16/02/2017 BBC News at Six


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16/02/2017

The latest national and international news stories from the BBC News team, followed by weather.


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More misery for hundreds of thousands of commuters as a deal

:00:00.:00:00.

to resolve one of the country's longest running rail

:00:07.:00:08.

Southern Rail passengers face the prospect of more

:00:09.:00:13.

strikes as train drivers go against their union refusing

:00:14.:00:15.

My husband pays almost ?4,000 a year for his season ticket and he doesn't

:00:16.:00:22.

know when he turns up at the railway station in the morning, whether he's

:00:23.:00:25.

I feel it's the job of both the unions and the management

:00:26.:00:30.

Surely that's what they're there for.

:00:31.:00:34.

We'll be asking when the next strikes are likely to take place.

:00:35.:00:37.

We report on the plight of hundreds of thousands of children in the UK

:00:38.:00:40.

who are forced to care for sick and disabled relatives

:00:41.:00:43.

Fears for the future of thousands of jobs at Vauxall's UK plants.

:00:44.:00:49.

Crisis talks are held with the government and unions.

:00:50.:00:52.

More than 150 thousand million million miles away,

:00:53.:00:54.

scientists build a telescope to see the black hole thought to be

:00:55.:00:57.

The new wren is welcomed by a Petty Officer and ushered

:00:58.:01:04.

into the presence of the Chief Officer.

:01:05.:01:06.

And the women's Royal Naval Service founded a century ago,

:01:07.:01:10.

that marked a huge change in women's roles in the armed forces.

:01:11.:01:15.

And coming up in the sport on BBC News, Arsene Wenger's future will be

:01:16.:01:18.

decided at the end of the season, after his Arsenal side

:01:19.:01:21.

were humiliated in the Champions League by Bayern Munich.

:01:22.:01:44.

Good evening and welcome to the BBC News at Six.

:01:45.:01:48.

Hopes for an end to the rail misery that's affected hundreds

:01:49.:01:50.

of thousands of commuters in southern England

:01:51.:01:52.

Train drivers ignored their own union and voted against a proposed

:01:53.:01:58.

deal to end the long-running dispute with Southern Rail.

:01:59.:02:01.

It's one of the country's busiest commuter networks.

:02:02.:02:04.

Unions have been at loggerheads with the company for more

:02:05.:02:06.

than a year over staffing and safety issues.

:02:07.:02:08.

For nearly a year, around 300,000 commuters have

:02:09.:02:18.

endured overcrowded trains, delays and strikes.

:02:19.:02:21.

It's been one of the most intractable rail

:02:22.:02:23.

After two weeks of talks hosted by the TUC it was thought

:02:24.:02:31.

We are pleased to announce that Aslef and GTR Southern have

:02:32.:02:37.

For Southern travellers at Brighton that means huge disappointment.

:02:38.:02:48.

And I pay a lot of money for the train monthly as well,

:02:49.:02:53.

That's terrible. What can you do?

:02:54.:02:56.

It's a lot of money on Uber, isn't it?

:02:57.:02:58.

Disappointed, to be fair, because I pay a lot of money

:02:59.:03:01.

to travel to Brighton every day and I think the service

:03:02.:03:03.

Around 900 Aslef drivers who work for Southern voted in the ballot.

:03:04.:03:13.

There was a turnout of over 72%, nearly 46% voted in favour

:03:14.:03:18.

of the deal, but over 54% voted against.

:03:19.:03:22.

This is an embarrassment for Aslef, the deal negotiated

:03:23.:03:25.

by their leadership has been overturned by their rank

:03:26.:03:27.

Mick Whelan, the general secretary of Aslef says,

:03:28.:03:32.

"We understand and support the decision arrived at them

:03:33.:03:45.

The dispute is over how many members of staff should be on every train.

:03:46.:03:50.

Could there be driver only trains or must there

:03:51.:03:52.

always be a second person, a conductor, on-board?

:03:53.:03:54.

Aslef said they had got a deal where there would always be two

:03:55.:03:57.

staff members on a train, with some exceptions.

:03:58.:03:59.

The reality was there was a whole host of exceptions that meant up

:04:00.:04:03.

to 1800 trains a day would be able to run without the

:04:04.:04:06.

