10/02/2017 Breakfast


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10/02/2017

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This is Breakfast, with Steph McGovern and Charlie

:00:00.:00:09.

The Health Secretary admits the situation at some hospitals

:00:10.:00:12.

Jeremy Hunt says there's no silver bullet but the Government has a plan

:00:13.:00:18.

I am doing this job because I want NHS care to be the safest and best

:00:19.:00:33.

in the world. And that kind of care is completely unacceptable.

:00:34.:00:45.

Donald Trump vows to fight on as a US appeals court says

:00:46.:00:51.

Good morning. Could we see spaceflights taking off from the

:00:52.:01:09.

UKindustry is worth ?14 billion to the economy. I am in the space

:01:10.:01:13.

centre to see what is possible. In the sport, change now,

:01:14.:01:14.

or face government action. That's the warning from MP's

:01:15.:01:17.

to the Football Association, after a vote of no confidence,

:01:18.:01:19.

in English football's governing And we have the weather. Good

:01:20.:01:28.

morning. Good morning. A chilly last commute of the week. Sleet and snow

:01:29.:01:33.

this morning. Wintry flows to come through this weekend in the wind

:01:34.:01:34.

will get even stronger. And I'll have all the weather

:01:35.:01:41.

forecast details in 15 minutes. Thanks.

:01:42.:01:42.

The Health Secretary, Jeremy Hunt, says it's "completely unacceptable"

:01:43.:01:44.

that some patients are waiting up to 13 hours in A

:01:45.:01:47.

In an exclusive BBC interview, he paid tribute to the hard work

:01:48.:01:50.

of staff, but said the problems of high demand were not unique

:01:51.:01:54.

Our health editor, Hugh Pym, has more.

:01:55.:02:02.

NHS England figures this winter show the worst performance since records

:02:03.:02:09.

began more than a decade ago. Jeremy Hunt paid tribute to the work of

:02:10.:02:13.

staff, but said the problems of high patient demand were not unique to

:02:14.:02:17.

the NHS, and all leading hills systems were grappling with the same

:02:18.:02:20.

challenge. He said there was no silver bullet. It is wrong to

:02:21.:02:24.

suggest to people that these profound challenges such as we face

:02:25.:02:30.

with an ageing population are ones where there is a silver bullet where

:02:31.:02:34.

you can solve the problem overnight. We have a good plan and it has the

:02:35.:02:39.

support of the NHS and will take time to deliver. We showed coverage

:02:40.:02:45.

this week of patients experiencing lengthy waits and a woman who had to

:02:46.:02:49.

spend six months in a hospital because no care home space was

:02:50.:02:53.

available. He said there were no excuses and this was unacceptable.

:02:54.:02:57.

It was incredibly frustrating for me, doing this job, because I want

:02:58.:03:04.

NHS care to be the safest and best in the world. And that kind of care

:03:05.:03:08.

is completely unacceptable. And no one would want it for members of

:03:09.:03:13.

their own family. Problems over the sustainability of social care, he

:03:14.:03:18.

said, were now being addressed by the government. But Sir Robert

:03:19.:03:23.

Francis said it was inevitable that the same mistakes will be made again

:03:24.:03:27.

if the current pressure on NHS resources continued. Hugh Pym, BBC

:03:28.:03:30.

News. A Federal appeals court has refused

:03:31.:03:32.

to reinstate Donald Trump's ban on travellers from seven

:03:33.:03:35.

mainly Muslim countries. The controversial immigration reform

:03:36.:03:37.

was suspended last week. The US President responded

:03:38.:03:39.

to the ruling saying there will be The case is now likely to go

:03:40.:03:42.

to The Supreme Court. Donald Trump's sudden ban on

:03:43.:03:56.

visitors from seven mainly Muslim nations caused chaos at airports and

:03:57.:04:02.

spiked protesting around the US. And then last week, a district judge in

:04:03.:04:08.

Seattle granted a stay, and now a San Francisco -based appeals court

:04:09.:04:14.

has kept that going. And no one from those seven nations has carried out

:04:15.:04:18.

an attack on the US. The decision infuriated Donald Trump. He wrote

:04:19.:04:24.

this. That prompted the leader of one of the States leading the

:04:25.:04:34.

challenge to reply this. And appealed to the highest court in the

:04:35.:04:38.

land, the US Supreme Court, now seems likely. -- an appeal. But they

:04:39.:04:43.

could put the decision in the hands of a court that is currently evenly

:04:44.:04:49.

decided, and a Thai would leave it in place. Donald Trump maintains his

:04:50.:04:55.

ban is necessary in order to protect the US from terrorism, but it may

:04:56.:04:59.

yet be proven unconstitutional. And until he has his day in court,

:05:00.:05:04.

refugees from around the world and citizens from those seven Muslim

:05:05.:05:09.

nations can continue to come into this country. David Willis, BBC

:05:10.:05:10.

News, in Washington. Campaigners will challenge

:05:11.:05:12.

the government's handling of the arrival of unaccompanied

:05:13.:05:14.

child refugees at a High Court They say ministers have not worked

:05:15.:05:17.

with local councils to find enough The judicial review comes

:05:18.:05:20.

after the government announced they would close a key humanitarian

:05:21.:05:24.

route into the UK once a total Inflation increases in council tax

:05:25.:05:27.

will hit many households in England The Local Government Information

:05:28.:05:40.

Unit says that 94% of council leaders and senior officials

:05:41.:05:44.

questioned said they would be forced to put up taxes and increase

:05:45.:05:47.

charging for services. Some households will

:05:48.:05:49.

face rises of up to 5%. Rail ticket machines cause so much

:05:50.:06:00.

confusion that a fifth of passengers who use them buy the wrong ticket,

:06:01.:06:05.

according to the rail regulator. While 7% of travellers

:06:06.:06:09.

underpay and could be fined, The Office of Rail and Road wants

:06:10.:06:11.

train companies to refund passengers who accidentally buy tickets

:06:12.:06:16.

which are too expensive Buying a train ticket can be

:06:17.:06:27.

difficult at the best of times. This report says that buying one from a

:06:28.:06:31.

machine without any human help can be even more confusing. The

:06:32.:06:36.

independent regulator, the Office of Rail and Road, carried out a study

:06:37.:06:39.

using mystery shoppers. It found that many people bought the wrong

:06:40.:06:43.

tickets. 13% paid more for their tickets than they needed to. 6% paid

:06:44.:06:48.

less than they should have done, opening themselves to the risk of

:06:49.:06:54.

being fined. And 65% could not find any information about which type of

:06:55.:06:58.

ticket they should be buying. One person found that buying a ticket

:06:59.:07:02.

with a real card was actually more expensive than buying one without.

:07:03.:07:06.

The consumer group Which described it as a mess, saying it was

:07:07.:07:10.

unacceptable that some passengers were paying over the odds. In

:07:11.:07:13.

December, the Department of Transport launched an action plan to

:07:14.:07:18.

improve to getting. Last week, rail operators announced a trial scheme

:07:19.:07:21.

that would automatically offered the cheapest fares to passengers. The

:07:22.:07:25.

rail minister, Paul Maynard, welcomed this latest report, saying

:07:26.:07:29.

the ticketing was often to complicated and hard to navigate.

:07:30.:07:32.

The rail operator said it was difficult to offer simple options

:07:33.:07:37.

because of what they called decades-old rail operations from the

:07:38.:07:40.

government. Andy Moore, BBC News. The BBC has learned

:07:41.:07:48.

that the organisation responsible for advising English health trusts

:07:49.:07:50.

on the security of staff That's despite a steep increase

:07:51.:07:53.

in attacks on doctors and nurses. NHS Protect has confirmed

:07:54.:07:57.

that its role in hospital security will continue only

:07:58.:07:59.

until the end of March. There were chaotic scenes

:08:00.:08:02.

in the South African parliament as President Jacob Zuma tried

:08:03.:08:04.

to deliver his annual state Opposition MPs called the president

:08:05.:08:07.

a "scoundrel" and "rotten to the core" because of

:08:08.:08:10.

corruption allegations. The President ordered the deployment

:08:11.:08:12.

of troops around the Parliament building to deal with

:08:13.:08:15.

thousands of protestors. Hundreds of whales have died

:08:16.:08:22.

on a beach in New Zealand The pilot whales were discovered

:08:23.:08:25.

on Farewell Spit on the South Conservation Department staff

:08:26.:08:29.

and volunteers are trying to save 100 of them

:08:30.:08:32.

that are still alive. Whale strandings at Farewell Spit

:08:33.:08:34.

are fairly common but this A fountain of bright lava that

:08:35.:08:37.

gushed from a hole in the side of a cliff for a month before

:08:38.:08:55.

disappearing has made It's known as the "fire hose,"

:08:56.:08:57.

and it seemed to have vanished from Hawaii's Kilauea

:08:58.:09:03.

