08:58.

breached the human rights of the women, and that

:08:59.:09:01.

means police can be sued. The force is now challenging that

:09:02.:09:05.

unprecedented ruling. This case is really important

:09:06.:09:10.

because women need to be able to hold police to account

:09:11.:09:13.

when they fail as catastrophically If the police had acted sooner,

:09:14.:09:15.

if they'd listened to the women, and if they had followed their own

:09:16.:09:20.

policies, it's likely that fewer As it was, he was

:09:21.:09:24.

left on the streets. The force admits it made mistakes

:09:25.:09:28.

but argues that important legal If the justices rule

:09:29.:09:30.

against the Met, it could have profound implications about how

:09:31.:09:35.

police chiefs prioritise serious After 9.30 this morning,

:09:36.:09:37.

Victoria will be talking to a former Met Dectective inspector,

:09:38.:09:49.

who was with the Met at the time Worboys committed his early crimes,

:09:50.:09:52.

and a woman who was raped by two strangers two years ago,

:09:53.:09:55.

when she 18 years old. Aid agencies are warning that time

:09:56.:09:59.

is running out to save an estimated 20 million people facing famine

:10:00.:10:02.

in four African countries. There's growing concern

:10:03.:10:04.

about four countries in particular, Nigeria,

:10:05.:10:06.

South Sudan, Yemen and Somalia. It's been described as the worst

:10:07.:10:10.

humanitarian crisis in 60 years and experts say that without urgent

:10:11.:10:14.

help many will simply starve. After 10.00, Victoria

:10:15.:10:22.

will be talking to aid agencies in Nigeria,

:10:23.:10:24.

South Sudan, Yemen and Somalia. NHS trials are currently assessing

:10:25.:10:36.

if dogs could also be used to detect One study shows that specially

:10:37.:10:39.

trained dogs can pick up the presence of such cancer in urine

:10:40.:10:42.

samples in 93 % of cases. the presence of such cancer in urine

:10:43.:10:46.

samples in 93% of cases. Coming up on Victoria Derbyshire,

:10:47.:10:49.

we have an exclusive film with the former Conservative Party

:10:50.:10:51.

leader, Iain Duncan Smith, who's drawing attention to research

:10:52.:10:53.

happening in the UK, which aims to show how dogs can

:10:54.:10:56.

help diagnose cancer. The Queen is launching

:10:57.:10:59.

the Commonwealth Games Baton relay The relay marks the start

:11:00.:11:01.

of the countdown to The Games which will be held in

:11:02.:11:05.

April next year. Over 388 days the baton

:11:06.:11:07.

will visit all 71 Commonwealth countries, before arriving

:11:08.:11:11.

at the Australian Gold Coast That's a summary

:11:12.:11:13.

of the latest Palace. We will have a dog in the studio who

:11:14.:11:39.

saved his own's life thousands and thousands of times.

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Do get in touch with us throughout the morning use the hashtag Victoria

:11:42.:11:44.

live and If you text, you will be charged

:11:45.:11:46.

Time for the sport now with Hugh and the giant-killing

:11:47.:11:50.

The semi-finals will involve four of the best teams

:11:51.:12:02.

If you are a supporter of those teams, it is marvellous, if you are

:12:03.:12:14.

not, you are like, really? The likes of Sutton getting to the

:12:15.:12:26.

fifth round and Lincoln getting to the quarterfinals, it is rare to

:12:27.:12:29.

have four of the top six sides contesting the semifinals. I think

:12:30.:12:36.

it has happened only twice in at least 20 years and with Manchester

:12:37.:12:39.

United and Chelsea having the chance to join the three already true, that

:12:40.:12:44.

will be the case later. Lincoln did ever so well to get to the

:12:45.:12:48.

quarterfinals and also until nearly half time until Theo Walcott got the

:12:49.:12:53.

first of five goals for Arsenal in that much. Eventually losing and

:12:54.:12:59.

their fairy tale run may be over, but their heads are high. Danny

:13:00.:13:06.

Cowley and his brother who is the assistant, the Lincoln management

:13:07.:13:09.

team got to spend an hour or so with Arsene Wenger after the game. They

:13:10.:13:13.

will appreciate that time. Arsenal are now two to the third semifinal

:13:14.:13:18.

in four years. They will it the other times. Across north London,

:13:19.:13:22.

Spurs went one better. No doubt hoping to do exactly that. They won

:13:23.:13:43.

6-0. Millwall have beaten two of the Premier League sides on their way to

:13:44.:13:48.

the quarterfinals. But you are right, the giant-killing is done for

:13:49.:13:49.

another year. Could Millwall be in trouble

:13:50.:13:50.

with the FA because of the behaviour They may be, the FA will be looking

:13:51.:14:02.

at some of the chanting that seemed to have a racist element. They were

:14:03.:14:14.

aimed at Sonia men. The FA will ask for observations from both the

:14:15.:14:18.

clubs. Neil Harris said at the time he didn't hear anything and he

:14:19.:14:25.

doesn't condone it and any guilty fans will be dealt with harshly.

:14:26.:14:36.

Now, I know you're nowhere near the age of 50, Hugh...

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But I'm assuming you'll be hanging up your football boots well

:14:42.:14:57.

before you get there - there's a Japanese player

:14:58.:14:59.

This man is 50 and still scoring competitively in professional

:15:00.:15:09.

matches. He has broken the record held by Sir Stanley Matthews. He was

:15:10.:15:14.

the oldest player to score a goal in professional football at the age of

:15:15.:15:20.

50 years and five days. But this Japanese player made his debut in 19

:15:21.:15:34.

76. He scored Big E Raqqa goal in his second division match. It is

:15:35.:15:40.

quite impressive. Not only that, he is psychic. He said the vibes were

:15:41.:15:44.

with him before he scored that goal, he had a feeling. Thank you very

:15:45.:15:47.

much. Much more from you later. Those of you who watch our programme

:15:48.:15:51.

regularly will know that every so often we ask an MP to make a film

:15:52.:15:54.

for us about an issue When we approached former

:15:55.:15:57.

Conservative Party leader Iain Duncan Smith, who is the former

:15:58.:16:00.

Work and Pensions Secretary and one of the highest profile campaigners

:16:01.:16:03.

to leave the EU the subject he was most passionate

:16:04.:16:06.

about surprised us. He chose to draw attention

:16:07.:16:08.

to some incredible research happening in the UK,

:16:09.:16:10.

which aims to show how dogs - can help us to diagnose cancer

:16:11.:16:14.

in the very early stages. Initial studies show specially

:16:15.:16:17.

trained dogs can detect prostate Iain Duncan Smith's wife Betsy

:16:18.:16:19.

was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2009 and became involved

:16:20.:16:24.

with the charity "medical detection dogs" which is what sparked

:16:25.:16:29.

Mr Duncan Smith's interest. Here's his exclusive

:16:30.:16:31.

film for this programme. My name is Iain Duncan Smith. I'm

:16:32.:16:43.

the member of Parliament for Chingford and Woodford Green. I used

:16:44.:16:46.

to be a member of the Cabinet, but I'm not here to talk about politics,

:16:47.:16:51.

I'm here to talk about something much, much more interesting.

:16:52.:16:57.

In this film, I want to tell you about something extraordinary. About

:16:58.:17:00.

pioneering research with the potential to change how we diagnose

:17:01.:17:04.

cancer and how people living with serious illness can be helped to

:17:05.:17:07.

manage their conditions with the help of this lot and their

:17:08.:17:16.

remarkable sense of smell. Dogs like these are capable of

:17:17.:17:21.

detecting the tiniest of odour concentration. I mean up to one part

:17:22.:17:26.

per trillion, and maybe even more, but what does that mean? Imagine one

:17:27.:17:33.

teaspoon of sugar, dissolved not just in one Olympic sized swimming

:17:34.:17:38.

pool, but in two Olympic sized swimming pools and the dogs can

:17:39.:17:42.

detect that. That means that once properly trained they're able to

:17:43.:17:46.

detect odours associated with disease in human beings. In other

:17:47.:17:50.

words these dogs are capable of literally sniffing out disease.

:17:51.:18:00.

Experts agree that early detection is the most important factor in

:18:01.:18:05.

surviving cancer and the research has been conducted here offers an

:18:06.:18:11.

opportunity for us to drast drastically improve the early

:18:12.:18:14.

detection of the disease. In this test, a specially trained cancer

:18:15.:18:19.

detection dog is told to circle a carousel holding eight evenly spaced

:18:20.:18:24.

urine samples. One is from a patient with prostate cancer and the other

:18:25.:18:27.

seven are from healthy individuals. Indication four. Remarkably, the dog

:18:28.:18:32.

is able to detect the sample from the cancer patient. Well, that was

:18:33.:18:38.

amazing. I mean, I have never seen anything like that. How do you

:18:39.:18:42.

actually get the dogs to do all that, to train, to make sure they

:18:43.:18:46.

check the right samples? How does that come about? Well, all our work

:18:47.:18:51.

is based on positive reinforcement, the dog wants to come in and search

:18:52.:19:01.

the samples and gets paid. He understands the scent of prostate

:19:02.:19:05.

cancer means a reward. He gets a sound and food. Is there a certain

:19:06.:19:10.

number or a person percentage of times that if a dog isn't getting it

:19:11.:19:14.

right, you say, do you know what, I can't use that dog? What is that

:19:15.:19:18.

like? When we are looking at the development of the dog, we're

:19:19.:19:23.

looking at reliability of 85%, 90%, we need to make sure the dog is

:19:24.:19:28.

operating at that level. I heard these remarkable stories, stories...

:19:29.:19:32.

As Chief Executive of the charity Medical Detection Dogs, Dr Clare

:19:33.:19:36.

Guest is a leading figure in driving this research forward. In fact, her

:19:37.:19:40.

interest in this area began after she was alerted by her own dog to a

:19:41.:19:44.

potentially life threatening condition. One of my dogs, Daisy,

:19:45.:19:50.

she is a bladder cancer detection dog started behaving differently

:19:51.:19:54.

around me. She started giving me a worried look and started nudging at

:19:55.:19:57.

my chest, it led me to investigate and I found a lump. I went to the

:19:58.:20:02.

doctor's and was referred and to cut a long story short, I was diagnosed

:20:03.:20:06.

with a very early stage breast cancer. I was fascinated by Clare's

:20:07.:20:12.

story, but I wanted to be sure that the research being under taken by

:20:13.:20:16.

Clare's team was meeting the highest scientific standards. How reliable

:20:17.:20:21.

do you think the science is? How robust are you? So this is really,

:20:22.:20:26.

really rigorous work. We don't know exactly what it is the dogs use to

:20:27.:20:29.

make the identification that cancer is there, but we know it is a

:20:30.:20:34.

volatile, we know it is a smell. In fact, studies published in France,

:20:35.:20:38.

Italy and elsewhere have confirmed the extraordinary potential of dogs

:20:39.:20:41.

to assist with the diagnosis of disease in human beings and Clare's

:20:42.:20:45.

team is working on one of the largest studies to date. We're doing

:20:46.:20:50.

an incredibly robust clinical trial. We've got 3,000 patients involved in

:20:51.:20:54.

this next trial detecting prostate cancer from urine. Over the next few

:20:55.:20:58.

years we'll fund the results and the ability of the dogs to do this over

:20:59.:21:04.

a large sample patient size. What do you say to the clinicians who say,

:21:05.:21:08.

that's very nice and all very well, but we can't have dogs running

:21:09.:21:12.

around in GPs surgeries, you know, just sniffing everybody, that's

:21:13.:21:15.

ludicrous and the other thing they say is, this is a matter of life and

:21:16.:21:19.

death. You can't have dogs involved in life and death, it is too

:21:20.:21:23.

serious. How do you get through that barrier in a sense of praej tis, how

:21:24.:21:27.

do you get through that and show them this is pure science? Well,

:21:28.:21:30.

there is a number of ways. Firstly, the dog doesn't have to be in the

:21:31.:21:33.

hospital sniffing around the patient. The samples come to the dog

:21:34.:21:38.

in the training facility and the dog give their answer and the result

:21:39.:21:44.

goes back to the clinician. The dog is a highly sophisticated biosensor.

:21:45.:21:49.

Evolution has given him this highly sensitive nose. We're talking about

:21:50.:21:54.

a science here, we're not talking about fluffy dogs. The other thing

:21:55.:21:58.

is, that I'd say to you as well, you rely on dogs every day when you go

:21:59.:22:01.

into the House of Commons. You rely on the dogs to ensure your safety.

:22:02.:22:08.

People board planes every day that have been screened by detector dogs

:22:09.:22:11.

to see if there is explosives on board. That's a life and death

:22:12.:22:16.

decision. Why do we rely on them and not with health? How much support

:22:17.:22:19.

has the Government been giving you and where do you think the future

:22:20.:22:22.

lies? To date we have no support from the Government. And you think

:22:23.:22:26.

this could literally save lives? Absolutely. I know this can save

:22:27.:22:32.

lives. It saved my life and that inspired me to keep going. I am a

:22:33.:22:36.

scientist and I love the scientist. We are talking about a robust study

:22:37.:22:42.

and the ability of a biosensor to detect a disease. . Like Clare, my

:22:43.:22:48.

interest in this research is more than academic. It's personal. The

:22:49.:22:53.

doctor thought the lump had been there more about 18 months. My wife

:22:54.:22:59.