Southern's parent company Govia said in a statement:

:04:07.:04:10.

"Naturally we are saddened and hugely disappointed, as will be our

:04:11.:04:13.

passengers with today's decision by drivers,

:04:14.:04:17.

particularly as the agreement carried the full support

:04:18.:04:19.

and recommendation of the Aslef leadership."

:04:20.:04:30.

The RMT has already scheduled another 24-hour

:04:31.:04:34.

strike on the Southern network for next Wednesday,

:04:35.:04:36.

and the same dispute about driver operated only trains is spreading

:04:37.:04:38.

Ballots are being sent out today to staff on Arriva Trains North,

:04:39.:04:46.

there's also the prospect of industrial action on Merseyrail.

:04:47.:04:51.

The big question for these passengers travelling home tonight

:04:52.:04:57.

is, what happens next? In the short term, the Aslef leadership would

:04:58.:05:00.

have to get back around the negotiating table to get a better

:05:01.:05:03.

deal if they can to their members. In the long term, there is the

:05:04.:05:07.

possibility, only the possibility at the moment, of more strike action,

:05:08.:05:11.

although no dates have been announced. Remember, this is the

:05:12.:05:15.

train drivers we are talking about here. When they go on strike, the

:05:16.:05:17.

network is virtually shut down. More than half a million children

:05:18.:05:20.

and teenagers in the UK are carers who look after their ill

:05:21.:05:23.

or disabled relatives. Some spend more than 12 hours

:05:24.:05:25.

a week looking after them. But budget cuts at local councils

:05:26.:05:28.

are making it increasingly difficult for these young people to get

:05:29.:05:34.

the support that they need - that's according to the Local

:05:35.:05:37.

Government Association They say it's crucial for councils

:05:38.:05:39.

to have better relationships with schools and hospitals

:05:40.:05:42.

to try to make sure more youngsters Our Midlands Correspondent

:05:43.:05:45.

Sima Kotecha reports. In Dudley, 17-year-old Alex

:05:46.:05:49.

looks after his mum, I suppose you could say it's

:05:50.:05:56.

a big responsibility, but it doesn't really feel like it,

:05:57.:06:02.

because, obviously It's just the normal thing to go,

:06:03.:06:05.

have you had your tablet today? How many tablets does

:06:06.:06:17.

your mum take everyday? It's just trying to

:06:18.:06:19.

sort out which ones. He's her primary carer

:06:20.:06:24.

and is one of 700,000 young It is frustrating at times

:06:25.:06:27.

because you do just want to throw the towel in sometimes and just

:06:28.:06:36.

go, I've had enough. But then you see at the end

:06:37.:06:38.

of the day, you just see how happy you make the person or the people

:06:39.:06:44.

that you care for, and it really Some of these young people do get

:06:45.:06:47.

support from the local authorities, but the organisation

:06:48.:06:51.

which represents local councils in England and Wales says,

:06:52.:06:55.

tight budgets means they are having to make tough choices about who gets

:06:56.:06:58.

help and who doesn't. There might be some people

:06:59.:07:04.

watching this thinking, is it fair to have a Child helping

:07:05.:07:07.

you and being there for you, when actually the adult should be

:07:08.:07:10.

there for the child. I agree with that,

:07:11.:07:14.

to be quite honest. I wish that I hadn't got to rely

:07:15.:07:19.

on Alex, sort of thing. So I've got to rely on him,

:07:20.:07:26.

sort of thing, to help me. It's not as though I'm somebody

:07:27.:07:32.

that he doesn't know. Not too far away in Wolverhampton,

:07:33.:07:46.

ten-year-old Ethan takes care With his mum, he's one

:07:47.:07:51.

of his primary carers. Sometimes he does things

:07:52.:07:57.

that makes us angry. But then he does lots of things that

:07:58.:08:03.

make us happy as well. Noah has complex learning

:08:04.:08:07.

difficulties which means He needs to be

:08:08.:08:08.

supervised at all times. The government says later this year

:08:09.:08:16.

it will publish a strategy that will outline what more it will do

:08:17.:08:22.

to help vulnerable young carers. There's an argument that

:08:23.:08:25.

being young and responsible for someone's well-being is a duty

:08:26.:08:37.