Volcano last week. But it's since re-emerged,

:09:04.:09:05.

pouring a stream of molten lava over That is incredible, the colour,

:09:06.:09:08.

isn't it? A rare baby antelope just 19

:09:09.:09:23.

centimetres tall has joined The calf named Thanos was left

:09:24.:09:28.

orphaned when its mother died It's one of the world's smallest

:09:29.:09:32.

breeds of antelope and the baby is currently so light it doesn't

:09:33.:09:36.

register on the zoo's scales. When you see it with a person you

:09:37.:09:39.

get an idea of just how small it is. Staff are raising it by hand

:09:40.:09:44.

until it is big enough I bet there will be a lot of people

:09:45.:09:58.

that want to go and meet Thanos now. It is very cute. Hello, Mike. It is

:09:59.:10:06.

like a rabbit, isn't it? Well... Actually it's like an antelope. Why

:10:07.:10:11.

should people cared that a group of MPs have given a vote of no

:10:12.:10:15.

confidence into the FA? If it does not modernise it could lose

:10:16.:10:19.

30-40,000,000 pounds of funding. And they want the FA to do more about

:10:20.:10:26.

the England team, to make it more competitive at tournaments, to

:10:27.:10:29.

readdress the power of the Premier League at the moment. And also the

:10:30.:10:35.

make of the FA, the board, who makes all the decisions. The message is

:10:36.:10:36.

changed or be changed. -- That's the message from MP's

:10:37.:10:51.

to the FA, after their vote That vote isn't binding,

:10:52.:10:54.

but government legislation, could follow, if English football's

:10:55.:10:57.

governing body fails to act. As things stand, there are 122

:10:58.:11:00.

members, that make the big decisions, on the FA council,

:11:01.:11:03.

and more than 90 per-cent of them A spokesman for the FA says it's

:11:04.:11:06.

reforming all the time, and thinks the Government should

:11:07.:11:10.

be focusing on other Wales are confident,

:11:11.:11:13.

two of their main stars, George North and Dan Biggar

:11:14.:11:16.

will be fit to face England in the Six Nations tomorrow..they're

:11:17.:11:19.

named in the team, but England are pleased that the roof will be

:11:20.:11:22.

open at the Millenium Stadium. A new season of rugby league's

:11:23.:11:27.

Super League is under way, and in a tight game St Helens

:11:28.:11:30.

just edged Leeds 6-4. And Great Britain's women

:11:31.:11:33.

are one step closer, After two resounding wins,

:11:34.:11:35.

Jo Konta and company can guarantee a place in the play-offs this

:11:36.:11:39.

weekend with victory over they must have been training with

:11:40.:12:01.

Charlie and I last week. They have fine-tuned their serves and volleys

:12:02.:12:06.

and backhands. So, the play-offs. They want to see if they can finally

:12:07.:12:10.

get back into the world top groups. We will have a look at the papers in

:12:11.:12:15.

just a minute so stay there. First, the weather. Good morning. Good

:12:16.:12:22.

morning. Another chilly day out there. Temperature-wise, this

:12:23.:12:25.

morning, not as low as you would imagine. It feels cold thanks to a

:12:26.:12:31.

strengthening wind. Wind and ice this morning, especially in Scotland

:12:32.:12:35.

and north-east England. Further wintry showers expected, especially

:12:36.:12:42.

in the east. West will be best. The details. Further sleet and snow

:12:43.:12:47.

flurries this morning. Further south and into East Anglia, rain, drizzle,

:12:48.:12:53.

and sleet. Damp underfoot. With temperatures quite low, ice around.

:12:54.:12:59.

Further west, a frosty start. We will see a lot of sunshine across

:13:00.:13:02.

the north and west of Scotland, parts of Northern Ireland as well.

:13:03.:13:05.

West England not faring too badly. Snow showers keep coming in with

:13:06.:13:10.

sleet in the north-east of England and further patchy rain and drizzle

:13:11.:13:15.

and sleet in East Anglia and the south-east. A grey day. As the wind

:13:16.:13:20.

picks up, chilly. Parts of the south-east may see some brightness

:13:21.:13:24.

at times a day but we have to head to the west of the country to see

:13:25.:13:28.

the best of the sunny weather. One or two showers in the south with

:13:29.:13:31.

Devon and Cornwall. Wales, largely dry. The best of the sunshine in

:13:32.:13:35.

Cardigan Bay. Northern Ireland, not faring too badly as far as sunshine

:13:36.:13:41.

is concerned. Cloudy at times. The weather through the country is not

:13:42.:13:45.

especially warm. Temperatures only around 1- five degrees at best for

:13:46.:13:51.

the most part. Tonight, sleet and snow flurries continue and become

:13:52.:13:54.

more abundant across eastern areas into the second half of the night as

:13:55.:13:58.

the wind picks up. Western areas always clearest. Widespread frost.

:13:59.:14:02.

Temperatures in north-west Scotland could drop to -10. Way you have

:14:03.:14:06.

wintry showers, ice into Saturday morning. More showers around

:14:07.:14:11.

generally and they will push further west. Sleet and snow to begin with.

:14:12.:14:15.

Snow continuing in the hills of northern England and south-east

:14:16.:14:18.

Scotland through the day. Elsewhere, snow showers turned back to rain and

:14:19.:14:26.

sleet. It will not feel warm. Temperatures will again be not far

:14:27.:14:30.

off today's values. Add on the wind and it will feel cold. Sunday,

:14:31.:14:36.

Wales, showers. Slightly fewer in number compared to Saturday. A

:14:37.:14:40.

slightly dry day. The best in the brightness as Rudy weekend is

:14:41.:14:45.

Scotland and Northern Ireland. But the wind will be strong in England

:14:46.:14:49.

and Wales especially. Touching gale force in one or two places. That

:14:50.:14:54.

will feel raw and sub-zero for some of you. Just before I go, this

:14:55.:14:59.

evening there is a lunar eclipse. It is a full moon. It is in fact, quite

:15:00.:15:10.

aptly, a snow moon. It is going to appear full, but quite dark with a

:15:11.:15:21.

shadow from the Earth at half ten tonight. Every full moon is given a

:15:22.:15:25.

slightly different name through the year. Because there is dominant snow

:15:26.:15:28.

this time of year in February it is a snow moon. Thank you.

:15:29.:15:33.

You're watching Breakfast from BBC News.

:15:34.:15:35.

The Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt tells that BBC that waiting times

:15:36.:15:40.

in some English hospitals is completely unacceptable.

:15:41.:15:46.

President Trump has suffered a setback to his immigration policy,

:15:47.:15:50.

after a Federal Appeal Court refused to reinstate his travel ban.

:15:51.:15:59.

A quick look at some of the front pages. The front page of the Sun.

:16:00.:16:10.

News of her death announced this week. The Sun talking about some of

:16:11.:16:17.

her friends. They were saying every day they want drugs more. Talking

:16:18.:16:22.

about the dark place she was in. A lot of the newspapers are talking

:16:23.:16:26.

about the story we have been covering this week, about NHS

:16:27.:16:31.

spending. Despite our ageing population, NHS funding is growing

:16:32.:16:37.

at the lowest rates since records began in 1955. And there's a picture

:16:38.:16:41.

from that time. We will spend a bit of time this

:16:42.:16:45.

morning looking at some of the areas of best practice, if you like that

:16:46.:16:52.

phrase, where they are trying to do things in a different way to make

:16:53.:16:55.

things work little better. The Telegraph. Council tax rises for

:16:56.:16:59.

millions. The possibility of households in many parts of the

:17:00.:17:03.

country facing council tax rises of up to 5%, as some local authorities

:17:04.:17:10.

try to boost funding. What have you got for us, Mike?

