09/02/2017 Breakfast


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09/02/2017

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This is Breakfast, with Charlie Stayt and Steph

:00:00.:00:07.

Record waiting times at A departments in English hospitals,

:00:08.:00:12.

according to figures seen by the BBC.

:00:13.:00:14.

Emergency departments suffered their worst performance

:00:15.:00:16.

last month, since the target to see patients within four hours

:00:17.:00:19.

The ayes to the right, 494, the left, 122.

:00:20.:00:59.

As Theresa May gets the all-clear to trigger Article 50,

:01:00.:01:02.

the Labour leader, Jeremy Corbyn, will be here to tell us

:01:03.:01:05.

what he wants to see from the Brexit negotiations.

:01:06.:01:08.

How a new law to tackle rogue landlords is failing to protect

:01:09.:01:11.

tenants from so-called "revenge evictions."

:01:12.:01:13.

Should you be able to access your late partner's pension

:01:14.:01:17.

A landmark ruling says "yes," paving the way to more pension freedoms.

:01:18.:01:21.

And it could affect millions of workers.

:01:22.:01:23.

Leicester have their first home win of the year.

:01:24.:01:27.

Demarai Gray scores in extra time to help them beat Derby in their FA

:01:28.:01:31.

You said you went home and you kissed your boy, you hugged your

:01:32.:01:47.

boy. Weren't you doing that before? I've been talking fatherhood,

:01:48.:01:49.

fake news, and the changing face of US politics, with

:01:50.:01:51.

Denzel Washington. Good morning. A cold day you had.

:01:52.:01:58.

The best of the sunshine in the west. Central and eastern areas,

:01:59.:02:01.

more cloud, some showers, and quite windy for some as well. All the

:02:02.:02:10.

details in about 30 minutes. Thank you, Carol. See you soon.

:02:11.:02:13.

Accident and Emergency departments in England last month

:02:14.:02:17.

had their worst waiting time performance since

:02:18.:02:19.

That's according to provisional figures leaked to the BBC.

:02:20.:02:22.

The data also suggests that record numbers of patients have had to wait

:02:23.:02:26.

on trolleys for a bed to become available.

:02:27.:02:28.

With more here's our health correspondent, Dominic Hughes.

:02:29.:02:39.

For months, A departments across England have been struggling. We

:02:40.:02:48.

were given access to the raw Royal Blackburn Hospital. The difficulty

:02:49.:02:54.

was easy to see. It is a similar picture across England. Provisional

:02:55.:02:59.

figures appeared to show that last month, 82% of patients were treated,

:03:00.:03:04.

admitted, and discharged within four hours, the worst performance since

:03:05.:03:08.

the target of 95% was produced in 2004. 780 patients waited more than

:03:09.:03:15.

12 hours for a bed after being admitted to hospital, known as a

:03:16.:03:20.

trolley wait, again the worst on record. If the figures are correct,

:03:21.:03:31.

it shows the degree of pressure the NHS is under, despite huge efforts

:03:32.:03:37.

from 1.4 million staff. The NHS is really struggling to cope with extra

:03:38.:03:42.

demand, record levels of demand. These figures are the worst since

:03:43.:03:49.

the four hour A target was introduced. It shows the pressure.

:03:50.:03:53.

The NHS in Scotland is coping better. But similar issues affect

:03:54.:03:57.

Wales and Northern Ireland. Symptoms of the pressure building across

:03:58.:04:03.

health and social care. NHS sources acknowledged the system is facing

:04:04.:04:06.

unprecedented demand. The latest figures suggest there is little sign

:04:07.:04:12.

of respite. Dominic Hughes, BBC News.

:04:13.:04:13.

We'll be speaking to the President of the Royal College

:04:14.:04:16.

of Emergency Medicine about the figures just

:04:17.:04:18.

The Government has told the House of Lords not to block Brexit

:04:19.:04:22.

after MPs overwhelmingly backed the bill to trigger Article 50,

:04:23.:04:25.

The Brexit Secretary, David Davis, called on peers

:04:26.:04:29.

to "do their patriotic duty" and pass the legislation.

:04:30.:04:31.

More than 50 Labour MPs defied the three-line whip imposed

:04:32.:04:34.

by their leader, Jeremy Corbyn, and voted against the bill.

:04:35.:04:37.

Here's our political correspondent, Tom Bateman.

:04:38.:04:48.

The message was clear. MPs gave their overwhelming support for

:04:49.:04:54.

Theresa May's plan to get on with Brexit talks. It is an historic vote

:04:55.:05:03.

today. It got through with a large majority. It has carried out the

:05:04.:05:08.

will of the British people. That is what Parliament has done today. Just

:05:09.:05:15.

137 words long, the bill, very simple, telling us we have to do

:05:16.:05:21.

what the people wanted. Some people for the bill all the way. They lost,

:05:22.:05:25.

but they sung the European anthem in defiance. The threat of a

:05:26.:05:35.

Conservative rebellion fell away, but 52 Labour MPs, including Clive

:05:36.:05:40.

Lewis, a shadow cabinet minister, defined Jeremy Corbyn to vote

:05:41.:05:49.

against the bill. -- defied. What you have done is allow a stitch up

:05:50.:06:01.

on the 21st century equivalent of a con job. Theresa May left after the

:06:02.:06:07.

vote clearing a first hurdle in Parliament. Now the bill goes to the

:06:08.:06:11.

House of Lords, where it may need yet more opposition. Tom Bateman,

:06:12.:06:13.

BBC News, Westminster. And picking up on that

:06:14.:06:15.

House of Lords process, our political correspondent,

:06:16.:06:17.

Carol Walker, is in Westminster this We move onto the next step. Talk us

:06:18.:06:29.

through what will happen. There will be a huge amount of pressure on

:06:30.:06:33.

gears to let this bill goes through and complete its passage through

:06:34.:06:37.

Parliament swiftly. -- peers. Downing Street sources have made it

:06:38.:06:41.

clear if the Lord's tried to disrupt this process they could face calls

:06:42.:06:45.

to be abolished. Now, I don't think that will stop peers from putting

:06:46.:06:51.

down amendments, the government does not have a majority, but any delays

:06:52.:06:55.

and changes will be minor and they will be able to see that off and

:06:56.:06:58.

stick to their timetable for triggering Article 50 by the end of

:06:59.:07:03.

March. The biggest immediate problem is facing the Labour leader Jeremy

:07:04.:07:07.

Corbyn. He has four positions in his shadow cabinet to feel and must

:07:08.:07:10.

decide whether to take action against more than a dozen junior MPs

:07:11.:07:16.

who voted against the bill and his wishes. That has laid bare the huge

:07:17.:07:21.

divisions within the Labour Party. Carol, thank you.

:07:22.:07:22.

Just after 8am, we'll be discussing this with Labour leader,

:07:23.:07:25.

A new law designed to help protect people in England from so-called

:07:26.:07:29.

"revenge evictions" by rogue landlords isn't working,

:07:30.:07:31.

according to senior MPs and housing lawyers.

:07:32.:07:32.

A BBC Freedom of Information request has revealed that there may be

:07:33.:07:36.

hundreds of thousands of vulnerable tenants,

:07:37.:07:37.

afraid to report things like damp, faulty electrics and broken boilers,

:07:38.:07:40.

Things like damp faulty electrics and broken boilers can all badly

:07:41.:07:55.

But here in Leeds, there's a concern many are too scared to complain

:07:56.:08:01.

in case their landlord kicks them out.

:08:02.:08:08.

This is rented out as private rented accommodation,

:08:09.:08:10.

People are paying to rent here, making complaints, nothing happening

:08:11.:08:14.

and they could be under the threat of revenge eviction.

:08:15.:08:16.

That's the reason why they're not coming forward

:08:17.:08:18.

And that's exactly what happened to Helen.

:08:19.:08:22.

Her and her family were hit with a revenge eviction.

:08:23.:08:24.

After months of complaining, we got a firm of solicitors

:08:25.:08:32.

in who deal with properties in these states of disrepair.

:08:33.:08:36.

They checked the property and they agreed it was damp

:08:37.:08:39.

So they wrote to our landlord and instructed that work needed

:08:40.:08:45.

And within a week of him receiving that, we received a Section 21

:08:46.:08:51.

eviction notice pushed under our door.

:08:52.:08:52.

Because of what happened to people like Helen,

:08:53.:08:54.

a new law was introduced in October 2015 to try to stop retaliatory

:08:55.:08:58.

But we've seen exclusive figures gathered in a freedom of information

:08:59.:09:12.

request gathered from hundreds of councils right across England

:09:13.:09:14.

that show more than half haven't stopped any at all.

:09:15.:09:17.

More than a quarter don't even record figures and fewer than one

:09:18.:09:20.

The Government says "revenge evictions" are rare,

:09:21.:09:25.

and thanks to its new law, councils have all the powers

:09:26.:09:27.

they need to stop them.

:09:28.:09:32.

The Labour peer who campaigned for unaccompanied migrant children

:09:33.:09:36.

to come to the UK, has said the Government's decision to stop

:09:37.:09:39.

When the Dubs Scheme was introduced last year,

:09:40.:09:43.

campaigners hoped thousands of children would benefit,

:09:44.:09:44.

but the actual numbers have been much lower.

:09:45.:09:46.

Vulnerable and scared. Many children remain in camps across Europe. An

:09:47.:09:57.

estimated 90,000 all alone without family. Following intense pressure

:09:58.:10:03.

last year, the then Prime Minister David Cameron introduced a programme

:10:04.:10:07.

to give century to some. Campaigners had hoped 3000 unaccompanied

:10:08.:10:15.

children with no links to the UK would benefit. Instead, 350 will be

:10:16.:10:20.

taken in before this scheme ends next month. It was designed by Lord

:10:21.:10:32.

Dubs, a former refugee who fled from the Nazis himself. I was in Greece.

:10:33.:10:39.

Desperate conditions. Many unaccompanied children who are

:10:40.:10:43.

bitterly cold and miserable We need to help them. There has been

:10:44.:10:47.

widespread condemnation. Opposition parties have called the move a

:10:48.:10:50.

betrayal of vulnerable children and British values, and called on the

:10:51.:10:55.

government to revive the Dubs Ammendment. Some were taken to this

:10:56.:11:00.

place in Devon. The Home Office says it is a matter of resources, the

:11:01.:11:04.

balance between enabling children to enter the country, while ensuring

:11:05.:11:07.

that local councils have the capacity to look after them.

:11:08.:11:09.

Alexander Mackenzie, BBC News. The US Senate has approved

:11:10.:11:11.

President Trump's choice Mr Trump criticised

:11:12.:11:13.

efforts by Democrats Mr Sessions was denied a post

:11:14.:11:16.

as a federal judge in the 1980s, when he was accused of racism,

:11:17.:11:21.

though he's always denied Tributes have continued to be paid

:11:22.:11:24.

to Tara Palmer-Tomkinson The actress and model became

:11:25.:11:29.

an "it-girl" in the 90s and wrote about her life as an aristocrat

:11:30.:11:34.

and her close ties to She was found dead in her London

:11:35.:11:37.

home after revealing that she had a brain tumour in

:11:38.:11:41.

November last year. Jane Austin's Mr Darcy from Pride

:11:42.:11:45.

and Prejudice is one of the most admired and romantic leading men

:11:46.:11:49.

in literary history. When Colin Firth played him

:11:50.:11:51.

he was famously tall, dark and handsome, but that

:11:52.:11:53.

might not have been the case This portrait by British academics

:11:54.:11:56.

paints a very different picture of Mr Darcy, giving him a pale face,

:11:57.:12:00.

powdered white hair, He's a far cry from the brooding

:12:01.:12:03.

Mr Darcy created by filmmakers. Yes. Umm there you go. You can see

:12:04.:12:27.

the contrast. LAUGHING. What did they say, a powdered... A powdered

:12:28.:12:31.

face. What is wrong with a powdered face? And fair hair. No tan because

:12:32.:12:42.

you are always inside. He looked a little bit like you. Why are you

:12:43.:12:47.

doing that are you thinking Hmm? What have you got going on was

:12:48.:12:54.

-- on? Leicester have their first home win of the year. They are one

:12:55.:13:02.

point above the relegation zone in the Premier League.

:13:03.:13:08.

3-1 in their FA Cup Fourth Round replay.

:13:09.:13:11.

Demari Gray scoring the pick of the goals.

:13:12.:13:14.

MPs will debate the Football Association's failure

:13:15.:13:16.

It follows a motion of "no confidence" in the governing body.

:13:17.:13:20.

Parliament will examine whether the FA can "comply fully

:13:21.:13:22.

Hundreds of mourners gathered in Wolverhampton yesterday

:13:23.:13:25.

for the funeral of former England women's cricket captain,

:13:26.:13:27.

A pioneer in women's cricket, she died aged 77 last month

:13:28.:13:31.

British snowsports are aiming to become one of the world's top

:13:32.:13:39.

five skiing and snowboarding nations by 2030.

:13:40.:13:41.

The winter Olympics take place in PyeongChang South Korea in one

:13:42.:13:44.

year and UK Sport says Great Britain can achieve its best ever Winter

:13:45.:13:47.

That is quite a long time to wait for your target, 2030. Why have they

:13:48.:14:07.

become so good at winter sports at the moment? Used to have to on a dry

:14:08.:14:15.

ski slope. There are many more with new indoor ones. And there is snow

:14:16.:14:23.

on the mountains by Carol. Is that the Grampians? This is a librarian

:14:24.:14:29.

picture. I knew you were going to ask me where it was. Sorry. May be

:14:30.:14:36.

some Malay like Yorkshire. -- somewhere like.

:14:37.:14:42.

Calls are today and cloudy across central and eastern areas. We will

:14:43.:14:50.

see showers, rain, sleet and snow. A blocking area of high pressure in

:14:51.:14:53.

the continent with wind moving around that coming from a cold sauce

:14:54.:14:58.

is sweeping across our shores so it is a cold start. In western Scotland

:14:59.:15:01.

you will see some sunshine this morning but it is cold and frosty.

:15:02.:15:05.

Down the east coast where we have the wintry showers, the risk of ice.

:15:06.:15:09.

A sunny start across north-west England, but a cold one and as we

:15:10.:15:13.

come down the east coast and inland we are looking on the coast at a

:15:14.:15:18.

mixture of rain and sleet. Inland it is a mixture of sleet and snow.

:15:19.:15:22.

Showers across the south, not as cold but still cold and as we drift

:15:23.:15:26.

towards the south-west you are under clearer skies but not as cold. Four

:15:27.:15:31.

degrees, will not feel warm if you are stepping outside. More cloud as

:15:32.:15:35.

we push inland and for Northern Ireland a bit more cloud as well

:15:36.:15:40.

stop temperatures at 7am right about four degrees in Belfast. Through the

:15:41.:15:45.

course of the day the lion's share of the sunshine will be out of the

:15:46.:15:49.

west, where it will be windy. Gales in the west, they will ease a touch

:15:50.:15:53.

during the day but a cold wind lowing in those showers. Coming out

:15:54.:15:57.

the cloud in central and eastern areas. Because they are showers not

:15:58.:16:01.

all of us will see one but they will have a wintry element to them

:16:02.:16:04.

inland. Through the evening and overnight it will be windy. We will

:16:05.:16:08.

have some showers strolling along the south of England here and there

:16:09.:16:12.

will be wintry across the Grampians, the Pennines and the east of the

:16:13.:16:16.

country as well. It is a cold night, and where the skies remain clear

:16:17.:16:19.

across north-west Scotland we are looking at a frost but frost

:16:20.:16:23.

shouldn't be a problem for much of the UK. That leaves us into

:16:24.:16:29.

tomorrow. Tomorrow once again we are looking at some snow showers, again

:16:30.:16:32.

coming in from the east. On the coast, rain, sleet and snow as we

:16:33.:16:36.

push inland. Not all of us will see them but across Orkney and Shetland

:16:37.:16:40.

we could see as much as five or six centimetres, just over two inches.

:16:41.:16:44.

Those are the kind of temperature values but if you are in the wind it

:16:45.:16:49.

will feel colder than those temperatures are suggesting. As we

:16:50.:16:54.

head on into Saturday we have a similar combination of rain and

:16:55.:16:57.

sleet in the coast, snow showers as we push inland. The change of wind

:16:58.:17:00.

direction to the north-easterly, still feeling cold but some of the

:17:01.:17:04.

showers will blow over to the west so we will see some in Wales, the

:17:05.:17:08.

south-west of England and Northern Ireland, and a quick look at Sunday.

:17:09.:17:12.

A similar kind of story, still some snow showers around and it will feel

:17:13.:17:17.

raw if you are out in that wind. It is going to feel raw. It is going to

:17:18.:17:26.

feel roar! Shall we have a look at the papers? As many of the papers

:17:27.:17:33.

are this morning, the front page dominated by the vote last night.

:17:34.:17:37.

Worth pointing out that Jeremy Corbyn will be with us on the sofa

:17:38.:17:42.

just after 8am, many questions of course posed about his leadership or

:17:43.:17:46.

what he makes of what will happen in the Brexit negotiations. The Daily

:17:47.:17:51.

Express also talking about that vote, saying that MPs last night

:17:52.:17:58.

gave Theresa May the all clear to take Britain out of the EU, and

:17:59.:18:05.

Prince Charles with Tara Parker Thompson, who tragically died. The

:18:06.:18:09.

front page of the Times has some big brands and where the advertising

:18:10.:18:16.

ends up. And if you go inside, it explains a little bit about how it

:18:17.:18:20.

works and it is not the brands themselves who are choosing to

:18:21.:18:23.

advertise on the extremist videos but we don't all see the same advert

:18:24.:18:27.

only click on a video. The video player will look at what else we

:18:28.:18:31.

have been browsing for on the internet, it will find relevant ad

:18:32.:18:35.

and may be sure you one for a car, bank or retailer. That is how they

:18:36.:18:39.

are ending up on these sites. Google, which owns YouTube, has

:18:40.:18:43.

received is in place to stop it happening but some are clearly

:18:44.:18:48.

getting through. On the front page of the Daily Express a follow on

:18:49.:18:52.

with EU exit, time to get on with it, a theme from many of the papers

:18:53.:18:56.

this morning. And the Guardian this morning also with a picture of Tara

:18:57.:19:01.

Palmer-Tomkinson, and the story of anger and dismay greeting the

:19:02.:19:04.

announcement by the government that it will end its commitment to

:19:05.:19:10.

provide a lone child refugees in Europe. I know lots of people are

:19:11.:19:18.

enjoying the rugby at the moment, you included, Charlie. The Mirror

:19:19.:19:22.

have done a piece about Eddie Jones who has been compared to Brian

:19:23.:19:27.

Clough, because the thing about Eddie Jones is he has got that air

:19:28.:19:31.

of confidence. He exudes confidence the whole time and lows on into his

:19:32.:19:36.

players. He is quite clever at manipulating us, journalists. He has

:19:37.:19:42.

said his players are scared of playing Wales at home. Not all of

:19:43.:19:46.

them are scared of playing Wales at home, but it is the clever thing to

:19:47.:19:51.

say. He has said privately that he knows journalists want the headline

:19:52.:19:54.

and if you don't give them something to talk about they will talk about

:19:55.:19:58.

something else. He is deciding what they are going to talk about and

:19:59.:20:02.

giving them a new thing to say each day which keeps all of us distract

:20:03.:20:06.

that while he gets on with it. They are all into the idea of mind games,

:20:07.:20:11.

they? In the game on Saturday is at the Millennium Stadium. If I am

:20:12.:20:14.

remembering rightly I think the visiting team can request the roof

:20:15.:20:19.

to be close. He said so far they haven't decided whether they are

:20:20.:20:23.

going to request for the roof to be closed, they will wait and see. The

:20:24.:20:27.

big thing about closing the roof is it could give Wales an advantage, it

:20:28.:20:32.

makes it much noisier. It locks in the atmosphere. If you are there on

:20:33.:20:36.

the roof is closed, the atmosphere is unbelievable. This is a story we

:20:37.:20:41.

will cover letter in the programme, that Body Shop could be looking for

:20:42.:20:46.

a new owner. We can think of it as a touchy-feely local retailer but it

:20:47.:20:55.

is owned by Loreal, and it has been struggling on the high street. Sales

:20:56.:20:59.

have fallen, down about .5%. -- L'Oreal. We will talk about that

:21:00.:21:08.

just about eight a.m.. And this is about people who when they go home

:21:09.:21:11.

of an evening might feel a bit lonely, and now in Japan they have

:21:12.:21:18.

come up with a virtual grandmother who you can put on your TV who will

:21:19.:21:22.

chat to you while you are having your tea. You can interact with the

:21:23.:21:28.

granny. This old lady chats on the screen and creates the illusion of a

:21:29.:21:32.

family meal while you are at home. Does she tell you off and tell you

:21:33.:21:37.

you are doing everything wrong? She is critical of your cooking! It is a

:21:38.:21:44.

real person? There is this lady, who is the one who is being filmed, and

:21:45.:21:47.

it is connected to your smartphone and everything so you can interact

:21:48.:21:51.

and basically have a bit of company. It makes you feel better, that is

:21:52.:21:56.

all that matters, isn't it? She asked you if you slept well. Quite

:21:57.:21:59.

sweet, really, isn't it? Across the BBC this week,

:22:00.:22:02.

we have been looking We have met rural GPs working long

:22:03.:22:05.

hours, seen how cuts are affecting mental health provision,

:22:06.:22:10.

and investigated alternative ways Today, for our NHS Health Check,

:22:11.:22:12.

we follow a day in the life of Kathryn Carruthers,

:22:13.:22:17.

a matron at a busy emergency care It is chock-a-block. All those

:22:18.:22:34.

patients you can see are waiting and there is probably more patients,

:22:35.:22:37.

more patients here and more patients all down the corridor here.