that's just too much. But in many of these cases,

:08:38.:08:39.

there is little choice. Sometimes he doesn't

:08:40.:08:42.

listen to anyone else. But if I tell him to do it,

:08:43.:08:43.

he will listen to me. And when I tell people about it,

:08:44.:08:46.

it just makes me feel proud. Sima Kotecha, BBC News

:08:47.:08:54.

in the West Midlands. The president of General Motors -

:08:55.:08:59.

which owns Vauxhall in the UK - has flown to London to hold crisis

:09:00.:09:02.

talks with the government and unions, amid fears

:09:03.:09:04.

that thousands of jobs A rival French company is in talks

:09:05.:09:07.

with General Motors about taking over its European business,

:09:08.:09:14.

but there's concern about what that would mean for Vauxhall's plants

:09:15.:09:17.

in Luton and Ellesmore Port. Our Business Editor Simon Jack

:09:18.:09:20.

is in Westminster. Those plants employ

:09:21.:09:22.

more than 4000 people. I think quite worried, because I can

:09:23.:09:36.

tell you the government is taking this threat of deadly seriously.

:09:37.:09:40.

After meeting the president of General Motors here today at the

:09:41.:09:44.

Department of business behind me, this Secretary Greg Clark got an EU

:09:45.:09:47.

row start train to Paris and is meeting with his opposite number in

:09:48.:09:52.

Paris, as we speak, the industrial minister. He will then meet the

:09:53.:09:58.

board of PSA, deep company that owns citron and Peugeot. This may come

:09:59.:10:04.

down to a 3-way fight between the French, German and British

:10:05.:10:09.

governments. In that fight, the French government owns 14% of

:10:10.:10:13.

Peugeot. The Peugeot family on another 14%, so there will be a

:10:14.:10:16.

distinguished French feel to this company. You have to feel that

:10:17.:10:22.

sacked in German auto engineers is considered three times more

:10:23.:10:26.

expensive. With 24 combined plants across continental Europe, with two

:10:27.:10:31.

in the UK, it's clear Greg Clark the Business Secretary will have to turn

:10:32.:10:34.

on the charm he did with Nissan to persuade them to stay in the UK. But

:10:35.:10:41.

that three could fight he has, it's a bit of a mountain to climb.

:10:42.:10:42.

A suicide bomber has attacked a crowded Sufi shrine

:10:43.:10:44.

in southern Pakistan, killing at least 50 people

:10:45.:10:46.

So-called Islamic State has claimed responsibility for the attack.

:10:47.:10:50.

It is the largest in a string of bombings by militants

:10:51.:10:52.

The Islamic State group has also claimed responsibility for a huge

:10:53.:11:02.

car bomb in the Iraqi capital, Baghdad.

:11:03.:11:03.

45 people died and at least 50 were injured in the blast

:11:04.:11:06.

which targeted a used car market in the southern district of Bayaa.

:11:07.:11:09.

It's the third car bomb attack in as many days,

:11:10.:11:11.

The new US Secretary of State, Rex Tillerson, has held his first

:11:12.:11:19.

face to face meeting with his Russian counterpart.

:11:20.:11:22.

It comes in the wake of turmoil in the White House over alleged

:11:23.:11:25.

links between the Trump administration and the

:11:26.:11:27.

Rex Tillerson also held talks with the foreign secretary,

:11:28.:11:33.

Boris Johnson, as part of a G20 summit in Germany.

:11:34.:11:36.

From Bonn our diplomatic correspondent, James

:11:37.:11:37.

Rex Tillerson's first day overseas as Donald Trump's top diplomat,

:11:38.:11:46.

and it's been the toughest of starts with Washington in turmoil over

:11:47.:11:49.

links to Russia and much of the outside world worrying

:11:50.:11:51.

where America's foreign policy could be heading.

:11:52.:11:57.

Top priority for the new Secretary of State - reassurance.

:11:58.:11:59.

Russia, he said, won't dictate to Washington.

:12:00.:12:02.

Where we do not see eye to eye, the United States will stand up

:12:03.:12:06.

for the interest and values of America and her allies.

:12:07.:12:11.