:17:11.:17:16.

People were asking why I was going on about the roof at the Millennium

:17:17.:17:19.

Stadium, whether it makes any difference if it is closed on. The

:17:20.:17:24.

answer is it does! -- closed or not. There are some facts in the Times.

:17:25.:17:31.

There have been ten matches since it was built and the times when the

:17:32.:17:36.

roof has been closed whales have won four out of five of those matches

:17:37.:17:45.

and when it was open England have won four out of five -- Wales. It is

:17:46.:17:50.

more than superstition. The intensity, the noise, helps the

:17:51.:17:53.

Welsh and puts off the English little bit. So on this occasion the

:17:54.:18:00.

roof will be open. Whenever you do the papers I notice

:18:01.:18:03.

there are scribbles everywhere. That's because they don't wear my

:18:04.:18:08.

glasses normally, so when I look at you it is fine. When it comes to

:18:09.:18:12.

reading small text I write a little note to make it bigger, or I could

:18:13.:18:16.

put my glasses on... Have you picked another one?

:18:17.:18:23.

This is heartwarming. The former football fan suffering from a rare

:18:24.:18:28.

form of cancer. He has captured the nation. Coming out in front of the

:18:29.:18:34.

teams of Sunderland and Everton. Jermain Defoe gave him a couple.

:18:35.:18:39.

That picture was shared by his mother. Very moving, those stories.

:18:40.:18:45.

The players go the extra miles. William. A change of tone. I am

:18:46.:18:52.

always tickled by these things. When someone finds a giant thing... This

:18:53.:18:58.

is rammed flakes and this year, can you get a close-up? This is the

:18:59.:19:02.

actual side... Compared to my hand?

:19:03.:19:06.

This is the actual size of an individual brand flake. This young

:19:07.:19:12.

chap, Oscar, founded in his brand. You would need a lot of milk to go

:19:13.:19:17.

without! -- with that!

:19:18.:19:25.

It looks like Brazil. 14 centimetres!

:19:26.:19:29.

I wonder if he could keep that and try and sell it. This was the week,

:19:30.:19:37.

I heard on Radio 5 Live, a man sold a Cheeto that was the exact replica

:19:38.:19:45.

of the gorilla Harambe. It was a tiny thing.

:19:46.:19:52.

Imagine if you had a life-size gorilla chip!

:19:53.:19:56.

Not even a baby gorilla! Very odd.

:19:57.:20:03.

?100,000! Check your crisps and cereal this morning. You never know!

:20:04.:20:07.

It looks like your hair. A little sculpted brown flakes somewhere...

:20:08.:20:16.

Now we've gone off entirely. Thank you, see you later. More

:20:17.:20:23.

weather later. And a full sports bulletin.

:20:24.:20:24.

Today we're looking at ways in which the NHS can deliver better

:20:25.:20:28.

care, despite the pressure it's under.

:20:29.:20:29.

getting them the help they need quickly is vital.

:20:30.:20:38.

Well, a hospital in Fife has found that technology might

:20:39.:20:41.

Nurses at Victoria Hospital were given touch screen tablets

:20:42.:20:45.

to help them easily identify the patients at highest risk.

:20:46.:20:48.

Good morning and welcome. At the Victoria Hospital every day begins

:20:49.:20:56.

like this. Each department coming together to share information.

:20:57.:21:01.

Cardiac arrest in the last 24 hours? The purpose of the meeting summed up

:21:02.:21:07.

in three words. Safe to start. Safe to start. Fulfilling that mantra

:21:08.:21:12.

requires a combination of traditional and modern methods. Fife

:21:13.:21:16.

are the only health board in Scotland using this technology.

:21:17.:21:21.

Patient's vitals are entered into the tablet, generating a school. The

:21:22.:21:26.

information is instantly available drop the hospital. It is very easy

:21:27.:21:32.

for people to see patterns and have an early warning score. At a glance

:21:33.:21:36.

you can see where the sickest patients are, so we can ensure that

:21:37.:21:42.

patients go to the right areas. Introduced in one ward as part of a

:21:43.:21:46.

pilot project, the technology is now used throughout the hospital. One

:21:47.:21:50.

measure of success as it has helped reduce the number of cardiac arrest.

:21:51.:21:55.

Good morning! Pleased with the results, the hospital are now

:21:56.:21:58.

considering an upgrade. Wearable tech that constantly updates the

:21:59.:22:04.

patient's readings. The information from the device is coming through to

:22:05.:22:10.

a phone here. How would you feel about wearing this device? It feels

:22:11.:22:14.

all right. I can move around? Yes, it is all wireless. The signal comes

:22:15.:22:19.

through Bluetooth. Just like the current system, a high score

:22:20.:22:24.

automatically triggers a call to the doctor. The longer it takes for

:22:25.:22:29.

doctors and nurses to recognise a patient has deteriorated, the longer

:22:30.:22:34.

that time is the more serious it is for the patient, so the quicker we

:22:35.:22:38.

can respond and treat the better it will be for the patient. This trial

:22:39.:22:42.

points towards the future, but it still needs to pass an age-old test.

:22:43.:22:47.

Does it help staff help the patient is needed most? -- patients who need

:22:48.:22:51.

it most? We will be talking about some of

:22:52.:22:59.

those issues raised regarding the NHS throughout the programme.

:23:00.:23:04.

The final frontier and one where there are fortunes to be made

:23:05.:23:12.

in everything from satellite technology to tourism.

:23:13.:23:14.

Over the next three years the government is planning

:23:15.:23:16.

on investing millions in the UK's first spaceport,

:23:17.:23:18.

so is time to start getting fitted for a spacesuit?

:23:19.:23:21.

Sean is at the National Space Centre.

:23:22.:23:23.

Is here in there? Unfortunately not! They wouldn't let

:23:24.:23:33.

me in there yet. I will try to persuade them by the end of the

:23:34.:23:37.

morning. It is a big deal, the UK space industry. We've heard dumber

:23:38.:23:42.

had a bit of money from the UK government, but overall Williams is

:23:43.:23:46.

contributed to the UK economy. -- we've had a bit of money. About

:23:47.:23:51.

40,000 jobs directly, about 100,000 overall. We are familiar with the

:23:52.:23:58.

sexy space travel stuff. This is where... Well, not exactly where,

:23:59.:24:03.

this is the International Space Station, where Tim Peake was, is.

:24:04.:24:08.

This is one of the modules on the end, it was put there by the

:24:09.:24:14.

international dumber international -- international space agency. The

:24:15.:24:20.

big part of the industry is the stuff we don't see so much. The way

:24:21.:24:23.

we are broadcasting to you now, we've travelled... The waves have

:24:24.:24:29.

travelled thousands of miles into space for satellite and into your

:24:30.:24:32.

living rooms and that's driven a lot by the UK space aged. We have

:24:33.:24:38.

someone from the National Space Centre, where we are this morning.

:24:39.:24:41.

Tim Peake gets all the headlines, but a lot of the money in the UK

:24:42.:24:45.

isn't from that sort of thing, is it? A lot of people don't realise

:24:46.:24:49.

how healthy and thrive in the UK space aged ears and that's almost

:24:50.:24:54.

entirely in satellites, in monitoring the earth and looking at

:24:55.:24:57.

the space. The UK is good at building the detectors and cameras

:24:58.:25:01.

that are absolutely ingrained in our everyday life. We take it for

:25:02.:25:05.

granted, but the fact that we can jump in our part, turn on a sat nav

:25:06.:25:09.

and it will take us home from anywhere in the world, that's due to

:25:10.:25:13.

a GPS network of satellites above us telling us where we are and where we

:25:14.:25:18.

need to be. The fact that we can look at the weather forecast is due

:25:19.:25:21.

to satellites. The fact that we can watch a sporting event in a country

:25:22.:25:25.

across the world in real time, that signal is sent by satellites. Do we

:25:26.:25:28.

really thriving industry. But Tim Peake doesn't do any of that. Does

:25:29.:25:33.

he take a bit of the glamour out of it for you guys? Not at all. I think

:25:34.:25:37.