:22:38.:22:40.

Everybody is trying but sometimes trying isn't enough, and you feel

:22:41.:22:43.

that everything is gridlocked. And that can be very frustrating. My

:22:44.:22:50.

name is Kathryn Carruthers. I'm the matron for emergency care here at

:22:51.:22:57.

this hospital. Where part of the emergency division. We try to see

:22:58.:23:04.

patients that need urgent care, and get treatment without the

:23:05.:23:14.

requirement for admission. A have already run this morning to see if

:23:15.:23:18.

we can take some patients that have been down there for quite sometime.

:23:19.:23:22.

We're at 100%. Staffing is a huge challenge. We don't always have the

:23:23.:23:26.

number of staff that we would like. OK, so will go to ED. It is busy.

:23:27.:23:35.

Lots of staff and patients and trolleys and relatives, who looks

:23:36.:23:40.

set up. They have been waiting, you can tell. Good morning. I Cathy, I'm

:23:41.:23:47.

the matron. I know you have been here for a very long time. For me,

:23:48.:23:52.

currently, this is probably the worst I have seen the NHS. When it

:23:53.:23:55.

is completely relentless, I think you do drain staff. Got a real

:23:56.:24:02.

problem, actually. There is a woman who has just moved, and she has a

:24:03.:24:10.

bowel instruction, and she can sit here all night in a chair. It is

:24:11.:24:13.

absolutely full, and nowhere to examine patients. Which is not the

:24:14.:24:18.

hospital's fault, it does its absolute best. Mayhem and bad.

:24:19.:24:25.

Sorry, do you mind if I take this call? High:. Two orthopaedic

:24:26.:24:34.

patients, a chap in a chair. -- hi, Colin. I had to wait, and wait and

:24:35.:24:41.

wait. Oh well. Looks like a movie now. You are not allergic to any

:24:42.:24:47.

medicine? It is almost the end of the day. My department ticked along

:24:48.:24:50.

quite nicely. I don't think it is sustainable to continue this amount

:24:51.:24:55.

of pressure. I am off training, I met an athletic club before going

:24:56.:25:00.

home and seeing to the rest of the family. And then back to do it all

:25:01.:25:05.

again. Back to do it all again tomorrow.

:25:06.:25:08.

Thank you to Kathryn Carruthers and her staff at Northwick Ealing

:25:09.:25:12.

Hospital. You can find out much more

:25:13.:25:14.

about the BBC's NHS Health Check series online, including a piece

:25:15.:25:17.

by our health correspondent Nick Triggle, who has analysed ten

:25:18.:25:20.

charts which show why, despite rising funding,

:25:21.:25:22.

the NHS is in trouble. You are watching

:25:23.:25:32.

Breakfast from BBC News. Still to come this morning:

:25:33.:25:33.

Denise Brewster was with her partner for ten years, but after he died,

:25:34.:25:36.

she was told she couldn't receive his pension

:25:37.:25:40.

because they weren't married. We will speak to a legal expert

:25:41.:25:42.

about how a Supreme Court ruling in her favour could now affect

:25:43.:25:45.

millions of unmarried couples. Time now to get the news,

:25:46.:25:50.

travel and weather where you are. I'm back with the latest

:25:51.:25:54.

from the BBC London newsroom Plenty more on our website

:25:55.:29:18.

at the usual address. This is Breakfast with

:29:19.:29:21.

Steph McGovern and Charlie Stayt. We'll bring you all the latest news

:29:22.:29:27.

and sport in a moment, Jeremy Corbyn says the "real fight

:29:28.:29:30.

starts now," after MPs overwhelming We'll be asking him what he wants

:29:31.:29:35.

to see from the negotiations New rules on child booster

:29:36.:29:39.

seats are on the way. But there's still confusion over

:29:40.:29:43.

who should be sitting in what. We'll try and get to the bottom

:29:44.:29:46.

of the new regulations Let me ask you a question. I am the

:29:47.:29:49.

journalist now. And Hollywood superstar,

:29:50.:30:01.

Denzel Washington, turned the tables and started interviewing

:30:02.:30:03.

Charlie when they met to discuss his new film

:30:04.:30:05.

"Fences" this week. But now, a summary of this

:30:06.:30:07.

morning's main news. Accident and Emergency departments

:30:08.:30:11.

in England last month suffered their worst waiting time

:30:12.:30:13.

performance since targets were introduced, according

:30:14.:30:16.

to provisional data leaked The figures also suggest that record

:30:17.:30:17.

numbers of patients have had to wait on trolleys for a bed

:30:18.:30:23.

to become available. The Department of Health insists

:30:24.:30:25.

the vast majority of patients We'll be speaking to the President

:30:26.:30:28.

of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine

:30:29.:30:34.

about the figures just after 7am. The Government has told the House

:30:35.:30:41.

of Lords not to block Brexit, after MPs overwhelmingly backed

:30:42.:30:44.

the bill to trigger Article 50, The Brexit Secretary,

:30:45.:30:47.

David Davis, called on peers to "do their patriotic duty"

:30:48.:30:51.

and pass the legislation. More than 50 Labour MPs defied

:30:52.:30:54.

the three-line whip imposed by their leader, Jeremy Corbyn,

:30:55.:30:56.

and voted against the bill. Our political correspondent,

:30:57.:30:59.

Carol Walker, is in Westminster this Carol, how much pressure

:31:00.:31:02.

will there be on the Lords not Brexit now moves on to the Lords.

:31:03.:31:20.

Talk us through it. There is huge pressure on the House of Lords to

:31:21.:31:24.

take heed of that. They will look at the authority the government had at

:31:25.:31:27.

the end of the vote last night. Downing Street sources have said if

:31:28.:31:32.

the Lord's tried to disrupt or change the process, they could call

:31:33.:31:35.

for the abolition. I think there will be a huge amount of pressure on

:31:36.:31:43.

peers to toe the line now. That will not stop amendments being put down

:31:44.:31:46.

and attempts to change the ruling. But ministers are confident they

:31:47.:31:50.

will get the bill through both chambers of Parliament in time to

:31:51.:31:55.

begin the formal Brexit negotiations by the end of March. The biggest

:31:56.:32:00.

immediate problem is the one facing the Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn. He

:32:01.:32:05.

has four positions to fill in his shadow cabinet after the resignation

:32:06.:32:11.

of Clive Lewis. He is deciding on the action to take on junior

:32:12.:32:14.

ministers who voted against the bill. Although his spokesman has

:32:15.:32:20.

dismissed rumours he may be thinking of standing down in the future, I

:32:21.:32:24.

think it is a big problem for the Labour Party when it has divisions

:32:25.:32:27.

laid bare on such an important issue. Carol, for the moment, thank

:32:28.:32:32.

you. A new law designed to help protect

:32:33.:32:38.

people in England from so-called "revenge evictions" by rogue

:32:39.:32:41.

landlords isn't working, according to senior MPs

:32:42.:32:43.

and housing lawyers. A BBC Freedom of Information request

:32:44.:32:45.

has revealed that there may be hundreds of thousands

:32:46.:32:48.

of vulnerable tenants, afraid to report things like damp,

:32:49.:32:50.

faulty electrics and broken boilers, The Labour peer who campaigned

:32:51.:32:53.

for unaccompanied migrant children to come to the UK, has said

:32:54.:32:56.

the Government's decision to stop When the Dubs Scheme

:32:57.:33:00.

was introduced last year, campaigners hoped thousands

:33:01.:33:03.

of children would benefit, but the actual numbers

:33:04.:33:05.

have been much lower. By the time the system closes next

:33:06.:33:14.

month, 350 children will have been taken in. It was designed by Lord

:33:15.:33:21.

Dubs, a former refugee who fled Nazi occupation is. I was in Greece a few

:33:22.:33:27.

months ago. There were desperate situations, with many children cold

:33:28.:33:30.

and miserable. We owe it to those children. The government ministers

:33:31.:33:38.

said to me we intend to accept the letter and spirit of your amendment.

:33:39.:33:42.

My contention is that they are not doing that.

:33:43.:33:44.

Tributes have continued to be paid to Tara Palmer-Tomkinson

:33:45.:33:47.

The actress and model became an "it-girl" in the 90s and wrote

:33:48.:33:52.

about her life as an aristocrat and her close ties to

:33:53.:33:55.

She was found dead in her London home after revealing that she had

:33:56.:33:59.

a brain tumour in November last year.

:34:00.:34:01.

The US Senate has approved President Trump's choice

:34:02.:34:03.

Mr Trump criticised efforts by Democrats

:34:04.:34:06.

Mr Sessions was denied a post as a federal judge in the 1980s,

:34:07.:34:11.

when he was accused of racism, though he's always denied

:34:12.:34:13.

Good news for Leicester. They needed. It has to be a consolation

:34:14.:34:33.

prize for them. -- need it. Struggling Premier League

:34:34.:34:40.

champions, Leicester City, are through to the fifth

:34:41.:34:42.

round of the FA Cup following a replay

:34:43.:34:44.

against Derby County. They came through 3-1

:34:45.:34:46.

after extra time. Andy King put Leicester ahead before

:34:47.:34:48.

Abdoul Camera's deflected free kick Leicester restored their lead

:34:49.:34:51.

through substitute, Wilfred Ndidi, And Demarai Gray's superb solo

:34:52.:34:54.

goal secured their place We want to do well in the

:34:55.:35:10.

competition where we play. Of course we want to go forward in the FA Cup.

:35:11.:35:17.

The Premier League is not so good, but we have to play in the Premier

:35:18.:35:19.

League. And then there is Sunday. Tonight was about the squad and the

:35:20.:35:31.

injured players getting back in the game We missed the opportunity in

:35:32.:35:35.

the first game. We did not want a replay. It was a fantastic game.

:35:36.:35:40.

Fantastic support from our fans. And I could not fault the players. I

:35:41.:35:42.

think he was slightly cross. MPs will debate the Football

:35:43.:35:46.

Associations "failure It follows a motion of no confidence

:35:47.:35:48.

in the governing body. Parliament will examine

:35:49.:35:52.

whether the FA is fit for purpose. Last July, Sports Minister,

:35:53.:35:55.

Tracey Crouch, said the governing body would lose its ?30 million

:35:56.:35:57.

to ?40 million of public funding Britain is aiming to become one

:35:58.:36:00.

of the world's top five skiing In a year's time, the winter

:36:01.:36:05.

Olympics take place in Pyeongchang, South Korea, and UK Sport

:36:06.:36:09.

says Great Britain can At around 8:40, we'll be talking

:36:10.:36:12.

to Olympic bronze medal winning snowboarder, Jenny Jones,

:36:13.:36:16.

and TeamGB hopeful freestyle skier, A little bit more skiing coming up

:36:17.:36:19.

in just a moment. World champion, Mark Selby,

:36:20.:36:35.

suffered a shock first-round defeat to world number 18, Martin Gould,

:36:36.:36:37.

at snooker's World Grand Prix Better news for

:36:38.:36:41.

Australia's Neil Robertson. He compiled a century break

:36:42.:36:43.

in the first frame of his match He'll face Ronnie O'Sullivan

:36:44.:36:46.

in the next round. I mentioned skiing, didn't I? You

:36:47.:36:54.

have to feel for this chap. No matter how much preparation

:36:55.:37:00.

and training you can put into a sport, nothing ever

:37:01.:37:03.

prepares you for this. Could this be the worst start

:37:04.:37:05.

to a men's Super-G ski race? But then, Kazakhstan skier,

:37:06.:37:09.

Taras Pimenov, tripped as he left the gate at the Skiing World

:37:10.:37:21.

Championships at St Moritz. That is awful. Can we try and see it

:37:22.:37:28.

again? He finished 20 seconds behind the winner. The key word is that he

:37:29.:37:35.

finished. He got up and carried on? He got back up. He was not last!

:37:36.:37:43.

Isn't that just a lesson? Things can go wrong and you can just carry on.

:37:44.:37:49.

We will have that. We will see you later on. Thank you.

:37:50.:37:51.

There's still a long way to go before Brexit,

:37:52.:37:53.

but last night the message from MPs was clear, let the Government begin

:37:54.:37:57.

the UK's departure from the European Union.

:37:58.:37:59.

494 members voted in favour of the EU Withdrawal Bill,

:38:00.:38:02.

One of those to support it was the Conservative MP

:38:03.:38:05.

James Cleverly, who joins us now from Westminster.

:38:06.:38:13.

Good morning. So, the bill has passed unamended in the House of

:38:14.:38:22.

Commons. It now goes to the Lord's. Do you think it will be passed there

:38:23.:38:26.

as well? I am pretty confident it will for two reasons. The fact it

:38:27.:38:30.

came from the Commons unamended, what we call a clean bill, is a

:38:31.:38:37.

strong signal to the Lord's. And the Labour Lord's, a deciding factor,

:38:38.:38:43.

they will want to put their own, they will not want to put their own

:38:44.:38:47.

party under any more pressure. Anytime there is a Brexit bill

:38:48.:38:50.

inputs their party under more pressure. You don't think there will

:38:51.:38:54.

be more amendments. But there could be, and if there are, what will

:38:55.:38:58.

happen? There is always a chance. There is always a chance the Labour

:38:59.:39:03.

Party will opt to a amended. The Lib Dems said they intend to make

:39:04.:39:10.

trouble. It puts the Lords in a difficult position. People will be

:39:11.:39:14.

understandably frustrated and probably furious if the result of a

:39:15.:39:24.

democratic process is undermined by part of the Houses of Parliament not

:39:25.:39:27.

up for election themselves. That will go down poorly with British

:39:28.:39:31.

people. Sources from Downing Street suggest that if big you not pass

:39:32.:39:41.

this bill, it could mean that the Lord's will be abolished. -- they do

:39:42.:39:48.

not. Is that true? I have not heard that from my colleagues in Downing

:39:49.:39:52.

Street personally, but I do think that when the British people voted

:39:53.:39:57.

in huge numbers, the largest popular mandate in British political

:39:58.:40:01.

history, for the Lord's to try and undermine or subvert that, that puts

:40:02.:40:06.

them in a constitutionally very difficult place. It is a pragmatic

:40:07.:40:11.

place. Many people understand the implications of trying to distort or

:40:12.:40:17.

delay or even undermine this bill... Sorry to interrupt. You talk a lot,

:40:18.:40:24.

James Cleverly, about a huge number of people voting to leave. Many

:40:25.:40:27.

people voted to remain as well. Yeah, absolutely. But the referendum

:40:28.:40:36.

result was conclusive. No one has questioned that referendum result.

:40:37.:40:42.

And I think that all the people who spoke before the referendum about

:40:43.:40:47.

the importance of honouring the result now have to do that. And I

:40:48.:40:52.

think they will. I think they will. There will be EU nationals living

:40:53.:40:56.

here that will be worried about their status in the country at the

:40:57.:41:04.

moment, won't there? I am pleased the Prime Minister has made it clear

:41:05.:41:09.

and unambiguous statement with her desire to protect their status. If

:41:10.:41:13.

the EU matched her commitment word for word this will be resolved

:41:14.:41:17.

overnight. But they have said that they refused to discuss this until

:41:18.:41:21.

Article 50 is triggered. So the sooner we can get that drew the

:41:22.:41:28.

Lords, the quicker we can give the security that the EU nationals

:41:29.:41:31.

living in the UK absolutely desire and absolutely deserve. -- through.

:41:32.:41:36.

What are your thoughts on Parliament getting a say on the final deal,

:41:37.:41:40.

because there are some Conservatives that want more than the take it or

:41:41.:41:45.

leave it vote being offered. You have to remember how Parliament

:41:46.:41:50.

works. Parliament works on a yes-no system. Ultimately, the vote will be

:41:51.:41:55.

the proposed bill that has been negotiated over two years in 2019.

:41:56.:42:03.

And because we have to vote on a yes-no question, the question will

:42:04.:42:08.

have to be, yes, we accept this agreement, or, no, we do not accept

:42:09.:42:12.

that. You cannot have two versions of reality. That was always the

:42:13.:42:17.

case. That is how all Parliament questions are structured. They could

:42:18.:42:21.

be issues with the UK and EU negotiators to come up with a

:42:22.:42:27.

sensible pragmatic deal that works with us and our friends on the

:42:28.:42:31.

continent. And I hope that is what happens. OK, James Cleverly, thank

:42:32.:42:35.

you very much for your time this morning.

:42:36.:42:38.

You are watching Breakfast from BBC News.

:42:39.:42:40.

Leaked figures show the performance of A units in England last month

:42:41.:42:45.

The Government warns the House of Lords not to stand in the way

:42:46.:42:50.

of Brexit, after MPs vote overwhelmingly in favour

:42:51.:42:52.

That is what we were just talking about.

:42:53.:42:58.

Here is Carol with a look at this morning's weather.

:42:59.:43:03.

Good morning. Good morning. Earlier, I was asked where my picture was

:43:04.:43:14.

from. It was the Lake District. It will be fairly cloudy in central and

:43:15.:43:18.

eastern areas with wintry showers. Not all of us will see them, but

:43:19.:43:22.

some of us will. Look at this area of high pressure. It is a blocking

:43:23.:43:33.

high blocking this frontal system coming our way. But around that, we

:43:34.:43:36.

are dragging in the cool air from the continent. If you have not gone

:43:37.:43:40.

outside, it will be cold and get colder. Western Scotland, watch out

:43:41.:43:43.

for frost. Sunshine. Wintry showers means highs on untreated surfaces in

:43:44.:43:47.

eastern Scotland and England is possible. As we come across central

:43:48.:43:53.

and eastern parts, this is where we have more cloud in some wintry

:43:54.:43:57.

showers. On the coast, accommodation of rain and sleet, England, sleet

:43:58.:44:02.

and rain. Inland towards the south-west, we are looking at some

:44:03.:44:08.

sunny skies. Not quite as cold. But, if you are out here, it will not

:44:09.:44:14.

feel warm. Sunshine for Wales. Cloudy in Northern Ireland. Just a

:44:15.:44:19.

few showers. Through the day we continue with the rain and sleet

:44:20.:44:23.

across the east coast. Inland, a culmination of sleet and snow that

:44:24.:44:26.

could fall almost anywhere in central and eastern parts. Sunshine

:44:27.:44:31.

out towards the west. It is going to be a windy day. Windy in the morning

:44:32.:44:35.

towards the south-west. Gales. That will go down through the day. One or

:44:36.:44:39.

two centimetres of snow in the Pennines, the Grampians, through the

:44:40.:44:43.

day. Through the evening and overnight, where we have clear

:44:44.:44:48.

skies, you will see a frost. You might have to scrape the car in the

:44:49.:44:52.

morning. Elsewhere, no issues with that. It will be cold. A lot of

:44:53.:44:58.

cloud around. Still snow showers. Highs may be a problem first thing

:44:59.:45:03.

in the morning to watch out for. -- ice. More of the same. Tomorrow,

:45:04.:45:08.

Shetland, more substantial snow. Between 5-6 1010 metres, over two

:45:09.:45:15.

inches. Cloud in central and eastern areas. Rain, sleet and snow.

:45:16.:45:20.

Brightest skies towards the west. Windy. Although the thermometer

:45:21.:45:24.

might say three or four, it will feel colder than that. Saturday, the

:45:25.:45:32.

wind goes northerly, a cold direction for us. Saturday, the snow

:45:33.:45:37.

showers will go over towards Wales, the south-west of England, and also

:45:38.:45:42.

Northern Ireland. Showers. Not all of us will see them. Maximum

:45:43.:45:46.

temperatures, four or five, but feeling colder than that. The wind

:45:47.:45:50.

will exacerbate that chilly feel. Sunday, it will feel raw. We still

:45:51.:45:56.

have a north-easterly and easterly wind coming in off the continent.

:45:57.:46:01.

Still quite a bit of cloud around in central and eastern parts as well.

:46:02.:46:04.

Still that cloud is producing wintry showers. As is the drill for the

:46:05.:46:08.

next few days, down the east coast, rain and sleet moving inland. The

:46:09.:46:15.

combination is sleet and snow. Temperatures, five to about seven.

:46:16.:46:19.

So, Steph and Charlie, a short you wrap up warmly. Certainly.

:46:20.:46:25.

I love the way it, when you were talking about the cold, you did a

:46:26.:46:37.

little body shake with it. Thank you very much, see you in a bit.