And this was the crucial first meeting, America's novice diplomat,

:12:12.:12:15.

although experienced in commercial dealings with President Putin,

:12:16.:12:19.

face-to-face with Russia's veteran Foreign Minister,

:12:20.:12:22.

Sergei Lavrov, eager to deny any Moscow wrong-doing.

:12:23.:12:27.

You should know that we do not interfere in domestic

:12:28.:12:29.

But if that was meant to close the issue of alleged

:12:30.:12:33.

Russian interference in the United States, it didn't.

:12:34.:12:36.

At Nato headquarters, America's Defence Secretary seemed

:12:37.:12:38.

REPORTER: Do you believe that the Russians interfered

:12:39.:12:43.

Right now, I would just say there's very little doubt that they've

:12:44.:12:50.

either interfered or they've attempted to interfere in a number

:12:51.:12:54.

So, could Boris Johnson somehow help America out?

:12:55.:13:00.

The Foreign Secretary came closest to making his new friend,

:13:01.:13:04.

Rex Tillerson, laugh at their first meeting.

:13:05.:13:09.

Afterwards, the Foreign Secretary told me they'd had a terrific

:13:10.:13:12.

conversation, he had no worries at all about the United

:13:13.:13:14.

We don't want to get into a new Cold War,

:13:15.:13:17.

that's something that London and Washington are

:13:18.:13:23.

I think that goes for all our European allies as well.

:13:24.:13:27.

But nor do we want to allow Russian behaviour to continue

:13:28.:13:29.

as it is and Rex Tillerson's been very clear about that.

:13:30.:13:35.

There are plenty of countries represented at this meeting

:13:36.:13:38.

They remain deeply anxious about the Trump administration,

:13:39.:13:43.

its policy towards Russia and the Middle East,

:13:44.:13:46.

over climate change, and the host of this global

:13:47.:13:49.

gathering, Germany, well, its leader, Chancellor Merkel,

:13:50.:13:53.

is blunt - no one country, she says, can solve the world's

:13:54.:13:55.

A 15 year old girl has pleaded not guilty to the murder of a 7 year

:13:56.:14:07.

Katie Rough was found with severe injuries

:14:08.:14:10.

on a playing field, and died later in hospital.

:14:11.:14:15.

The teenager accused of killing her appeared

:14:16.:14:16.

at Leeds Crown Court this

:14:17.:14:18.

morning via videolink - charged with murder,

:14:19.:14:19.

This month we've been focussing on the pressures

:14:20.:14:24.

on the health service - particularly the crisis

:14:25.:14:26.

in social care brought about by the Uk's ageing population.

:14:27.:14:30.

Many say the key to solving it is greater cooperation

:14:31.:14:33.

between health and social care services - an approach that has been

:14:34.:14:36.

in place in Northern Ireland for many years with care provided

:14:37.:14:39.

for some patients at home rather than in hospital.

:14:40.:14:41.

Here's our Ireland correspondent Chris Buckler.

:14:42.:14:46.

Hour after hour, people arrive at hospitals looking for treatment.

:14:47.:14:54.

And to ease that constant pressure, staff need to find ways

:14:55.:14:59.

of keeping some patients away from this building.

:15:00.:15:01.

In his living room, Thomas Wright is seeing a doctor.

:15:02.:15:06.

In his kitchen a nurse is preparing his antibiotics.

:15:07.:15:09.

Yet in the past, and even now, many 97-year-olds would be

:15:10.:15:12.

on their way to hospital for this kind of care.

:15:13.:15:14.

We actually got the call from the paramedic when he was in

:15:15.:15:17.

the back of the ambulance on his way to hospital.

:15:18.:15:19.

They rang us first and we said, look, why don't we see him at home?

:15:20.:15:23.

So we came straight out and saw him here with his son.

:15:24.:15:26.

He was delighted not to have to make that journey.

:15:27.:15:28.

In Northern Ireland, like elsewhere around the UK,

:15:29.:15:32.

operations are regularly having to be cancelled because beds

:15:33.:15:34.

Now we have all year round pressures.

:15:35.:15:42.

And we have such a stretch on beds that we are often unable

:15:43.:15:46.

Waiting lists in Northern Ireland are already among the longest

:15:47.:15:50.

in the UK, and in recent months politicians have warned the health

:15:51.:15:52.