Tim Peake is that amazing ambassador for a thriving industry that perhaps

:25:38.:25:41.

is a bit of the hidden gem, so delighted that Tim Peake is rated --

:25:42.:25:48.

is raising the profile. One thing that seems to be missing from the UK

:25:49.:25:55.

is space flights taking off. We will have a little delve into this, where

:25:56.:26:00.

Tim Peake spent a lot of his time in the international space centre. We

:26:01.:26:04.

can get into exactly what goes on in there, all of the research they do.

:26:05.:26:06.

Before that, the news, travel I'm back with the latest

:26:07.:26:08.

from the BBC London newsroom This is Breakfast,

:26:09.:29:28.

with Steph McGovern and Charlie We'll bring you all the latest news

:29:29.:29:38.

and sport in a moment. Assaults on doctors and nurses

:29:39.:29:42.

in England may have reached record levels, but the service helping

:29:43.:29:47.

to protect staff is being withdrawn. This is Breakfast,

:29:48.:29:52.

with Steph McGovern and Charlie We'll bring you all the latest news

:29:53.:29:54.

and sport in a moment. Assaults on doctors and nurses

:29:55.:29:58.

in England may have reached record levels, but the service helping

:29:59.:30:02.

to protect staff is being withdrawn. We'll hear what's it like to be

:30:03.:30:06.

on the front-line just after seven. Also this morning,

:30:07.:30:09.

they are the gymnasts of the seas. Why thousands of dolphins

:30:10.:30:12.

are appearing off the west This guy said you like just look

:30:13.:30:14.

like a fat Jack Whitehall. And find out how comedian,

:30:15.:30:23.

Jack Whitehall, dealt with being taken down a peg,

:30:24.:30:25.

or two, just before 9am. But now, a summary of this

:30:26.:30:28.

morning's main news. The Health Secretary, Jeremy Hunt,

:30:29.:30:32.

says it's "completely unacceptable" that some patients are waiting

:30:33.:30:35.

up to 13 hours in A In an exclusive BBC interview,

:30:36.:30:38.

he paid tribute to the hard work of staff, but said the problems

:30:39.:30:41.

of high demand were not unique It is, you know, incredibly

:30:42.:30:48.

frustrating for me doing this job because I want NHS care to be the

:30:49.:30:53.

safest and best in the world. And that kind of care is completely

:30:54.:30:57.

unacceptable. No one would want it for members of their own family.

:30:58.:31:01.

Overall, there are positive things as well as negative things. And

:31:02.:31:04.

there is huge commitment in the NHS to sort out those negative things.

:31:05.:31:07.

A Federal appeals court has refused to reinstate Donald Trump's ban

:31:08.:31:10.

on travellers from seven mainly Muslim countries.

:31:11.:31:12.

The controversial immigration reform was suspended last week.

:31:13.:31:14.

The US President responded to the ruling saying there will be

:31:15.:31:17.

The case is now likely to go to The Supreme Court.

:31:18.:31:22.

Campaigners will challenge the way the Government deals

:31:23.:31:24.

with unaccompanied child refugees at a High Court hearing today.

:31:25.:31:27.

They say ministers have not worked with local councils to find enough

:31:28.:31:30.

The judicial review comes after the government announced

:31:31.:31:33.

they would close a key humanitarian route into the UK once a total

:31:34.:31:37.

Council tax rises will hit many households in England and Wales

:31:38.:31:51.

The Local Government Information Unit says that 94% of council

:31:52.:31:54.

leaders and senior officials questioned said they would be forced

:31:55.:31:57.

to put up taxes and increase charging for services.

:31:58.:32:00.

Some households will face rises of up to 5%, well above inflation.

:32:01.:32:12.

Rail ticket machines cause so much confusion that a fifth of passengers

:32:13.:32:15.

who use them buy the wrong ticket, according to the rail regulator.

:32:16.:32:18.

While 7% of travellers underpay and could be fined,

:32:19.:32:21.

The Office of Rail and Road wants train companies to refund passengers

:32:22.:32:25.

who accidentally buy tickets which are too expensive

:32:26.:32:27.

There were chaotic scenes in the South African parliament

:32:28.:32:34.

as President Jacob Zuma tried to deliver his annual state

:32:35.:32:37.

Opposition MPs called the president a "scoundrel" and "rotten

:32:38.:32:40.

to the core'" because of corruption allegations.

:32:41.:32:42.

The President ordered the deployment of troops around the Parliament

:32:43.:32:45.

building to deal with thousands of protestors.

:32:46.:32:52.

Some distressing pictures from New Zealand where hundreds

:32:53.:32:54.

of whales have died on a beach after they became stranded.

:32:55.:32:57.

The pilot whales were discovered on Farewell Spit, on the South

:32:58.:33:00.

Conservation Department staff and volunteers are trying

:33:01.:33:03.

to save 100 of them that are still alive.

:33:04.:33:05.

Whale strandings at Farewell Spit are fairly common but this

:33:06.:33:08.

And it's been announced that George Clooney and his wife Amal

:33:09.:33:21.

The news was broken by their showbiz friend pal, Matt Damon,

:33:22.:33:25.

who said he almost started crying when he found out.

:33:26.:33:27.

He added that they will make awesome parents.

:33:28.:33:30.

The A-list couple tied the knot at a lavish wedding

:33:31.:33:32.

Those are the main stories. Now for the sport. There have been calls for

:33:33.:33:53.

the FA, the Football Association, to reform for decades. But it is

:33:54.:33:59.

apparently like getting turkeys to vote for Christmas. Now the MPs got

:34:00.:34:06.

involved. There were not that many in the House of Commons yesterday

:34:07.:34:09.

but they have given a vote of no-confidence which they will make

:34:10.:34:11.

the FA change from within finally. It's all about helping the England

:34:12.:34:14.

national team and making the Football Association more

:34:15.:34:17.

reflective, of the millions who play As things stand, there are 122

:34:18.:34:20.

members that make the big decisions on the FA council, and more than 90%

:34:21.:34:24.

of them are men aged over 60. There have been calls

:34:25.:34:28.

for change for decades. And now, after a vote of no

:34:29.:34:30.

confidence in the FA by MP's, the Government will legislate

:34:31.:34:34.

if English football's governing However, one of the FA members,

:34:35.:34:36.

Keith Compton, responded, saying the FA is changing and added,

:34:37.:34:39.

"it is pity that the MPs have got The Scottish FA are appealing

:34:40.:34:43.

against the fine they received for wearing poppies on their shirts

:34:44.:34:47.

against England last November. Both teams wore the symbol

:34:48.:34:50.

to commemorate Remembrance Day during the England versus

:34:51.:34:52.

Scotland World Cup Qualifier The SFA say they have received

:34:53.:34:54.

the written reasons from Fifa and have told world football's

:34:55.:34:58.

governing body they intend to appeal It wasn't the highest scoring start

:34:59.:35:01.

to the new Super League season, but St Helens fans won't care,

:35:02.:35:08.

as they beat their old rivals Leeds. The game was won by a moment

:35:09.:35:12.

of class, as St Helens, slid across the field,

:35:13.:35:15.

before unpicking the door and finding a gap with

:35:16.:35:17.

Frenchman Theo Farge, squeezing across the

:35:18.:35:20.

line to make it 6-4. There's another big weekend ahead in

:35:21.:35:26.

the Six Nations. Scotland are in France on Sunday,

:35:27.:35:28.

Ireland travel to Rome to face Italy tomorrow while the roof will be open

:35:29.:35:32.

for the match between Wales and England in Cardiff,

:35:33.:35:35.

and that is what England wanted. Coach, Eddie Jones, had suggested

:35:36.:35:38.

he wasn't bothered and thinks Wales may have some other

:35:39.:35:41.

tricks up their sleeve. We are prepared to win. We are

:35:42.:35:53.

prepared for any shenanigans that may go on. And we are looking

:35:54.:36:01.

forward to it. It is a great opportunity to play in one of the

:36:02.:36:05.

great stadiums in the world. What are the shenanigans that you are

:36:06.:36:09.

preparing for? I don't know, but they are coming out of the walls,

:36:10.:36:19.

aren't they? They have daffodils, roses, everything. Who knows? Who

:36:20.:36:20.

knows? Wales are very proud

:36:21.:36:20.

of the ceremonial goat that leads them out, and are just

:36:21.:36:23.

as proud of George North, who has recovered from the leg

:36:24.:36:26.

injury he picked up scoring against italy, and is named

:36:27.:36:29.

in the side along with another We have trained as best as we can.