:46:38.:46:40.

A landmark ruling at the Supreme Court yesterday

:46:41.:46:43.

could pave the way to more pension freedoms for millions of people.

:46:44.:46:46.

Ben is looking at what it could mean.

:46:47.:46:53.

This is the difference between a married couple and people who are

:46:54.:46:59.

partners, in relation to your pension. And it could come down to

:47:00.:47:03.

ticking a box on the form when you sign it.

:47:04.:47:04.

What rights do you have to your partner's pension

:47:05.:47:06.

Well, if you were married, it is pretty straightforward.

:47:07.:47:10.

But if you are not married, things aren't so clear.

:47:11.:47:16.

You are not automatically entitled to claim their pension savings.

:47:17.:47:20.

Denise Brewster lost her partner of more than ten years,

:47:21.:47:23.

but they weren't married, and she wasn't allowed to access

:47:24.:47:26.

She thought that wasn't fair, and after an eight-year legal

:47:27.:47:30.

The initial fight was about fighting for us, and what we were to each

:47:31.:47:42.

other. And then I realise that this wasn't only affecting me. This was

:47:43.:47:47.

affecting so many other families out there. So at least I just had to

:47:48.:47:54.

defend myself and take my hardships, but when you have other families,

:47:55.:47:57.

that have a young daughter, losing their daddy of them army, and then

:47:58.:48:01.

they have their financial burden on top of that, the inequality and

:48:02.:48:06.

injustice of it all, I thought, was immense -- their mummy.

:48:07.:48:09.

With me is Charmian Johnson from the legal firm Eversheds

:48:10.:48:12.

Nice to see you. We have called it a landmark ruling. How significant is

:48:13.:48:25.

it? I think it is a significant decision. This landmark decision, as

:48:26.:48:29.

you call it, could affect millions of people and it really goes to the

:48:30.:48:32.

heart of the inequality of cohabitees. And the issue is that,

:48:33.:48:38.

whether you are living with someone, for however long, if you are not

:48:39.:48:43.

married and you have not got that certificate, then it will not make

:48:44.:48:46.

any difference unless you take a form on the paperwork. Can you

:48:47.:48:50.

explain that? With public sector schemes in the UK and Northern

:48:51.:48:53.

Ireland, many of these public sector schemes require cohabitees to fill

:48:54.:48:58.

in a form with their partner and lodge it with the scheme so in the

:48:59.:49:02.

event of the partner's death it would be considered, and that would

:49:03.:49:06.

be a requirement in order to receive a survivor's pension. The rules have

:49:07.:49:10.

changed a little bit since, and depending on where you are in the

:49:11.:49:13.

country things will have changed, but it is a difficult area for

:49:14.:49:17.

people to navigate. There is a lot to think about when you take out a

:49:18.:49:33.

pension in the first place. There is clearly a lot to think about if your

:49:34.:49:37.

partner dies. This is the last thing people need to be thinking about. It

:49:38.:49:41.

certainly is, yes. And that is why this has been a very sensible and

:49:42.:49:44.

understandable decision of the Supreme Court. Many of these public

:49:45.:49:46.

sector schemes still require surviving cohabitees to show that

:49:47.:49:49.

they were in genuine and lasting relationships, irrespective of

:49:50.:49:52.

filling in the nomination form, and that is why the nomination form

:49:53.:49:55.

didn't really add anything in practice. And so we had this ruling

:49:56.:49:59.

which came out yesterday, will set a precedent? It does, the Supreme

:50:00.:50:02.

Court is the highest in the land, if you like. The case in question

:50:03.:50:05.

really related to the Northern Ireland local government pension

:50:06.:50:08.

scheme, but this could affect other cohabitees in UK public sector

:50:09.:50:11.

schemes, so we are talking about NHS staff, teachers, police, civil

:50:12.:50:13.

servants, firefighters, this decision could be relevant to those

:50:14.:50:17.

who are co-habiting. What does it mean if people have been through

:50:18.:50:20.

this already and not been able to claim their partner's pension when

:50:21.:50:25.

they have died? Can it be backdated? Can you claim after the event? I

:50:26.:50:29.

think now that this decision means that the government is forced to

:50:30.:50:33.

revisit past cases where cohabitees have been refused a survivor 's

:50:34.:50:36.

pension purely because this nomination form has not been lodged.

:50:37.:50:41.

What do people need to do? How would you even start this process if you

:50:42.:50:45.

have been through this and weren't able to claim your partner's

:50:46.:50:49.

pension? I imagine that the schemes and the government will be

:50:50.:50:52.

considering communicating the wall potentially affected members but if

:50:53.:50:56.

you are a cohabitees who has been a member of a UK public sector scheme,

:50:57.:51:00.

I would be writing to the scheme and lodging the facts with the scheme

:51:01.:51:06.

that you are a cohabitees, and for those who have had surviving

:51:07.:51:09.

pensions refused on the basis that no form had been lodged, I would

:51:10.:51:13.

ring that to the attention of the scheme. And so the onus will be on

:51:14.:51:17.

the industry to communicate that, will it? They will be looking at how

:51:18.:51:21.

they process some of these claims and what they do from here on.

:51:22.:51:26.

Indeed, and it is a bit of a headache for the government. There

:51:27.:51:29.

are millions of people in these schemes, it is a bit of an exercise

:51:30.:51:34.

for them but it can't hurt for the people who think they may be

:51:35.:51:37.

affected to contact their schemes and raise it with them. A really

:51:38.:51:40.

interesting area, and a really important case. More from me after

:51:41.:51:43.

seven a.m.. I will see you then. Denzel Washington is one

:51:44.:51:46.

of Hollywood's biggest stars, and already has two Oscars

:51:47.:51:49.

under his belt, so can he make it a hat-trick with his Best Actor

:51:50.:51:52.

nomination this year, Charlie went to ask him

:51:53.:51:55.

what he thought of his chances of winning, and his opinion

:51:56.:51:59.

of America's new President. Lovely to see you. Thank you. Are

:52:00.:52:13.

you well? I am jetlagged. We just got here like two hours ago. It is

:52:14.:52:21.

not easy for me to admit that I have been standing in the same place the

:52:22.:52:25.

18 years. Well, I have been standing with you. I have been right here

:52:26.:52:29.

with you, Troy. I had a life too. Troy starts off as a rather lovable,

:52:30.:52:34.

bombastic man who likes the sound of his own voice. We have all been

:52:35.:52:38.

guilty of that sometimes, haven't we? You know what it is? Is like

:52:39.:52:43.

there is a ritual on Friday night, and Troy is the television. It is

:52:44.:52:48.

the same stories he always tells, and it seemed wonderful until it

:52:49.:52:54.

ain't. Answer me when I speak to you, don't you eat everyday? Yes.

:52:55.:53:04.

Got clothes on your back? Yes, Sir. Why do you think that is? Because

:53:05.:53:12.

you like me? Like you? If there is a theme in the film it is people's

:53:13.:53:16.

ability to change or not to change. Would you say that is right? It is

:53:17.:53:21.

fair. Because it is a time in history when a lot is changing in

:53:22.:53:25.

America, and Troy is a character who is not adapting to that change, or

:53:26.:53:30.

maybe not seeing around him. Would that be right? He is actually

:53:31.:53:34.

wanting to effect change. He is trying to become a driver. He is

:53:35.:53:38.

trying to move up. Now, the small detail in the play is that he

:53:39.:53:42.

doesn't know how to drive. He doesn't even know how to drive, or

:53:43.:53:47.

read, but he wants that. So in some sense it is ridiculous, but it is

:53:48.:53:52.

also admirable. On the theme of change, right now, in the world we

:53:53.:53:57.

live in, there is a lot of change going on. Yes. Are you comfortable

:53:58.:54:01.

about the changes that are happening, for example in the US

:54:02.:54:07.

right now? Understand this. I have been talking about this years ago,

:54:08.:54:11.

third wave or future shock. We went from an agricultural society to an

:54:12.:54:17.

industrial society. The third wave is the information age. There are

:54:18.:54:23.

millions of people that are falling in the gap because they don't fit in

:54:24.:54:32.

to this information age. I don't care who you are, you could promise

:54:33.:54:36.

people whole lot, but there is a whole lot of people that are going

:54:37.:54:41.

to... That are in trouble right now, because they just don't fit in. It

:54:42.:54:45.

is no coincidence that the places that were at the height of the

:54:46.:54:48.

Industrial Revolution in America, Pittsburgh, the rustbelt, are

:54:49.:54:55.

suffering the worst right now. And those other places, of course, where

:54:56.:54:59.

Donald Trump... And they are frustrated. And I don't care which

:55:00.:55:04.

President it is. They can't promise them anything, and those jobs aren't

:55:05.:55:07.

coming back. I don't care who promise is you that. When people

:55:08.:55:11.

hear you talking as passionately as you just did about the people who

:55:12.:55:15.

don't have a voice, and who need a voice, they might think one day

:55:16.:55:19.

Denzel Washington might like to have a bigger voice, voice in government.

:55:20.:55:23.

You have got to stay in your LAN. I am not running for... For what? I

:55:24.:55:28.

don't want any of that -- stay in your LAN. Would you ever? I would

:55:29.:55:32.

never, ever ever ever. That is a very definitive never,

:55:33.:55:43.

ever ever ever. You can tell he is very passionate, he feels very

:55:44.:55:46.

passionately, and all his thoughts about America at the moment are

:55:47.:55:50.

built on a genuine knowledge about the way the system works. And it is

:55:51.:55:56.

interesting, the film, Fences, is about a man who likes the sound of

:55:57.:56:01.

his own voice. Denzel Washington has an amazing voice. When you sit in

:56:02.:56:05.

the room with him, he has the ability to fill the room with sound,

:56:06.:56:08.

and of course his father, himself, was a preacher. There is a bit of

:56:09.:56:13.

that in him. When you ask him a question about what it is like in

:56:14.:56:17.

America right now, he has a theory and wants to get it out there. It is

:56:18.:56:21.

a very moving film, Fences, and we will hear more about it later in the

:56:22.:56:24.

programme. Time now to get the news,

:56:25.:56:25.

travel and weather where you are. It will start to get a bit less cold

:56:26.:59:43.

as we head into the start This is Breakfast,

:59:44.:59:47.

with Charlie Stayt and Steph Record waiting times at A

:59:48.:00:07.

departments in English hospitals, according to figures

:00:08.:00:09.

seen by the BBC. Emergency departments

:00:10.:00:14.

suffered their worst performance last month, since the target to see

:00:15.:00:16.

patients within four hours As Theresa May gets the all-clear

:00:17.:00:19.

to trigger Article 50, the Labour leader, Jeremy Corbyn,

:00:20.:00:51.

will be here to tell us what he wants to see

:00:52.:00:54.

from the Brexit negotiations. As experts warn that new booster

:00:55.:00:58.

seat rules risk leaving parents confused, we'll explain

:00:59.:01:01.

what the changes mean for you. It's been a high street

:01:02.:01:06.

favourite since the 1970s, but the owner of Body Shop could be

:01:07.:01:09.

looking to sell it off. So, what next for the

:01:10.:01:12.

struggling retailer? Leicester have their first

:01:13.:01:14.

home win of the year. Demarai Gray scores in extra time

:01:15.:01:17.

to help them beat Derby in their FA I've been talking fatherhood,

:01:18.:01:21.

fake news, and the changing face of US politics, with

:01:22.:01:31.

Denzel Washington. Would you never? Never, ever, ever,

:01:32.:01:45.

ever. What was he referring to, becoming president of America.

:01:46.:01:48.

Good morning. A cold start. It will be cold for the next few days. The

:01:49.:02:01.

best of the sunshine in the west. Wintry showers coming in from the

:02:02.:02:13.

east on a keen wind. More details in 15 minutes. Thanks, Carol. See you

:02:14.:02:14.

in a bit. Accident and Emergency departments

:02:15.:02:15.

in England last month had their worst waiting

:02:16.:02:19.

time performance since That's according to provisional

:02:20.:02:21.

figures leaked to the BBC. The data also suggests that record

:02:22.:02:24.

numbers of patients have had to wait on trolleys for a bed

:02:25.:02:28.

to become available. With more here's our health

:02:29.:02:30.

correspondent, Dominic Hughes. For months now, Accident

:02:31.:02:40.

and Emergency departments Last week, the BBC was

:02:41.:02:42.

given exclusive access to the Royal Blackburn Hospital

:02:43.:02:55.

where the pressure on it was New data leaked from the NHS

:02:56.:02:58.

says it is a similar Provisional figures appeared

:02:59.:03:07.

to show that last month, 82% of patients were treated,

:03:08.:03:10.

admitted, and discharged within four hours, the worst performance

:03:11.:03:13.

since the target of 95% 780 patients waited for more than 12

:03:14.:03:15.

hours for a bed after being admitted to hospital by a doctor,

:03:16.:03:25.

known as a trolley wait. And more than 60,000 waited more

:03:26.:03:27.

between four and 12 hours, If the figures are correct,

:03:28.:03:41.

it shows the degree of pressure That's despite huge efforts

:03:42.:03:45.

from 1.4 million staff. The NHS is really struggling

:03:46.:03:49.

to cope with extra demand, These figures are the worst

:03:50.:03:51.

since the four-hour A It shows the pressure

:03:52.:03:55.

the NHS is under. The NHS in Scotland is coping

:03:56.:03:59.

better, but similar issues affect Wales and Northern Ireland,

:04:00.:04:02.

symptoms of the pressure building NHS sources acknowledge the system

:04:03.:04:04.

is facing unprecedented demand. And these latest figures suggest

:04:05.:04:12.

there is little sign of respite. The Government has told the House

:04:13.:04:15.

of Lords not to block Brexit after MPs overwhelmingly backed

:04:16.:04:19.

the bill to trigger Article 50, The Brexit Secretary,

:04:20.:04:22.

David Davis, called on peers to "do their patriotic duty"

:04:23.:04:26.

and pass the legislation. More than 50 Labour MPs defied

:04:27.:04:28.

the three-line whip imposed by their leader, Jeremy Corbyn,

:04:29.:04:31.

and voted against the bill. Here's our political

:04:32.:04:34.

correspondent, Tom Bateman. MPs gave their overwhelming support

:04:35.:04:49.

for Theresa May's plan to get And it got through with a large

:04:50.:04:55.

majority every turn. It has carried out the will

:04:56.:05:06.

of the British people. That is what Parliament

:05:07.:05:08.

has done today. And it has put through a bill

:05:09.:05:11.

is very simple, just 137 words long, authorising us to do

:05:12.:05:16.

what the people wanted. The Scottish National Party fought

:05:17.:05:24.

the bill all the way. They lost, but they sung

:05:25.:05:26.

the European anthem in defiance. The threat of a Conservative

:05:27.:05:29.

rebellion fell away, but 52 Labour MPs, including

:05:30.:05:38.

shadow Cabinet member, defied Jeremy Corbyn

:05:39.:05:42.

to vote against the bill. Lib Dems called for

:05:43.:05:52.

a referendum on the exit deal. What you have done is allow

:05:53.:05:55.

a stitch-up, the 21st century 80% of people will be dissatisfied

:05:56.:05:58.

with what is imposed upon them. Theresa May left after the vote

:05:59.:06:11.

clearing a first hurdle in Now the bill goes to the House

:06:12.:06:13.

of Lords, where it may need And picking up on that

:06:14.:06:17.

House of Lords process, our political correspondent,

:06:18.:06:22.

Carol Walker, is in Westminster this So, this passes onto the House of

:06:23.:06:28.

Lords. Questions on what happens there. But questions to Jeremy

:06:29.:06:31.

Corbyn about what this means for him. Ministers hoped that thumping

:06:32.:06:34.

majority they got in the House of Commons last night will send a

:06:35.:06:38.

strong signal to the House of Lords. Downing Street sources suggested

:06:39.:06:43.

that if the Lords were too tried to stop the process, they could be

:06:44.:06:47.

abolished. Amendments to the bill will probably be put down. There

:06:48.:06:53.

will not be too many problems. The government will be able to trigger

:06:54.:06:57.

Article 50 and begin those formal negotiations by the end of March. As

:06:58.:07:01.

you mentioned, I think the bigger problem immediately is the one

:07:02.:07:05.

facing Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn. He has four positions in the shadow

:07:06.:07:11.

cabinet to fill and has to decide what action to take if any against

:07:12.:07:15.

more than a dozen junior shadow ministers who defied his

:07:16.:07:19.

instructions and voted against the bill. The bigger problem for the

:07:20.:07:23.

Labour Party are the divisions laid bare on perhaps the biggest issue

:07:24.:07:30.

facing the country at the moment. Carol, thank you very much.

:07:31.:07:32.

Just after 8am, we'll be discussing this with Labour leader,

:07:33.:07:34.

We will ask about the resignations and what he is aiming to achieve in

:07:35.:07:43.

the coming months and years after the Brexit negotiations.

:07:44.:07:44.

A new law designed to help protect people in England from so-called

:07:45.:07:47.

"revenge evictions" by rogue landlords isn't working,

:07:48.:07:49.

according to senior MPs and housing lawyers.

:07:50.:07:51.

A BBC Freedom of Information request has revealed that there may be

:07:52.:07:54.

hundreds of thousands of vulnerable tenants,

:07:55.:07:56.

afraid to report things like damp, faulty electrics and broken boilers,

:07:57.:07:59.

The Labour peer who campaigned for unaccompanied migrant children

:08:00.:08:09.

to come to the UK, has said the Government's decision to stop

:08:10.:08:13.

When the Dubs Scheme was introduced last year,

:08:14.:08:16.

campaigners hoped thousands of children would benefit,

:08:17.:08:18.

but the actual numbers have been much lower.

:08:19.:08:20.

Many children remain in camps across Europe.

:08:21.:08:32.

An estimated 90,000 are alone with no family.

:08:33.:08:35.

Following intense pressure last year, the then

:08:36.:08:39.

Following intense pressure last year, the then Prime Minister,

:08:40.:08:42.

David Cameron, introduced a programme to give

:08:43.:08:44.

Campaigners had hoped 3000 unaccompanied children with no links

:08:45.:08:47.

Instead, 350 will be taken in before this scheme ends next month.

:08:48.:08:54.

It was designed by Lord Dubs, a former refugee who fled

:08:55.:08:59.

Many unaccompanied children who are bitterly cold and miserable

:09:00.:09:17.

There has been widespread condemnation.

:09:18.:09:22.

Opposition parties have called the move a betrayal of vulnerable

:09:23.:09:25.

children and British values, and called on the Government

:09:26.:09:28.

Some youngsters were taken to this location in Devon.

:09:29.:09:35.

The Home Office says it is a matter of resources,

:09:36.:09:38.

a balance between enabling children to enter the country,

:09:39.:09:40.

while ensuring that local councils have the capacity

:09:41.:09:42.

Tributes have continued to be paid to Tara Palmer-Tomkinson

:09:43.:09:47.

The actress and model became an "it-girl" in the 90s and wrote

:09:48.:09:52.

about her life as an aristocrat and her close ties to

:09:53.:09:55.

She was found dead in her London home after revealing that she had

:09:56.:09:59.

a brain tumour in November last year.

:10:00.:10:03.

The US Senate has approved President Trump's choice

:10:04.:10:06.

Mr Trump criticised efforts by Democrats

:10:07.:10:09.

Mr Sessions was denied a post as a federal judge in the 1980s,

:10:10.:10:13.

when he was accused of racism, though he's always denied

:10:14.:10:16.

Jane Austin's Mr Darcy from Pride and Prejudice is one of the most

:10:17.:10:27.

admired and romantic leading men in literary history.

:10:28.:10:29.

When Colin Firth played him he was famously tall,

:10:30.:10:31.

dark and handsome, but that might not have been the case

:10:32.:10:34.

This portrait by British academics paints a very different picture

:10:35.:10:41.

of Mr Darcy, giving him a pale face, powdered white hair,

:10:42.:10:44.

He's a far cry from the brooding Mr Darcy created by filmmakers.

:10:45.:11:11.

Quite different from Colin Firth, but the both look good to me. And

:11:12.:11:16.

he's made up anyway so you can think what you like! Doesn't matter.

:11:17.:11:18.

As a way of keeping tabs on A waiting times,

:11:19.:11:21.

a target was brought in 13 years ago which said 95% of patients should be

:11:22.:11:25.

But figures leaked to the BBC suggest that last month saw

:11:26.:11:29.

emergency departments at hospitals in England suffered their worst ever

:11:30.:11:31.

performance since the target was introduced.

:11:32.:11:33.

The Department of Health insists the vast majority of patients

:11:34.:11:36.

Let's talk to Dr Taj Hassan, the President of the Royal College

:11:37.:11:40.

Let's talk to Dr Taj Hassan, the President of the Royal College

:11:41.:11:44.