Betsy has had breast cancer. In many respects I was lucky and my

:23:00.:23:02.

children, my youngest was 16, but when I was so ill I remember

:23:03.:23:07.

thinking how would I have managed if my children had, if it had been ten

:23:08.:23:12.

years earlier and my children were little? I was written off. I was

:23:13.:23:16.

very, very ill as you remember. I couldn't look after myself. I

:23:17.:23:21.

couldn't do anything for myself. The sooner you can detect cancer the

:23:22.:23:25.

better. The sooner you can detect all diseases the better. But this

:23:26.:23:29.

re-McAble ability has implications for more than just the detection of

:23:30.:23:38.

cancer. Dogs cab trained to alert patients with conditions such as

:23:39.:23:42.

type one diabetes to a minute shift in Nair blood sugar levels which

:23:43.:23:47.

might, in extreme cases, signal the onset of a coma. The dogs are able

:23:48.:23:52.

to detect when a patient might be in danger and fetch any vital medical

:23:53.:23:56.

supplies. He has got it now. He's going round and round. I went to

:23:57.:24:01.

visit Steve and Molly. Steve was diagnosed with type one diabetes in

:24:02.:24:06.

2006. It is no exaggeration to say having Molly at his side has been

:24:07.:24:10.

life changing for Steve and his family. Halfs life like for both of

:24:11.:24:17.

you before Molly arrived? Where were the big problems, how difficult was

:24:18.:24:21.

all of this? Well, when Stephen was little, we would have him just

:24:22.:24:24.

running around and then falling over. We would be scooping him up

:24:25.:24:28.

and putting him on the sofa and trying to get things into him. I had

:24:29.:24:34.

gone in the night and he had scezures, we were testing all night,

:24:35.:24:38.

every night. So you were getting up through the night. Setting alarms.

:24:39.:24:43.

We did that until Molly came along and suddenly when we realised we

:24:44.:24:46.

could trust her, that's when we stopped and now I only get up when

:24:47.:24:51.

she alerts. She comes and sits at football, doesn't she? She alerts

:24:52.:24:54.

from the sidelines of the football pitch. I used to have to call

:24:55.:24:59.

Stephen off and keep testing him and sometimes he had gone so low he was

:25:00.:25:03.

tripping over the ball so he'd have to have glucose and sit out for 20

:25:04.:25:08.

minutes. Shoal know in an open football pitch and she will alert

:25:09.:25:11.

and you will know that she is alerting that your son, who is busy

:25:12.:25:14.

about to score a goal, has to come off the pitch to get himself sorted

:25:15.:25:18.

out? Yes. Is that right? That's remarkable. She has got permission

:25:19.:25:23.

from the club referees to be let loose on the pitch with her coat on.

:25:24.:25:28.

Molly is capable of detecting at any stage out in the fields, in the

:25:29.:25:35.

garden, on the playing pitch, if you're upstairs and she is is

:25:36.:25:38.

downstairs, she will get agitated. Yes. Clare is a beneficiary of her

:25:39.:25:46.

dog's ability to detect shifts in blood glucose levels that might

:25:47.:25:52.

indicate she is is in danger. In In the three-and-a-half years we have

:25:53.:25:54.

been together he has aall righted and saved my life over 3500 times.

:25:55.:26:01.

He does it all for a dog biscuit and often leaves me emotional after all

:26:02.:26:04.

this time because I know without him, I wouldn't be alive today. I

:26:05.:26:09.

actually work as a children's diabetes nurse. My job is to help

:26:10.:26:14.

care, support, and educate children and families that have got type one

:26:15.:26:19.

diabetes. So having Magic means I can carry on my job. Without him I

:26:20.:26:24.

would be testing my blood glow can yous level every 20 or 30 minutes to

:26:25.:26:28.

try and pre-empt what was going to happen. With Magic I don't have to

:26:29.:26:33.

do that which means I can carry on doing my job, but I'm being safe

:26:34.:26:36.

with patients and I'm not likely to collapse when I'm in the middle of a

:26:37.:26:42.

consultation with them, which is not only embarrassing for me, but it is

:26:43.:26:46.

giving the wrong message to patients that you can still live life to the

:26:47.:26:49.

full even though you've got diabetes. So this Magic telling me

:26:50.:26:56.

he wants me to do a blood glucose test. I will ask Magic to fetch my

:26:57.:27:02.

kit. Fetch kit. Good boy. And then I'll check my blood sugar to see

:27:03.:27:12.

what is going on. Good boy, Magic. And the blood glucose is 5.5 so his

:27:13.:27:18.

target is 4.7. So he's telling me that in the next 20, 30 minutes he

:27:19.:27:24.

thinks my blood glucose level will be too low. Magic sleeps by my bed

:27:25.:27:29.

so he is always close by me, but he can detect a change in my blood

:27:30.:27:34.

glucose level even when I'm upstairs and he's downstairs, but he sleeps

:27:35.:27:38.

by my bed and he will wake up overnight and tell me to test.

:27:39.:27:44.

Before I got Magic I would be up every hour, day and night, trying to

:27:45.:27:49.

check my blood glucose level and trying to pre-empt when the episodes

:27:50.:27:52.

would happen. That meant I was exhausted, many a time I would be

:27:53.:27:58.

too afraid to go to sleep in case I had an episode and wouldn't wake up

:27:59.:28:03.

from them. Other times I would be too exhausted I didn't care if I was

:28:04.:28:08.

going to die. I wanted to close my eyes and get sleep. What Magic

:28:09.:28:13.

allowed me to do is to go to bed and not be afraid that I'm never going

:28:14.:28:17.

to wake up. I'm going to go to bed and my husband doesn't have to worry

:28:18.:28:22.

that when he wakes up, I won't be dead next to him. Simple things like

:28:23.:28:26.

that, it is very difficult to put into words, but that's what having

:28:27.:28:30.

Magic means is I can have an ordinary life and do ordinary things

:28:31.:28:34.

and I've got an amazing companion that's going to follow me all the

:28:35.:28:37.

way through it. I have been so impressed with the progress made in

:28:38.:28:41.

in field that I wanted to find out why its potential hasn't been

:28:42.:28:45.

properly recognised and why it isn't receiving the funding it deserves. I

:28:46.:28:48.

went to see the Health Secretary for England, Jeremy Hunt. I started by

:28:49.:28:53.

asking why it was that the Health Service hasn't so far got behind

:28:54.:28:59.

this incredibly promising work? I think probably ideas like this

:29:00.:29:03.

sometimes don't get looked at as quickly as they should because they

:29:04.:29:07.

get put in the quackery box when actually what we're doing now, what

:29:08.:29:10.

you're doing is saying well, let's look at the science. Let's actually

:29:11.:29:16.

see whether these new ways of doing things are scientifically valid and

:29:17.:29:19.

sometimes when you do that, you get a surprise. From 2004, this work has

:29:20.:29:24.

been peer reviewed and been available and published and actually

:29:25.:29:29.

a lot of doctors involved in cancer treatment, have been absolutely

:29:30.:29:31.

certain there is something rather unique and special about what has

:29:32.:29:34.

been going on. It has been the devil's own business to get medical

:29:35.:29:38.

professionals on a wider scale to say let's have a look at this. Do

:29:39.:29:44.

you think this says something about the resistance to investment and

:29:45.:29:48.

invowation at times that comes from the medical profession within the

:29:49.:29:53.

NHS? I wouldn't characterise the NHS as not being innovative, but

:29:54.:29:56.

sometimes nonetheless, when you have something that's so unorthodox as

:29:57.:30:01.

this, I mean, I can imagine that lots of doctors heart would miss a

:30:02.:30:06.

beat at the thought of using a dog to help detect cancer, but as

:30:07.:30:09.

doctors and scientists, they need to look at the evidence. So instead of

:30:10.:30:15.

it being dogs, I was able to say to you or to anyone from the medical

:30:16.:30:21.

profession, what we have here is a laboratory that detects cancer

:30:22.:30:26.

earlier and more accurately than any of the existing medical tests, what

:30:27.:30:29.

do you think would be the natural reaction to that without the word

:30:30.:30:35.

dogs in it? Well, of course, it's the dogs bit that, I think, as I

:30:36.:30:39.

say, probably causes one or two people's heart rates to miss a beat

:30:40.:30:45.

or two. But I will look at the results of this research when it

:30:46.:30:50.

comes through. One of our jobs as MPs is sometimes to question

:30:51.:30:55.

orthodoxes and look at different ways of doing things that possibly

:30:56.:31:00.

the establishment has swept under the carpet or not wanted to look at.

:31:01.:31:04.

So if this research is good then I want to know about it and I will

:31:05.:31:08.

certainly look at it carefully. The work of our pioneering researchers

:31:09.:31:12.

in this field doesn't just have the potential to save lives, but also to

:31:13.:31:19.

save our NHS many millions of pounds if it's properly funded. We need to

:31:20.:31:24.

recognise that we can still reimagine our century's old

:31:25.:31:28.

relationship with dogs and find new ways to make use of their absolutely

:31:29.:31:31.

extraordinary abilities. You have been telling us what you

:31:32.:31:53.

think. This view tweets, with no hint of irony, Victoria has Iain

:31:54.:32:02.

Duncan Smith reporting on dogs detecting cancer. This view says, my

:32:03.:32:07.

dog started to display unusual behaviour. Wouldn't stay in the same

:32:08.:32:12.

room as me and became anxious. When I saw a specialist I had a tumour on

:32:13.:32:16.

one of my kidneys which had been missed by my GP.

:32:17.:32:20.

After ten o'clock Iain Duncan Smith will be here and we will be meeting

:32:21.:32:28.

one of the life-saving dogs. Keep your comments coming in.

:32:29.:32:34.

Still to come, police are launching an unprecedented appeal

:32:35.:32:36.

at the Supreme Court against a ruling that it failed

:32:37.:32:39.

victims of one of the UK's most dangerous rapists.

:32:40.:32:42.

And the singer Adele has found a novel way of getting

:32:43.:32:50.

to the stage in a box designed for transporting musical equipment.

:32:51.:32:58.

Here's Joanna in the BBC Newsroom with a summary of today's news.

:32:59.:33:00.

MPs are due to debate changes to the Brexit bill

:33:01.:33:03.

It comes after the House of Lords voted in favour of amendments

:33:04.:33:07.

which would guarantee the rights of EU citizens living

:33:08.:33:09.

in the UK, and would give parliament a "meaningful" say

:33:10.:33:12.

If MPs and peers do pass the bill today, Theresa May could start

:33:13.:33:17.

the process of the UK leaving the European Union this week.

:33:18.:33:30.

A British man has been jailed for six years in Indonesia,

:33:31.:33:34.

over the killing of a policeman on the island of Bali.

:33:35.:33:37.

David Taylor had admitted his role in the crime, saying he feared

:33:38.:33:40.

for his life during a fight with the police officer,

:33:41.:33:43.

who was attacked with a beer bottle and his own binoculars.

:33:44.:33:45.

his partner Sarah Connor has been sentenced to four years as an

:33:46.:33:48.

accessory to the crime. Rail staff from three firms

:33:49.:33:57.

across England have started 24-hour strikes in a dispute over

:33:58.:34:00.

the role of guards. The RMT's 30th strike day

:34:01.:34:02.

in its dispute with Southern over plans for driver-only-operated

:34:03.:34:04.

trains, has spread to Guards and drivers working for

:34:05.:34:06.

Merseyrail and Northern are taking Rail bosses argue it's

:34:07.:34:10.

about modernising services Police are launching

:34:11.:34:12.

an unprecedented appeal at the Supreme Court

:34:13.:34:25.

against a ruling it failed the victims of one of the UK's

:34:26.:34:27.

most dangerous rapists. Judges said Scotland Yard had

:34:28.:34:29.

breached the human rights of two women because officers didn't

:34:30.:34:32.

properly investigate John Worboys who was jailed for life in 2009

:34:33.:34:34.

after committing more The outcome of the case

:34:35.:34:36.

could have profound legal Aid agencies are warning that time

:34:37.:34:39.

is running out to save an estimated 20 million people facing famine

:34:40.:34:44.

in four African countries. There's growing concern

:34:45.:34:46.

about four countries in particular, Nigeria,

:34:47.:34:47.

South Sudan, Yemen and Somalia. It's been described as the worst

:34:48.:34:49.

humanitarian crisis in 60 years and experts say that without urgent

:34:50.:34:52.

help many will simply starve. That's a summary of

:34:53.:34:58.

the latest BBC News. Here's some sport now

:34:59.:35:00.

with the other Hugh! The FA Cup fairy tales are over as

:35:01.:35:11.

Spurs ensure the semifinalists will come from the Premier League.

:35:12.:35:30.

Celtic need only six more points to win the Scottish Premiership again

:35:31.:35:33.

but they were denied a 23rd consecutive league win by Rangers -

:35:34.:35:36.

a late Clint Hill equaliser gave them a 1-1 draw.

:35:37.:35:40.

Derby County have sacked Steve McClaren for a second time...

:35:41.:35:45.

Just five months after he rejoined the club.

:35:46.:35:54.

Derby are tenth in the Championship - they've won only once

:35:55.:35:57.

There are no British players left in the singles

:35:58.:36:00.

draw at the Indian Wells tennis in California.

:36:01.:36:02.