:36:30.:36:37.

We are looking forward to playing one of the best sides, if not the

:36:38.:36:42.

best side, in this game in the world at the moment. It says everything

:36:43.:36:46.

about England. You admire their strength and depth.

:36:47.:37:02.

British Sprinter James Ellington, says he's determined to race

:37:03.:37:05.

at the highest level again, despite being involved in a serious

:37:06.:37:08.

He'll undergo surgery later today and faces three months,

:37:09.:37:11.

Yesteray he spoke publicly about the crash for the first time

:37:12.:37:15.

When I was on the floor and I looked at my leg and there was blood

:37:16.:37:21.

everywhere and my leg was in pieces, I lost six pints of blood, and I was

:37:22.:37:35.

laying there thinking, what the hell is going on? It was like a

:37:36.:37:37.

nightmare. Ronnie O'Sullivan, is out

:37:38.:37:37.

of snooker's World Grand Prix in Preston, after losing in

:37:38.:37:39.

the second round to Australia's Neil O'Sullivan could only sit and watch,

:37:40.:37:42.

as the world number seven knocked in a break 83 to take the match

:37:43.:38:00.

by four frames to one. Great Britain's women,

:38:01.:38:03.

can move a big step closer to the promised land

:38:04.:38:07.

and the world elite groups, if they can win their third FED

:38:08.:38:10.

cup round robin match World number one, Johanna Konta,

:38:11.:38:13.

and her teamates are on a roll, thrashing Latvia

:38:14.:38:17.

and Portugal so far. Another win and they'll play in this

:38:18.:38:19.

weekend's play offs and it would give new Team Captain Anne

:38:20.:38:22.

Keothavong, a clean sweep We know the opposition pretty well.

:38:23.:38:30.

They are not to be taken lightly. But, you know, I believe in my

:38:31.:38:33.

players and hope in them and I think they can do well.

:38:34.:38:34.

What's the secret to team GB's success in the Fed Cup?

:38:35.:38:38.

Perhaps it's down to what they're doing off the court.

:38:39.:38:40.

Heather Watson and her team-mate were caught taking advantage

:38:41.:38:43.

of the chilly temperatures of -11C in Estonia and having a rather,

:38:44.:38:46.

They are powdery. You want them to make an impact! Anyway, enough of

:38:47.:39:08.

the snowball analysis. Now watch this!

:39:09.:39:13.

And finally, an Austrian man has broken his own downhill speed record

:39:14.:39:17.

It appears he's borrowed his outfit from Britney Spears and the helmet

:39:18.:39:22.

from the Nightmare movie, but it seemed to do the trick.

:39:23.:39:25.

Launching himself down a gravelly hill in the Atacama Desert,

:39:26.:39:27.

and without even pedalling, Stokl reached a jaw-dropping speed

:39:28.:39:30.

Shall we try to follow him down on Saturday for a feature? That is

:39:31.:39:48.

extraordinary. There is the proof. He beat his own record. Incredible.

:39:49.:39:54.

He did not even have to pedal. Quite the outset. You doubted my story

:39:55.:40:10.

about Cheetoh's being crisps. But it is a maize-based snack. This man

:40:11.:40:25.

found one that resembled Harambe the gorilla. Who has since passed. Well,

:40:26.:40:29.

I have proof. It was sold on auction for $100,000. What would you do with

:40:30.:40:34.

that? Put it in a case on your wall? You could make it into a brooch.

:40:35.:40:43.

That is a good idea. People may be tempted to nibble it when they greet

:40:44.:40:46.

you. That does look like the gorilla. There is no doubt. I think

:40:47.:40:50.

that would perish over time. You might need a case or a vacuum sealed

:40:51.:40:57.

pack. There we go. You were right. There is a market out there. I

:40:58.:41:02.

accept it. See you later on. When it comes to exams,

:41:03.:41:04.

children with special educational needs such as dyslexia can be given

:41:05.:41:06.

extra time to finish their papers. But research by the Today programme

:41:07.:41:10.

has found as many as one in five students from independent schools

:41:11.:41:13.

were given extensions to complete their GCSE

:41:14.:41:15.

and A-Level exams last year. That's almost double the number

:41:16.:41:18.

of pupils from state schools Catherine Wright from the charity

:41:19.:41:20.

Dyslexia Action is here with us now. A very good morning to you. Good

:41:21.:41:37.

morning. That is a big difference between state and private schools.

:41:38.:41:41.

Can you give us any insight into what is going on? Umm, when it comes

:41:42.:41:46.

down to it, there is... Dyslexia Action, we support both independent

:41:47.:41:52.

and state schools. I think what is happening is that, in an independent

:41:53.:41:57.

school, you have smaller class sizes, there is more awareness

:41:58.:42:03.

within that. And probably more funds within that sector to actually

:42:04.:42:09.

support learners. Whereas within state schools they are still very

:42:10.:42:14.

aware, but there are probably less funds, and of course, larger class

:42:15.:42:19.

sizes. So you will find there are some learners who are falling

:42:20.:42:22.

through the net probably. So, they are the same methods used to

:42:23.:42:27.

diagnose it but it is just a case of having more facilities to detect it

:42:28.:42:35.

in private schools. Recognition is probably higher and parents are

:42:36.:42:39.

probably a little bit more aware within that sector as well. And yes,

:42:40.:42:45.

you don't actually have to diagnose it. There is very certain criteria.

:42:46.:42:55.

And it has to be done by a Level seven specialist. That is where we

:42:56.:42:59.

come in. That feels really unfair. That difference between private and

:43:00.:43:07.

state. Umm, I do not know whether it is unfair. Probably the private

:43:08.:43:11.

sector actually have the right statistics. 20% is about correct.

:43:12.:43:16.

Because when you start to think about one in ten dyslexic people,

:43:17.:43:20.

and then dyspraxia and autism and other aspects, 20%, you are pretty

:43:21.:43:29.

much spot on. So, yes, state schools, they probably just need to

:43:30.:43:34.

increase their awareness. Yes. It is unfair really to blame individual

:43:35.:43:38.

teachers. They have a very heavy workload in the state system and

:43:39.:43:42.

bigger classes. Put on the face of it, it doesn't sound like they have

:43:43.:43:46.

to do any more work. They must know the class in front of them and what

:43:47.:43:51.

speeds people are learning out and maybe those indicators... It doesn't

:43:52.:43:55.

seem like an awful lot to ask for them to just say, do you know what,

:43:56.:43:59.

let us just check those one or two pupils who may be in the class. Is a

:44:00.:44:04.

much more to expect from them to be able to do that? I don't think that

:44:05.:44:12.

is absolutely fine. And I think a lot of teachers will recognise that.

:44:13.:44:16.

The problem is recently over the last two years the necessities to

:44:17.:44:32.

granted have increased. Is to be Level Five and now it is Level

:44:33.:44:36.

Seven. So they may have to bring in people. -- it used to be. Or they

:44:37.:44:41.

may need to train people up to do it. That takes at least a year. But

:44:42.:44:47.

you have many young people slipping through the net. They should be

:44:48.:44:50.

getting more time. They should be getting more time. And it is so

:44:51.:44:55.

valuable, that time. They need to be taught how to use the time

:44:56.:44:59.

effectively. And they need other arrangements. It makes such a big

:45:00.:45:03.

difference to dyslexic people and people with other specific learning

:45:04.:45:08.

difficulties. Catherine at thank you very much. From Dyslexia Action.

:45:09.:45:15.

Let's find out what's happening with the weather.

:45:16.:45:18.