Good morning to you, Dr Taj Hassan. What do you make of the leaked

:11:45.:11:50.

figures, 82% for example not being seen within the four hours, leaving

:11:51.:11:54.

some people who are not. Is that in tune with what you are hearing and

:11:55.:12:00.

seeing? They certainly do. The figures showed the remarkable state

:12:01.:12:04.

of the NHS and emergency care systems. Unfortunately that is how

:12:05.:12:09.

they are in the moment in this country. They are keeping with the

:12:10.:12:14.

downward incline, the decline, of performance in our systems over the

:12:15.:12:18.

past two years. We predicted this would happen back and set number. So

:12:19.:12:21.

it comes as unfortunately no surprise to us. -- back in

:12:22.:12:29.

September. This is depressing and the BBC has been describing in

:12:30.:12:33.

graphic detail some of the pressures staff and emergency staff are having

:12:34.:12:41.

in trying to deliver safe care. That is something that is not

:12:42.:12:45.

sustainable, unfortunately. So, do you think this four hour target is

:12:46.:12:52.

unrealistic? Not at all. The four hour standard is a reflection of the

:12:53.:12:58.

whole system. It is not just what is happening in the emergency

:12:59.:13:01.

department, but unfortunately, the consequences play out very

:13:02.:13:03.

graphically in the emergency department with crowded departments,

:13:04.:13:08.

resulting in care not being delivered in a timely fashion. Pain

:13:09.:13:13.

relief is not given in a timely fashion. Assessment is not given in

:13:14.:13:17.

a timely fashion. So, what we need to do is look at the causes, and the

:13:18.:13:22.

causes are threefold. We unfortunately do not have enough

:13:23.:13:28.

money to fund social care, so patients who are fit for medical

:13:29.:13:33.

discharge in hospital beds are stuck rather than being in the community

:13:34.:13:37.

were them and their families want them to be. We do not have enough

:13:38.:13:41.

beds. And increased demand is having a tremendous effect on nurses and

:13:42.:13:45.

doctors and the department who are just trying to deliver good care. We

:13:46.:13:49.

need more staff for those departments and other aspects of the

:13:50.:13:52.

rest of the hospital to be able to cope. You mentioned the problem and

:13:53.:13:58.

the cause is being threefold, and to solve those would need money. If you

:13:59.:14:03.

look at the money spent on the NHS, it is increasing. Last year it was

:14:04.:14:08.

?140 billion, ten times more than 60 years ago. Is this just about money?

:14:09.:14:14.

Are there more things that could be done as well? I think the NHS is

:14:15.:14:19.

different to where it was 60 years ago. But no doubt all independent

:14:20.:14:23.

observers have shown proportionately we are spending less than most of

:14:24.:14:27.

our European partners. In fact, we are probably on the bottom in most

:14:28.:14:39.

OECD countries. We have to change. Clinical staff across the country

:14:40.:14:43.

are looking at ways to reconfigure the NHS to make it fit for purpose.

:14:44.:14:47.

But the bottom line is we have cut and cut and cut far too much and

:14:48.:14:51.

we're back the basic skeleton and staff are stretched to their limits

:14:52.:14:56.

and that is unacceptable. It is also, I would say, a leadership

:14:57.:15:01.

moment, not just for staff and departments trying to deliver good

:15:02.:15:07.

care, but also executive boards and trusts and national bodies making

:15:08.:15:10.

submissions to the Prime Minister, making it clear as to the scale of

:15:11.:15:15.

the challenge and why we need to invest.

:15:16.:15:19.

Do you think leadership in hospitals is bad at the moment? No, not at

:15:20.:15:26.

all, in most trusts and hospitals, leadership is showing...

:15:27.:15:28.

CROSSTALK You say it needs improving? No, what

:15:29.:15:34.

I said is I think there is a need for focus around emergency care at

:15:35.:15:39.

the moment, because, as your figures show, the system is unfortunately

:15:40.:15:43.

acutely stressed. OK, thank you very much for your time this morning.

:15:44.:15:52.

Thank you. The time is 7:15am. That is our main story this morning.

:15:53.:15:56.

Leaked figures show the performance of A units in England last month

:15:57.:15:59.

The Government warns the House of Lords not to stand in the way

:16:00.:16:05.

of Brexit after MPs vote overwhelmingly in favour

:16:06.:16:07.

We will have a look at some of the front pages for you. On the front of

:16:08.:16:21.

the Sun, marking the death of Tara Palmer Tomkinson, police say she was

:16:22.:16:25.

discovered dead in her flat yesterday. The announcement made

:16:26.:16:29.

yesterday afternoon. Tributes coming in, including from members of the

:16:30.:16:34.

royal family. And the Guardian has a picture of her, and it picks up on a

:16:35.:16:39.

story we mentioned, which was to do with the Prime Minister being a

:16:40.:16:45.

accused of closing the door on child refugees, refusing to resettle 3000

:16:46.:16:49.

children, which was halted just after 350 were allowed into the

:16:50.:16:53.

country. And Jeremy Corbyn will join us here later this morning, just

:16:54.:16:58.

after 8am and of course we will talk to him about Brexit and the vote

:16:59.:17:03.

last night in the house of Common. It gets the go-ahead from MPs and

:17:04.:17:07.

now moves to the House of Lords. Many questions for Jeremy Colburn

:17:08.:17:13.

with another resignation from his shadow cabinet, and he will be here

:17:14.:17:20.

just after 8am -- -- Corbyn. OK, now, where is that picture from,

:17:21.:17:24.

that is gorgeous? I think it is from Glencoe, because it looks like it,

:17:25.:17:30.

and it is beautiful, you are quite right. Sorry, I didn't mean to catch

:17:31.:17:34.

you out. I know, it is another library shot, but it shows what is

:17:35.:17:38.

going on, there is Hilson at around and -- hill snow and a set of cloud,

:17:39.:17:47.

even at low levels, and we have this high-pressure area in Scandinavia,

:17:48.:17:55.

it is it coming across our shores, blocking the weather front from

:17:56.:17:58.

affecting us, and look at the isobars. It will be windy in the

:17:59.:18:03.

north-west. We have jails in north-west Scotland, they will ease

:18:04.:18:07.

through the day. Dry weather, cold and frosty to start, but these coast

:18:08.:18:11.

of Scotland and England we have more cloud -- We have gales. At least end

:18:12.:18:17.

into eastern areas, so, right on the coastline and for the next couple of

:18:18.:18:22.

days we have an extra of rain and sleet. You don't have to travel to

:18:23.:18:26.

fight in LAN and we have sleet and snow. Because they are showers not

:18:27.:18:30.

all of us will see them -- you don't have to travel far inland. In

:18:31.:18:36.

south-west Wales it is a cold and frosty start, then we run into cloud

:18:37.:18:41.

for the rest of Wales. Northern Ireland has cloud around with

:18:42.:18:45.

showers, and they will tend to ease. So, through the day, western areas

:18:46.:18:51.

hang onto the sunshine. For central and eastern parts, we have more

:18:52.:18:55.

cloud and wintry showers. Don't be disappointed. Not all of us will see

:18:56.:19:00.

snow. A lot of us want to see it. We could see one or two centimetres,

:19:01.:19:04.

less than an inch, for the north York Moors and the Grampians.

:19:05.:19:10.

Overnight, showers move across southern counties, we hang on to the

:19:11.:19:14.

cloud and showers for central and eastern areas, and it is a cold

:19:15.:19:20.

easterly wind to the west. Under clear skies, frost, particularly

:19:21.:19:24.

north-west Scotland and west Wales, despite the low temperatures and the

:19:25.:19:28.

frost elsewhere, there is too much cloud and breeze to need to scrape

:19:29.:19:33.

your car in the morning. Then we start the same for central and

:19:34.:19:38.

eastern parts, and tomorrow too that accommodation continues, with more

:19:39.:19:42.

significant snowfall for Orkney Shetland, five or six centimetres.

:19:43.:19:46.

Despite the fact there will be sunshine in the west, wherever you

:19:47.:19:50.

are it will be cold. In fact, if affected by the wind, if standing in

:19:51.:19:54.

the wind, it will be much colder than temperatures suggest. Then on

:19:55.:19:58.

Saturday we continue with rain, sleet and snow but on Saturday more

:19:59.:20:02.

comes to the west, some getting into Northern Ireland, Wales and the

:20:03.:20:06.

south-west. The best sunshine for the north-west. It is feeling cold

:20:07.:20:11.

in the wind, and it will feel raw, Charlie and Steph, by Sunday. Jilly

:20:12.:20:16.

for now, but getting warmer, thank you. -- chilly.

:20:17.:20:19.

Ben has more on that and the other main business stories.

:20:20.:20:23.

Yes, I am going to start with Body Shop.

:20:24.:20:27.

Body Shop could be looking for a new owner.

:20:28.:20:30.

The firm, owned by L'Oreal, has 3,000 stores in 66 countries

:20:31.:20:33.

but sales are down sharply and losses last year grew

:20:34.:20:36.

The company has blamed a slowdown overseas

:20:37.:20:44.

and L'oreal is now looking into a potential sale.

:20:45.:20:50.

We will talk about that in half an hour.

:20:51.:20:53.

Democrats have condemned President Donald Trump's tweet

:20:54.:20:55.

attacking a clothing retailer after it dropped a fashion line

:20:56.:20:57.

Mr Trump tweeted that "Ivanka has been treated so unfairly"

:20:58.:21:01.

A Democratic senator called the post "inappropriate" and an ex-White

:21:02.:21:05.

House ethics tsar dubbed it "outrageous".

:21:06.:21:07.

Earlier this month Nordstrom became the fifth retailer to drop

:21:08.:21:09.

the Ivanka Trump clothing line, citing lack of sales.

:21:10.:21:18.

Travel firm Thomas Cook has reported losses of ?67 million,

:21:19.:21:23.

it did that in the last 20 minutes, and warned that it remains cautious

:21:24.:21:27.

about the rest of the year, given the uncertain political

:21:28.:21:30.

The firm says bookings to Greece are up by over 40%,

:21:31.:21:33.

and destinations like Cyprus, Bulgaria, Portugal and Croatia have

:21:34.:21:36.

That's helping make up for a fall in sales to Turkey and Egypt

:21:37.:21:41.

as tourists are deterred by recent terror attacks.

:21:42.:21:44.

We will talk more about the Body Shop story in about half an hour.

:21:45.:21:48.

Thank you. The rules on child booster seats

:21:49.:21:51.

in cars are due to change next month, but many parents say

:21:52.:21:55.

the new regulations have So, to try and clear things

:21:56.:21:57.

up, let's take a look at what the present

:21:58.:22:01.

guidelines are, and how Currently, parents in the UK can use

:22:02.:22:03.

backless booster seats for children Under the new rules,

:22:04.:22:08.

in order use a backless booster seat, children must weigh over 22

:22:09.:22:13.

kilograms, three-stone-seven, and be over 125 centimetres tall,

:22:14.:22:15.

which is four-foot-one. That means children between 15kg

:22:16.:22:21.

and 22kg will now have to be put But there is an exception

:22:22.:22:25.

to the new rules. Parents and guardians who already

:22:26.:22:31.

have a backless booster seat can For more on these changes,

:22:32.:22:34.

let's speak to Nick Lloyd, road safety manager

:22:35.:22:40.

at the Royal Society Good morning. Before we start

:22:41.:22:53.

getting into the practicality, do you welcome the changes, is it a

:22:54.:22:58.

step forward in safety? It is potentially a step forward. It is

:22:59.:23:02.

confusing currently because what will happen is with the new UN

:23:03.:23:07.

regulations that we will have two types of booster cushions, which is

:23:08.:23:12.

this one here, which will be available for parents to buy. Our

:23:13.:23:17.

advice is to go for one of these seats, which is a high backed

:23:18.:23:23.

booster seat. Let's go back this is the booster cushion. Yes. You say

:23:24.:23:27.

that there will be two versions? That is right. As you said in your

:23:28.:23:32.

introduction, this one is suitable for children that weigh 15 kg, up to

:23:33.:23:40.

36 kg, and the new regulations will mean that manufacturers will be

:23:41.:23:46.

making seats that are from 22 kg up to 36 kg and, crucially as well,

:23:47.:23:53.

children must be of a height of 125 centimetres. It makes it confusing.

:23:54.:24:01.

Short of a taping measure, why can't they go by age? Child car seats, as

:24:02.:24:07.

technology advances, have become so complicated. We have a website,

:24:08.:24:16.

child car seats .org.uk, which has 2 million hits per year because

:24:17.:24:21.

parents are confused about the seats that they can purchase. Our if Isis

:24:22.:24:26.

to look at the website, do your research, -- our advice is to look

:24:27.:24:33.

at the website, do your research, look at the maximum age it is

:24:34.:24:36.

appropriate for, look at the weight and plan from birth on what sort of

:24:37.:24:41.

seat that you are going to go for and work through. Our advice is

:24:42.:24:47.

simple. Don't worry much about booster cushions and the new

:24:48.:24:51.

regulations. Actually don't use one of these. We don't think they are

:24:52.:24:58.

dangerous, parents can use the old style seat, they don't have to throw

:24:59.:25:02.

it away, there is nothing wrong with them. These are safer seats. This

:25:03.:25:08.

seat, a high-backed boots deceit, one with a back on, this goes up, it

:25:09.:25:12.

is suitable from about six years up to 12, so it has a huge ages span

:25:13.:25:19.

and these are safer because, as you can see, viewers will be able to

:25:20.:25:26.

see, they offer considerably more protection than a cushion. You will

:25:27.:25:32.

be aware that people think this is more convenient, you can take it out

:25:33.:25:35.

quickly, it is less cumbersome, but you say not as safe? Not as safe,

:25:36.:25:41.

research proves these are safer and that is why it we advise to go for

:25:42.:25:47.

one of these seats rather than the booster cushion. What we are not

:25:48.:25:50.

saying is that they are dangerous and shouldn't be used. As you say,

:25:51.:25:56.

they serve a very useful purpose. They are extremely light, easy to

:25:57.:25:59.

fit, they are great to transport from one car to another, so parents,

:26:00.:26:04.

grandparents and whatever - they serve a useful purpose, but to

:26:05.:26:08.

stress, they are not as safe as these because they don't give as

:26:09.:26:12.

much protection in the event of a collision. OK, thank you very much

:26:13.:26:19.

for your time this morning. He regulations in relation to the

:26:20.:26:24.

booster seats. And if you want to see how they suit you, you might

:26:25.:26:28.

want to see that information on Facebook and Twitter, so have a look

:26:29.:26:30.

online. You're watching

:26:31.:26:30.

Breakfast from BBC News. Let me ask you a question, I am a

:26:31.:26:40.

journalist now. Go ahead. Is there some Troy in new? He is a rather

:26:41.:26:50.

bombastic father figure in this very moving film. He has a lot to say

:26:51.:26:56.

about many things, talking of little about politics, a little about fake

:26:57.:26:58.

news as well. Yeah, good interview. Time now to get the news,

:26:59.:27:01.

travel and weather where you are. This is Breakfast with

:27:02.:30:22.

Steph McGovern and Charlie Stayt. Accident and Emergency departments

:30:23.:30:35.

in England last month suffered their worst waiting time

:30:36.:30:40.

performance since targets were introduced, according

:30:41.:30:43.

to provisional data leaked The Department of Health insists

:30:44.:30:45.

the vast majority of patients The figures also suggest that record

:30:46.:30:51.

numbers of patients have had to wait on trolleys for a bed

:30:52.:30:55.

to become available. We unfortunately do not have enough

:30:56.:31:05.

money to fund social care. So patients who are fit for discharge

:31:06.:31:11.

from the beds us dark rather than being in the community where they

:31:12.:31:18.

and their family want them to be. -- are stuck. It is having a tremendous

:31:19.:31:22.

negative effect on the nurses and dog is in the department. --

:31:23.:31:28.

doctors. The Government has told the House

:31:29.:31:30.

of Lords not to block Brexit, after MPs overwhelmingly backed

:31:31.:31:33.

the bill to trigger Article 50, The Brexit Secretary,

:31:34.:31:36.

David Davis, called on peers to "do their patriotic duty"

:31:37.:31:40.

and pass the legislation. More than 50 Labour MPs defied

:31:41.:31:42.

the three-line whip imposed by their leader, Jeremy Corbyn,

:31:43.:31:45.

and voted against the bill. New laws introduced last year

:31:46.:31:47.

to protect tenants from so called That's according to MPs

:31:48.:31:50.

and housing lawyers. A BBC Freedom of Information

:31:51.:31:53.

request has found that there may be hundreds

:31:54.:31:56.

of thousands of tenants afraid to report things like damp,

:31:57.:32:01.

faulty electrics, and broken boilers,

:32:02.:32:03.

for fear of being evicted. Tributes continue to be paid

:32:04.:32:05.

to Tara Palmer-Tomkinson The actress and model became

:32:06.:32:07.

an "it-girl" in the 90s. She was born into aristocracy

:32:08.:32:14.

and had close ties to She was found dead

:32:15.:32:16.

in her London home. In November last year,

:32:17.:32:20.

she revealed that she had The US Senate has approved

:32:21.:32:22.

President Trump's choice Mr Trump criticised

:32:23.:32:30.

efforts by Democrats Mr Sessions was denied a post

:32:31.:32:33.

as a federal judge in the 1980s, when he was accused of racism,

:32:34.:32:38.

though he's always denied If you lived in Russia and had

:32:39.:32:40.

a constant supply of snow, Well, one man from

:32:41.:32:44.

the village of Sosnovka decided to build the chilliest

:32:45.:32:56.

church in the world. He spent every day for two

:32:57.:32:59.

months constructing it, even when the temperatures

:33:00.:33:02.

plunged below -30. He did it so the villagers had

:33:03.:33:07.

a place to pray as there isn't He said building the alter

:33:08.:33:11.

and getting the cross on the roof were the most difficult

:33:12.:33:22.

parts of the build. Waking at -30 sounds the hardest. I

:33:23.:33:33.

was trying to think of a link to the sport. It has got a roof... What,

:33:34.:33:46.

like the Millennium Stadium? I know that you saw the name of the village

:33:47.:33:58.

approaching on the cuer and thought I will stop here and she would have

:33:59.:34:03.

to say it! Now we know. Next time we have to see it we will be lasting.

:34:04.:34:05.

So will Leicester fans. -- LAUGHING. Struggling Premier League

:34:06.:34:11.

champions, Leicester City, are through to the fifth

:34:12.:34:13.

round of the FA Cup following a replay

:34:14.:34:16.

against Derby County. They came through 3-1

:34:17.:34:17.

after extra time. Andy King put Leicester ahead before

:34:18.:34:19.

Abdoul Camera's deflected free kick Leicester restored their lead

:34:20.:34:22.

through substitute, Wilfred Ndidi, And Demarai Gray's superb solo

:34:23.:34:25.

goal secured their place We want to do well in

:34:26.:34:29.

the competition where we play. Of course we want to go

:34:30.:34:38.

forward in the FA Cup. The Premier League is not so good,

:34:39.:34:42.

but we have to play in the Premier Tonight was about the squad

:34:43.:34:46.

and the injured players getting back We missed the opportunity

:34:47.:34:56.

in the first game. I think he was a little bit more

:34:57.:34:59.

cross than he was showing there. MPs will debate the Football

:35:00.:35:26.

Associations "failure It follows a motion of no confidence

:35:27.:35:28.

in the governing body. Parliament will examine

:35:29.:35:32.

whether the FA is fit for purpose. Last July, Sports Minister,

:35:33.:35:34.

Tracey Crouch, said the governing body would lose its ?30 million

:35:35.:35:37.

to ?40 million of public funding We have heard from Tiger Woods

:35:38.:35:45.

overnight. He said strong things in the interview. He said he will never

:35:46.:35:49.

feel great again. He pulled out because of back spasms. He admitted

:35:50.:35:54.

there were times when he simply did not ever think he would return to

:35:55.:35:56.

golf. Hundreds gathered for the funeral

:35:57.:35:58.

of former England women's cricket captain, Rachael Heyhoe

:35:59.:36:01.

Flint, yesterday. She was a vice president

:36:02.:36:02.

of Wolverhampton Wanderers and people lined the streets

:36:03.:36:04.

and applauded as the limousines Baroness Heyhoe Flint,

:36:05.:36:07.

who captained England between 1966 and 1978, was seen as a pioneer

:36:08.:36:10.

in women's cricket. She died aged 77

:36:11.:36:13.

after a short illness. World champion, Mark Selby,

:36:14.:36:16.

suffered a shock first-round defeat to world number 18, Martin Gould,

:36:17.:36:19.

at snooker's World Grand Prix Better news for

:36:20.:36:22.

Australia's Neil Robertson. He compiled a century break

:36:23.:36:24.

in the first frame of his match He'll face Ronnie O'Sullivan

:36:25.:36:27.

in the next round. Britain is aiming to become one

:36:28.:36:37.

of the world's top five skiing In a year's time, the winter

:36:38.:36:41.