Women's number one, Johanna Konta, was knocked out in the third

:36:03.:36:05.

round by Caroline Garcia of France, and Dan Evans and Kyle

:36:06.:36:07.

John Worboys is one of Britain's most dangeorus rapists.

:36:08.:36:16.

He's serving a life sentence for carrying out more than 100

:36:17.:36:19.

rapes and sexual assaults while he was a black

:36:20.:36:21.

Over a period of six years between 2002 and 2008,

:36:22.:36:24.

he'd drug his victims, female passengers in his taxi,

:36:25.:36:27.

by pretending he'd won on the lottery, persuading them

:36:28.:36:35.

to "celebrate" with a glass of doped champagne.

:36:36.:36:38.

The Metropolitan Police had several opportunities

:36:39.:36:39.

to apprehend and stop him, and didn't.

:36:40.:36:41.

On one occasion Worboys was so confident of getting

:36:42.:36:43.

away with his crimes, that he actually drove his victim

:36:44.:36:46.

to a police station and dropped her off there,

:36:47.:36:48.

officers took neither his name nor his cab registration details.

:36:49.:36:52.

Here's how the story was reported at the time.

:36:53.:36:55.

In his familiar and licensed black cab, they should have been safe,

:36:56.:36:59.

but John Warboys is convicted of drugging, sexually molesting

:37:00.:37:02.

or raping dozens, possibly even hundreds, of women

:37:03.:37:05.

While those offences are being investigated by the police,

:37:06.:37:11.

and there are serious questions being asked about their inquiry

:37:12.:37:14.

and whether he could have been caught sooner, tonight he stands

:37:15.:37:17.

convicted of 19 counts dating back to October 2006.

:37:18.:37:24.

Sources say in the 13 years he drove this black cab,

:37:25.:37:27.

John Warboys may have attacked more than 200 women.

:37:28.:37:30.

While he now faces a lengthy prison sentence, the IPCC wants to know

:37:31.:37:34.

why, having arrested him once, the police allowed him and his taxi

:37:35.:37:37.

Their failings led two women to sue the police

:37:38.:37:45.

for breaching their human rights, and judges agreed.

:37:46.:37:48.

Today the Met Police are trying to challenge that ruling

:37:49.:37:50.

in the highest court in the land, the Supreme Court.

:37:51.:37:53.

Today's appeal could have profound implications for how police

:37:54.:37:55.

investigate serious sexual offences and means they could be sued

:37:56.:37:59.

for the most serious of crimes that amount to inhuman or degrading

:38:00.:38:02.

treatment if they fail to conduct an effective investigation.

:38:03.:38:06.

The case is so important to the law around police

:38:07.:38:11.

negligence that Theresa May, when she was still Home

:38:12.:38:14.

Secretary, intervened to support Scotland Yard.

:38:15.:38:31.

Let's speak to her knee, only using her first name. We are not showing

:38:32.:38:36.

her face to protect her identity. she was raped by two strangers two

:38:37.:38:38.

years ago when she 18. She thinks police should be held

:38:39.:38:41.

accountable if they fail Hamish Brown, a former

:38:42.:38:44.

Met Dectective inspector, who was with the Met at the time

:38:45.:38:47.

Worboys committed his early crimes. Harriet Wistrich , the solicitor

:38:48.:38:50.

for the two women who sued the Met. Harriet, your clients are arguing,

:38:51.:39:01.

had the police investigated properly, John Worboys would have

:39:02.:39:04.

been caught earlier and they would not have been raped, is that right?

:39:05.:39:08.

Those are the facts of the case. There were a number of

:39:09.:39:13.

opportunities, about ten women came forward at different times before he

:39:14.:39:16.

was eventually arrested and prosecuted. And had they conducted

:39:17.:39:25.

an effective investigation, there were a whole series of failings at

:39:26.:39:28.

every stage along the route, but the judge found at the High Court. Then

:39:29.:39:36.

he wouldn't have gone on to rape so many women. The police have

:39:37.:39:40.

acknowledged their errors and apologised and they have put in

:39:41.:39:43.

place things to improve the way they deal with this. You don't believe

:39:44.:39:51.

that? The problem is, there were some good policies in place at the

:39:52.:39:58.

time. There was a policy about how to prosecute, how to investigate

:39:59.:40:02.

drug assisted rape. That policy was not followed by the officers on the

:40:03.:40:09.

ground. There isn't an answer to save the police constantly say, we

:40:10.:40:13.

have changed, we have put in place better procedures. This wouldn't

:40:14.:40:18.

happen again. But they said that at the time and it did happen. The

:40:19.:40:24.

problem is, the officers on the ground were not necessarily

:40:25.:40:27.

enforcing these policies and following them properly. In fact, at

:40:28.:40:33.

the trial, an inspector said in evidence, when asked if the policies

:40:34.:40:36.

were there and they didn't follow it, he said, I don't know, and that

:40:37.:40:46.

came under criticism. You have to put those policies in place and you

:40:47.:40:50.

have to have officers on the ground who are trained and realise it is

:40:51.:40:55.

important to follow them. It didn't happen in this case. The Met want to

:40:56.:41:00.

make it clear, by defending this action, they are not doubting the

:41:01.:41:05.

voracity of the claimants' accounts. What they yell saying it is the

:41:06.:41:10.

boundaries of police responsibility and liability. If the Court upholds

:41:11.:41:18.

the ruling, the police could be sued if they are deemed to have failed to

:41:19.:41:23.

conduct a proper investigation. Why would that be a good thing? They

:41:24.:41:29.

should be held to an account. Where they fell, they should be held to

:41:30.:41:35.

account. This is a mechanism for victims to hold the state body to

:41:36.:41:43.

account. We can hold all other state organisations, doctors, social

:41:44.:41:47.

services and we hold all sorts of people to account through common law

:41:48.:41:50.

as long as through the human rights frameworks. Why are the police

:41:51.:41:55.

accepted and if they continue to fail even where the framework and

:41:56.:42:01.

the policies are in place, and this is a mechanism which enables another

:42:02.:42:05.

mechanism to say, you cannot carry on doing this and put in place, not

:42:06.:42:10.

just policies, but measures to make those policies work. Honey, thanks

:42:11.:42:15.

for talking to others, you were raped two years ago by strangers. In

:42:16.:42:20.

your case, the police were incredibly supportive and two men

:42:21.:42:24.

were convicted last year. But you were nervous about reporting it

:42:25.:42:32.

initially? I don't know why, we cannot hear you. Maybe we will

:42:33.:42:36.

reconnect the line. In the meantime, let's bring in Hamish Brown, former

:42:37.:42:50.

Met policeman and Chris. Some of the 's mistakes made, one believable.

:42:51.:42:55.

John Worboys dotting of one of his victims at a police station and

:42:56.:42:59.

offers is not taking his name or cab registration details. Had they done

:43:00.:43:05.

that, they might have caught him earlier? Regrettably, everything is

:43:06.:43:08.

true and I go along with everything Harriet said. But I think the police

:43:09.:43:14.

are concerned about the floodgates, at one stage I going to stop whether

:43:15.:43:18.

police have made a mistake. Let's take the case of a burglary. It is

:43:19.:43:23.

not investigated properly for whatever reason and that burglar

:43:24.:43:28.

goes on to commit another hundred crimes. It affects people taking

:43:29.:43:33.

their personal things, or that people going to come forward and sue

:43:34.:43:40.

the police? Or, investigate the case properly? Yes, in times of cuts, the

:43:41.:43:46.

Metropolitan Police have just lost 700 detectives because of one reason

:43:47.:43:50.

or another. Maybe it is not unattractive job any more. Will this

:43:51.:43:54.

work and will the police go out of business? Why should the police be

:43:55.:43:58.

in a different position, why should there be an exception when NHS

:43:59.:44:03.

surgeons can be sued, teachers can be sued. I would agree in the most

:44:04.:44:08.

serious of cases, they should be. I am not against that. Where the

:44:09.:44:13.

caution is is opening the flood gates and where should the line be

:44:14.:44:17.

drawn. Harriet is wanting to come back in. Can I make a point. Can you

:44:18.:44:26.

hear me OK? Just to be clear, burglary would not come within this

:44:27.:44:31.

sort of case. It has to be a breach of article three, which is inhumane

:44:32.:44:37.

and degrading treatment. It is not every crime the police investigate,

:44:38.:44:41.

it affects the most serious crimes as Hamish said. It isn't any

:44:42.:44:46.

failure, it has to be serious failures in the best a geisha in. To

:44:47.:44:51.

suggest it will open the floodgates and every time a police officer

:44:52.:44:55.

investigate something and they mess up, they will be sued, is not

:44:56.:45:01.

correct. It is designed only in relation to those very serious cases

:45:02.:45:06.

and you are talking about really serious crimes, you know, not short

:45:07.:45:11.

of having huge impacts on victims, that we are having this safeguard

:45:12.:45:18.

in. It is not just one minor mistake, it has to be a serious

:45:19.:45:22.

failure. Thank you for clarifying that. We will try and talk to honey

:45:23.:45:24.

again, I hope we can hear you. Tell us about your apprehension

:45:25.:45:35.

before you reported to the police? I was just really nervous that I

:45:36.:45:38.

wouldn't be taken seriously and that people would sort of, they would be

:45:39.:45:42.

suspicious and wouldn't believe me. And actually, the police treated you

:45:43.:45:46.

incredibly well and were incredibly supportive and did their job

:45:47.:45:50.

properly? They were just professional the whole way through,

:45:51.:45:54.

you know, it was just amazing. So when people say, "I'm not sure if

:45:55.:46:00.

the police are going to believe me." They didn't express an opinion in

:46:01.:46:04.

your case, they just investigated? They were 100% behind me. They never

:46:05.:46:09.

said you're right or you're wrong, but they investigated it as they

:46:10.:46:12.

should with any crime. What do you think of this legal case that could

:46:13.:46:15.

lead to the police being sued if they fail to investigate a serious

:46:16.:46:20.

crime properly? If there are serious failings and if the crime involved

:46:21.:46:26.

degrading treatment? I do think that the police being sued would be

:46:27.:46:30.

important because with this type of crime it's so important that women

:46:31.:46:35.

are supported and anyone supported when they report abuse or sexual

:46:36.:46:41.

violence. If the police are failing to not take people seriously and

:46:42.:46:45.

also be professional in their job then yeah, they should be taken to

:46:46.:46:49.

court and they should be sued for it. Thank you very much. Rachel,

:46:50.:46:54.

Chris, why are you supporting the two women who are taking the case?

:46:55.:46:58.

We've intervened because it is really important that women have the

:46:59.:47:01.

ability to challenge the police, to hold them to account. Very few rapes

:47:02.:47:06.

get reported, about 15% we think of rapes get reported to the police and

:47:07.:47:09.

in part that's because women are concerned that they won't be

:47:10.:47:12.

believed or they won't be taken seriously and when that happens, we

:47:13.:47:15.

really need to be able to challenge the police who are not following

:47:16.:47:19.

their policies and not following their procedures properly. So it is

:47:20.:47:26.

important to us. Do you accept that since the John Warboys case police

:47:27.:47:31.

have made progress? There has been progress, but the progress is patchy

:47:32.:47:35.

and we still hear from women who still get disbelieved and whose

:47:36.:47:39.

cases are not taken certificate lussy and evidence not being

:47:40.:47:44.

followed up. Human Rights see this crime as discrimination against

:47:45.:47:48.

women. It is extremely serious sexual violence as a crime. It's

:47:49.:47:51.

really important that the Human Rights that we've got work in

:47:52.:47:56.

practise so they are not just on paper, it is not enough to have that

:47:57.:47:59.

human right, you have to be able to have it when the State does

:48:00.:48:03.

something wrong and gets it so catastrophically wrong that more

:48:04.:48:06.

women are raped you have to be able to hold them to account for that.

:48:07.:48:10.

Honey, are you still with us? No, I think she has gone. I'm going

:48:11.:48:16.

to ask Harriet about the comments from the female judge last week that

:48:17.:48:20.

drunk women are putting themselves at greater risk of rape. Saying

:48:21.:48:26.

women were entitled to drink themselves into the ground, but

:48:27.:48:30.

their behaviour could put them in danger. Is she right? I think the

:48:31.:48:35.

reason this has caused a lot of controversy is because, you know,

:48:36.:48:40.

it's a sense of women being blamed again for getting raped and the

:48:41.:48:47.

concern is that men and in fact, it is interesting because Warboys

:48:48.:48:51.

deliberately targeted women coming out of nightclubs late at night

:48:52.:48:55.

often who would have had a few drinks. The issue is about

:48:56.:49:01.

identifying those men who target women who are vulnerable and I think

:49:02.:49:09.

it's not necessarily very helpful to focus in that way, but it's true and

:49:10.:49:17.

I think we need to look at the ways in which vulnerability is targeted.

:49:18.:49:20.