It was an especially cold night last night. Temperatures as low as minus

:45:19.:45:23.

two degrees in a couple of spots, but there is a chilly the air and it

:45:24.:45:28.

will be the -- morning where some of you wake up to some frost and maybe

:45:29.:45:33.

snow, the eastern Scotland and the north-east England. Wintry showers

:45:34.:45:36.

in eastern areas throughout the day, and a strengthening wind, which will

:45:37.:45:42.

add to the chill. West is best for the brightness throughout the day. A

:45:43.:45:45.

couple of showers in Northern Ireland, but most of the showers are

:45:46.:45:49.

in the east of the country. Rain and drizzle across the south-east and

:45:50.:45:54.

east Anglia. Further north, sleet. To the north and west of Scotland is

:45:55.:45:59.

a bit of frost, hear a lovely day in store. Wind is not desperately

:46:00.:46:03.

strong and there should be plenty of sunshine. A couple of centimetres of

:46:04.:46:10.

snow. The west of the Pennines, especially around Cumbria, it should

:46:11.:46:16.

be fine, with sunshine. Further south, especially grey and misty. We

:46:17.:46:19.

will have further rain and drizzle coming to us throughout the day. The

:46:20.:46:23.

breeze picking up through the country. Limited to about 1-6

:46:24.:46:31.

Celsius by and large. Most of south-west England and much of

:46:32.:46:34.

Western England and Wales and Northern Ireland will be dry and

:46:35.:46:40.

there will be a little bit of sunshine at times. Where we have the

:46:41.:46:44.

clearest skies you can see the lunar eclipse tonight. The full moon in

:46:45.:46:48.

the west of the country for some of you. The clearest conditions in the

:46:49.:46:51.

north and west of Scotland. Further west, lots of cloud. Some wintry.

:46:52.:46:59.

That will lead to a frost, and ice risk, with temperatures close to

:47:00.:47:03.

freezing in most parts of the UK. If you are out and about on Saturday

:47:04.:47:07.

make sure you lay your app to cause the wind will be cold. Showers much

:47:08.:47:10.

more frequent across the country. Initially sleet and snow. A good

:47:11.:47:15.

covering over the hills of northern England and eastern Scotland.

:47:16.:47:18.

Turning back to rain and sleet through the day. It is the north and

:47:19.:47:22.

west where we continue to see the best of the sunshine. Temperatures

:47:23.:47:26.

like today, struggling in single figures. Even colder given the

:47:27.:47:33.

strength of the wind. It picks up in the Sunday, especially for England

:47:34.:47:36.

and Wales. Touching gale force in places. Great conditions for England

:47:37.:47:40.

and Wales. Things will be much brighter for Scotland and Northern

:47:41.:47:43.

Ireland, where we have the lightest winds. With the strength of wind it

:47:44.:47:48.

will feel much colder than the temperatures suggest. Some will feel

:47:49.:47:53.

like it is subzero all day. Wrap up well! How cold argue at the moment?

:47:54.:48:00.

Actually not too bad. I look cold, but I am all right.

:48:01.:48:06.

You need a scarf for your neck! I am all right, I am sheltering in

:48:07.:48:08.

between. Glad to hear it! See you later.

:48:09.:48:16.

Over the next few years the government says it will fund the

:48:17.:48:22.

first spaceport in the UK. Britain is a rising star in the

:48:23.:48:31.

commercial space race. Sean is at the national space centre in

:48:32.:48:34.

Leicester. What are we looking at? You've got to leave some puns for

:48:35.:48:41.

me. These are couple of rockets, which haven't been used before, as

:48:42.:48:46.

you might guess. The one on the right is British built. The one gap

:48:47.:48:51.

in the UK space in this we is the fact that we don't have anywhere.

:48:52.:48:54.

The takeoff and that's what we've heard a bit about this week.

:48:55.:49:01.

Overall, ?14 billion is put into the UK. Manufacturing stuff like that

:49:02.:49:08.

rockets, 40,000 jobs. What more can be done. Martin is from the

:49:09.:49:15.

University of Leicester. You have a focus on the space industry. How

:49:16.:49:18.

crucial is it to skills and development in the UK. It's a

:49:19.:49:23.

high-tech industry, so the jobs are really important for us, because we

:49:24.:49:27.

need to grow our skills. At a time when we are looking for real

:49:28.:49:31.

economic impact, the space industry is a fantastic way to get that. In

:49:32.:49:35.

terms of economic impact, the one thing you notice when you look at

:49:36.:49:38.

the space industry is it is really productive, more productive than a

:49:39.:49:42.

lot of the other parts of the UK economy. Why is that? Partly because

:49:43.:49:46.

of the skills involved, also the potential for growth is enormous.

:49:47.:49:50.

You've been talking about building rockets and that's really important,

:49:51.:49:55.

but actually there's also a lot of downstream growth, the use of

:49:56.:49:59.

products from developing space hardware and also taking data from

:50:00.:50:02.

the satellites we have in orbit. Looking down at the Earth,

:50:03.:50:08.

developing products from that date. Andy, you run a business in space

:50:09.:50:12.

technology. If average heard from the government and industry this

:50:13.:50:16.

week, plans to get a spaceport in the UK, and if we could take off

:50:17.:50:21.

from here, how would that affect your business? I think it is the key

:50:22.:50:26.

that would unlock the door to space, because it enables lower cost access

:50:27.:50:31.

to space, which means we can launch lower cost satellites, which creates

:50:32.:50:35.

more data and ultimately that date will allow the big growth in the

:50:36.:50:41.

UK's space industry. There's a reason we haven't launched anything

:50:42.:50:46.

really huge from the UK in the past. You often see it in America, but not

:50:47.:50:50.

here. Why is that? There are logistic goblins, you -- problems,

:50:51.:50:59.

you can't launch from the UK easily. It is difficult unless you launch

:51:00.:51:07.

from the east. So how will would a spaceport look in the UK? Where

:51:08.:51:14.

would it be? It would need to be somewhere on the coast and certainly

:51:15.:51:17.

you can get the image of the big takeoff. We believe we will have to

:51:18.:51:22.

launch over the poles. There are also concepts of launching from an

:51:23.:51:28.

aeroplane. So an aeroplane would fly out over the Atlantic Ocean and then

:51:29.:51:31.

drop the rocket which will then fly off into space from underneath the

:51:32.:51:38.

aeroplane. Some areas are looking at the horizontal takeoff market. I

:51:39.:51:42.

think that's probably a good area for reducing the cost of access to

:51:43.:51:48.

space. So it is conceivable that within 5- ten years we could have

:51:49.:51:52.

some kind of launch from Scotland? That big television spectacular that

:51:53.:51:55.

we see in other countries? I don't see why not. It's not just the money

:51:56.:52:03.

that the UK space industry... Agency has announced today, it is also the

:52:04.:52:06.

change in the environment, so it enables that access to happen. Why

:52:07.:52:12.

not? There you go. We will be talking more throughout the morning

:52:13.:52:14.

about the potential for tourists travel into space as well. It might

:52:15.:52:24.

even get me into a space suit at some point!

:52:25.:52:25.

Thanks for a much. Seeing dolphins in the wild

:52:26.:52:28.

is an experience many people And last year record

:52:29.:52:31.

numbers were spotted off The waters around the Hebrides

:52:32.:52:35.

are home to nearly 70% of Europe's dolphin,

:52:36.:52:41.

whale and porpoise species, but despite this we still

:52:42.:52:44.

know remarkably little about their habitats

:52:45.:52:46.

or the threats facing them. Good morning. First of all it sounds

:52:47.:53:02.

like your job is amazing, to be able to see and experience all of this.

:53:03.:53:06.

Tell us a bit about what you might see at the moment in terms of

:53:07.:53:10.

dolphins? At the moment if you went out on the water or look for land

:53:11.:53:15.

you might see some porpoises. We see them year round off the coast of

:53:16.:53:18.

Scotland. Also occasionally bottlenose dolphins and in the

:53:19.:53:23.

summer we have migrated this, so Ningi -- whales and the odd

:53:24.:53:36.

humpback. A lot of people don't realise we have these animals off

:53:37.:53:40.

the UK. What can we see here at the moment? This is our research vessel

:53:41.:53:45.

and these are common dolphins. They are spectacular species. They have

:53:46.:53:50.

this yellow strip down the side, they are very active at the surface,

:53:51.:53:53.

they love to barrel riding, so that's what they're doing now. They

:53:54.:53:57.

ride on the pressure wave. They really enjoyed being there and

:53:58.:54:03.

swimming alongside the boat. I know you've been monitoring the numbers

:54:04.:54:08.

as best you can. What are the figures showing? What's changing?