At the end of last year they published this,

:15:53.:15:56.

a 10-year plan to try to change the way services are delivered.

:15:57.:15:59.

And with this report came a stark warning -

:16:00.:16:02.

currently, of the total amount of money that Stormont

:16:03.:16:05.

has for public spending in Northern Ireland,

:16:06.:16:06.

health and social care takes up around half.

:16:07.:16:10.

Ministers say unless there is significant change,

:16:11.:16:11.

that figure will rise to 90% of the total budget within a decade.

:16:12.:16:19.

It's already showing signs of struggle, financially

:16:20.:16:25.

showing signs of struggle, showing signs of struggle

:16:26.:16:28.

in terms of waiting times, and those will both exacerbate

:16:29.:16:30.

Unlike other parts of the UK, for decades here there's been one

:16:31.:16:36.

budget for both health and social care.

:16:37.:16:38.

It can make it easier to offer joined up services.

:16:39.:16:43.

Mervyn has been waiting years for a kidney transplant

:16:44.:16:47.

but with support he's able to look after his own dialysis

:16:48.:16:49.

It's different to the treatment he would get 20 miles away

:16:50.:16:55.

at hospital in Newry, but there are advantages

:16:56.:16:57.

It's probably at least a third, maybe in some

:16:58.:17:03.

cases half as expensive to deliver home dialysis.

:17:04.:17:12.

And money is a concern for the busy health service in Northern Ireland.

:17:13.:17:17.

Where the collapse of the power-sharing government has

:17:18.:17:19.

created uncertainty, not just for politics

:17:20.:17:20.

More misery for Southern Rail passengers as drivers go

:17:21.:17:30.

against their union and refuse to accept a deal to end the dispute

:17:31.:17:37.

Still to come, we'll be live here in Portsmouth Naval dockyard to mark

:17:38.:17:45.

100 years of the Wrens. Swapping the Premier League

:17:46.:17:49.

for the Middle East. After taking charge of three

:17:50.:17:52.

major finals in 2016, referee Mark Clattenburg quits

:17:53.:17:54.

English football to take up It's more than 150,000 million

:17:55.:17:57.

million miles away from earth - now an international team

:17:58.:18:08.

of scientist is determined to try to photograph

:18:09.:18:10.

the supermassive black hole that they believe is at

:18:11.:18:12.

the centre of our galaxy. So they've built what's effectively

:18:13.:18:17.

the world's biggest telescope. Our Science Correspondent,

:18:18.:18:21.

Pallab Ghosh has had exclusive access to this ambitious project

:18:22.:18:22.

underway in America. A swirl of stars and planets

:18:23.:18:29.

including our own Earth. At its centre it has

:18:30.:18:36.

a heart of darkness, It's an object with immense gravity

:18:37.:18:38.

that pulls in everything around it. It's so strong that it

:18:39.:18:47.

even sucks in light. In a few weeks' time,

:18:48.:18:52.

researchers here will try So, there's a tonne of excitement

:18:53.:18:54.

around getting this picture. We are all really looking forward

:18:55.:19:01.

to getting the data in April And not only because it's

:19:02.:19:04.

going to be super cool to take the first picture of a black hole,

:19:05.:19:10.

and see it looks like, the immediate environment

:19:11.:19:13.

around a black hole, So how are scientists down

:19:14.:19:14.

here on earth going to see the black No single telescope is powerful

:19:15.:19:19.

enough, so 12 of them, all around the world,

:19:20.:19:25.

will be linked together, and the images they collect will be

:19:26.:19:27.

fed into a computer in Boston. Now, our galaxy is a vast

:19:28.:19:31.

spiral with the earth here on one of the arms,

:19:32.:19:33.

and the black hole is right at the centre,

:19:34.:19:38.