It is drink. It maybe people who have mental illness or learning

:49:21.:49:25.

disability or who are very young. There are all different sorts of

:49:26.:49:29.

ways in which women are targeted and the challenge is really to try and

:49:30.:49:34.

challenge those men who are targeting the women rather than to

:49:35.:49:39.

blame women for their behaviour. A final thought from Hamish. I'm sure

:49:40.:49:44.

the judge meant very well and I'm sor the interpretation that's been

:49:45.:49:47.

put on it, but I hear what Harriet says as well. Look, there is a lot

:49:48.:49:51.

of good work in the Metropolitan Police and police forces around the

:49:52.:49:55.

country on rape and serious sexual offences, progress has been made

:49:56.:50:00.

from the 60s, 70s and 80s when it all went wrong of the mistakes will

:50:01.:50:05.

be made. The police will be punished, but there is a shortage of

:50:06.:50:08.

police officers. It's going to be difficult to go forward, but I hope

:50:09.:50:12.

the police will learn from this and we all move on. Thank you.

:50:13.:50:17.

Thank you. We will report back what happens in the Supreme Court.

:50:18.:50:22.

Thank you for your comments on the film that Iain Duncan Smith made

:50:23.:50:27.

which we showed earlier about cancer detecting dogs. Specially trained

:50:28.:50:33.

dogs. This e-mail from John, "Remarkable film that should be sent

:50:34.:50:38.

to all medical practises." Harry says, "Fantastic. A new way of

:50:39.:50:44.

looking at things." LJ, "A great story on what could be a

:50:45.:50:47.

breakthrough detected by man's best friend." This from Duncan, "IDS

:50:48.:50:55.

trying to convince people he has a compassionate bone in his body. He

:50:56.:51:00.

hasn't folks." After 10am, we will talk this this lady and her dog. She

:51:01.:51:05.

has type one diabetes and her dog helps her out when her blood sugar

:51:06.:51:12.

levels change. That's Caroline and Simba, so we'll hear her experience

:51:13.:51:17.

after 10am. Also, we'll bring you the latest on Brexit.

:51:18.:51:31.

As parliament considers the final stage of the law

:51:32.:51:33.

that will allow the UK to begin divorce proceedings

:51:34.:51:36.

The Queen is launching the Commonwealth Games Baton relay

:51:37.:51:39.

Over 388 days the baton will visit all 71 Commonwealth

:51:40.:51:42.

countries, before arriving at the Australian Gold Coast

:51:43.:51:44.

Our correspondent Katherine Downs is at Buckingham Palace.

:51:45.:51:47.

Hello Victoria. A lot of numbers to remember in this one. All kinds of

:51:48.:51:52.

stats. This is the longest Commonwealth Games baton in history.

:51:53.:51:58.

388 days, 230,000 miles it will travel around the world before it

:51:59.:52:02.

ends up on the gold coast in Australia for the Commonwealth Games

:52:03.:52:07.

which start in April. So just over a year to go in Australia next year. I

:52:08.:52:12.

don't know if you can hear behind me, they're testing the public

:52:13.:52:15.

announcement system. The crowds are beginning to gather in front of

:52:16.:52:18.

Buckingham Palace where the ceremony will start later on this morning. It

:52:19.:52:21.

is the beginning really of the countdown to the Commonwealth Games

:52:22.:52:24.

and what will happen is that the Queen will come out on to that

:52:25.:52:27.

platform behind me here. She will put a message of hope and friendship

:52:28.:52:32.

into the Commonwealth Games baton that will invite athletes from

:52:33.:52:35.

around the Commonwealth to come together in peaceful and friendly

:52:36.:52:38.

competition in Australia next year and what she'll do, she will hand

:52:39.:52:45.

the baton to the first baton runner who is Anna Mears, the most

:52:46.:52:54.

decorated female cyclist in history, five times Commonwealth Games Gold

:52:55.:52:58.

Medallist. She has to run 20 meters across the fore court of Buckingham

:52:59.:53:00.

Palace to the big gate in the centre and she will hand the baton then to

:53:01.:53:06.

her long time rival Victoria Pendleton. Anna Mears pipped

:53:07.:53:15.

Victoria Pendleton. Now they've retired the rivalry is water under

:53:16.:53:21.

the bridge! Victoria Pendleton will run around the Queen Victoria

:53:22.:53:34.

Memorial and send the baton off. The baton has arrived with the designers

:53:35.:53:39.

from Design Works. Here is the baton. This is it. I have never seen

:53:40.:53:48.

a baton that sums up Australia. Talk us through the design. It was to

:53:49.:53:51.

represent the gold coast very well. There is lots of things of the shape

:53:52.:53:55.

itself is all about boundless energy of the people, place, and spirit of

:53:56.:53:58.

the coast. So that's what the loop is all about. Then on the side, we

:53:59.:54:04.

split it up into three different sectors, that represents, the past,

:54:05.:54:07.

the present and the future. The back of the baton is made from a wood, it

:54:08.:54:14.

is a tree that's indigenous to the gold coast. It is an important story

:54:15.:54:19.

from the indigenous people of the gold coast. They would take seeds

:54:20.:54:23.

and plant them along the paths that they walked to provide suss ten nans

:54:24.:54:30.

for the future. The guest of honour is arriving behind us. I don't know

:54:31.:54:35.

if you can see that. That's the Queen and her outriders arriving for

:54:36.:54:41.

the Olympic, sorry Commonwealth baton ceremony, going around the

:54:42.:54:45.

Queen Victoria Memorial and she will be heading into Buckingham Palace

:54:46.:54:48.

where she will be meeting elders from the gold cos and coast. That

:54:49.:54:59.

represents the past. We have a stringer on the side which is the

:55:00.:55:03.

stainless part. The stringer has engaved all the nations that will

:55:04.:55:06.

see the baton as it goes through its journey. They are in the order of

:55:07.:55:10.

the relay. The front here is reclaimed plastic. So we collected

:55:11.:55:15.

plastic from the ocean, beaches and waterways of the gold coast. It is

:55:16.:55:19.

quite clean. We had a lot of people helping us. Community groups and the

:55:20.:55:24.

gold coast City Council. We reclaimed that and reconstituted it

:55:25.:55:30.

into the leading edge. Where does this message go? I thought she was

:55:31.:55:34.

putting it in the baton, but it looks hollow? There is this little

:55:35.:55:43.

part. A capsule will get dropped in. And then the message is inside the

:55:44.:55:46.

capsule. It is on some really special paper. The paper is made

:55:47.:55:56.

using a special paper that has really strong properties using the

:55:57.:56:01.

nano particles. How many batons are there? Is this just the only baton

:56:02.:56:05.

that will be going around the Commonwealth or are there loads in

:56:06.:56:09.

case one gets lost or dropped in the sea? We have to have a back-up. But

:56:10.:56:16.

there is one baton with the message and it will go around the

:56:17.:56:19.

Commonwealth and of course, there is back-up. How important do you think

:56:20.:56:23.

it is that there is a baton like this that goes around the

:56:24.:56:27.

Commonwealth and kind of unites people and invites the athletes to

:56:28.:56:32.

take part in the Games? When you have the pictures of past baton

:56:33.:56:37.

relays, the Glasgow one and the kids in South Africa or the Caribbean,

:56:38.:56:42.

just the excitement that it brings. We're trying to include, ignite and

:56:43.:56:46.

inspire and I think that's what this really does. Well, thank you for

:56:47.:56:49.

bringing it along to show us this morning. It is a beautiful piece of

:56:50.:56:55.

artwork and the first time we have been up close to a Commonwealth

:56:56.:56:58.

Games baton. So that's it. That's the baton that will be taking its

:56:59.:57:03.

centre stage really at the ceremony this morning before heading off on

:57:04.:57:07.

that enormous 388 day journey to the gold coast. The Commonwealth Games

:57:08.:57:11.

next year kicks off on 4th April and you will be able to watch that baton

:57:12.:57:16.

set-up on its baton journey on the BBC News Channel this morning. Thank

:57:17.:57:17.

you. Thank you for your e-mails about

:57:18.:57:32.

dogs. Sean on Facebook, "Fantastic and interesting film about

:57:33.:57:34.

biomarking. As the scientist says there is no funding from the UK

:57:35.:57:38.

Government in this area." We will talk more about this after 10. We

:57:39.:57:45.

will talk to Cancer Research UK who are sceptical. The latest news and

:57:46.:57:48.

sport in a moment. Before that, the weather. Look at you! What a bright,

:57:49.:57:55.

shining deliciousness you are on this Monday morning!

:57:56.:58:02.

We're in the mood for spring. There is some cloud around. But we have

:58:03.:58:09.

seen some amazing sunrises this morning. We have got BBC Weather

:58:10.:58:15.

Watcher pictures to show you what it was like. If we look at what's

:58:16.:58:18.

happening around the country. First of all, we have got this beautiful

:58:19.:58:26.

one from Saltburn and another one, another beautiful sunrise from

:58:27.:58:29.

Suffolk. And then as we travel around the country, you can see in

:58:30.:58:32.

Cardiff, a little bit more in the way of frost. It was a nippy start

:58:33.:58:38.

for you. But beautiful blue skies in Hampshire. Again, lovely, lovely

:58:39.:58:42.

weather out there if you like it sunny. You can see on the satellite

:58:43.:58:45.

picture where we have the clear skies, this area here is actually a

:58:46.:58:51.

weather front. The weather front moved across Northern Ireland and

:58:52.:58:54.

Scotland last night and it raised temperatures overnight, but it is

:58:55.:58:57.

still producing a fair bit of cloud and the odd spot of rain, nothing

:58:58.:59:01.

too much. As it sink southwards and bumps into the high pressure, it

:59:02.:59:05.

will be a fairly weak affair. So as we go through the morning, a lot of

:59:06.:59:08.

sunshine in the south. Some sunshine in Scotland and Northern Ireland.

:59:09.:59:12.

Behind this weather front. The weather front continues to drift

:59:13.:59:15.

across the rest of Northern England and in through Wales and the

:59:16.:59:17.

south-west. Quite murky conditions around the coast with sea fog as

:59:18.:59:22.

well in the south-west. But by then Northern Ireland will be busking in

:59:23.:59:26.

sunshine. Highs of 13 Celsius in Belfast. Across much of Scotland

:59:27.:59:29.

too, a lot of sunshine, but rain starting to come in across the

:59:30.:59:32.

north-west, breezy across the north of Scotland as well. As we move down

:59:33.:59:36.

towards the north of England, here under the influence of the weather

:59:37.:59:39.

front it will be fairly cloudy, but the very far north of Northern

:59:40.:59:44.

England improving and that cloud prevails towards the Midlands and

:59:45.:59:48.

the Wash, but for East Anglia, Essex and Kent and the Isle of Wight and

:59:49.:59:52.

Dorset, we are looking at some blue skies into the afternoon. For

:59:53.:59:56.

south-west England though, under that weather front, cloudier. Again,

:59:57.:00:00.

there is murkiness around the coast and for parts of Wales, again cloudy

:00:01.:00:03.

this afternoon under that weather front. It gets down to the

:00:04.:00:08.

south-east with all its cloud. Some brighter breaks behind, but then

:00:09.:00:10.

another weather front comes in across Northern Ireland and Scotland

:00:11.:00:14.

with rain and strengthening winds. The rain turning more showery

:00:15.:00:19.

through the course of the night. Tomorrow we start off with showers

:00:20.:00:22.

across the north of Scotland. Some of those will be wintry and

:00:23.:00:26.

accompanied by gusts of wind 60mph to 70mph. As we come south, murky

:00:27.:00:32.

around Cardigan Bay and Pembrokeshire and around the Bristol

:00:33.:00:35.

Channel area. Inland if you're in the sunshine, temperatures 12 to 15

:00:36.:00:40.

Celsius. But somewhere tomorrow in the south-eastern quarter of the UK

:00:41.:00:43.

we could hit 17 Celsius or 18 Celsius in the south-east. The

:00:44.:00:47.

average at this time in March is 11 Celsius.

:00:48.:00:52.

Hello, it's Monday, it's 10am, I'm Victoria Derbyshire.

:00:53.:00:57.

After the news we'll have more on our top story -

:00:58.:01:00.

Former Minister Iain Duncan Smith will be here to tell us what these

:01:01.:01:05.

Imagine one teaspoonful of sugar dissolved, not just in one Olympic

:01:06.:01:08.

sized swimming pool, but in two Olympic sized swimming

:01:09.:01:11.

The dogs can also help people with diabetes tell

:01:12.:01:23.

when their blood sugar is low, and having one can be a life

:01:24.:01:26.

I had gone in in the night and he had

:01:27.:01:31.

so we were testing every hour-and-a-half every

:01:32.:01:34.

So you were getting up through the night?

:01:35.:01:37.

We'll bring you the latest on Brexit, later today the bill to

:01:38.:01:45.

allow divorce proceedings to begin is expected to be

:01:46.:01:47.

At Westminster, Tory MPs and peers are ready to back down paving the

:01:48.:01:59.

way for Theresa May to trigger our departure from the EU.

:02:00.:02:01.

And if you were a superstar singer, how would you get

:02:02.:02:04.

Adele has developed an interesting technique,

:02:05.:02:07.

Joanna is in the BBC Newsroom with a summary

:02:08.:02:15.

The legislation paving the way for Theresa May to start formal

:02:16.:02:19.

Brexit negotiations faces its final test in parliament today.

:02:20.:02:21.

Ministers believe MPs will reject the two changes made

:02:22.:02:25.

to the Brexit Bill in the House of Lords , one guaranteeing

:02:26.:02:30.

to the Brexit Bill in the House of Lords, one guaranteeing

:02:31.:02:32.

the rights of EU nationals living in Britain and another calling

:02:33.:02:35.

for parliament to have a "meaningful" vote on the final deal.