:54:09.:54:13.

For common dolphins, once we've just seen, we're singing a general

:54:14.:54:17.

increasing trend of larger groups and more sightings. Are they living

:54:18.:54:26.

there year-round? Is that the home? What's happening? Common dolphins

:54:27.:54:30.

generally we would see in the summer, from about May to October,

:54:31.:54:35.

but I had to quickly look through our sightings before I left and

:54:36.:54:38.

we've actually seen them throughout the winter this year. Although most

:54:39.:54:44.

numbers we will see during the summer, there seemed to be a feud

:54:45.:54:48.

here and there throughout the winter as well. Why do you think that is?

:54:49.:54:51.

What's changing? We aren't entirely sure. There could be lots of

:54:52.:54:58.

reasons, more food, or a shift in their distribution. These animals

:54:59.:55:01.

travel long distances and it might just be that they are shifting

:55:02.:55:07.

further north. In the Hebrides we know that seasurface temperatures

:55:08.:55:10.

are increasing by about half a degree every decade and common

:55:11.:55:13.

dolphins in particular generally are a warmer water species, as we would

:55:14.:55:18.

normally expect to see them around topics and warm temperate waters. So

:55:19.:55:23.

this might be forcing them further north and in the coastal waters.

:55:24.:55:27.

Beautiful images. Most people don't have access to a yacht or underwater

:55:28.:55:31.

filming. Can you see them from the shore, or from the beach in certain

:55:32.:55:36.

places? In certain places. Maybe not common dolphins, there are harbour

:55:37.:55:41.

porpoises. I seen them within 50 metres off the beach when I've been

:55:42.:55:45.

walking along. So anybody in the whole of the UK has an opportunity

:55:46.:55:50.

to see them. Are there hotspots apart from the Hebrides? I used to

:55:51.:55:56.

see them in Norfolk. They are down off the south coast of Wales,

:55:57.:56:02.

Ireland, all around the UK there is fantastic marine life out there,

:56:03.:56:05.

whether it be seals, whales, dolphins. Just get out and see.

:56:06.:56:11.

Thanks for an much for your time this morning.

:56:12.:56:13.

Time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.

:56:14.:59:35.

Plenty more on our website at the usual address.

:59:36.:59:37.

This is Breakfast, with Steph McGovern and Charlie

:59:38.:00:03.

The Health Secretary admits the situation at some hospitals

:00:04.:00:07.

Jeremy Hunt says there's no silver bullet but the Government has a plan

:00:08.:00:16.

And that kind of care is completely unacceptable.

:00:17.:00:24.

No one would wanted for members of their own family. -- would want it.

:00:25.:00:37.

Donald Trump vows to fight on as a US appeals court says

:00:38.:00:48.

Could we see spaceflights taking off from the UK?

:00:49.:00:57.

The industry is worth ?14 billion to the economy.

:00:58.:01:00.

I am in the National Space Centre to see what is possible.

:01:01.:01:05.

In the sport, change now, or face government action.

:01:06.:01:07.

That's the warning from MP's to the Football Association,

:01:08.:01:10.

after a vote of no confidence, in English football's governing

:01:11.:01:13.

And we have the weather. Good morning. Good morning. A little bit

:01:14.:01:20.

of frost and ice around this morning. One or two of you waking up

:01:21.:01:25.

to snow. Showers to take us the weekend. A wind that will make you

:01:26.:01:36.

feel colder. I will have all the weather forecast details and 15

:01:37.:01:38.

minutes. Thank you. The Health Secretary, Jeremy Hunt,

:01:39.:01:44.

says it's "completely unacceptable" that some patients are waiting

:01:45.:01:46.

up to 13 hours in A In an exclusive BBC interview,

:01:47.:01:49.

he paid tribute to the hard work of staff, but said the problems

:01:50.:01:52.

of high demand were not unique Our health editor,

:01:53.:01:55.

Hugh Pym, has more. NHS England figures this winter show

:01:56.:01:59.

the worst performance since records Jeremy Hunt paid tribute

:02:00.:02:02.

to the work of staff, but said the problems of high

:02:03.:02:06.

patient demand were not unique to the NHS, and all leading health

:02:07.:02:09.

systems were grappling I think it's wrong to suggest

:02:10.:02:12.

to people that these profound challenges such as we face

:02:13.:02:19.

with an ageing population are ones where there is a silver

:02:20.:02:23.

bullet that you can solve We have a very good plan,

:02:24.:02:25.

it has the support of the NHS, We showed coverage this week

:02:26.:02:35.

of patients experiencing lengthy waits in A and a woman who had

:02:36.:02:39.

to spend six months in a hospital because no

:02:40.:02:43.

care home space was available. He said he didn't want to make

:02:44.:02:50.

excuses and this was unacceptable. It was incredibly

:02:51.:02:53.

frustrating for me. I'm doing this job, because I want

:02:54.:02:57.

NHS care to be the safest and best And that kind of care

:02:58.:03:01.

is completely unacceptable. And no one would want it for members

:03:02.:03:03.

of their own family. He added that problems over

:03:04.:03:07.

the sustainability of social care, he said, were now being

:03:08.:03:10.

addressed by the government. But Sir Robert Francis

:03:11.:03:20.

who carried out the inquiry into the Midstaffordshire scandal

:03:21.:03:22.

said it was inevitable that the same mistakes will be made again

:03:23.:03:25.

if the current pressure A Federal appeals court has refused

:03:26.:03:28.

to reinstate Donald Trump's ban on travellers from seven

:03:29.:03:33.

mainly Muslim countries. The controversial immigration reform

:03:34.:03:35.

was suspended last week. The US President responded

:03:36.:03:37.

to the ruling saying there will be The case is now likely to go

:03:38.:03:40.

to The Supreme Court. Donald Trump's sudden ban

:03:41.:03:44.

on visitors from seven mainly Muslim nations caused chaos at airports

:03:45.:03:49.

and sparked protesting Then, last week, a district judge

:03:50.:03:51.

in Seattle granted a stay, and now, a San Francisco-based

:03:52.:04:09.

appeals court has backed that stay, citing, among other things,

:04:10.:04:12.

that no one from those seven nations The decision infuriated

:04:13.:04:15.

Donald Trump. Prompted the leader of one

:04:16.:04:19.

of the states leading the challenge An appeal to the highest court

:04:20.:04:23.

in the land, the US Supreme Court, But that could put the decision

:04:24.:04:30.

in the hands of a court currently evenly decided,

:04:31.:04:39.

and a tie would leave it in place. Donald Trump maintains his ban

:04:40.:04:45.

is necessary in order to protect the US from terrorism, but it may

:04:46.:04:48.

yet be proven unconstitutional. And until he has his day in court,

:04:49.:04:50.

refugees from around the world and citizens of those seven Muslim

:04:51.:04:55.

nations can continue to come David Willis, BBC

:04:56.:04:57.

News, in Washington. Campaigners will challenge

:04:58.:05:01.

the government's handling of the arrival of unaccompanied

:05:02.:05:03.

child refugees at a High Court They say ministers have not worked

:05:04.:05:06.

with local councils to find enough The judicial review comes

:05:07.:05:10.

after the government announced they would close a key humanitarian

:05:11.:05:13.

route into the UK once a total Inflation increases in council tax

:05:14.:05:16.

will hit many households in England The Local Government Information

:05:17.:05:30.