Olympics take place in Pyeongchang, South Korea, and UK Sport

:36:42.:36:45.

says Great Britain can At around 8:40, we'll be talking

:36:46.:36:47.

to Olympic bronze medal winning snowboarder, Jenny Jones,

:36:48.:36:52.

and TeamGB hopeful freestyle skier, A little bit more skiing coming

:36:53.:36:54.

up in just a moment. All about how things have changed

:36:55.:37:24.

and why it is becoming more popular and different types of snowboarding

:37:25.:37:28.

and other things are very popular now. Thank you very much.

:37:29.:37:34.

When Aston Hall Psychiatric Hospital in Derbyshire closed in the 1990s,

:37:35.:37:37.

dozens of former patients began to come forward saying they had been

:37:38.:37:40.

The hospital has been accused of using a discredited "truth serum"

:37:41.:37:44.

In a moment, we'll speak to a woman who was a patient at Aston Hall

:37:45.:37:50.

in the 1970s, but first here's a brief history of what's alleged

:37:51.:37:54.

A country house, the 18th-century Aston Hall near Darby was a 1970

:37:55.:38:13.

psychiatric hospital. Dozens of the child patients from the 1960s and

:38:14.:38:17.

70s now claimed that the hospital's head doctor, the late Dr Kenneth

:38:18.:38:26.

Milner, carried out experiments on of them. They claim to have been

:38:27.:38:32.

injected with a powerful drug. It was used to sedate shell shocked

:38:33.:38:36.

troops in World War Two. It was later used as the so-called "truth

:38:37.:38:43.

drug". There are also reports it can be used to create false memories. Dr

:38:44.:38:50.

Milner died in 1976 on the hospital was closed in the 1990s. It was only

:38:51.:38:56.

when derelict pictures of it came online that the stories came to

:38:57.:39:01.

light. Both the police and the Department of Health are both

:39:02.:39:02.

investigating the allegations. We're joined now by Barbara O'Hare,

:39:03.:39:04.

a former patient at Aston Hall, who has written a book

:39:05.:39:07.

about her experiences. Thank you for coming on to talk us.

:39:08.:39:13.

You are welcome. Having read the book, I have to say what you have

:39:14.:39:17.

gone through in your life in every element, not just the hospital, but

:39:18.:39:21.

every element of your life, it feels like you have been let down

:39:22.:39:24.

massively, not just by the hospital, but the care system generally. I

:39:25.:39:30.

mean, how have you managed to cope? I think that each experience makes

:39:31.:39:34.

you stronger. I think that is exactly what it does. So, for you,

:39:35.:39:40.

you just feel like every experience you have bad, you just got stronger.

:39:41.:39:46.

It hardens you up a bit. It is a bit like grieving. You have to get over

:39:47.:39:51.

it. You get stronger as time goes by and I just grew up that way. That is

:39:52.:39:56.

the way it is. Take us back early on in the story. One of the issues...

:39:57.:40:00.

Some of these are very harrowing and we cannot go into some details about

:40:01.:40:04.

what happened in the hospital itself. But take us back in the

:40:05.:40:10.

story a little bit to why it was you ended up in that situation and why

:40:11.:40:14.

you were in such a vulnerable situation early on. Because many

:40:15.:40:19.

people will think that there might have been a point at which somebody

:40:20.:40:23.

could have got involved in your life. Yes. Originally, my father was

:40:24.:40:29.

left on his own. My mother left. She was not seen. My father was left by

:40:30.:40:36.

himself to raise a little girl. -- sane. How old were you? 11, 12,

:40:37.:40:41.

there is no specific time when that happened. My poor dad was left to

:40:42.:40:47.

bring up a little girl on his own. So, you know, you have to understand

:40:48.:40:51.

what he went through as well. And then you moved from various family

:40:52.:40:58.

member... My father looked for foster carers. And then this private

:40:59.:41:07.

foster carer not greedy. She approached social services and got

:41:08.:41:10.

money off of them as well as my father. And she was very, very, very

:41:11.:41:14.

abusive, as I have stated in the book. Many people who have read the

:41:15.:41:20.

story will think at this point how is that no one wanted to get

:41:21.:41:24.

involved in what was happening in your life? If you want to know the

:41:25.:41:29.

truth, and I will say it, even if it is on television, the social

:41:30.:41:32.

services, according to my reports, were well aware that I was getting

:41:33.:41:37.

abused but let it happen. I was running away and doing everything I

:41:38.:41:40.

could not to go home, doing everything I could to get attention.

:41:41.:41:45.

I was basically crying out for help rather than going home. When her

:41:46.:41:49.

husband came in I would be rejected and sometimes he would not come in

:41:50.:41:53.

until late. That is why I would wait. -- protected. The signs were

:41:54.:41:59.

there. I was too frightened to talk about the beatings and tell them

:42:00.:42:04.

that. I kept hoping they would take me away and then I would tell them.

:42:05.:42:09.

But she was beating me and saying things about my mother who why did

:42:10.:42:13.

not know. I decided I will find my own way. And then eventually,

:42:14.:42:20.

through being in various homes, you ended up being in the hospital in

:42:21.:42:24.

Aston Hall, didn't you? I ended up in a home in Derby. There is a lot

:42:25.:42:34.

of talk about it. I know many who went to Aston Hall, as was mentioned

:42:35.:42:47.

in the Inside Out programme a couple of days ago with Simon. In each

:42:48.:42:51.

chapter, bits of your life get worse if you read the book. It feels like

:42:52.:42:55.

at each stage another terrible thing happens. Now, as you look back and

:42:56.:42:58.

think about other people slides, and maybe people who are in care now,

:42:59.:43:04.

who maybe need to tell someone and alert someone, do you have any more

:43:05.:43:08.

faith in the system now? -- people's lives. None whatsoever in the social

:43:09.:43:12.

care system. I would like to say I do not want anyone in care. Social

:43:13.:43:19.

services is one thing. I think that if children were in care it is

:43:20.:43:23.

important they have a body, the body stays with them throughout the care

:43:24.:43:28.

system, a friend, maybe, you know, someone who will take them to the

:43:29.:43:32.

cinema, someone who will text them, who has to be not the foster parent

:43:33.:43:38.

but a social worker. That was my problem. Obviously, now, having gone

:43:39.:43:44.

through everything you have been through, you decided to write about

:43:45.:43:48.

it. Has that helped you in any way? Oh my god. It is unbelievable. First

:43:49.:43:54.

of all, I just started writing and did not mean to do a book. But

:43:55.:43:58.

another survivor, I will not mention her name, a lovely girl, she went

:43:59.:44:03.

through a similar experience in a place in Kent in a place called

:44:04.:44:09.

Kendall House. That inspired me. If she can do it, I will do what she

:44:10.:44:15.

did. And obviously that led to the book. Many people have come forward.

:44:16.:44:20.

What happened was I was getting flashbacks and panic attacks. There

:44:21.:44:25.

was nothing on my medical records so the doctors could not help me at you

:44:26.:44:31.

knowanyway, after a long time, I found someone on the Internet with a

:44:32.:44:37.

similar story to tell. Then there were three of us. Eventually it

:44:38.:44:42.

grew. It was hard to get the media on board. And now they are coming

:44:43.:44:47.

forward every day. Can I ask you, how important is it to you, the

:44:48.:44:53.

doctors involved in what happens to you died many years ago, how

:44:54.:44:59.

important is it to you that there is an investigation and this is

:45:00.:45:01.

pursued? -- happened. It is very important, not just to

:45:02.:45:10.

me, but to the survivors, you know. We need to know who authorised this,

:45:11.:45:15.

you know. There is a million questions we need answering to get

:45:16.:45:20.

closure. One thing does worry me, you have to remember, for people

:45:21.:45:25.

listening to this, this is a one in a million doctor. Don't think all

:45:26.:45:29.

doctors are like this. They appreciate you coming to tell your

:45:30.:45:34.

story. It is a very harrowing read. Thank you for your time. Thank you

:45:35.:45:39.

for having me. God bless you. And good luck with everything as well.

:45:40.:45:41.

Barbara O'Hare's book is called The Hospital.

:45:42.:45:43.

Here's Carol with a look at this morning's weather.

:45:44.:45:47.

Good morning. It will be cold today, for the next couple of days, and

:45:48.:45:56.

some will have wintry showers, so a mix of rain and sleet on the coast,

:45:57.:46:05.

inland sleet and snow. High pressure is currently dominating the weather,

:46:06.:46:10.

the air is coming from the cold continent and effectively blocking

:46:11.:46:13.

the weather fronts from the Atlantic. If you look at the

:46:14.:46:18.

isobars, you can tell it will be windy, especially in the west. We

:46:19.:46:22.

have gales across north-west Scotland, they will ease through the

:46:23.:46:26.

day. It is frosty to start. Watch out for eyes. The best of the

:46:27.:46:32.

sunshine in the west because central and eastern parts. We are looking at

:46:33.:46:36.

a lot of cloud first thing also wintry showers. Through the

:46:37.:46:41.

afternoon, it will be cloudy in Scotland with wintry showers along

:46:42.:46:45.

the coast, the same for the east coast of England, and you will find

:46:46.:46:50.

it will be rain or sleet, but inland showers will be sleet and snow. That

:46:51.:46:55.

continues through the afternoon. A cold stay in prospect. You might see

:46:56.:47:01.

some rain showers with sleet. To the south-west, we come back under the

:47:02.:47:04.

clear skies with showers possible at times in Cornwall. In western parts

:47:05.:47:09.

of Wales, you hang on to the sunshine, elsewhere it will be

:47:10.:47:14.

cloudy in Wales and feeling cold. And for Northern Ireland, once

:47:15.:47:18.

again, variable amounts of cloud and no heatwave. Through the evening and

:47:19.:47:22.

overnight we hang onto this keen easterly wind. Where we have clear

:47:23.:47:27.

skies for the north-west Scotland and Wales you are likely to see

:47:28.:47:32.

frost, so you may well the scraping your car windscreen. For the rest of

:47:33.:47:37.

the country, there will be cloud around, a breeze and temperatures

:47:38.:47:41.

around freezing, but less likely to be scraping your car as a result in

:47:42.:47:45.

the morning. Tomorrow we start with clear skies to the west, which means

:47:46.:47:50.

the sunshine. For the rest of us, cloudy, wintry showers, on the

:47:51.:47:55.

coast, sleet and rain, inland, sleet and snow, but for Orkney Shetland

:47:56.:48:00.

five to six centimetres, and despite the fact your thermometer might read

:48:01.:48:04.

the temperatures as three or four, it will feel colder than that with

:48:05.:48:09.

the wind. As we head into Saturday, well, once again, the combination of

:48:10.:48:14.

rain, sleet and snow, more organised, as you can see, drifting

:48:15.:48:20.

further west, bringing some of that into Wales, south-west England and

:48:21.:48:24.

Northern Ireland. The wind has changed direction to an

:48:25.:48:26.

north-easterly, so it is exacerbating the cold feel. And then

:48:27.:48:31.

when we get to Sunday it will feel raw. A fair bit of cloud around and

:48:32.:48:35.

that mix of wintry showers. Thank you.

:48:36.:48:39.

High street favourite The Body Shop could be up for sale

:48:40.:48:42.

when it's owner L'Oreal reports annual results later today.

:48:43.:48:46.

Good morning. It has been on many high street since the 1970s. The

:48:47.:49:02.

chances are you might have a product in your bathroom. The Body Shop hit

:49:03.:49:08.

the high street in the 1970s with an ethical stance on animal welfare and

:49:09.:49:13.

it was a huge success, expanding across the world by the 1990s. After

:49:14.:49:17.

a stock market flotation it was joked that their shares defied

:49:18.:49:21.

gravity. Its founder Anita Roddick used her business to campaign animal

:49:22.:49:27.

testing, the environment and body image. She sold it off in 2006 to

:49:28.:49:33.

international cosmetics giant L'Oreal for over ?600 million.

:49:34.:49:37.

With me now is Professor Cathy Parker, a specialist

:49:38.:49:39.

Morning to use. Morning. There is a tendency to think of the Body Shop

:49:40.:49:51.

as a small retailer. It is owned by one of the biggest cosmetic firms in

:49:52.:49:56.

the world, L'Oreal, why do they want to get rid of it? They have a

:49:57.:50:02.

massive portfolio and they buy a brand that will return a good

:50:03.:50:07.

investment to them. And Body Shop isn't doing as well, so they want to

:50:08.:50:11.

buy another brand and get the money that way. What has gone wrong, if it

:50:12.:50:16.

isn't returning the money, where did it lose its way? On many high

:50:17.:50:21.

streets, many have these products at home, so what has changed? When

:50:22.:50:27.

L'Oreal bought the Body Shop, it was at a time when people started to get

:50:28.:50:31.

concerned about ethical issue. At the time there wasn't a ban across

:50:32.:50:37.

the EU on animals being tested on beauty products, so it was a good

:50:38.:50:42.

opportunity for L'Oreal to buy into the market which was profitable at

:50:43.:50:47.

that point, but with the EU legislation all products that we buy

:50:48.:50:51.

here in the UK are not tested on animals, so it is difficult for the

:50:52.:50:55.

Body Shop to stand out and say, why is it different. It has lost its

:50:56.:51:02.

unique selling point, and those ethical issues that it once traded

:51:03.:51:07.

on no longer are relevant? I think they probably are relevant but

:51:08.:51:11.

people take them for granted because they will get it from most of its

:51:12.:51:16.

products. It has done well. People were cynical when L'Oreal took over

:51:17.:51:19.

that it would become another high-street beauty retailer but they

:51:20.:51:22.

have done a lot in biodiversity and ethical procurement, but I don't

:51:23.:51:27.

think they have made enough noise about it and I don't think consumers

:51:28.:51:31.

know that it was all behind the brand. And now Anita Roddick, when

:51:32.:51:35.

they sold it, obviously, you know, she is no longer with us, associated

:51:36.:51:40.

with that brand, it is difficult for people to know what the Body Shop

:51:41.:51:50.

is. Who would want to buy them? No shortage of private equity companies

:51:51.:51:54.

because it is a massive international chain. They have 3000

:51:55.:52:00.

stores in 56 countries, so you are buying into a big global market

:52:01.:52:05.

worth about 50 billion x 2020, so it is an Nundah for forming brand, they

:52:06.:52:10.

want to take it over and get a good return. We were talking on favourite

:52:11.:52:16.

products, what is yours? -- it is an underperforming brand. 1980s,

:52:17.:52:21.

coconut shampoo. LAUGHTER Everyone has one. A lot of people said

:52:22.:52:32.

Duberry. Satsuma, I loved rubbing it on, or whatever you use to do with

:52:33.:52:38.

it. LAUGHTER What was it? All kinds of things, it was a spray, body

:52:39.:52:43.

scrub, moisturiser. Have you ever actually tried it? No, I was making

:52:44.:52:49.

it up. I thought that was obvious! LAUGHTER.

:52:50.:52:51.

Denzel Washington is one of Hollywood's biggest stars

:52:52.:52:53.

and already has two Oscars under his belt.

:52:54.:52:55.

So can he make it a hat trick with his Best Actor nomination this

:52:56.:52:59.

Charlie went to ask him what he thought of his chances

:53:00.:53:03.

of winning, and his opinion of America's new president.

:53:04.:53:08.

It is not easy for me to admit that I have been standing in the same

:53:09.:53:21.

I have been right here with you, Troy.

:53:22.:53:26.

Troy starts off as a rather lovable, bombastic man who likes the sound

:53:27.:53:31.

We have all been guilty of that sometimes, haven't we?

:53:32.:53:35.

It's like there is a ritual on Friday night, and Troy

:53:36.:53:40.

It is the same stories he always tells, and it seemed wonderful,

:53:41.:53:47.

As long as you're in my house you put a "Sir" on the end of it

:53:48.:53:58.

If there is a theme in the film, it is people's ability to change,

:53:59.:54:17.

It is fair, because it is a time in history when a lot

:54:18.:54:23.

And Troy is a character who is not adapting to that change,

:54:24.:54:28.

or maybe not seeing change around him.

:54:29.:54:30.

He is actually wanting to effect change.

:54:31.:54:33.

Now, the small detail in the play is that he doesn't know

:54:34.:54:39.

He doesn't even know how to drive, or read, but he wants that.

:54:40.:54:44.

So in some sense it is ridiculous, but it is also admirable.

:54:45.:54:51.

On the theme of change, right now, in the world we live in,

:54:52.:54:54.

Are you comfortable about the changes that

:54:55.:55:01.

are happening, for example in the US right now?

:55:02.:55:04.

I have been talking about this years ago, the third wave or future shock.

:55:05.:55:08.

We went from an agricultural society to an industrial society.

:55:09.:55:14.

The third wave is the information age.

:55:15.:55:23.

There are millions of people that are falling in the gap,

:55:24.:55:26.

because they don't fit in to this information age.

:55:27.:55:30.

I don't care who you are, you could promise people whole lot,

:55:31.:55:33.

but there is a whole lot of people that are going to...

:55:34.:55:42.

That are in trouble right now, because they just don't fit in.

:55:43.:55:45.

It is no coincidence that the places that were at the height

:55:46.:55:48.

of the Industrial Revolution in America, Pittsburgh,

:55:49.:55:50.

the rustbelt, are suffering the worst right now.

:55:51.:55:52.

And those are the places, of course, where Donald Trump...

:55:53.:55:56.

And I don't care which President it is, they can't promise them

:55:57.:56:00.

anything, and those jobs ain't coming back.

:56:01.:56:02.

When people hear you talking as passionately as you just did

:56:03.:56:10.

about the people who don't have a voice, and who need a voice,

:56:11.:56:14.

they might think, one day Denzel Washington might

:56:15.:56:16.

like to have a bigger voice, voice in government.

:56:17.:56:21.

Time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.

:56:22.:00:06.

Now, though, it is back to Charlie and Steph.

:00:07.:00:09.

Hello, this is Breakfast with Charlie Stayt and Steph McGovern.

:00:10.:00:17.

Record waiting times at A units in English hospitals,

:00:18.:00:19.

according to figures seen by the BBC.

:00:20.:00:21.

Emergency departments suffered their worst

:00:22.:00:22.

performance in 13 years, since the target to see patients

:00:23.:00:24.

Good morning, it's Thursday 9th February.

:00:25.:00:45.

As many as are of the opinion, say, "aye". To the contrary,

:00:46.:01:04.

As Theresa May gets the all-clear to trigger Article 50,

:01:05.:01:07.

the Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn will be here to tell us

:01:08.:01:09.

what he wants to see from the Brexit negotiations.

:01:10.:01:11.

How a new law to tackle rogue landlords is failing

:01:12.:01:14.

to protect tenants from so-called revenge evictions.

:01:15.:01:15.

Travel firm Thomas Cook reports losses of ?67 million,

:01:16.:01:18.

and says it remains cautious about the rest of the year, given

:01:19.:01:20.

Leicester have their first home win of the year.

:01:21.:01:27.

Demarai Gray scores in extra time to help them beat Derby in their FA

:01:28.:01:30.

And I've been talking to Denzel Washington.

:01:31.:01:37.

would you never? Never, ever, ever, ever. What would he never ever ever

:01:38.:01:50.

ever? Get into politics, that is what he would never do. We talked

:01:51.:01:56.

about fatherhood, fake news, and the changing face of US politics.

:01:57.:02:03.

Carroll has the weather. The brightest skies will be in the West,

:02:04.:02:08.

there will be a keen wind, and I will have more detailed in 15

:02:09.:02:09.

minutes. Accident and Emergency departments

:02:10.:02:15.

in England last month had their worst waiting time

:02:16.:02:20.

performance since targets That's according to provisional

:02:21.:02:22.

figures leaked to the BBC. The data also suggests that record

:02:23.:02:25.

numbers of patients have had to wait on trolleys for a bed

:02:26.:02:28.

to become available. The Department of Health insists

:02:29.:02:31.

the vast majority of patients With more, here's our health

:02:32.:02:33.

correspondent Dominic Hughes. For months now, Accident

:02:34.:02:39.

and Emergency departments Last week, the BBC was

:02:40.:02:41.

given exclusive access to the Royal Blackburn Hospital,

:02:42.:02:48.

where the pressure New data leaked from the NHS

:02:49.:02:57.

suggests it's a similar Provisional figures appeared

:02:58.:03:06.

to show that last month 82% of patients were treated,

:03:07.:03:11.

admitted, and discharged within four hours - the worst performance

:03:12.:03:13.

since the target of 95% 780 patients waited for more than 12

:03:14.:03:16.

hours for a bed after being admitted to hospital by a doctor,

:03:17.:03:22.

known as a trolley wait. And more than 60,000 waited more

:03:23.:03:26.

between four and 12 hours, If the figures are correct,

:03:27.:03:30.

it shows the degree Despite huge efforts

:03:31.:03:38.

from 1.4 million staff, the NHS is really struggling

:03:39.:03:44.

to cope with extra demand, These figures are the worst

:03:45.:03:47.

since the four-hour A They just show how much pressure the

:03:48.:03:50.

service is under. The NHS in Scotland is coping

:03:51.:04:00.

better, but similar issues affect Wales and Northern Ireland,

:04:01.:04:05.

symptoms of the pressures building NHS sources acknowledge the system

:04:06.:04:07.

is facing unprecedented demand. And these latest figures suggest

:04:08.:04:10.

there is little sign of respite. The Government has told the House

:04:11.:04:14.

of Lords not to block Brexit, after MPs overwhelmingly backed

:04:15.:04:23.

the bill to trigger Article 50, The Brexit Secretary,

:04:24.:04:25.