:02:36.:02:38.

If MPs and peers do pass the bill today, Theresa May could start

:02:39.:02:41.

the process of the UK leaving the European Union this week.

:02:42.:02:44.

A British man has been jailed for six years in Indonesia,

:02:45.:02:46.

over the killing of a policeman on the island of Bali.

:02:47.:02:49.

David Taylor had admitted his role in the crime, saying he feared

:02:50.:02:52.

for his life during a fight with the police officer,

:02:53.:02:55.

who was attacked with a beer bottle and his own binoculars.

:02:56.:02:57.

His partner Sara Connor has been sentenced to four years

:02:58.:03:00.

Energy supplier SSE says it will increase standard domestic

:03:01.:03:05.

electricity prices from the end of next month.

:03:06.:03:07.

It would result in an average 6.9% rise for a typical

:03:08.:03:10.

The company said it would keep gas prices at their current level

:03:11.:03:15.

but electricity prices would rise by an average 14.9%.

:03:16.:03:22.

Police are launching an appeal at the Supreme Court

:03:23.:03:24.

against a ruling that it failed the victims of one of the UK's

:03:25.:03:27.

Judges said Scotland Yard had breached the human rights of two

:03:28.:03:31.

women because officers didn't properly investigate John Worboys

:03:32.:03:35.

who was jailed for life in 2009 after committing more than 100 rapes

:03:36.:03:38.

The outcome of the case could have profound legal

:03:39.:03:43.

Hamish Brown is a former Detective inspector,

:03:44.:03:48.

who was with the Met at the time Worboys committed his early crimes,

:03:49.:03:51.

The police are now worried about opening the floodgates at a time

:03:52.:04:05.

when forces are facing cuts. At what stage will you stop when it

:04:06.:04:15.

is a mistake? What about burglary? What if the case wasn't investigated

:04:16.:04:23.

properly and the burglar goes on to commit another 100 crimes. Is it

:04:24.:04:27.

that kind of crime where victims will come forward and sue the

:04:28.:04:33.

police? Or investigate the case properly. Yes, at a time when the

:04:34.:04:40.

police have just had 700 job cuts, maybe it isn't an attractive job any

:04:41.:04:42.

more. Rail staff from three firms

:04:43.:04:44.

across England have started 24-hour strikes in a dispute over

:04:45.:04:46.

the role of guards. The RMT's 30th strike day

:04:47.:04:48.

in its dispute with Southern over plans for driver-only-operated

:04:49.:04:51.

trains, has spread to Guards and drivers working for

:04:52.:04:52.

Merseyrail and Northern are taking Rail bosses argue it's

:04:53.:04:56.

about modernising services Aid agencies are warning that time

:04:57.:04:58.

is running out to save an estimated 20 million people facing

:04:59.:05:03.

famine in Africa. There's growing concern

:05:04.:05:05.

about four countries in particular: Nigeria,

:05:06.:05:09.

South Sudan, Yemen and Somalia. It's been described as the worst

:05:10.:05:11.

humanitarian crisis in 60 years and experts say that without urgent

:05:12.:05:14.

help many will simply starve. That's a summary of the latest BBC

:05:15.:05:21.

News, more at 10.30. Samantha has message on Facebook. I

:05:22.:05:35.

have a medical detection dog called Charlie who detects and Norton make

:05:36.:05:41.

condition which causes me to black out and hurt myself. Charlie has

:05:42.:05:45.

transformed my life, I am safe and no longer scared to leave my home.

:05:46.:05:51.

Since having Charlie, the charity have managed two more to people with

:05:52.:05:59.

the same condition who continued to alert. Charlie walk me down the

:06:00.:06:03.

aisle at my wedding. Without Charlie I may have ended up in hospital on

:06:04.:06:06.

my wedding day. Thanks for letting us know about that, Samantha. We

:06:07.:06:12.

will talk more about dogs able to wander owners in changes in their

:06:13.:06:16.

medical condition and dogs who can detect cancer as well.

:06:17.:06:18.

Do get in touch with us throughout the morning,

:06:19.:06:20.

use the hashtag Victoria live and If you text, you will be charged

:06:21.:06:24.

Spurs ensured the FA Cup semi finals will be an all Premier League affair

:06:25.:06:30.

after beating League one Millwall 6-0 in the last

:06:31.:06:32.

South Korean Son-Hueng Min scored a hat-trick after top scorer

:06:33.:06:35.

Harry Kane was forced off with what looked like

:06:36.:06:38.

They joined Manchester City and Arsenal in the last four.

:06:39.:06:48.

We are really pleased, very happy. And now we need to prepare this week

:06:49.:06:55.

for the Premier League game against Southampton. Please, very happy. It

:06:56.:06:57.

was fantastic. Meanwhile the Football Association

:06:58.:07:00.

is to investigate allegations Millwall supporters directed

:07:01.:07:01.

what appeared to be racist chants at Son Heung-min during the match

:07:02.:07:04.

at White Hart Lane. They'll wait for the

:07:05.:07:06.

referee's match report. And also ask for the observations

:07:07.:07:08.

of both clubs and the police before Millwall are also under

:07:09.:07:11.

investigation for the behaviour of some of their fans

:07:12.:07:14.

in the previous round. So the last of the quarter finals,

:07:15.:07:18.

Chelsea against Manchester United, is live on BBC One,

:07:19.:07:21.

coverage starts at 7.30. There's also commentary on radio

:07:22.:07:25.

Five Live and coverage In the Premier League, Jurgen Klopp

:07:26.:07:27.

says he saw his Liverpool team win And was pretty

:07:28.:07:35.

relieved about it too. They came from behind

:07:36.:07:39.

to beat Burnley 2-1, Liverpool are fourth in the table

:07:40.:07:41.

just a point now behind Spurs, Managing Derby County seems to be

:07:42.:07:47.

something of a tricky challenge, Steve McClaren has been sacked

:07:48.:07:55.

for a second time, only five months Derby are tenth in the Championship

:07:56.:08:00.

after winning only one And they say there had

:08:01.:08:05.

been a "significant, unexpected and persistent decline

:08:06.:08:08.

in results, team unity and morale". Celtic are now just two

:08:09.:08:14.

wins away from another Scottish Premiership title,

:08:15.:08:18.

but they were prevented from a 23rd straight league victory

:08:19.:08:20.

by their Old Firm rivals. They were held to a 1-1 draw

:08:21.:08:22.

at Celtic Park after a late So Celtic are just the 25

:08:23.:08:26.

points clear of Aberdeen There are no British

:08:27.:08:38.

players left in the singles draw at the Indian Wells

:08:39.:08:42.

tennis in California. Women's number one, Johanna Konta,

:08:43.:08:44.

said she wasn't "brave enough", after losing in three sets

:08:45.:08:46.

to Caroline Garcia of France. A few years ago, Andy Murray

:08:47.:08:49.

predicted that Garcia would make it She's currently ranked 25th,

:08:50.:08:52.

14 places lower than Konta. Also out both remaining men,

:08:53.:09:00.

Kyle Edmund lost in straight While British number two Dan Evans

:09:01.:09:02.

was beaten by Kei Nishikori, And Judd Trump says he's

:09:03.:09:06.

hitting form at the right time, ahead of snooker's

:09:07.:09:16.

World Championship next month. He came from 5-2 down to beat

:09:17.:09:19.

Marco Fu 10-8 in the final of the Players Championship

:09:20.:09:24.

in Llandudno, that's Trump's second That is it for now, much more coming

:09:25.:09:39.

up in the headlines at 10:30 a.m.. Good morning, welcome to the

:09:40.:09:40.

programme. This morning, we've been telling

:09:41.:09:42.

you about a pioneering trial which has the potential

:09:43.:09:44.

to save lives and save the NHS But is there a reluctance

:09:45.:09:47.

amongst some in the medical community to adopt it

:09:48.:09:51.

because it involves dogs? Initial studies show specially

:09:52.:09:53.

trained dogs can detect prostate In an exclusive film for this

:09:54.:09:56.

programme, the former Conservative party leader Iain Duncan Smith tells

:09:57.:10:00.

us he wants to see it England's Health Secretary Jeremy

:10:01.:10:02.

Hunt has promised he will personally take a look at the results

:10:03.:10:11.

of an initial trial. We played you Iain Duncan Smith's

:10:12.:10:13.

full film earlier in the programme. I'm the Member of Parliament

:10:14.:10:16.

for Chingford and Woodford Green. I used to be a member

:10:17.:10:23.

of the Cabinet but I'm not I'm here to talk about something

:10:24.:10:27.

much, much more interesting. Dogs like these are capable

:10:28.:10:31.

of detecting the tiniest I mean up to one part

:10:32.:10:33.

per trillion, maybe even more. That means that once properly

:10:34.:10:38.

trained they are able to detect odours associated with disease

:10:39.:10:41.

in human beings. In other words, these dogs

:10:42.:10:46.

are capable of literally In this test, a specially trained

:10:47.:10:48.

cancer detection dog is told to circle a carousel holding eight

:10:49.:10:55.

evenly spaced urine samples. One is from a patient with prostate

:10:56.:11:00.

cancer and the other seven Remarkably the dog is able to detect

:11:01.:11:03.

the sample from a cancer patient. Dr Claire Guest is a leading figure

:11:04.:11:18.

in driving this research forward. We don't know exactly

:11:19.:11:22.

what it is the dogs use to make the identification that the cancer

:11:23.:11:25.

is there but we know it is We are doing an incredibly

:11:26.:11:28.

robust clinical trial. We've got 3000 patients

:11:29.:11:32.

who are going to be involved in this trial detecting prostate

:11:33.:11:35.

cancer from urine. Dogs can also be trained to alert

:11:36.:11:39.

patients with conditions such as type one diabetes to a minute

:11:40.:11:42.

shift in their blood sugar levels which might in extreme cases signal

:11:43.:11:45.

the onset of a coma. Steve was diagnosed with type

:11:46.:11:50.

one diabetes in 2006. Before Molly arrived,

:11:51.:11:57.

where were the big problems? When Stephen was little

:11:58.:12:00.

we would have him running around We would be scooping him up

:12:01.:12:07.

and putting him on the sofa I had gone in in the night and he'd

:12:08.:12:13.

had seizures so we were testing every hour and a half to two hours

:12:14.:12:18.

all night every single night. So you were getting

:12:19.:12:21.

up through the night And we did that until Molly

:12:22.:12:23.

came along and suddenly That's when we stopped and I now

:12:24.:12:28.

only get up when she alerts. Claire is also a type one diabetic

:12:29.:12:32.

and she is also a beneficiary of her dog's ability to detect

:12:33.:12:35.

shifts in blood glucose levels that In the three and a half years

:12:36.:12:38.

that we have been together, he has alerted and potentially

:12:39.:12:46.

saved my life over 3500 times and he does it

:12:47.:12:49.

all for a dog biscuit. What Magic has allowed me to do

:12:50.:12:54.

is I can go to bed and not be afraid that I'm never going to wake up

:12:55.:12:58.

in the morning, that I can have an ordinary life,

:12:59.:13:01.

do ordinary things, and I've got an amazing companion

:13:02.:13:04.

that's going to follow me I've been so impressed

:13:05.:13:06.

by the progress that's been made in this field that I wanted to find

:13:07.:13:11.

out why its potential hasn't been I went to see my old colleague,

:13:12.:13:15.

the Health Secretary I think probably ideas like this

:13:16.:13:18.

sometimes don't get looked at as quickly as they should

:13:19.:13:23.

because they get put But if this research is good then

:13:24.:13:26.

I want to know about it and I will certainly look

:13:27.:13:45.

at it carefully. We need to recognise that we can

:13:46.:13:47.

still reimagine our centuries-old relationship with dogs and find

:13:48.:13:49.

new ways to make use of their absolutely

:13:50.:13:52.

extraordinary abilities. So should the NHS get behind

:13:53.:13:53.

cancer-detecting dogs? He became interested

:13:54.:13:57.

in the issue after his wife, who had breast cancer,

:13:58.:14:00.

became a trustee of the charity Claire Guest who is a research

:14:01.:14:03.

scientist and co-founder of that Cancer expert Professor Karol Sikora

:14:04.:14:06.

and Dr Emma Smith from Cancer There are many other ways

:14:07.:14:11.

dogs can save people's Also with us Carolyn Gatenby

:14:12.:14:22.

who is here with her dog Simba. He helps her to manage her type 1

:14:23.:14:27.

diabetes and has saved her She will tell you all about that in

:14:28.:14:42.

a moment. Welcome to all of you. We have had a huge response. People are

:14:43.:14:47.

fascinated. Tell us how you became interested in the potential of these

:14:48.:14:52.

dogs to do this? It was because, as the film so, my wife had quite late

:14:53.:14:57.

detection of cancer. I still kick myself over the fact I hadn't

:14:58.:15:01.

spotted what was going on. She went through all of the stuff everybody

:15:02.:15:07.

has to do, the chemo, radiotherapy, mastectomy. All of these are very

:15:08.:15:12.

traumatic for somebody. Coming out at the end of it, a couple of years

:15:13.:15:17.

later, she has still been knocked back a bit and has less energy than

:15:18.:15:22.

she used to have. Somebody mentioned there was this organisation and she

:15:23.:15:26.

went to have a look at it and was bowled over by what they were doing.