153,000 million million miles away. It's four and a half million times

:19:39.:19:43.

the mass of our sun. No one has ever seen it

:19:44.:19:47.

but scientists think it looks And very soon they'll find

:19:48.:19:51.

out if they're right. It's a mind-boggling amount of data

:19:52.:19:59.

stored on dozens of hard drives flown in from telescopes

:20:00.:20:03.

all across the world. It will take the team here months

:20:04.:20:06.

to go through all the information. The project is the brainchild

:20:07.:20:10.

of Professor Shep Doeleman, who has waited 20 years

:20:11.:20:15.

for this moment. Black holes have been

:20:16.:20:17.

mysteries forever. It's been almost a holy grail

:20:18.:20:20.

for astronomers to be able to image and probe the area right around

:20:21.:20:25.

the point of no return, What we're going to learn is how

:20:26.:20:27.

black holes feed and swallow some The scientists here may

:20:28.:20:33.

have their first image by Christmas. And it'll help them discover how

:20:34.:20:37.

galaxies are created and what the centre of our own

:20:38.:20:40.

Milky Way is really like. While we've been on on air,

:20:41.:20:42.

Donald Trump has been giving his first solo

:20:43.:20:56.

press conference since He's used it to launch another

:20:57.:20:58.

attack on the media, The press has become so dishonest

:20:59.:21:11.

that if we don't talk about it, we are doing a tremendous disservice to

:21:12.:21:15.

the American people. Tremendous disservice. We have to talk about it

:21:16.:21:22.

to find out what is going on because the press, honestly, the level of

:21:23.:21:28.

dishonesty is out of control. Our Washington correspondent was

:21:29.:21:30.

listening, more sharp words for the media, what else did he have to say?

:21:31.:21:35.

Extraordinary moment. We got about one hour notice this was going to

:21:36.:21:39.

happen, it came pretty much out of the blue. He's not given to doing

:21:40.:21:43.

press conferences, he's controlled them very, closely. We had a sort of

:21:44.:21:48.

meandering account of his first almost four weeks in government,

:21:49.:21:52.

almost a mixture of what he did in the campaign and some of the things

:21:53.:21:56.

he's done since. He said he'd done more than any other president had

:21:57.:22:00.

done in the amount of time. He rejected claims that the White House

:22:01.:22:04.

was in chaos. He said it was a fine tuned machine that was running in

:22:05.:22:09.

the White House at the moment. He introduced the new Labour secretary

:22:10.:22:13.

nominee, one of those pulled out last night, and that is in a week

:22:14.:22:17.

where he lost his National Security Agency. He also told us that the

:22:18.:22:25.

controversial executive order that banned people from those seven

:22:26.:22:27.

predominantly Muslim countries from coming into America for 90 days has

:22:28.:22:32.

been caught up in the courts, has been put on hold by the courts. He's

:22:33.:22:37.

promised to redraft that and issue a new one of those next week, as he

:22:38.:22:41.

puts it, to protect the American people. He promised that would

:22:42.:22:45.

happen this week. It's going to happen next week now. He's just

:22:46.:22:50.

about to start to take questions from reporters. We'll see whether he

:22:51.:22:54.

takes any from unfriendly organisations or those who are less

:22:55.:23:00.

friendly towards him. The first question he answered, he said that

:23:01.:23:03.

Michael Flynn had effectively lost his job because of the actions of

:23:04.:23:07.

the media. Gary O'Donoghue with the latest from the White House, thank

:23:08.:23:09.

you. In Wales more patients are having

:23:10.:23:13.

to wait over 12 hours at accident and emergency units -

:23:14.:23:16.

than a year ago. In January 4,000 patients

:23:17.:23:18.

were left waiting compared The proportion of patients waiting

:23:19.:23:20.

less than four hours held steady, according

:23:21.:23:23.

to the latest monthly figures. Plans by former footballers Ryan

:23:24.:23:36.

Giggs and Gary Neville to redevelop areas of Manchester would erase the

:23:37.:23:42.

history of the area. Historic England said the area which includes

:23:43.:23:46.

two skyscrapers and a five story hotel threatens the area history.

:23:47.:23:51.

The former Manchester United players claim the development would

:23:52.:23:52.

transform the area. They're famously known as the Wrens

:23:53.:23:54.

- the women's royal naval service - which was founded 100 years ago

:23:55.:23:57.

during World War One. It was the start of a huge change

:23:58.:23:59.

in the role women played Wrens initially served as cooks,

:24:00.:24:03.

stewards and dispatch riders but they went on to play other

:24:04.:24:06.

key roles in the Navy, during the Second

:24:07.:24:09.