David Davis, called on peers to "do their patriotic duty"

:04:26.:04:31.

and pass the legislation. Our political correspondent

:04:32.:04:34.

Carol Walker is in The bill has passed an amended in

:04:35.:04:44.

the House of Commons, now the pressure is on the House of Lords to

:04:45.:04:48.

pass it as well? That is right, and Downing Street

:04:49.:04:51.

has softened its tone somewhat from some of the dire warnings from one

:04:52.:04:55.

source last night who said that if the House of Lords were to try to

:04:56.:04:58.

disrupt the process they would face calls for the House of Lords to be

:04:59.:05:03.

abolished. But I think ministers who believe that the thumping majority

:05:04.:05:07.

they had in the final vote in the Commons sends a very strong signal

:05:08.:05:09.

to the House of Lords, and that although there may

:05:10.:05:31.

be some attempts to amend, change the bill, ministers don't really

:05:32.:05:33.

expect too much difficulty from the Lords now, and they are pretty

:05:34.:05:35.

confident they will be able to stick to their timetable, Trigger Article

:05:36.:05:37.

50 to start formal Brexit negotiations by the end of March.

:05:38.:05:40.

The biggest immediate problem is that facing Labour leader Jeremy

:05:41.:05:42.

Corbyn. We saw last night Clive Lewis, Shadow Business Secretary,

:05:43.:05:44.

resigned, saying he could not support the bill. Jeremy Corbyn now

:05:45.:05:46.

has four Shadow Cabinet posts to fill, he will have to decide what

:05:47.:05:49.

action if any to take against more than a dozen more junior shadow

:05:50.:05:52.

ministers who defied his instructions and voted against the

:05:53.:05:57.

bill, and although his spokesman has dismissed suggestions he might be

:05:58.:06:00.

setting a date for his departure, I think when you see such huge

:06:01.:06:04.

divisions exposed on what is the biggest political issue facing the

:06:05.:06:07.

country, that is a really big problem for the Labour Party and its

:06:08.:06:15.

leader. Thank you very much. Jeremy Corbyn will be joining us on

:06:16.:06:18.

the server in a few minutes to give us his thoughts on this.

:06:19.:06:21.

A new law designed to help protect people in England from so called

:06:22.:06:24.

revenge evictions by rogue landlords isn't working, according to senior

:06:25.:06:27.

A BBC freedom of information request has revealed that there may be

:06:28.:06:33.

hundreds of thousands of vulnerable tenants who are afraid to report

:06:34.:06:36.

things like damp, faulty electrics and broken boilers,

:06:37.:06:38.

Things like damp, faulty electrics and broken boilers can all badly

:06:39.:06:45.

But here in Leeds, there's a concern many are too scared to complain

:06:46.:06:50.

in case their landlord kicks them out.

:06:51.:06:53.

This is rented out as private rented accommodation,

:06:54.:06:55.

People paying to rent here, making complaints, nothing happening

:06:56.:07:03.

and they could be under the threat of revenge eviction.

:07:04.:07:06.

That's the reason why they're not coming forward to the council

:07:07.:07:08.

And that's exactly what happened to Helen.

:07:09.:07:11.

Her and her family were hit with a revenge eviction.

:07:12.:07:14.

After months of complaining, we got a firm of solicitors

:07:15.:07:17.

in who deal with properties in these states of disrepair.

:07:18.:07:19.

They checked the property and they agreed it was damp

:07:20.:07:22.

So they wrote to our landlord and instructed that work needed

:07:23.:07:28.

And within a week of him receiving that, we received a Section 21

:07:29.:07:35.

eviction notice pushed under our door.

:07:36.:07:38.

Because of what happened to people like Helen,

:07:39.:07:42.

a new law was introduced in October 2015 to try to stop retaliatory

:07:43.:07:45.

But we've seen exclusive figures gathered in a Freedom of Information

:07:46.:07:51.

request gathered from hundreds of councils right across England

:07:52.:07:56.

that show more than half haven't stopped any at all.

:07:57.:08:03.

More than a quarter don't even record figures, and fewer than one

:08:04.:08:06.

The Government says "revenge evictions" are rare,

:08:07.:08:10.

and, thanks to its new law, councils have all the powers

:08:11.:08:13.

The decision to put a stop to a programme to allow

:08:14.:08:20.

unaccompanied migrant children to come to the UK is "shameful",

:08:21.:08:23.

according to the Labour peer who campaigned for it.

:08:24.:08:26.

When the Dubs scheme was introduced last year it was hoped thousands

:08:27.:08:29.

By the time the system closes next month, 350 children

:08:30.:08:32.

It was designed by Lord Dubs, a former refugee who

:08:33.:08:37.

Desperate conditions in the refugee camps there.

:08:38.:08:53.

The Government ministers said to me, "We intend to accept the letter

:08:54.:09:02.

My contention is they are not doing that.

:09:03.:09:06.

Tributes continue to be paid to Tara Palmer-Tomkinson

:09:07.:09:09.

The actress and model became an it-girl in the 90s.

:09:10.:09:19.

She was born into aristocracy and had close ties to the royal family.

:09:20.:09:22.

She was found dead in her London home.

:09:23.:09:24.

She revealed that she had a brain tumour in November last year.

:09:25.:09:27.

The US Senate has approved President Trump's choice

:09:28.:09:29.

Mr Trump criticised efforts by Democrats

:09:30.:09:31.

Mr Sessions was denied a post as a federal judge in the 1980s,

:09:32.:09:37.

when he was accused of racism, though he's always

:09:38.:09:39.

Last night the Government took another step towards Brexit -

:09:40.:09:49.

MPs voted by a margin of four to one in favour of the EU Withdrawal Bill,

:09:50.:09:54.

giving Theresa May the authority to start the process of leaving

:09:55.:09:56.

But divisions in the Labour ranks emerged with more than 50

:09:57.:10:00.

MPs voting against it, despite their leader saying

:10:01.:10:02.

So what does this say about the party?

:10:03.:10:06.

The Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn joins us now.

:10:07.:10:09.

Good morning to you, thank you for your time this morning. There is a

:10:10.:10:16.

sense of elation in Government circles obviously, Theresa May,

:10:17.:10:19.

David Davis are elated about what has happened. Can you give us a

:10:20.:10:24.

sense of what your thoughts are this morning? There was a referendum, a

:10:25.:10:28.

decision by the people of this country, and we support the result

:10:29.:10:37.

of the referendum and have to carry it out. It doesn't mean we agree

:10:38.:10:40.

with the Government, it does mean we have to build good relations with

:10:41.:10:51.

everyone across Europe. Diane Abbott, one of your closest allies,

:10:52.:10:53.

said after the vote last time, which she did not take part in this time

:10:54.:10:56.

round, I think Tory Brexit is going to be a disaster. That was after

:10:57.:10:59.

voting for the bill? She was not voting for Tory Brexit, she was

:11:00.:11:02.

voting, as the rest of us were, to respect the referendum and open the

:11:03.:11:05.

way for negotiations. I had a meeting with members of the European

:11:06.:11:08.

Parliament yesterday, in two weeks I am eating socialist leaders from

:11:09.:11:11.

across Europe to discuss and agree on the relationship we will develop

:11:12.:11:16.

with them in the future. The Government does not have a blank

:11:17.:11:20.

cheque to set up an offshore tax haven in Britain, all that it has

:11:21.:11:24.

its authority to proceed with negotiations, which is what the

:11:25.:11:27.

referendum was about. But it absolutely does have a blank check.

:11:28.:11:32.

You tweeted last night, the real fight starts now. Quite a few people

:11:33.:11:36.

have been in touch with us today, David tweeted this morning, why

:11:37.:11:40.

didn't the real fight starts during the campaign? The referendum

:11:41.:11:45.

campaign? Why are you saying the real fight starts now? We campaigned

:11:46.:11:51.

for a yes vote in the referendum, two thirds of Labour supporters

:11:52.:11:55.

voted yes, the majority of Labour MPs, the vast majority, campaigned

:11:56.:11:59.

for a yes vote. That was our position. The referendum result was

:12:00.:12:04.

different, remember it was the largest participation in any

:12:05.:12:07.

electoral process in Britain for as long as I can remember, and there

:12:08.:12:11.

was a result, and Parliament has to respect that result. Moving forward,

:12:12.:12:18.

you can do nothing to stop what the Tories want to do, you just had a

:12:19.:12:23.

series of debates, no concession given, that is almost certainly

:12:24.:12:29.

going to happen again. How exactly are you going to affect what the

:12:30.:12:35.

Tories' negotiate in Europe? At the time Theresa May became a minister

:12:36.:12:41.

she was proposing to start Article 50 without a Parliamentary process,

:12:42.:12:45.

she has been forced into a Parliamentary process, forced into

:12:46.:12:48.

it by legal action and opposition. But that has become academic now,

:12:49.:12:53.

nothing has changed. It is not academic, she has to now report to

:12:54.:12:56.

Parliament on what she's doing, there has to be a vote in all

:12:57.:13:00.

Parliament at the end of this, there has to be... But you have agreed on

:13:01.:13:06.

everything. We have not agreed on everything! Do you not understand,

:13:07.:13:11.

this was a one clause bill giving the Government the power to start

:13:12.:13:15.

the negotiations. In what way are you going to affect what the terms

:13:16.:13:19.

of the negotiation are? They came back, with five months to go, or

:13:20.:13:23.

whatever the timescale is... Two years. The next vote will be

:13:24.:13:29.

approximately five months, and it will be the same thing again, you

:13:30.:13:33.

will do the same thing again, vote with the Government and nothing will

:13:34.:13:37.

have been achieved? Not at all, there will be a repeal bill started

:13:38.:13:41.

in May, a massive piece of legislation, that will be

:13:42.:13:44.

examination line by line of every aspect of the legislation but it is

:13:45.:13:50.

also about the debate we have now, the kind of economy we want. Theresa

:13:51.:13:56.

May said that she was prepared to establish some kind of tax haven in

:13:57.:13:59.

Britain on the shores of Europe, I think that is completely wrong, we

:14:00.:14:03.

will oppose that, campaign against that. We want investment led

:14:04.:14:07.

economy, good relationships with Europe, to protect workers' writes,

:14:08.:14:12.

maternity leave and paternity leave, issues achieved through European

:14:13.:14:16.

regulation. You have lost another member of your Shadow Cabinet, Clive

:14:17.:14:18.

Lewis. People are saying this is a sign of

:14:19.:14:35.

how bad the situation is within the Labour Party, specifically for you

:14:36.:14:38.

as leader, it is a disaster? No, it is not a disaster. The majority of

:14:39.:14:41.

Labour MPs voted to Trigger Article 50. 50 odd voted against it, mainly

:14:42.:14:43.

on the basis of their strong message from their own constituents -- 15

:14:44.:14:49.

voted against. My feeling is that it was a national referendum and

:14:50.:14:52.

Parliament has to respect that. On all the other votes and campaigning

:14:53.:14:57.

points, there is unity. Your personal circumstances, I'm aware of

:14:58.:14:59.

the issue of fake news at the moment. There is a lot of it about!

:15:00.:15:05.

There is a story that you have set a date for when you are going to quit

:15:06.:15:10.

as Labour leader. Is there no truth in that? Absolute nonsense. So your

:15:11.:15:17.

future as leader is intact, you have not considered for a moment whether

:15:18.:15:22.

you are damaging the party... I am surprised the BBC is reporting fake

:15:23.:15:27.

news. I am giving you the opportunity to say... I was elected

:15:28.:15:31.

leader of the party, I am proud to lead the party, we will go through

:15:32.:15:36.

the process demanding social justice in Britain, setting out economic

:15:37.:15:41.

plans for investment led economy, opposing this Government in the

:15:42.:15:46.

crisis in health care, that is our agenda, that is what unites us, that

:15:47.:15:53.

is what I am doing. And if the polls remain the same in two years' time,

:15:54.:15:57.

if you are in the same place in the polls, even Len McCluskey has said

:15:58.:16:00.

he would have to consider your position? We are demanding social

:16:01.:16:04.

justice in Britain, that is what the Labour Party exists for, that is

:16:05.:16:08.

what I joined for and that is what I will continue doing. Can I ask about

:16:09.:16:12.

social care, people will have seen yesterday that he presented Theresa

:16:13.:16:20.

May with the situation unfolding in Surrey, suggesting the local

:16:21.:16:22.

authority is getting special treatment. What would a Labour

:16:23.:16:24.

Government do to improve social care? Everyone knows it is in crisis

:16:25.:16:29.

right now. First of all, several billion pounds has been cut since

:16:30.:16:33.

2010 from social care and the crisis has seeped into a crisis in the

:16:34.:16:40.

hospitals as well because it affects care outside of hospitals, so there

:16:41.:16:43.

is a blocking process in the hospital. That is a problem so we

:16:44.:16:47.

would ensure proper funding of it and would not do sweetheart deals

:16:48.:16:51.

with Surrey County Council is, there has to be a fair national system.

:16:52.:16:56.

The Government's line of development on this is to allow local

:16:57.:17:00.

authorities to raise council tax to pay for it, even if they all raised

:17:01.:17:05.

it by 3% it only raises the sixth of the money necessary but race

:17:06.:17:15.

different sums of money. You get a big sum of money in Windsor, for

:17:16.:17:18.

example, a very small sum of money in Knowsley, there has to be

:17:19.:17:20.

national funding for rate. About ?2 billion is needed. But the crisis in

:17:21.:17:28.

the NHS is also paid for by families, many of whom have to give

:17:29.:17:31.

up work to care for people who should be cared for by the social

:17:32.:17:33.

care You -- Lord Shadow Chancellor was

:17:34.:17:44.

here a week ago News that if Donald Trump was in the UK he wouldn't meet

:17:45.:17:48.

him, what you do? My position is Donald Trump shouldn't come. Would

:17:49.:17:53.

you meet him? I think we have to have relations with USA, I'm not

:17:54.:17:58.

sure he'd want a meeting with us. Is an answer to the question? Would you

:17:59.:18:04.

meet him? The point is Donald Trump has been promoting something that

:18:05.:18:09.

into mine 's international law, promoting misogyny, he's been mating

:18:10.:18:15.

some awful statements in the USA and threatening to build a wall. I think

:18:16.:18:23.

we should be challenging Trump on international law issues and we

:18:24.:18:26.

should be not rolling out the red carpet to him. You could do that if

:18:27.:18:31.

you met him? When he weds a candidate somebody said, would I

:18:32.:18:34.

meet him and I said I thought it would be very useful for him to come

:18:35.:18:39.

to the mosque in my constituency so he could understand something about

:18:40.:18:41.

multicultural society. I don't know if he wants to do that is.

:18:42.:18:47.

Honestly... So we can end this, would you meet him? I think it would

:18:48.:18:51.

be right to meet the president of the USA but I think it would be

:18:52.:18:55.

wrong for him to come here. Thank you! Thank you. I appreciate your

:18:56.:18:59.

time this morning. Thank you for coming in to see us.

:19:00.:19:05.

It's 8.19am and you're watching Breakfast from BBC News.

:19:06.:19:08.

Here's Carol with a look at this morning's weather.

:19:09.:19:13.

A mixed picture this morning. This in Devon but this is in

:19:14.:19:19.

Berwick-upon-Tweed. More cloud around. That tells the forecast

:19:20.:19:22.

quite nicely. In the West under clear skies some lovely sunrises,

:19:23.:19:27.

but in the east there is more cloud on some wintry showers. High

:19:28.:19:30.

pressure is blocking the weather systems coming in from the Atlantic

:19:31.:19:34.

and around this area of high pressure, we are dragging in cold

:19:35.:19:37.

continental air. If you haven't stepped outside yet, it is cold and

:19:38.:19:47.

for some of us frosty. Watch out for some ice on untreated surfaces first

:19:48.:19:50.

thing. A fair bit of sunshine in the West. A few showers dotted around

:19:51.:19:52.

here and there. In Central and eastern areas, some cloud and the

:19:53.:19:55.

cloudier it will stay with wintry showers. Into the afternoon we hang

:19:56.:19:59.

on to some lovely sunshine in the West of Scotland. The gales we have

:20:00.:20:04.

in the north-west easing, snow in the Grampians and in the Southern

:20:05.:20:08.

uplands. As we come across central and eastern parts of England, a lot

:20:09.:20:12.

of cloud. On the coastline some wintry showers, a mix of rain and

:20:13.:20:19.

sleet. You don't have to come too far inland and that will be a mix of

:20:20.:20:23.

sun and snow. In the south-west clearer skies throughout the day.

:20:24.:20:27.

One or two showers in Cornwall. It will still feel cold. The same for

:20:28.:20:31.

West Wales. You will hang onto some sunshine but the rest of Wales,

:20:32.:20:35.

fairly cloudy. Northern Ireland, a lot of the showers fading but still

:20:36.:20:39.

a few rogue ones left behind and bright spells or sunshine. Through

:20:40.:20:42.

this evening and overnight, where we have clear skies, the north-western

:20:43.:20:47.

half of Scotland, West Wales, there will be some frost and you might

:20:48.:20:50.

have to scrape yorker first thing in the morning. Elsewhere, although it

:20:51.:20:55.

will be cold, some frost around but we carry on with the wintry showers,

:20:56.:21:00.

so there could be an issue with ice first thing. Into tomorrow, that's

:21:01.:21:04.

how we start, on that cold node. Still this cold easterly wind coming

:21:05.:21:09.

in. Tomorrow there will be further snow showers, the same combination

:21:10.:21:14.

is today. Sleet and rain in the east on the coast, inland snow.

:21:15.:21:19.

Particularly so across Orkney and Shetland, where we could have up to

:21:20.:21:26.

six centimetres, two inches. Despite the temperatures you will see on

:21:27.:21:29.

your thermometers, at the window and it will fill cold. By Saturday a

:21:30.:21:33.

more organised area of rain, sleet and snow coming from the ease, the

:21:34.:21:38.

wind moves to north-easterly, exacerbating the cold feel. So

:21:39.:21:42.

though showers will make it into Wales, south-west England and also

:21:43.:21:45.

Northern Ireland. But generally speaking the north-west seeing the

:21:46.:21:49.

lion share of the sunshine. A raw feeling day on Sunday. Once

:21:50.:21:52.

again a fair bit of cloud, still this keen wind and still a wintry

:21:53.:21:59.

mix of showers. Thank you.

:22:00.:22:02.

Across the BBC this week we've been looking

:22:03.:22:04.

We've met rural GPs working long hours, seen how cuts are affecting

:22:05.:22:11.

mental health provision, and investigated alternative ways

:22:12.:22:17.

We follow a day in the life of Kathryn Carruthers,

:22:18.:22:22.

a matron at a busy emergency care unit in north London.

:22:23.:22:24.

All those patients you can see are waiting, and there is probably

:22:25.:22:29.

more patients, more patients here, and more patients all down

:22:30.:22:32.

Everybody is trying, but sometimes trying isn't enough,

:22:33.:22:38.

and you feel that everything is gridlocked, and that can

:22:39.:22:40.

I'm the matron for ambulatory emergency care here at

:22:41.:22:48.

We're part of the emergency division.

:22:49.:22:52.

We try to see patients that need urgent care,

:22:53.:22:57.

and get treatment without the requirement for admission.

:22:58.:23:04.

A have already rung this morning to see if we can take some patients

:23:05.:23:07.

that have been down there for quite some time.

:23:08.:23:11.

We don't always have the number of staff that we would like.

:23:12.:23:20.

Lots of staff, and patients on trolleys, and relatives,

:23:21.:23:31.

They have been waiting, you can tell.

:23:32.:23:36.

I know you have been here for a very long time.

:23:37.:23:42.

For me, currently, this is probably the worst I have seen the NHS.

:23:43.:23:47.

When it is completely relentless, I think you do drain staff.

:23:48.:23:53.

There is a woman who has just moved, and she has a bowel obstruction,

:23:54.:24:03.

and she can sit here all night in a chair.

:24:04.:24:06.

It is absolutely full, and nowhere to examine patients.

:24:07.:24:09.

Which is not the hospital's fault, it does its absolute best.

:24:10.:24:15.

Sorry, do you mind if I take this call?

:24:16.:24:20.

Two orthopaedic patients, a chap in a chair.

:24:21.:24:26.

You are not allergic to any medicine?

:24:27.:24:37.

Our department ticked along quite nicely.

:24:38.:24:43.

I don't think it is sustainable to continue this amount of pressure.

:24:44.:24:47.

I'm at an athletic club, before going home and seeing

:24:48.:24:52.

Our thanks to Katherine and the hospital.

:24:53.:25:07.

You can find out much more about the BBC's NHS

:25:08.:25:10.