:15:27.:15:30.

If they are detecting earlier than most of the medical tests seem to

:15:31.:15:35.

be, then why not try and find a way to get the medical side to use this

:15:36.:15:40.

and to engage. That is what she went to do and eventually got so

:15:41.:15:44.

involved, she has become part of the trust. It is remarkable, when you

:15:45.:15:49.

get to see it, we have had the cancer specialist from the health

:15:50.:15:53.

department go down, Skype Tickle. Bowled over after an hour and a

:15:54.:16:00.

half. -- sceptical. The Health Secretary, had a poor brief from the

:16:01.:16:04.

health Department. Walked out and he is going to ask why he didn't get a

:16:05.:16:08.

better be. So my question is constantly, they are there, they are

:16:09.:16:13.

showing the signs exist, showing your works, even whatever else we

:16:14.:16:16.

want to do to take this forward, they are here, why can't we use this

:16:17.:16:21.

now and get some funding from the various health agencies.

:16:22.:16:28.

Is Simba all right? Yes. He is agreeing with me. A viewer tweets,

:16:29.:16:39.

"A remarkable piece. Dogs are a man's best friend." A viewer said,

:16:40.:16:43.

"I spent three years in hospital. She has alerted over 5,000 times and

:16:44.:16:49.

kept me out of hospital." So Clare, the question, are the dogs really

:16:50.:16:55.

detecting earlier than conventional tests? We have a long way to go in

:16:56.:17:00.

term of working out how early they are able to diagnose the cancer.

:17:01.:17:04.

Yes, the dog finds it easier the earlier the stage of the cancer.

:17:05.:17:10.

That's because, we are using the dog's incredible sense of smell.

:17:11.:17:16.

What we see is that every disease and condition in cancer has its own

:17:17.:17:20.

biochemical changes which produce an odour change in our bodies. It is

:17:21.:17:27.

like sitting next to someone with nice aftershave on. Now, we have

:17:28.:17:33.

this big three year trial with 3,000 patients and we're looking at it not

:17:34.:17:41.

only their reliability and accuracy, they are more reliable than the

:17:42.:17:45.

current prostate cancer which is the PSA, the blood test which

:17:46.:17:49.

unfortunately though it picks up cancer well, it has a high false

:17:50.:17:56.

positive rate. That leads to unnecessary interventions? Yes and

:17:57.:18:01.

unnecessary anxiety. The dog detects with a high level of accuracy

:18:02.:18:05.

without that false positive read. That's what's going to be exciting.

:18:06.:18:10.

Cancer volatiles travel from infected cells into the urine as the

:18:11.:18:14.

body tries to dispose of the chemicals. It is thought the dogs

:18:15.:18:17.

can pick up the odour of the volatiles. You say in prostate it is

:18:18.:18:22.

93% accurate? That's what the training trials have shown and there

:18:23.:18:27.

is a publication in Italy that showed it was 98% reliable from a

:18:28.:18:34.

drop of urine. When a dog looks at a volatile pattern sorted with a

:18:35.:18:37.

disease, the less it is going on in the body, the more strongly that

:18:38.:18:42.

pattern stands out. That's why in early detections the dogs are very

:18:43.:18:46.

good. The difference between someone who is healthy and someone with

:18:47.:18:51.

cancer odour is very, very big. By the time that person becomes very

:18:52.:18:55.

unwell, there is so much going on that the dog has to peer through the

:18:56.:18:58.

disease and the conditions to see the volatiles. Professor, there is

:18:59.:19:03.

not much you don't know about cancer, what do you think about it?

:19:04.:19:09.

It is fascinating. I love dogs and I have one myself, but we have to get

:19:10.:19:14.

away from the dog. The dog had evolutionary training to smell

:19:15.:19:16.

something we don't understand. We have got to find out what it is and

:19:17.:19:20.

develop a laboratory test. The trouble with using animals and when

:19:21.:19:24.

I heard about this, Clare, I thought you'd come to the clinic and the dog

:19:25.:19:28.

would round up the patients that have got cancer and shoe the others

:19:29.:19:32.

out of the clinic. We have got to work out what the dog is detecting

:19:33.:19:36.

and then make a laboratory test and that would be practical. We haven't

:19:37.:19:44.

done that yet. I'm saying, we, I have got nothing to do with it?

:19:45.:19:51.

Since 2004 there were in-roads, the interest has been reignited in the

:19:52.:19:54.

detection of cancer through volatiles. The dog's sense of smell

:19:55.:19:58.

sin credibly reliable and that's going to be the challenge. Emma

:19:59.:20:02.

Smith Cancer Research UK, what's your view? I'm not sceptical about

:20:03.:20:09.

the science behind it. There is good rational for looking for the smelly

:20:10.:20:13.

molecules to get cancer diagnosed earlier. Like Carol said, there is

:20:14.:20:22.

no way we could be using dogs as a routine diagnostic test. Why not?

:20:23.:20:29.

350,000 people are diagnosed. Dogs need feeding and walking and they

:20:30.:20:32.

need a rest and plus I would be interested to look at economics of

:20:33.:20:35.

how much it would cost to keep the dogs and to have working dogs as

:20:36.:20:40.

opposed to a test. You say you want to look for another way to do there,

:20:41.:20:43.

but as you start looking for that right now, what has been

:20:44.:20:46.

demonstrated categorically that it is possible for dogs to do this.

:20:47.:20:50.

Now, you say there are lots of different people diagnosed with

:20:51.:20:53.

cancerment even if the dogs save one life, this is quite important. You

:20:54.:20:57.

say it's not practical. I challenge you to go to medical detection dogs

:20:58.:21:01.

and figure out how practical it is to set-up different centres, call

:21:02.:21:05.

them laboratories if you like, to detect cancer instead of saying no,

:21:06.:21:08.

we're not going to do that, why don't you say, let's embrace this.

:21:09.:21:11.

Let's help them and support them with finance and let's see where

:21:12.:21:15.

this goes first of all with the dags and then extrapolate to see whether

:21:16.:21:18.

or not in the future you can produce something else that replicates a

:21:19.:21:22.

dog, but at moment you've got dogs and they're better than the medical

:21:23.:21:28.

test. It is being embraced and that's why the research is on going

:21:29.:21:33.

and Clare is doing her studies. We will take it to biotech companies

:21:34.:21:38.

and develop a mechanical test. I think Emma is correct. It is

:21:39.:21:42.

impracticable to have the dogs do it. And the biotech industry should

:21:43.:21:55.

grab this. They don't think that because science is molecular. The

:21:56.:21:58.

dog has it in his brain and his nose. Smelly molecules are not

:21:59.:22:05.

something that has been researched. I don't understand why the medical

:22:06.:22:09.

profession is so resistant to saying we can do these in parallel, you can

:22:10.:22:15.

learn from one while we learn to diagnose cancer at the same time and

:22:16.:22:20.

we can run a parallel process that says extragting from the wider sense

:22:21.:22:23.

of what we're doing will learn more as the dogs do more with it rather

:22:24.:22:26.

than saying it is all very well, we will have a look at this, but we put

:22:27.:22:30.

our money and our thoughts in here. What we should do, in any other walk

:22:31.:22:34.

of life everybody in science and engineering, they would be doing

:22:35.:22:38.

parallel work. Use what you've got now, parallel that with testing. At

:22:39.:22:42.

the moment you just want to do the bit on the electronic nose. We don't

:22:43.:22:49.

use diagnostic tests until we have robust evidence that it works. You

:22:50.:22:54.

can get robust evidence on this. We will have the situation where some

:22:55.:22:57.

cases are missed and other people are getting a positive result when

:22:58.:23:00.

actually they don't need fi nurt tests. What about the pH A test.

:23:01.:23:09.

Every man will tell you, it is a horrible test... That's why it is

:23:10.:23:13.

not a screening test. Why don't we think about that more and even

:23:14.:23:18.

checking on the PSA test and run it past the dogs. There are issues with

:23:19.:23:22.

the PSA test and I don't think anyone would recommend that as a

:23:23.:23:26.

single test to determine whether a man has prostate cans are or not. So

:23:27.:23:32.

a doctor will look at all the man's other symptoms and do a physical

:23:33.:23:37.

examination and combine that with information from the PSA test. The

:23:38.:23:44.

PSA test is not a diagnosis. Hundreds of people go to have that

:23:45.:23:48.

second test I is painful and can lead to disease because they can't

:23:49.:23:53.

focus on who has. Why not use the dogs? We never ever believed it was

:23:54.:23:58.

dog or the dog took over. What we believe is the dog can assist the

:23:59.:24:05.

cln i and the -- clinician and the point is if somebody has a raised

:24:06.:24:11.

PSA, why not have a Ukraine test as well and that could be something we

:24:12.:24:15.

could cover because the clinician has the PSA against a urine test but

:24:16.:24:22.

the point that's been so frustrating for myself is that the amount of

:24:23.:24:25.

money that's been invested into this work, we have been going ten years

:24:26.:24:30.

now, we have had to raise money ourselves to do this work whereas

:24:31.:24:34.

other organisations would have spent millions by now to get the answers

:24:35.:24:37.

that we've got and that's the frustration. We have to

:24:38.:24:42.

commercialise it and get the biotech industry involved. It is not

:24:43.:24:45.

something that cancer charities can do. We have got to have peer review

:24:46.:24:51.

publications and then we have to get away from the dog and that will

:24:52.:24:57.

produce the future. Iain is sort of right. I'm seeing patients and the

:24:58.:25:03.

dog comes out positive, what do we know? It is too varied yable,

:25:04.:25:08.

different dogs, different diseases and we have got to get it

:25:09.:25:12.

standardised. This is not standardisable. I want to bring in

:25:13.:25:20.

Carolyn. Megan tweets, "A very interesting report on dogs helping

:25:21.:25:25.

to diagnose cancer by smell." Another viewer says, "Dogs are

:25:26.:25:31.

fantastic animals." ." Explain to our audience, you found out that

:25:32.:25:36.

Simba was touble to detect changes in your medical condition, your type

:25:37.:25:41.

one diabetes? That's right with no warning signals. I had got to the

:25:42.:25:51.

end of my medical profession where they could actually offer me no more

:25:52.:25:56.

really. The only thing they could offer me was a transplant, but the

:25:57.:26:02.

side-effects was breast cancer and I had already been through that. So I

:26:03.:26:08.

knew that I would end up in a nursing home because at that stage I

:26:09.:26:15.

was needing help day and night. And so I actually went on to the

:26:16.:26:23.

internet and found Medical Detection Dogs. And Clare came to assess Simba

:26:24.:26:29.

to see if he was suitable and my goodness, within a week he was

:26:30.:26:33.

actually alerting me. What does that involve? What does that mean? Tell

:26:34.:26:38.

me who aren't aware of what Simba can do. Well, Simba is able to tell

:26:39.:26:45.

me the change in my sugar levels in my blood. So he can alert me when my

:26:46.:26:52.

sugars are going high. -My sugaring going low and when they are also

:26:53.:26:56.

dropping quickly which I suffer from. So I can be quite at a high

:26:57.:27:04.

rate, but within five or ten minutes I could be nearly in a coma. So

:27:05.:27:13.

Simba actually gives me total quality of life. He would jump up at

:27:14.:27:21.

you or... He has got quite a few different ways. The main one, he's

:27:22.:27:25.

coming up to me and licking my face. You would get your kit out which you

:27:26.:27:31.

carry? Frlghts it is teamwork. So when he alerts me, he expects me to

:27:32.:27:38.

take my sugars. Right. He is not usually wrong. The I'm in the normal

:27:39.:27:45.

change and he's chilled out. We can see that. Thank goodness you have

:27:46.:27:51.

been in the normal range while you have been on the programme? That's

:27:52.:27:57.

right. I'm unpredictable, he's there 24 hours a day. I'm getting quite

:27:58.:28:05.

emotional because I believe solely, I've given my life to him because he

:28:06.:28:10.

has given me such a good life. I've had, since he has been trained, I've

:28:11.:28:16.

had six-and-a-half years of quality life. It isn't where I'm scared of

:28:17.:28:23.

going out anymore, I'm living it to the fullest and I'm enjoying it.

:28:24.:28:29.

Good. All I have to do is take Simba wherever I go. He doesn't stop

:28:30.:28:34.

working when he has got his coat off. He is continually working. He's

:28:35.:28:42.

not made to, but as soon as he sees the changes in, or smells the

:28:43.:28:48.

changes, he will react. I know he's chilled. I don't know if we can see

:28:49.:28:53.

him properly. Is it a bit mean if we ask him to stand up. Simba? Simba?

:28:54.:29:01.

Come on. Oh, Simba, you are delicious!

:29:02.:29:08.

Clare was taken to hospital three times a week before she had Simba.

:29:09.:29:12.