World War, and beyond. Our Correspondent Duncan Kennedy

:24:10.:24:11.

is in Portsmouth, where events You know the story of the Wrens has

:24:12.:24:25.

never really been told in a full major exhibition like this,

:24:26.:24:29.

especially their lives and achievements. Royal Navy was of

:24:30.:24:33.

course the first of the three services to officially recognise

:24:34.:24:37.

women like this. And now 100 years after the formation of the Wrens,

:24:38.:24:39.

their story has been told in full. At 90 years old, Win Price still has

:24:40.:24:43.

an affection for the sea. And the Wrens who hold sway

:24:44.:24:46.

over her maritime memories that first began when she joined

:24:47.:24:48.

as a 17-year-old in 1944. They had cooks and

:24:49.:24:52.

stewards they wanted. Well, I couldn't cook,

:24:53.:25:05.

so I opted for a steward. Proud then, and honoured now to be

:25:06.:25:07.

celebrating 100 years of the Wrens. No, the ones before

:25:08.:25:10.

me were pioneers! The Women's Royal Naval Service

:25:11.:25:30.

was formed in 1917. By the Second World War they had

:25:31.:25:37.

become the home front force that Now a century of achievements

:25:38.:25:42.

are charted in this new exhibition. The strength of this exhibition lies

:25:43.:25:51.

in its detail and the telling This is the leave permit

:25:52.:25:54.

for a Jane Rossiter, it's dated December 1918,

:25:55.:26:06.

was obviously going But then we know that Jane

:26:07.:26:08.

subsequently left the Navy and then re-enlisted at the outbreak

:26:09.:26:11.

of the Second World War. Here we have her

:26:12.:26:14.

identity book for that. In 100 years women sailors have gone

:26:15.:26:16.

from medics to Marines, They had to prove themselves,

:26:17.:26:25.

which they did really well. After that it was for the other

:26:26.:26:31.

women to embrace that change, and they took it forward,

:26:32.:26:34.

and it's continued to go forward. Now called sailors, not

:26:35.:26:37.

wrens, women's have seen And for those like Win Price,

:26:38.:26:38.

the exhibition is a proud salute Duncan Kennedy, BBC News,

:26:39.:26:49.

Portsmouth Harbour. Not a huge amount of sunshine today

:26:50.:27:01.

but some amongst the showers in Scotland, a rainbow looking out

:27:02.:27:07.

towards Perth and sunny spells in Essex. In Northern Ireland it turned

:27:08.:27:11.

wetter and we've seen outbreaks of rain through Wales, north-west

:27:12.:27:13.

England, edging through the Midlands towards East Anglia. As the night

:27:14.:27:18.

goes on, some of that showing up in south-east England. You can pick up

:27:19.:27:24.

the dam zone here overnight. North of that becoming dry, clearing skies

:27:25.:27:32.

in Scotland, chilly overnight, top shelf frost for some, and fog

:27:33.:27:34.

patches developing in southern Scotland could be slow to clear. We

:27:35.:27:40.

still have this damp zone tomorrow morning but by the afternoon any

:27:41.:27:45.

rain left will be patchy in nature into western Scotland, and the rest

:27:46.:27:48.

of us will have a mainly dry Friday afternoon. The best of the sunshine

:27:49.:27:53.

in Scotland will be in the east and I stayed to north-east England.

:27:54.:27:57.

Increasing clouds in Northern Ireland. Lighter winds across the

:27:58.:28:01.

northern half, so although temperatures a degree or so down it

:28:02.:28:04.

will not feel different to today. Outbreaks of rain reaching West

:28:05.:28:09.

Wales and the far south-west of England. Brightening up, south-east

:28:10.:28:17.

England staying rather cloudy. A week weather front coming as we

:28:18.:28:20.

start off on Saturday, when speaking up across the northern half of the

:28:21.:28:25.

UK again. Quite wet in western Scotland at Saturday begins but it

:28:26.:28:28.

will ease as the rain edges further south. To the south of that the bulk

:28:29.:28:34.

of England and Wales staying dry. On Sunday breezy across-the-board and

:28:35.:28:37.

wet again in north-west Scotland. Some sunny spells elsewhere. Mild,

:28:38.:28:42.

potentially the start of next week very mild.

:28:43.:28:46.