Including a piece by our Health Correspondent, Nick Triggle,

:25:11.:25:13.

who has analysed ten charts which show why, despite rising

:25:14.:25:15.

Ben has the other main business stories today.

:25:16.:25:27.

Travel firm Thomas Cook has reported losses of ?67m -

:25:28.:25:34.

and warned that it remains cautious about the rest of the year,

:25:35.:25:37.

given the uncertain political and economic outlook.

:25:38.:25:40.

The firm says bookings to Greece are up by over 40%,

:25:41.:25:43.

and destinations like Cyprus, Portugal and Croatia have

:25:44.:25:45.

That's helping make up for poor sales to Turkey and Egypt -

:25:46.:25:51.

as tourists are put off by recent terror attacks.

:25:52.:25:55.

Waitrose says it's looking to close six stores,

:25:56.:25:57.

500 jobs are at risk in Hertford, Staines, Leek, Huntingdon,

:25:58.:26:00.

The supermarket says it tries hard to avoid closing branches

:26:01.:26:09.

but will review how the shops perform and will act accordingly.

:26:10.:26:18.

The battle between our supermarkets is hotting up.

:26:19.:26:26.

Body Shop could be looking for a new owner.

:26:27.:26:29.

The firm, owned by L'Oreal, has 3,000 stores in 66 countries

:26:30.:26:31.

but sales are down sharply and losses last year

:26:32.:26:33.

Lots of people getting in touch talking about their favourite Body

:26:34.:26:44.

Shop products. White mask. Satsuma? I don't remember any of

:26:45.:26:51.

them. I am sure I smelt them. Maybe for the ladies!

:26:52.:26:57.

Thanks very much. Now it is time to get the news, travel and weather

:26:58.:26:58.

where You can get plenty more

:26:59.:30:17.

news on our website, Now, though, it's back

:30:18.:30:19.

to Charlie and Steph. Hello this is Breakfast with

:30:20.:30:22.

Charlie Stayt and Steph McGovern. Accident and Emergency departments

:30:23.:30:43.

in England last month suffered their worst waiting time

:30:44.:30:44.

performance since targets were introduced, according to

:30:45.:30:46.

provisional data leaked to the BBC. The Department of Health insists

:30:47.:30:49.

the vast majority of patients But the figures also suggest that

:30:50.:30:51.

record numbers of patients have had to wait on trolleys for a bed

:30:52.:30:55.

to become available. We unfortunately do not have enough

:30:56.:31:00.

money to fund social care, so patients who are fit for medical

:31:01.:31:03.

discharge in a hospital beds are stuck rather than being in the

:31:04.:31:06.

community where they and their families want them to be first up we

:31:07.:31:10.

don't have enough acute beds, and the increased demand is having a

:31:11.:31:13.

tremendous effect on our nurses and doctors and apartments.

:31:14.:31:21.

The Government has told the House of Lords not to block Brexit,

:31:22.:31:24.

after MPs overwhelmingly backed the bill to trigger Article 50,

:31:25.:31:26.

But divisions in the Labour ranks emerged with more than 50

:31:27.:31:33.

MPs voting against it, despite their leader saying

:31:34.:31:35.

Our Political Correspondent Carol Walker is in

:31:36.:31:37.

So still dissent in the Labour Party, Carol? That's right. Last

:31:38.:31:45.

night, the government had a thumping majority in that final vote in the

:31:46.:31:50.

Commons to give the government the authority to trigger Article 50 to

:31:51.:31:52.

start those poor bricks in negotiations. Jeremy Corbyn had

:31:53.:31:57.

instructed his MPs to vote for the bill, but more than 50 defied those

:31:58.:32:03.

instructions. He had another resignation from his Shadow Cabinet,

:32:04.:32:07.

Clive Lewis, the Shadow Business Secretary said he simply did not

:32:08.:32:11.

believe it would be right for him to support the Article 50 bill. So he

:32:12.:32:16.

resigned. This morning, when you were talking to Jeremy Corbyn just a

:32:17.:32:19.

short time ago, the Labour leader sought to play down the significance

:32:20.:32:26.

of the latest resignations. Now, it is not a disaster. The majority of

:32:27.:32:30.

Labour MPs voted to trigger Article 50. , mainly on the basis of the

:32:31.:32:40.

strong message from their own constituents. -- 50 odd voted

:32:41.:32:45.

against it mainly on the bases of the strong message from their own

:32:46.:32:49.

constituents. Belavia the votes there is unity, nor the other

:32:50.:32:53.

competing points there is unity. Jeremy Corbyn said the idea that he

:32:54.:32:58.

might set a date to stand down as Labour leader is absolute nonsense.

:32:59.:33:02.

He dismissed it as fake news. But there is no doubt he faces a huge

:33:03.:33:08.

problem. He now has to fill four Shadow Cabinet positions, he has to

:33:09.:33:12.

decide what action if any to take against a whole clutch, more than a

:33:13.:33:16.

dozen of more junior shadow ministers who defied his

:33:17.:33:20.

instructions last night. Frankly that vote did lay bare the huge

:33:21.:33:26.

divisions within the Labour Party. And this issue of Brexit, how the

:33:27.:33:30.

government should approach it, how the negotiations should go, will

:33:31.:33:35.

continue to large over our politics. That is a huge problem for the

:33:36.:33:38.

Labour Party to be so divided on such a huge issue.

:33:39.:33:53.

New laws introduced last year to protect tenants from so-called

:33:54.:33:58.

revenge evictions on working. That's according to MPs and housing

:33:59.:34:03.

lawyers. If you receive freedom of information request has found that

:34:04.:34:06.

there may be hundreds of thousands of tenants afraid to report comes

:34:07.:34:09.

with the homes of fear of being evicted.

:34:10.:34:22.

Tributes continue to be paid to Tara Palmer-Tomkinson

:34:23.:34:24.

The actress and model became an it-girl in the nineties.

:34:25.:34:28.

She was born into aristocracy and had close ties to the royal family.

:34:29.:34:31.

She was found dead in her London home.

:34:32.:34:33.

In November last year, she revealed that she had a brain tumour.

:34:34.:34:36.

The US Senate has approved President Trump's choice

:34:37.:34:38.

of Attorney General - Jeff Sessions.

:34:39.:34:40.

Mr Trump criticised efforts by Democrats

:34:41.:34:41.

Mr Sessions was denied a post as a federal judge in the 1980s,

:34:42.:34:45.

when he was accused of racism, though he's always

:34:46.:34:47.

If you are thinking of the most admired and romantic leading men in

:34:48.:34:51.

literary history, I was looking at you because I wasn't going to 30

:34:52.:34:54.

year but I look at you anyway. Jane Austin's Mr Darcy from pride and

:34:55.:34:57.

prejudice is who are talking about. Because when Colin Firth played him

:34:58.:34:59.

he was famously tall, dark and handsome though that might not have

:35:00.:35:02.

been the case according to new research. A slightly different look

:35:03.:35:06.

here. A portrait by a British academic, it paints a very different

:35:07.:35:14.

image. Pale face, powdered white hair, a long nose and a pointed

:35:15.:35:20.

chin. You would save chiselled rather than pointy chin, but there

:35:21.:35:24.

you go. Powdered hair is never a good look, is it? No. They're ago,

:35:25.:35:32.

there is Colin Firth, the big difference the two. 8:35am is the

:35:33.:35:40.

time. Let's see what is coming up on breakfast. Let me ask you a

:35:41.:35:49.

question, I am the journalist now. That is Denzel Washington. He is

:35:50.:35:53.

talking about his new film, Fences. We talk about a lot of things,

:35:54.:35:57.

including fake news and the state of US politics. You don't normally

:35:58.:36:03.

associate computer games with classical music, but this cellist,

:36:04.:36:08.

Tina Guo, wants to change that. She will be here to tell us how she has

:36:09.:36:12.

transformed Pokemon in the next half-hour. Also on the sofa, Luisa

:36:13.:36:24.

Omeilan used to ask yourself, what would Beyonce do? That is the name

:36:25.:36:29.

of her stage show, a lot of music and improvisation, she will be

:36:30.:36:33.

joining us on the sofa later on. I often asked by southernwood Sally

:36:34.:36:36.

Nugent do? I often asked myself what would Beyonce do, every day? What

:36:37.:36:43.

would she do? If you ask yourself that question, she probably wouldn't

:36:44.:36:47.

do the latest results from Leicester. Of course she would, it

:36:48.:36:51.

will be a Hollywood film one day, it is all glamour on this over, I'm

:36:52.:36:57.

telling you. Hotpot cheaply? She would direct it, she would run the

:36:58.:37:02.

thing. Have you not heard of that, she runs the world. Talking of

:37:03.:37:07.

Leicester, a lot of debate about FA Cup replays, whether or not people

:37:08.:37:12.

like them or not. Steve McClaren, the Derby County manager, said why

:37:13.:37:14.

on earth did this go to a replay, should we not have just made the

:37:15.:37:18.

game and it gone the extra time and penalties and been a billion night,

:37:19.:37:21.

instead of changing things around, another match and it doesn't always

:37:22.:37:25.

work out everybody. Both teams last night had ever things to worry about

:37:26.:37:29.

but it was the Premier League champions Leicester City who won,

:37:30.:37:32.

through to the fifth round of the FA Cup. They came through 3-1 against

:37:33.:37:39.

Derby County. Andy King put Leicester had before a deflected

:37:40.:37:42.

free kick forced that match at extra time. Leicester restored their lead

:37:43.:37:47.

through the substitute Wilfred Nditi. His first goal for the club.

:37:48.:37:52.

Demarai Gray's superb solo goal secured their place in the fifth

:37:53.:37:56.

round. Leicester now play Millwall away. We want to do well in all the

:37:57.:38:01.

competitions where we play. Of course we want to go forward also in

:38:02.:38:07.

the FA Cup. The Premier League is not so good that we have to stay in

:38:08.:38:10.

the Premier League and therefore that is now the focus on Sunday.

:38:11.:38:16.

Tonight was about the squad, the French played, the injured players

:38:17.:38:20.

coming back and getting the game. We missed our opportunity in the first

:38:21.:38:25.

game. We did not want a replay. It was a great game, fantastic support

:38:26.:38:30.

from our fans. I could not fault the players.

:38:31.:38:49.

MPs will debate the Football Associations "failure

:38:50.:38:51.

It follows a motion of 'no confidence' in the governing body.

:38:52.:38:55.

Parliament will examine whether the FA is fit for purpose.

:38:56.:38:57.

Last July, sports minister Tracey Crouch said the governing

:38:58.:38:59.

body would lose its ?30m to ?40m of public funding

:39:00.:39:02.

Tiger Woods has said he would ever feel great again. He said two back

:39:03.:39:08.

operations and pulled out of the Dubai Desert classic earlier this

:39:09.:39:11.

month because of spasms. He also admitted there have been times he

:39:12.:39:13.

didn't think he would be able to return to go. The super league

:39:14.:39:17.

season starts this evening. The first matches between Saint Helens

:39:18.:39:22.

at Leeds. Leeds had to secure their place in the top flight through the

:39:23.:39:25.

qualifiers last season, while St Helens were knocked out in the

:39:26.:39:30.

play-off semifinals. The defending champions Wigan. Here they are

:39:31.:39:33.

winning the super league at travel last year. They won their fourth

:39:34.:39:36.

crown, and prevented Warrington from winning their first super league

:39:37.:39:41.

trophy and 61 years. No matter Corporation and training you can put

:39:42.:39:44.

into a sport nothing ever prepares you for this. This be the worst

:39:45.:39:48.

start to amen 's super super genius key race?

:39:49.:40:04.

Khasakstan skier Taras Pimenov, tripped as he left the gate

:40:05.:40:06.

at the Skiing World Championships at St Moritz.

:40:07.:40:08.

After the rather embarrassing face plant he continued on,

:40:09.:40:10.

finishing nearly 20 seconds behind the winner.

:40:11.:40:12.

The technical term is he caught an inch. But he got back up and carried

:40:13.:40:16.

on. The thing as it is separate, isn't it? Funny that, when you are

:40:17.:40:21.

skis and snow, it is slippery. LAUGHTER

:40:22.:40:25.

We will carry on talking about when the sports now. We should ask our

:40:26.:40:29.

next guest about that. It's a year until the Winter

:40:30.:40:33.

Olympics kick off in South Korea. Team GB have high hopes

:40:34.:40:36.

they will have their best ever winter games -

:40:37.:40:38.

beating the four medals they won We'll be joined in a moment by one

:40:39.:40:41.

of those Sochi medal winners, Jenny Jones, along with one of next

:40:42.:40:45.

year's hopefuls, Rowan Cheshire. But first, David McDaid has been

:40:46.:40:48.

finding out how the preparations In PyeongChang, preparations into

:40:49.:41:00.

the home side. Korea is ploughing more than ?8 billion into their

:41:01.:41:04.

first Winter Olympics and Great Britain are aiming to send around 60

:41:05.:41:08.

athletes. Overall the impression is a really good, the stadiums look

:41:09.:41:12.

great, the villagers were not quite at the same stage of construction,

:41:13.:41:17.

about 55%, I would say, but the build quality and everything looks

:41:18.:41:20.

fantastic so I think our athletes are in for a treat when they go to

:41:21.:41:24.

these Olympic Games. But South Koreans may not be so infused.

:41:25.:41:29.

Political corruption scandals there have led organisers to express

:41:30.:41:32.

concerns over public apathy towards the games. But at least one athlete

:41:33.:41:39.

who has already won World Cup gold in PyeongChang is not worried about

:41:40.:41:42.

poor attendances. Now, I don't think so, especially with a short track,

:41:43.:41:47.

Koreans love short track. And I think a lot of this stuff has sold

:41:48.:41:51.

out quite fast. It is like one of the national sports. Kind of like

:41:52.:41:56.

football or rugby would be here. Lizzy Yarnold is the Olympic

:41:57.:42:02.

champion, my goodness! After a best equalling four medals that the Sochi

:42:03.:42:05.

Games com UK Sport have more than doubled their investment in winter

:42:06.:42:09.

sport to more than ?27 million, but with increased money is their

:42:10.:42:14.

increased pressure to deliver? I try not to think it brings more

:42:15.:42:17.

pressure. It just allows us to have more of the things we need to

:42:18.:42:21.

succeed. I think it takes a bit of the pressure off, because there are

:42:22.:42:24.

other things you don't have to worry about because they are in place. So

:42:25.:42:29.

few worries the GB athletes, until at is based upon a star lines in

:42:30.:42:31.

one-year's time. Snowboarding Bronze medal

:42:32.:42:34.

winner, Jenny Jones, and Freestyle skier,

:42:35.:42:35.

Rowan Cheshire, join us now. Jenny Comey have said it is quite a

:42:36.:42:44.

special anniversary of you today. Exactly three years ago to the day

:42:45.:42:49.

that I won my medals. That he won the medal there. Threw this medal,

:42:50.:42:53.

and one year to go until PyeongChang for the Winter Olympics, so that is

:42:54.:42:59.

exciting. We have heard about this target the Great Britain to be one

:43:00.:43:03.

of the top five winter sports nations in the world. Did that even

:43:04.:43:06.

cross your mind when you started because it seems really ambitious

:43:07.:43:11.

now. I think definitely not for me initially. Slopestyle wasn't even in

:43:12.:43:16.

the Olympics, so it wasn't even on my radar, and then there was that

:43:17.:43:21.

two years where I work towards it. Before that it was X games and

:43:22.:43:25.

things like that. Now when you look at the athletes coming through and

:43:26.:43:28.

all of the facilities we have with the snow domes in the dry slopes and

:43:29.:43:32.

the results we are getting this year, especially in Park and pipe

:43:33.:43:40.

and I think there is that potential. Rowan, tell us about your event? I

:43:41.:43:46.

compete in the half pipe. It is basically like half of a pipe, so a

:43:47.:43:53.

shape like that, massive dam the slide of the slip, then you try to

:43:54.:44:01.

do as many technical tricks as possible. How do you decide which a

:44:02.:44:09.

venue will do? It is kind of personal preference, freestyle

:44:10.:44:11.

skiing is similar, doing tricks, and when you go abroad there is the

:44:12.:44:15.

options are trying different things. Is this your event? Yes, this is me.

:44:16.:44:22.

So are you judged on the height you get off the wall? Yes, on height,

:44:23.:44:27.

the amplitude, the technicality of the trick, the style, so that is

:44:28.:44:35.

pretty much what you get judged on. And you're pretty good at getting

:44:36.:44:39.

inverted. You have a flair trick. I haven't done that in a while. Upside

:44:40.:44:46.

down, sideways. But actually you have had to recover from a really

:44:47.:44:50.

tricky time. You had a terrible accident, two years ago now? Yes, it

:44:51.:44:55.

was at the last Olympics, so three years ago now. I basically did that

:44:56.:45:01.

flair trick, the side flip, and just overcooked the landing a bit, just

:45:02.:45:04.

jumped too hard for the shape of the pipe and kind of missed the landing

:45:05.:45:08.

and went straight to my head. So I got a pretty severe concussion. Many

:45:09.:45:15.

people remember that even she posted, very severe concussion. How

:45:16.:45:18.

long did it take to recover from? It was within the year, it was my first

:45:19.:45:22.

major concussion, so not that long really. And then I suffered another

:45:23.:45:28.

two after that, as well. Which wasn't great. Does that not put you

:45:29.:45:34.

off? It did for a little bit, I'm not going to lie, but the healing

:45:35.:45:37.

process, you get your motivation back you start to feel more normal

:45:38.:45:40.

so it is easier to push through and get back into the sport and find the

:45:41.:45:46.

love for it again. You have got to have a a lot of guts to take part on

:45:47.:45:50.

events on the snow. We were just laughing a moment ago, slightly

:45:51.:45:53.

unfairly, it was the guy from Kazakhstan, who started that super

:45:54.:45:58.

G, and that was a fall, no damage done on that occasion, but you it is

:45:59.:46:03.

a high-risk game, you have probably been hurt a few times? Yes, I have a

:46:04.:46:06.

good number of injuries on my list. It's the depiement about how varied

:46:07.:46:21.

the sport is that draws people in -- it's that excitement. We have a new

:46:22.:46:26.

thing called big air which is a really huge jump. In slope style

:46:27.:46:30.

it's three or four jumps and some rails. There are no rails involved,

:46:31.:46:34.

it's one big jump and you get three goes. So go as high as you possibly

:46:35.:46:40.

can? It's how technical your trick is and you get two chances at that.

:46:41.:46:44.

If you want to get into doing this type of sport and you are thinking

:46:45.:46:52.

about it, it's quite an expensive sport isn't it? Is there any funding

:46:53.:46:55.

out there for people at the grass roots level who might not be able to

:46:56.:47:00.

afford the prices at the slopes? Yes, very much so. They've got the

:47:01.:47:09.

Go Ski Board, it's discounted lessons in skiing and snowboarding

:47:10.:47:14.

all over the UK. We have so many dry slopes and snow domes that you can

:47:15.:47:20.

try it at. That's how the youngsters started and can progress through.

:47:21.:47:28.

Katie Ormrod started in a snow dome for years, for example. Do they take

:47:29.:47:40.

you seriously now? I'm old enough to remember Eddie the Eagle Edwards and

:47:41.:47:46.

all that stuff. Has that all gone away, do they take you seriously

:47:47.:47:51.

now? Yes, definitely. It's an English orientated sport. A lot of

:47:52.:47:55.

us have done well in podium finishes now that we have really proven

:47:56.:47:59.

ourselves that we can do this sport, even in a country that doesn't have

:48:00.:48:03.

that much snow. We have beaten the odds a bit and we have proven

:48:04.:48:06.

ourselves worthy being able to compete in the sport. We wish you

:48:07.:48:13.

well. No more injuries! No. It's worth mentioning Dave Riding had a

:48:14.:48:16.

great result in skiing which has been a long time coming so well done

:48:17.:48:21.

to him. We mention him regularly on the programme. Big fan. We were

:48:22.:48:27.

talking about snow, let us find out if there is any sign of it from

:48:28.:48:30.

Carol. There is snow in the forecast but

:48:31.:48:35.

not in the pictures I am about to show you. Look at this gorgeous

:48:36.:48:40.

scene in Devon. Towards Berwick-upon-Tweed, here there's

:48:41.:48:43.

more cloud around. That tells the forecast quite nicely because west

:48:44.:48:47.

has clearer skies, central and eastern areas more cloud and wintry

:48:48.:48:51.

showers. If you are stepping out, these are the temperature values

:48:52.:49:00.

togree you. It's a cold start and for some of us, a frosty one --

:49:01.:49:06.

temperatures to greet you. Towards the west, they'll see the lion's

:49:07.:49:11.

share of the sunshine today. Central and eastern areas, there is

:49:12.:49:15.

a lot of cloud around. Along the coastlines of Scotland and England,

:49:16.:49:19.

you will find not just this morning but through the day, there'll be a

:49:20.:49:23.

mixture of rain and sleet. The showers, not all of us will see

:49:24.:49:27.

them, they move inland and you are more likely to see a combination of

:49:28.:49:31.

sleet and snow. That is what is happening now. It will continue to

:49:32.:49:34.

happen through the day. For many, it's going to be a dry and quite a

:49:35.:49:40.

cloudy day. Also a cold day with the keen wind around. In the north-west

:49:41.:49:45.

it will ease through the day and, as we push into the south-west, it will

:49:46.:49:50.

be largely dry with sunshine through parts of Cornwall and Devon. West

:49:51.:49:56.