She was at risk of going into a care home. There is ?13 million a year

:29:13.:29:21.

spent on hypoglycemic events which could be prevented. I was falling

:29:22.:29:25.

everywhere. I would walk to the shops and end up in a coma so

:29:26.:29:30.

whenever I went out of the house, I never knew if I was going to make it

:29:31.:29:34.

home, but more times than not, I would end up in an ambulance or at

:29:35.:29:44.

the A So my life was very, very on a rocky, you know, place. Well,

:29:45.:29:50.

he has transformed it and saved your life countless times. He is checking

:29:51.:29:55.

her now to see if her sugars are right. This is him. So... So he has

:29:56.:30:02.

just licked your face, do you need to check something? He sensed a

:30:03.:30:08.

change in my odour. So if you don't mind, am I allowed to? We'll look

:30:09.:30:19.

after her. Can you just explain what you're doing as you're doing it

:30:20.:30:22.

because this is really instructive for everybody? Simba has alerted me

:30:23.:30:30.

and so obviously he senses some change within me. In terms of your

:30:31.:30:36.

blood sugar levels? Yes. So my responsibility now is to actually

:30:37.:30:43.

take a test so I know if I'm dropping, I'm low. If I'm dropping

:30:44.:30:49.

quickly, or if I'm going high. So then I can sort myself out. Is it

:30:50.:30:57.

all right, you have just done that. You've clicked your finger. I've

:30:58.:31:01.

wiped me finger. I've wiped everything off. Now I'm going to put

:31:02.:31:07.

blood on my blood strip. OK. So then it will actually tell me what's

:31:08.:31:12.

going on in my body. OK. And before I came in here, I were eight. I'm

:31:13.:31:18.

now 6.9. Just show that to the camera.

:31:19.:31:35.

What Simba is telling me is that I am on a quick drop. What will you

:31:36.:31:44.

need to do? I will need to take Luke said an something to boost my sugars

:31:45.:31:50.

back-up. If not, I walk into my coma, I don't have any signals. Then

:31:51.:31:59.

it is a hospital job. He actually saves the National health thousands

:32:00.:32:04.

and thousands of pounds because I wouldn't acknowledge I was going low

:32:05.:32:09.

and then you would have to take me to hospital. That is extraordinary

:32:10.:32:15.

to see that in action. Thank you, Simba. Iain Duncan Smith, going back

:32:16.:32:20.

to the cancer detection, a number of viewers are criticising you in

:32:21.:32:25.

trying to come over as cosy and cuddly because of your background as

:32:26.:32:33.

Work and Pensions Secretary. You detract from the message, how do you

:32:34.:32:41.

react to that? You will always get politicians on both sides of the

:32:42.:32:45.

fence. But this isn't about politics, you have just seen this,

:32:46.:32:51.

the ability of these dogs to detect cancer and sugar diabetic falls. It

:32:52.:32:56.

is not about me, I am not the founder of this, Claire is. It is

:32:57.:33:01.

not about my involvement, it is about me going to look at it. My

:33:02.:33:05.

wife had breast cancer and like anybody else, once you see

:33:06.:33:09.

something, you think it can be done better, you want to go and change it

:33:10.:33:14.

and it is just about alerting people as to what is going on. Thank you

:33:15.:33:19.

all for coming on the programme. We have breaking news to bring you...

:33:20.:33:23.

Former Crewe Alexandra football coach Barry Bennell has been

:33:24.:33:25.

remanded in custody charged with 12 child sex offences.

:33:26.:33:27.

Our correspondent Katie Gornall is at South Cheshire

:33:28.:33:29.

Victoria, Barry Bennell didn't appear in person, he appeared via

:33:30.:33:44.

video link on Raman. We saw him on a TV screen in the corner of the court

:33:45.:33:49.

room, he was wearing a blue jumper and sat with his arms crossed. Spoke

:33:50.:33:54.

only to confirm his name and date of birth and understood the fresh 12

:33:55.:33:59.

charges. These include for indecent assault charges relating to a boy

:34:00.:34:04.

under 14 alleged to have taken place between 1981 and 1982 and eight

:34:05.:34:09.

counts of child sex abuse relating to two boys under the age of 16,

:34:10.:34:16.

alleged to have taken place between 1980 and 1987. Barry Bennell is a

:34:17.:34:20.

former football coach with Crewe Alexander. He has now been remanded

:34:21.:34:30.

into custody, as you say, where he will appear again on the 22nd of

:34:31.:34:33.

March, faced with a total of 20 child sex abuse allegations. It

:34:34.:34:36.

follows on from a recent court appearance where he pleaded not

:34:37.:34:40.

guilty to similar offences. He will appear at Chester Crown Court on the

:34:41.:34:46.

22nd of March facing 20 child sex abuse allegations. Thank you very

:34:47.:34:48.

much. Still to come: Aid agencies are

:34:49.:35:02.

warning time is running out to save 20 million people facing famine in

:35:03.:35:05.

African countries. We will speak to people in each of the affected

:35:06.:35:08.

nations who are working on the ground. And...

:35:09.:35:18.

Still to come, what's the best way for a superstar singer to avoid

:35:19.:35:21.

being distracted by adoring fans on the way to the stage?

:35:22.:35:24.

Adele hides in a giant box. More later.

:35:25.:35:32.

Joanna is in the BBC Newsroom with a summary

:35:33.:35:34.

MPs are due to debate changes to the Brexit bill

:35:35.:35:38.

It comes after the House of Lords voted in favour of amendments

:35:39.:35:42.

which would guarantee the rights of EU citizens living

:35:43.:35:44.

in the UK, and would give parliament a "meaningful" say

:35:45.:35:47.

If MPs and peers do pass the bill today, Theresa May could start

:35:48.:35:51.

the process of the UK leaving the European Union this week.

:35:52.:35:53.

A British man has been jailed for six years in Indonesia,

:35:54.:35:56.

over the killing of a policeman on the island of Bali.

:35:57.:35:59.

David Taylor had admitted his role in the crime, saying he feared

:36:00.:36:01.

for his life during a fight with the police officer,

:36:02.:36:04.

who was attacked with a beer bottle and his own binoculars.

:36:05.:36:07.

His partner Sara Connor has been sentenced to four years

:36:08.:36:09.

Rail staff from three firms across England have started 24-hour

:36:10.:36:13.

strikes in a dispute over the role of guards.

:36:14.:36:15.

The RMT's 30th strike day in its dispute with Southern over

:36:16.:36:18.

plans for driver-only-operated trains, has spread to

:36:19.:36:19.

Guards and drivers working for Merseyrail and Northern are taking

:36:20.:36:25.

Rail bosses argue it's about modernising services

:36:26.:36:29.

That's a summary of the latest news, join me for BBC

:36:30.:36:38.

Spurs ensured the FA Cup semi finals will be an all Premier League affair

:36:39.:36:48.

after beating League one Millwall 6-0 in the last

:36:49.:36:50.

South Korean Son-Hueng Min scored a hat-trick after top scorer

:36:51.:36:56.

Harry Kane was forced off with what looked like

:36:57.:36:58.

They joined Manchester City and Arsenal in the last four.

:36:59.:37:11.

Celtic are now just two wins away from another

:37:12.:37:13.

Scottish Premiership title, but they were prevented from a 23rd

:37:14.:37:15.

straight league victory by their Old Firm rivals.

:37:16.:37:17.

They were held to a 1-1 draw at Celtic Park after a late

:37:18.:37:20.

So Celtic are just the 25 points clear of Aberdeen

:37:21.:37:24.

Managing Derby County seems to be something of a tricky challenge,

:37:25.:37:28.

Steve McClaren has been sacked for a second time, only five months

:37:29.:37:32.

Derby are tenth in the Championship after winning only one

:37:33.:37:36.

Former Birmingham boss, Gary row it is the overwhelming favourite to

:37:37.:37:39.

replace him. There are no British

:37:40.:37:40.

players left in the singles draw at the Indian Wells

:37:41.:37:42.

tennis in California. Women's number one, Johanna Konta,

:37:43.:37:44.

said she wasn't "brave enough", after losing in three sets

:37:45.:37:46.

to Caroline Garcia of France. A few years ago, Andy Murray

:37:47.:37:49.

predicted that Garcia would make it She's currently ranked 25th,

:37:50.:37:52.

14 places lower than Konta. Also out both remaining men,

:37:53.:37:55.

Kyle Edmund lost in straight While British number two Dan Evans

:37:56.:37:57.

was beaten by Kei Nishikori, The government is urging MPs

:37:58.:38:01.

to reject the changes to the Brexit Bill which were made

:38:02.:38:04.

by the Lords when it returns to be Our political guru

:38:05.:38:08.

Norman Smith is here. How will it play out? Let me talk

:38:09.:38:13.

you through the choreography of what will be a big and confusing day at

:38:14.:38:16.

Westminster. The Brexit bill comes back to the Commons round about

:38:17.:38:25.

3:30pm today. What we will get is a sort of Parliamentary ping-pong when

:38:26.:38:29.

the bill shuttles back and forwards between the Commons and Lords.

:38:30.:38:34.

Because when it first came to the House of Commons last month, it was

:38:35.:38:39.

approved without any amendments at all. It went through with huge

:38:40.:38:44.

majorities. It then went to the House of Lords, but the House of

:38:45.:38:51.

Lords inflicted two defeats on the government. Won over guaranteeing

:38:52.:38:54.

the rights of EU nationals and the one over guaranteeing Parliament and

:38:55.:39:01.

meaningful vote. Now that Bill goes back to the Commons today. David

:39:02.:39:06.

Davis, the Brexit secretary will open the debate and we are expecting

:39:07.:39:11.

a vote around six o'clock. But the likelihood is, MPs will overturn

:39:12.:39:16.

those two defeats. Then, the bill goes back to the House of Lords.

:39:17.:39:21.

Round about ten o'clock, I think we will get the final vote in the House

:39:22.:39:26.

of Lords. The thinking of most people is, the House of Lords will

:39:27.:39:36.

back down, which means by the close of play today, Theresa May will

:39:37.:39:38.

probably have her Brexit bill. The only question then, we are waiting

:39:39.:39:41.

to see when will she trigger it, when will she "A set of leaving the

:39:42.:39:47.

EU. She has got until the end of March, but she could go tomorrow.

:39:48.:39:51.

The only person who does know is Theresa May and maybe her husband.

:39:52.:39:58.

And anybody who says they do know, I am not sure they are telling the

:39:59.:40:10.

truth. That speak to our guests. I am seeking Parliament will have a

:40:11.:40:20.

meaningful and timely vote towards the end of the negotiation process.

:40:21.:40:24.

It is important is our Parliament sees first, the final deal, if you

:40:25.:40:31.

like, before it goes to the European Union. Hasn't Theresa May said you

:40:32.:40:36.

will get some kind of vote? She has, but we need some clarity. The other

:40:37.:40:40.

question to answer is what would happen if we don't get a deal at

:40:41.:40:45.

all? That would mean we would be heading towards leaving the European

:40:46.:40:50.

Union without any proper arrangements with 27 nation states

:40:51.:40:54.

and the European Union as a whole. Do you expect to get an answer to

:40:55.:41:01.

that today? I will be seeking an answer. David Davis, an effective

:41:02.:41:04.

parliamentarian himself, will go some way, and I hope the whole way,

:41:05.:41:12.

towards reassuring us that the Parliamentary sovereignty matters.

:41:13.:41:15.

What do you think of your colleague, who might potentially vote against

:41:16.:41:20.

the government the night? It is a pity if they do. You cannot stop

:41:21.:41:25.

them of course, but this is a referendum authorised by the

:41:26.:41:28.

sovereign act of Parliament, it passed the House of Commons and the

:41:29.:41:32.

House of Lords by a massive majority. In the House of Commons,

:41:33.:41:37.

by 544 and then we got in the business of the Supreme Court. The

:41:38.:41:42.

bottom line is, we accepted of course, the House of Commons and the

:41:43.:41:45.

House of Lords would need to have a bill to legislate, but simply form a

:41:46.:41:53.

question. This is the main point, to notify the withdrawal process. It

:41:54.:41:56.

wasn't to go into all begins an ounce, but it was to deal with the

:41:57.:42:01.

simple question. That is what happened, with a massive majority,

:42:02.:42:08.

499 to around 120 or something. I see in Neal and nodding his head,

:42:09.:42:13.

because he knows it is the case. On the third reading, which took into

:42:14.:42:16.

account the amendments which had already been discussed, which cover

:42:17.:42:20.

these questions as well, Niall and others did vote. It is up to people

:42:21.:42:25.

to make up their own minds, but the House of Lords has its own

:42:26.:42:29.

functions, they had an opportunity to look at it. But the time has come

:42:30.:42:33.

now, we don't want the Prime Minister's hands to betide. She

:42:34.:42:40.

would find herself in extreme difficult circumstances, if there

:42:41.:42:43.

was some arrangements as a result of these amendments, the effect of

:42:44.:42:46.

which was to give leveraged to those who want to make it as difficult as

:42:47.:42:50.

possible for her in the negotiations. Why do you think it is

:42:51.:42:55.

right to attach conditions to this simple, short bill which is, simply

:42:56.:43:01.

about triggering the process? I am not thinking we should be attaching

:43:02.:43:05.

any conditions, because it is a short Bill anyway. It is about

:43:06.:43:10.

process and not outcomes. If we were talking about outcomes, we would be

:43:11.:43:14.

talking about all sorts of priorities we might have. What we

:43:15.:43:18.

are talking about is process. It is about giving Parliament the ability

:43:19.:43:24.

to comment on and decide upon aspects of the deal as it emerges.

:43:25.:43:29.

And I think it is also important to note, it would be I think, sensible,

:43:30.:43:37.

to have some sort of process to discuss the situation if we don't

:43:38.:43:42.

get a deal. Because we have two years and just two years. Now is the

:43:43.:43:47.

time to put down a marker that in about 18 months, or thereabouts, we

:43:48.:43:51.

should have an opportunity to discuss what the actual process is.