Wales seeing sunshine, the rest of Wales cloudy. Northern Ireland,

:49:57.:50:00.

bright and sunny spells, a few showers, not as many as we have seen

:50:01.:50:04.

this morning. Through the evening, still some showers across southern

:50:05.:50:08.

counties, still showers coming in across the east and through central

:50:09.:50:13.

parts of the UK. Under clear skies across north-west Scotland and west

:50:14.:50:17.

Wales, there'll be some frost so you will have to scrape the car in the

:50:18.:50:21.

morning. It won't be a warm night wherever you are with temperatures

:50:22.:50:27.

just on freezing or just below. The risk of ice on untreated surfaces

:50:28.:50:31.

with we have had the showers and it hasn't washed away the salt. Towards

:50:32.:50:36.

the west, the lion's share of the sunshine. Tomorrow, more snow in

:50:37.:50:41.

Orkney and Shetland. Just over two inches. Temperature range between

:50:42.:50:46.

three, five and six. If you are in the wind, it will feel colder than

:50:47.:50:51.

the temperatures are suggesting. For Saturday, a more organised band of

:50:52.:50:56.

rain, sleet and snow coming in from the North Sea pushing west. Wintry

:50:57.:51:00.

flurries across parts of Wales, possibly Northern Ireland and into

:51:01.:51:03.

south-west England. Brighter skies in the north-west. Temperatures four

:51:04.:51:08.

to six but still feeling cold. It will feel raw as we head on into

:51:09.:51:12.

Sunday with the keen wind. A lot of dry weather around but still the

:51:13.:51:15.

wintry showers. The refined world of classical music

:51:16.:51:21.

and the futuristic fantasies But cellist Tina Guo has brought

:51:22.:51:25.

them together in her new album. It features themes from gaming

:51:26.:51:31.

favourites like Pokemon and Super Mario, rearranged

:51:32.:51:35.

for the cello. We'll be speaking to her

:51:36.:51:38.

about what inspired her, but first let's take a look

:51:39.:51:41.

at the result. Tina joins us now. Thank you very

:51:42.:52:40.

much for joining us. Good morning. Interesting watching that video is

:52:41.:52:44.

how many strings are broken as you are playing. Yes. Do you get through

:52:45.:52:48.

a lot? I do. I usually go through one to two bows per show depending

:52:49.:52:53.

on how violent I am in my performance. Very physical

:52:54.:52:57.

performance. Yes. Your cello itself not one that people are accustomed

:52:58.:53:01.

to seeing like that. Can you describe how it's different? Sure.

:53:02.:53:04.

An electric Cheltenham slow the equivalent of what a classical

:53:05.:53:08.

guitar would be, an acoustic guitar to an electric guitar, so the

:53:09.:53:11.

electric Cheltenham slow similar to the electric guitar and can sound

:53:12.:53:16.

almost like an electric guitar. I use pedals, so that's what the

:53:17.:53:21.

equivalent of that is. So you mean it has much more variety of sound,

:53:22.:53:25.

can it sound like a more traditional cello as well? It can, but for a

:53:26.:53:31.

natural acoustic tone you need an acoustic cello but you can do a lot

:53:32.:53:36.

with the pedals. The style of music that you do, how would you describe

:53:37.:53:40.

it to people? I would describe my style of music as everything, just

:53:41.:53:44.

music, because I'm very passionate about all kind of music. I came from

:53:45.:53:49.

a classical background with Chinese music teacher parents, the most

:53:50.:53:52.

traditional that you can possibly get. My other passion is industrial

:53:53.:53:59.

metal. Then cinematic music, new age and what not, so just for me it's

:54:00.:54:03.

about the exploration of music in all forms. Which explains why you

:54:04.:54:07.

have done so many different collaborations and you provide music

:54:08.:54:10.

for lots of different things. Tell me some highlights? Oh, my gosh.

:54:11.:54:15.

Currently we are working on the new Wonder Woman movie. I play the

:54:16.:54:20.

theme. A lot of people, I saw some comments like that guitarist is so

:54:21.:54:24.

cool and I'm like no, it's an electric cello, which I zbes good

:54:25.:54:28.

because my whole goal is I want it to be like a rock-star guitar player

:54:29.:54:33.

thing. It's a good thing that I've achieved that. How does that work

:54:34.:54:37.

with music for a movie like that. Are you coming up with the ideas?

:54:38.:54:43.

You are presumably click rating with the director? Yes, so the theme

:54:44.:54:50.

originated from the collaboration with happens Zimmer. He wrote the

:54:51.:55:03.

Batman movie. The new movie is being script written by the person who I'm

:55:04.:55:07.

also collaborating with. We saw you doing your performances a moment

:55:08.:55:10.

ago. There would have been a time when a cellist would have been

:55:11.:55:14.

sitting very quietly in an orchestra maybe and a hard instrument to

:55:15.:55:18.

perform around because obviously you're attached to it aren't you?

:55:19.:55:22.

Yes. So it confines you to a degree but you have tried to reinvent that

:55:23.:55:27.

with the way you perform? Sure. I can't take credit for playing cello

:55:28.:55:33.

standing up or rocking. There are other great musicians before me like

:55:34.:55:39.

Apocalyptico like my favourite classic metal band. There are two

:55:40.:55:43.

types of playing, one is not better than the other, but it's a different

:55:44.:55:48.

way of expressing. For me, I like to be able to move around a bit more,

:55:49.:55:52.

so playing the electric cello is a bit more freedom, kind of being sat

:55:53.:55:56.

with a big instrument between your legs and being sedentary in that

:55:57.:56:00.

way, it's not like that. Your work involves you working with the gaming

:56:01.:56:05.

industry? Yes. We can see a clip of you performing the Super Mario

:56:06.:56:06.

theme. Let's have a look. Such a classic as well, that music.

:56:07.:56:44.

Takes you back to being sat at your computer playing it. What is your

:56:45.:56:49.

favourite computer game? I spent the most time playing classics growing

:56:50.:56:53.

up with my little brother who was upset. I loved Zelda and Super

:56:54.:57:00.

Mario. Some of the songs on this which is coming out tomorrow are a

:57:01.:57:05.

lot of the classics that I spent my childhood listening to and playing.

:57:06.:57:09.

Do you rehearse a lot? Every day, how much do you practise? So I

:57:10.:57:13.

started the cello when I was seven, practised for eight hours a day.

:57:14.:57:17.

Eight hours a day, including school time? No, not including school time.

:57:18.:57:23.

So after school? Before school, usually about two hours, like before

:57:24.:57:26.

the sun rose my parents were very extreme, I would practise, go to

:57:27.:57:31.

school, come home, do homework, practise eat, practise go to sleep

:57:32.:57:35.

every day. So it was an extreme childhood but I'm very grateful for

:57:36.:57:38.

it right now because I was able to develop the muscle memory, you know,

:57:39.:57:41.

sometimes it just comes down to that, the pure number of hours you

:57:42.:57:45.

put into practising your craft so you are able to express yourself.

:57:46.:57:49.

You had a lie-in this morning didn't you by comparison? Oh, yes, now I

:57:50.:57:53.

don't practise as much, maybe three or four hours. A day? A day, yes,

:57:54.:58:02.

yes. Wow that is a lot still? Yes, I guess it's OK, there are 24 hours in

:58:03.:58:07.

a day so it's not that extreme. Lovely to see you.

:58:08.:58:11.

Denzel Washington is one of Hollywood's biggest stars

:58:12.:58:16.

and already has two Oscars under his belt.

:58:17.:58:19.

So can he make it a hat trick with his Best Actor nomination this

:58:20.:58:22.

Charlie went to ask him what he thought of his chances

:58:23.:58:26.

of winning, and his opinion of America's new president.

:58:27.:58:28.

It is not easy for me to admit that I have been standing in the same

:58:29.:58:42.

I have been right here with you, Troy.

:58:43.:58:47.

It is a very raw emotional film. When you first saw it, is that the

:58:48.:59:04.

thing, I know you have performed on Broadway, something here that people

:59:05.:59:07.

won't necessarily be aware of. What is the first then forgot about it

:59:08.:59:11.

for you? Because it is great writing. Otis Wilson is one of the

:59:12.:59:17.

five or six great playwrights in American history. Jean O'Neill,

:59:18.:59:20.

Tennessee Williams, Arthur Miller, he is right there.

:59:21.:59:22.

Troy starts off as a rather lovable, bombastic man who likes the sound

:59:23.:59:25.

We have all been guilty of that sometimes, haven't we?

:59:26.:59:29.

It's like there is a ritual on Friday night, and Troy

:59:30.:59:33.

It is the same stories he always tells, and it seemed wonderful,

:59:34.:59:42.

As long as you're in my house you put a "Sir" on the end of it

:59:43.:59:51.

Hell, I know it is because of me. But why do you think that is?

:59:52.:00:13.

Because I like you. It is quite raw in terms of father and son, it makes

:00:14.:00:17.

you think how hard you are with your own children, did it have that

:00:18.:00:24.

effect on you? I saw it 30 years ago with James Earl Jones and corny

:00:25.:00:28.

advance. I related to the sun, but my father wasn't like that Troy. So

:00:29.:00:34.

I didn't say, it was not like my father, in that he couldn't read

:00:35.:00:38.

well and he had a manual labour job, and that he talk to me about getting

:00:39.:00:43.

a trade. My father was like Troy in that, or my mother was like the

:00:44.:00:47.

story, in that my mother could see that we should go to college, and

:00:48.:00:52.

all three, me and my brother and sister went to college. I remember

:00:53.:00:55.

my father would fumble, like he is looking for his glasses, because he

:00:56.:01:00.

knew he couldn't really, you know. My mother asked him to take a look

:01:01.:01:03.

at something. Then she was like oh, just committed. Because he was

:01:04.:01:09.

carrying on the pretence of not being to read? Yes, I think it was,

:01:10.:01:10.

a bit. If there is a theme in the film,

:01:11.:01:12.

it is people's ability to change, Because it is a time

:01:13.:01:15.

in history when a lot And Troy is a character who is not

:01:16.:01:26.

adapting to that change, or maybe not seeing

:01:27.:01:30.

change around him. He is actually wanting

:01:31.:01:32.

to effect change. Now, the small detail in the play

:01:33.:01:34.

is that he doesn't know He doesn't even know how to drive,

:01:35.:01:40.

or read, but he wants that. So in some sense it is ridiculous,

:01:41.:01:45.

but it is also admirable. On the theme of change, right now,

:01:46.:01:49.

in the world we live in, Are you comfortable

:01:50.:01:53.

about the changes that are happening, for example

:01:54.:01:58.

in the US right now? I have been talking about this

:01:59.:02:01.

years ago, the third We went from an agricultural society

:02:02.:02:10.

to an industrial society. The third wave is

:02:11.:02:15.

the information age. There are millions of people that

:02:16.:02:20.

are falling in the gap, because they don't fit

:02:21.:02:23.

in to this information age. I don't care who you are, you could

:02:24.:02:33.

promise people a whole lot, but there is a whole lot of people

:02:34.:02:36.

that are going to... That are in trouble right now,

:02:37.:02:39.

because they just don't fit in. It is no coincidence that the places

:02:40.:02:43.

that were at the height of the Industrial Revolution

:02:44.:02:46.

in America, Pittsburgh, the rust belt, are suffering

:02:47.:02:48.

the worst right now. And those are the places, of course,

:02:49.:02:53.

where Donald Trump... And I don't care which President

:02:54.:02:56.

it is, they can't promise them anything, and those

:02:57.:03:01.

jobs ain't coming back. So what is the long-term effect of

:03:02.:03:14.

too much information? The polarisation of the electorate? A

:03:15.:03:19.

meaner spiritless. And false information. Orbit, pick one, it is

:03:20.:03:23.

not just one, that is just the flavour of the day, everyday to

:03:24.:03:27.

something else. People have to understand are you using your

:03:28.:03:32.

device, or is your device using you? Can you put it down, can you turn it

:03:33.:03:38.

off? Phone, television, pick one. It used to be news, now it is opinions.

:03:39.:03:43.

Oh, glasses, we have three experts on the right, three experts on the

:03:44.:03:47.

left, let's discuss. That is not news, that is opinions news. Over

:03:48.:03:52.

and over and over, cycle, cycle, cycle, cycle. What is the long-term

:03:53.:03:56.

effect of too much information? If you are sitting there and thinking

:03:57.:03:59.

it is the gospel... What I am saying to people is the Holebas, I am not

:04:00.:04:04.

knocking the phone, what I am saying is that we have to understand, we

:04:05.:04:09.

have the least ask ourselves, around the world, newcomer here in England,

:04:10.:04:12.

wherever you are, what is it doing to us?

:04:13.:04:15.

When people hear you talking as passionately as you just did

:04:16.:04:18.

about the people who don't have a voice, and who need a voice,

:04:19.:04:21.

they might think, one day Denzel Washington might

:04:22.:04:23.

like to have a bigger voice, a voice in government.

:04:24.:04:25.

I told him if he wasn't the mankind to move at the ways of mankind could

:04:26.:04:45.

finally. That Comey, you are in my way, you are blocking the view. It

:04:46.:04:50.

is a film that is full of extraordinary performances, very

:04:51.:04:53.

moving, and I suggest people take a handkerchief when they go. LAUGHTER

:04:54.:04:58.

I am don't ask you a question, you said you went home and you kissed a

:04:59.:05:03.

boy, you have your boy. Yeah. Because you weren't doing that

:05:04.:05:08.

before? No, it is one of those films... Let me ask you a question,

:05:09.:05:12.

I am the journalist now! Is there some Troy in you. Every father,

:05:13.:05:21.

there is, he likes the sound of his own voice. Yeah, of course. What

:05:22.:05:27.

about your dad, was he tough on you? He was pretty liberal. Too loose?

:05:28.:05:33.

Often you can just get lost, hearing the sound of your own voice. Maybe

:05:34.:05:40.

you have done it too? My father-in-law was great at being

:05:41.:05:46.

quiet, and letting you figure... Like you would realise it later, and

:05:47.:05:49.

he didn't say anything but he spoke volumes, and you had to work at

:05:50.:05:53.

that, because maybe you had a bad day, and you come in, and your

:05:54.:05:56.

senses do what they say, before you know it, you are in that zone. But

:05:57.:06:01.

he is also becoming a man, he is not a man yet, and you don't want to

:06:02.:06:05.

kill that spirit. I never wanted to kill the spirit of my boys. I want

:06:06.:06:09.

them to be strong, I want them to be tough. But I wanted them to do what

:06:10.:06:14.

I said, too! You know, so we all have that moment, I remember I had

:06:15.:06:19.

it with Mike oldest son, that moment when, it might have been basketball

:06:20.:06:23.

something that got physical. Then I had that the moment where I couldn't

:06:24.:06:28.

keep up with them any more. It has been a real pleasure. Thank you so

:06:29.:06:30.

much. My pleasure. Denzel Washington's thoughts on a

:06:31.:06:39.

lot of things. He is a man with a lot of things, when you are in the

:06:40.:06:42.

room, he has one of those voices that fills the room. The film Cowan

:06:43.:06:46.

fences was previously a play on Broadway. You would need a bigger

:06:47.:06:49.

voice for that. Excellent. We'll be speaking to the comedian

:06:50.:06:52.

Luisa Omielan in a moment, but first, a last, brief look

:06:53.:06:54.

at the headlines where but first, a last, brief look

:06:55.:08:31.

Celsius. That is it from me this morning, please join me at 1:30pm

:08:32.:08:34.

with all of the lunchtime news, goodbye.

:08:35.:08:45.

This is a question I often ask myself:

:08:46.:08:50.

That's what Luisa Omielan's used to ask herself whenever life

:08:51.:08:54.

It might have started out as a personal mantra for her life,

:08:55.:08:58.

but she managed to turn the idea into comedy gold.

:08:59.:09:02.

LAUGHTER You know what I mean! Have you ever

:09:03.:09:12.

been introduced as a man before? May will make it easier for me, going

:09:13.:09:17.

forward? It was definitely a one-woman show at the Edinburgh

:09:18.:09:21.

Festival. Let's have a look at the show. I'm sorry, it is going wrong

:09:22.:09:26.

now! I thought we were going to have a look but we can't do that right

:09:27.:09:30.

now. So explain to us the idea, where did that come from? I found

:09:31.:09:36.

myself moving back into my mum 's house after graduating, but everyone

:09:37.:09:39.

always said to me when you graduate, that is when your life wasn't a

:09:40.:09:43.

place, you get a good agree, you can move into a house with two garages,

:09:44.:09:48.

a car, and two babies. I found myself approaching 25, 26, moving

:09:49.:09:55.

into my Mum's house, lying on my CV to try to get a job and a copy shop,

:09:56.:10:00.

how did it go so wrong? I spoke my phone, and she said you know you are

:10:01.:10:05.

the same age as Beyonce? I thought how is she filling out arenas and I

:10:06.:10:13.

am filling out a CV for a job and a cough shop? So I asked myself what

:10:14.:10:17.

would Beyonce do? Whenever I would get bored, I would play a Beyonce

:10:18.:10:21.

song, and people really liked it and it went from there. Your show is

:10:22.:10:25.

like a real party atmosphere, which you don't often see at comedy shows.

:10:26.:10:30.

Literally be bluff: dancing at your shows. That is the whole point of

:10:31.:10:34.

them, I call it a party with jokes in, because I talk about lots of

:10:35.:10:39.

topics that are quite sensitive, depression, mental health, body

:10:40.:10:43.

image, quite serious topics, but I think if you use, data is a real way

:10:44.:10:47.

to get people to open up and be receptive to information. So I make

:10:48.:10:54.

sure my shows are like a party. There are interludes where you just

:10:55.:10:57.

crank up the music basically, and it gives you a little bit of a break,

:10:58.:11:02.

and maybe the momentum changes a bit. You say you talk about

:11:03.:11:04.

sensitive things, you talk about your mum and dad, problems in

:11:05.:11:11.

relationships. Some of it is very, very personal. Some of it is, and I

:11:12.:11:15.

think it is important to talk about it, I talk about different mental

:11:16.:11:19.

health things, antidepressants, all those kinds of things. That by doing

:11:20.:11:23.

it with comedy, I think it just helps the healing process. I think

:11:24.:11:28.

it makes you feel better. People can really identify with that. My whole

:11:29.:11:33.

show is quite aspirational, why aren't I like Beyonce? But I think

:11:34.:11:36.

people can really identify with that feeling of we want our lives to be

:11:37.:11:39.

good but at the moment it is pretty pants. People can maybe identify

:11:40.:11:43.

with that feeling of I want better for myself. Quite aspirational, as

:11:44.:11:47.

well. You have been doing the show for five years and now it is going

:11:48.:11:53.

on TV. I know. Was its Kerry Wynn reforming it? Knowing there was

:11:54.:11:59.

cameras. Mate, I was wetting myself, I was absolutely wetting myself.

:12:00.:12:03.

Normally with the show I'm full of bravado, and with this one I was

:12:04.:12:09.

like... Welcome to the show! But my audiences are amazing, so I have

:12:10.:12:13.

built a following through my live audience, they are really loyal and

:12:14.:12:16.

supportive, so I put on the show, it filled up within a day, and they

:12:17.:12:20.

were there, and they were there with jumpers and T-shirts and banners,

:12:21.:12:24.

really supportive. That is really lovely. You do that thing at the

:12:25.:12:27.

beginning of the show where you bring someone up on stage. Yes, to

:12:28.:12:31.

introduce me. Because I started the show on the fringe, the free fringe,

:12:32.:12:39.

I set up in a room above a pub, I would set up the chairs, clear the

:12:40.:12:45.

glasses out, get the audience in, play the music on my phone.

:12:46.:12:48.

Initially when the audience came in I didn't know how to start, because

:12:49.:12:52.

I have been the doorman and now I have to be like, oh, I'm on stage,

:12:53.:12:56.

so I was like Wright, new, can you introduce me and then I will do like

:12:57.:12:59.

an entrance. It started like that Ashun I was like, right, you.

:13:00.:13:10.

Supporters next few come every year I have a Valentines party, I have on

:13:11.:13:16.

this Saturday at the firm at Kentish Town, called am I right, ladies? It

:13:17.:13:20.

is my show followed by a big party, so loads of June. I apologise once

:13:21.:13:27.

again to calling a man. It's fine, I get it over time. You put it in your

:13:28.:13:34.

show. Luisa Omeilan's show will be on BBC Three on Valentine's Day.

:13:35.:13:42.

If you've settled down to watch this with a nice cuppa,

:13:43.:13:45.