:43:52.:44:00.

What if there is no deal? The bottom line on that is, as David Davis said

:44:01.:44:07.

yesterday, he has been discussing the whole question, if there is no

:44:08.:44:11.

deal, what the outcome would be in terms of a planned. We had the

:44:12.:44:15.

chairman of the foreign affairs select committee yesterday as well,

:44:16.:44:21.

who discuss this. They said if there is no deal, they would hope there is

:44:22.:44:25.

a plan. David Davis and the government have made it clear, there

:44:26.:44:30.

is a plan. One of the problems in relation to negotiations before the

:44:31.:44:34.

referendum, David Cameron and his government, didn't have a plan. It

:44:35.:44:39.

is clear to us, Theresa May's government does have a plan. You

:44:40.:44:45.

think so? Will they tell us what the plan is if there isn't a deal? You

:44:46.:44:51.

have to conceive, it is not appropriate to go out and tell

:44:52.:44:55.

people on the other side of the negotiating table, everything you

:44:56.:45:00.

will be doing. It is part of the negotiations. I think basically

:45:01.:45:03.

there will be a good discussion this afternoon. We want to come to the

:45:04.:45:07.

end of this process and get royal assent and get on with it. That is

:45:08.:45:11.

what people outside really want. Thank you both for coming on the

:45:12.:45:17.

programme. Aid agencies are warning that time

:45:18.:45:20.

is running out to save an estimated 20 million people facing famine

:45:21.:45:23.

in four African countries. It has been described as the worst

:45:24.:45:25.

humanitarian crisis in 60 years. This next film contains upsetting

:45:26.:45:28.

images right from the beginning. This baby was four months

:45:29.:45:32.

old when a BBC team He's one of millions in Yemen

:45:33.:45:35.

who could be on the verge The UN says more than 20 million

:45:36.:45:41.

people face the threat of starvation and famine in Somalia,

:45:42.:45:50.

South Sudan, Nigeria and Yemen. It could be the biggest

:45:51.:45:55.

humanitarian crisis since 1945. In Yemen, a child dies every ten

:45:56.:46:00.

minutes from a preventable disease. The Red Cross says the ongoing

:46:01.:46:06.

conflict in the country The same is happening

:46:07.:46:09.

in South Sudan. Three years of civil war

:46:10.:46:15.

there have pushed millions Conflict fuelled by the extremist

:46:16.:46:17.

militants Boko Haram in Nigeria is also causing an unfolding

:46:18.:46:23.

disaster in the north More than seven million people

:46:24.:46:25.

in Nigeria are severely food insecure which means

:46:26.:46:37.

they don't have regular access And in Somalia it has only been six

:46:38.:46:39.

years since the last time Then it was estimated that more

:46:40.:46:45.

than a quarter of a million Again civil unrest is the main cause

:46:46.:46:52.

of the crisis in Somalia but a lack of water and underdevelopment

:46:53.:46:57.

is being blamed as well, leaving more than 6 million

:46:58.:46:59.

in need of urgent help. Unicef has warned that

:47:00.:47:04.

1.4 million children It says it needs ?3.5 billion

:47:05.:47:06.

to prevent the disaster 20 million people potentially

:47:07.:47:12.

starving to death in 2017. We can speak to Kevin Watkins,

:47:13.:47:23.

the boss of the Save the Children and says the international community

:47:24.:47:35.

is sitting on its hands. We can also speak to people in each

:47:36.:47:37.

of the four countries affected. Shabia Mantoo is on the ground

:47:38.:47:40.

for the UN Refugee Council in Yemen, a country where it's thought a child

:47:41.:47:43.

dies every ten minutes. Challiss McDonough is with the UN's

:47:44.:47:47.

World Food Programme Sadia Allin is in

:47:48.:47:49.

Somalia for ActionAid. Charles works for Christian Aid. You

:47:50.:48:10.

say there has been warnings, but nothing happened. Why? We have got

:48:11.:48:14.

into the habit of waiting until we see the starving children on our

:48:15.:48:18.

screens before we act on the problem and the 20 million number is a very

:48:19.:48:23.

big number. If I can give you one example of a boy behind that number.

:48:24.:48:27.

So last Thursday, I was in Somalia. I met a young lad who had been

:48:28.:48:33.

admitted to one of our emergency feeding clinics. 18 months old. He

:48:34.:48:38.

weighed 12lbs. That's the average weight of a ten week old baby in the

:48:39.:48:43.

UK. He had extreme diarrhoea. He was on the point of death. His life was

:48:44.:48:50.

saved. And speaking to his mother, a woman called eye sha, you realised

:48:51.:48:54.

the sheer anguish that the statistics don't capture. I've got

:48:55.:48:59.

two little boys myself and putting yourself in the position of these

:49:00.:49:02.

boys who want to keep their children alive and I believe have a right to

:49:03.:49:06.

expect far more of the international community than has been on offer so

:49:07.:49:10.

far. We need more resources. We need governments around the world to stop

:49:11.:49:16.

the obstruction of humanitarian aid in countries like Yemen and we need

:49:17.:49:19.

to start treating this as the crisis that it really is. We've got a

:49:20.:49:25.

shrinking window of opportunity over the next month to stop what is

:49:26.:49:30.

already a bad situation becoming a catastrophe. OK, four weeks, three

:49:31.:49:36.

weeks, to change things? To try and potentially reverse some of this

:49:37.:49:40.

horrific situation? Well, we know from the UN figure that is we need

:49:41.:49:44.

at least $4 billion in these countries by June. Now that seems

:49:45.:49:48.

like a huge figure, but there is a lot that we can do. It takes us

:49:49.:49:53.

around $10 per child to identify kids who are malnourished, to get

:49:54.:49:57.

them to our treatment centres, to get them the basic antibiotics that

:49:58.:50:01.

they need, the nutrition that they need so we've launched an appeal to

:50:02.:50:07.

try and tackle the problem. We're aiming to reach 100,000 children

:50:08.:50:13.

over the next few weeks. If the international community got behind

:50:14.:50:16.

this and the World Bank, the UK you can is doing a good job,

:50:17.:50:23.

approximates putting money into the financial pipeline, but others need

:50:24.:50:30.

to step up to the plate. Challiss tell us about the people that you

:50:31.:50:33.

are seeing there who need food? The things that I have seen are, they

:50:34.:50:41.

are unimaginable. It would seem unimaginable if I hadn't met people

:50:42.:50:49.

who had been through that. So in a village in Southern Unity. I met a

:50:50.:50:53.

woman who had runaway from her home when fighting had come there and had

:50:54.:50:57.

to runaway and for two months she walked until she reached a village

:50:58.:51:01.

where there was safety because it is surrounded by swamping. Somewhere in

:51:02.:51:04.

the course of the two months she gave birth. She was eight months

:51:05.:51:09.

pregnant when she left and she arrived with a six-week old child.

:51:10.:51:14.

So she was carrying a newborn baby through the swamps, trying to get

:51:15.:51:18.

her family to safety. And that's the kind of thing that I have seen like,

:51:19.:51:22.

it is des per operation, one of needing to provide for your family,

:51:23.:51:26.

and to keep them safe and these are things that I think anyone in the

:51:27.:51:30.

world can understand, but it is very hrd to imagine the lengths to which

:51:31.:51:36.

people have to go to meet their children's most basic needs. If she

:51:37.:51:39.

hadn't been able to reach the village then it would have been

:51:40.:51:44.

desperation and possibly death for her newborn baby, but she could get

:51:45.:51:48.

to some place where help could reach her and the important thing now is

:51:49.:51:53.

we can try to get that kind of assistance to people in as many

:51:54.:52:01.

parts of Unity State as possible. In Yemen, how bad is it there? Well,

:52:02.:52:07.

it is abysmal. We are talking about Yemen which is one of the world's

:52:08.:52:12.

worst crisis and people are facing misery. To describe to you, I met a

:52:13.:52:17.

few days ago a little boy who was actually just 14 years old. For me,

:52:18.:52:23.

he encapsulated what is happening in Yemen in terms of the desperation

:52:24.:52:28.

and the danger. He was just a little boy who fled from his home with his

:52:29.:52:34.

family. Inn a country that's affected by conflict. The population

:52:35.:52:40.

have fled. A lot of people have fled to dimp places across Yemenment so

:52:41.:52:44.

he was one of them and he fled with his family and now they are living

:52:45.:52:47.

on the street. They have nowhere to go. Nowhere safe. The town is

:52:48.:52:55.

affected by conflict. They fled to another area only to be faced by

:52:56.:53:00.

danger. This little boy has diabetes and now he is malnourished because

:53:01.:53:04.

there is not enough food. 14 million people in the country don't have

:53:05.:53:09.

enough food and three million people are national nourished. This boy is

:53:10.:53:14.

one of them. He is displaced and has diabetes and he sits on the street

:53:15.:53:18.

outside his tent. He can't get help from the hospital because 45% of

:53:19.:53:22.

Yemen's health facilities are incapacitated as a result of the

:53:23.:53:25.

conflict. It is abysmal. His parents were in tears. They don't know what

:53:26.:53:28.

to do and parents like his across the country are having to make

:53:29.:53:31.

really painful decisions about which child to save. Which child to feed

:53:32.:53:36.

with whatever meagre resources they have and for this family, they

:53:37.:53:41.

received emergency assistance, but they need continual assistance and

:53:42.:53:45.

it is not enough. So they were just receiving supplies from the local

:53:46.:53:49.

community, but the situation here, it is abysmal and this story is just

:53:50.:53:54.

one of 90 million who are in need. Which child to save? Which child to

:53:55.:53:59.

feed? This is extraordinary. Sadia in Somalia. Famine was declared

:54:00.:54:04.

there six years agoment how is it happening again? Three consecutive

:54:05.:54:12.

years without rain and 500,000 people in extreme hunger and we are

:54:13.:54:18.

witnessing the sad realities. When you meet people, it is when you

:54:19.:54:23.

realise the death and devastation. I met this woman. She is a widow. She

:54:24.:54:28.

is a mother of five children. She lost all her animals. She did not

:54:29.:54:37.

have the energy and the ability to move to search for water. She has

:54:38.:54:43.

been travelling months and months and she didn't eat in days. When

:54:44.:54:51.

ActionAid found and assisted her, we should remember in 2011 more than a

:54:52.:54:55.

quarter of million Somali lost their lives, but today, we have the

:54:56.:55:02.

chance. We need the international community to step up so we can scale

:55:03.:55:06.

up and speed up our response before it is too late. I would like towned

:55:07.:55:12.

in line those affected people have been the greatest contributors to

:55:13.:55:18.

the country's economy and losing their animals. They lose their pride

:55:19.:55:22.

and dignity. These people have never asked anyone for support, but we

:55:23.:55:30.

have been depending on them for meat, milk and it is in natural

:55:31.:55:39.

disaster which is making them so in extreme hunger.

:55:40.:55:49.

Let me cross to Nigeria. Describe the situation that you have seen

:55:50.:55:52.

first hand in the north-east of the country, Charles? Yes, this is

:55:53.:56:00.

Charles. So, in Nigeria, there were six States affected. Three of them

:56:01.:56:10.

badly. They were badly hit by the insurgency. We talk about two

:56:11.:56:14.

million people in dire need of food and assistance. The majority of the

:56:15.:56:22.

people in Nigeria who have been affected by a crisis, live in

:56:23.:56:25.

communities and that brings a different twist to what you see aco

:56:26.:56:30.

the world. The majority of people live with families who are already

:56:31.:56:34.

impoverished and stretched beyond their limits. Now, with the famine,

:56:35.:56:44.

we already have families who, an average sized family of seven to

:56:45.:56:48.

nine people who are barely able to eat one square meal a day and have

:56:49.:56:53.

another ten people to give an average size of 20 people per family

:56:54.:57:02.

then you know the situation is urgent and desperate. People are

:57:03.:57:07.

looking for a means to eat and to survive. Because of the conflict,

:57:08.:57:11.

typically if it is not well supported which is what the UN and

:57:12.:57:17.

NGOs are doing in Nigeria, it is about survival for the fittest. So

:57:18.:57:23.

we find situations whereby wherever there are food RACses there is a

:57:24.:57:26.

scramble because people are desperate for any form of food.

:57:27.:57:33.

Talking to a woman who has 20 people in her home. She is the head of this

:57:34.:57:38.

household, she has to feed them, and she is the oldest, she is the

:57:39.:57:42.

strongest, but she is not able to walk properly because she is weak.

:57:43.:57:48.

Having stayed days without food and without food, it is more of a local

:57:49.:57:55.

meal, more starch and less nutrients and proteins and all of that. It was

:57:56.:57:58.

difficult for her to move around and to compete with the more strong and

:57:59.:58:02.

able-bodied people in the scramble for food. This is really

:58:03.:58:07.

difficult... I'm going to leave it there Charles. We get the message.

:58:08.:58:12.

Thank you all of you and thank you too to Kevin Watkins the boss of

:58:13.:58:14.

Save The Children. On the programme tomorrow, exclusive

:58:15.:58:18.

access to a firearms training Thank you for your company today.

:58:19.:58:27.

You can see the cancer detecting dogs film on our programme page.

:58:28.:58:31.