Unit says that 94% of council leaders and senior officials

:05:31.:05:34.

questioned said they would be forced to put up taxes and increase

:05:35.:05:37.

charging for services. Some households will

:05:38.:05:40.

face rises of up to 5%. Rail ticket machines cause so much

:05:41.:05:42.

confusion that a fifth of passengers who use them buy the wrong ticket,

:05:43.:05:52.

according to the rail regulator. While 7% of travellers

:05:53.:05:55.

underpay and could be fined, The Office of Rail and Road wants

:05:56.:05:58.

train companies to refund passengers who accidentally buy tickets

:05:59.:06:02.

which are too expensive Buying a train ticket can be

:06:03.:06:05.

difficult at the best of times. This report says that buying one

:06:06.:06:15.

from a machine without any human The independent regulator,

:06:16.:06:19.

the Office of Rail and Road, carried out a study

:06:20.:06:24.

using mystery shoppers. It found that many people

:06:25.:06:26.

bought the wrong tickets. 13% paid more for their tickets

:06:27.:06:30.

than they needed to. 6% paid less than they should have

:06:31.:06:35.

done, opening themselves to the risk And 65% couldn't find any

:06:36.:06:39.

information about which type One person found that buying

:06:40.:06:43.

a ticket with a real card was actually more expensive

:06:44.:06:48.

than buying one without. The consumer group Which described

:06:49.:06:58.

the situation as a mess, saying it was unacceptable that some

:06:59.:07:00.

passengers were paying In December, the Department

:07:01.:07:03.

of Transport launched an action plan Last week, rail operators

:07:04.:07:06.

announced a trial scheme that would automatically offer

:07:07.:07:12.

the cheapest fares to passengers. The Rail Minister, Paul Maynard,

:07:13.:07:19.

welcomed this latest report, saying the ticketing was often

:07:20.:07:21.

to complicated and hard to navigate. The rail operator said

:07:22.:07:24.

it was difficult to offer simple options because of what they called

:07:25.:07:27.

decades-old rail operations options because of what they called

:07:28.:07:29.

decades-old rail regulations There were chaotic scenes

:07:30.:07:33.

in the South African parliament as President Jacob Zuma tried

:07:34.:07:40.

to deliver his annual state Opposition MPs called the president

:07:41.:07:43.

a "scoundrel" and "rotten to the core" because of

:07:44.:07:46.

corruption allegations. The President ordered the deployment

:07:47.:07:48.

of troops around the Parliament building to deal with

:07:49.:07:51.

thousands of protestors. Some distressing images from New

:07:52.:07:56.

Zealand. Hundreds of whales have died

:07:57.:07:58.

on a beach in New Zealand The pilot whales were discovered

:07:59.:08:01.

on Farewell Spit on the South Conservation Department staff

:08:02.:08:05.

and volunteers are trying to save 100 of them

:08:06.:08:07.

that are still alive. Whale strandings at Farewell Spit

:08:08.:08:09.

are fairly common but this This is the third largest mass

:08:10.:08:22.

drowning we have recorded in our history. It is a massive one.

:08:23.:08:28.

Logistically it is a massive undertaking. We started at ten

:08:29.:08:32.

o'clock last night. We were notified of that. This morning when we went

:08:33.:08:43.

out to check on them most of the animals were already dead.

:08:44.:08:44.

A fountain of bright lava that gushed from a hole in the side

:08:45.:08:48.

of a cliff for a month before disappearing has made

:08:49.:08:51.

It's known as the "fire hose," and it seemed to have vanished

:08:52.:08:56.

from Hawaii's Kilauea Volcano last week.

:08:57.:08:58.

But it's since re-emerged, pouring a stream of molten lava over

:08:59.:09:01.

That is incredible, the colour, isn't it?

:09:02.:09:04.

A rare baby antelope just 19 centimetres tall has joined

:09:05.:09:09.

The calf named Thanos was left orphaned when its mother died

:09:10.:09:13.

It's one of the world's smallest breeds of antelope and the baby

:09:14.:09:17.

is currently so light it doesn't register on the zoo's scales.

:09:18.:09:20.

When you see it with a person you get an idea of just how

:09:21.:09:24.

Staff are raising it by hand until it is big enough

:09:25.:09:28.

We've been hearing about the incredible pressure on the NHS.

:09:29.:09:42.

But as waiting times increase, have tempers begun to get shorter?

:09:43.:09:45.

There were 70,000 attacks on staff in 2015.

:09:46.:09:48.

Despite this, the body set up to advise hospitals in England

:09:49.:09:50.

on safety is stopping its work at the end of next month.

:09:51.:09:54.

The Department of Health says that a new approach is needed.

:09:55.:09:57.

Janet Davies is the Chief Executive of the Royal College of Nursing

:09:58.:10:00.

Good morning. Thank you for joining us. We have talked a lot this week

:10:01.:10:13.

about the high pressure environment that NHS staff are working under.

:10:14.:10:19.

How big is this problem of violence? A huge problem. 70,000 is the tip of

:10:20.:10:25.

the iceberg. Many people do not reported because they think nothing

:10:26.:10:29.

will happen about it. Obviously, when you are working in an

:10:30.:10:32.

environment like we have been seeing all week where people are having to

:10:33.:10:37.

wait a long time and they are in crowded situations and they are

:10:38.:10:41.

stressed, it is inevitable that that sometimes spills over into either

:10:42.:10:45.

verbal aggression or physical assaults. And what we feel is that

:10:46.:10:50.

the first thing we should do is try to prevent that from happening. And

:10:51.:10:53.

obviously, the conditions people are working in is very difficult. You

:10:54.:10:58.

need enough staff, time to talk to people and reassure people and that

:10:59.:11:01.

busy environment at the moment makes that very difficult. And as you say,

:11:02.:11:07.

a lot of this is coming from the frustration of patients who are

:11:08.:11:10.

waiting a long time. As you say, there is so much pressure on

:11:11.:11:13.

everybody in hospitals at the moment. Do you think staff deal

:11:14.:11:18.

unsafe? They can. They are the people trying to provide that care.

:11:19.:11:23.

At the same time they are trying to de-escalate a serious situation. The

:11:24.:11:27.

other thing is we need better sanctions. Too often there is no

:11:28.:11:30.

sanction against people that assault our NHS staff. What we believe is we

:11:31.:11:36.

should make it an offence. That if people wilfully assault a member of

:11:37.:11:42.

an staff, that they should be prosecuted. And one of the things

:11:43.:11:46.

that NHS Protect have done is they support the staff when police have

:11:47.:11:50.

not taken it any further and have actually got in some convictions the

:11:51.:11:56.

read. They have been very supportive on people in the frontline. --

:11:57.:12:00.

through it. How have they done that? Working individually with people who

:12:01.:12:03.

have been assaulted like nurses and other health professionals. They

:12:04.:12:08.

also provide the training and the support to NHS Trusts. And we have

:12:09.:12:12.

not been consulted about this change, and we have not been

:12:13.:12:16.

officially told this service is going. We have been very concerned.

:12:17.:12:21.

At this particular time we need the support more than ever. Agencies

:12:22.:12:25.

like this takes the pressure off the trust. They are so busy providing

:12:26.:12:29.

the care that we really believe we need the special support and

:12:30.:12:34.

security that each NHS Trust can not afford to provide themselves. Are

:12:35.:12:39.

you worried now that that NHS support will go? Get. We do not know

:12:40.:12:44.

what will be in its place. We are left unsure because no one has had a

:12:45.:12:49.

talk with us about this. We need more sanctions and more protection

:12:50.:12:54.

for staff. And we need to make sure it is seen as unacceptable to

:12:55.:12:59.

assault a member of NHS staff. Just hearing you talking about assaults

:13:00.:13:04.

becoming more common, what actually happens in a department if someone

:13:05.:13:08.

assaults someone else? What happens in the process? The process,

:13:09.:13:18.

obviously, if it is an actual assaults, we will consult the police

:13:19.:13:21.

and they will come and we would hope that person would be arrested. We

:13:22.:13:25.

would hope that that person would be a sick following that. That is the

:13:26.:13:31.

process we would expect. -- arrested. It is stressful for staff

:13:32.:13:40.

and their families to be assaulted. They are trying to do their best. We

:13:41.:13:45.

would expect this to be taken further and sanctions put against

:13:46.:13:48.

someone wilfully assaulted. There are some cases because of medical

:13:49.:13:53.

conditions, they may be confused, they may have mental health

:13:54.:13:55.

problems, where they get violent. We're talking about that. We are

:13:56.:14:00.

talking about wilful assault on staff. Before I let you go,

:14:01.:14:04.

obviously, Jeremy Hunt has done an interview last night. He has talked

:14:05.:14:09.

about the current situation in the NHS being unacceptable is. It is

:14:10.:14:13.

unacceptable. We need some big changes in how our health system.

:14:14.:14:21.

What do we need to provide? Much more money. We need to look at the

:14:22.:14:26.

percentage of GDP. The difficulty is because we pay it through taxation

:14:27.:14:30.

it becomes a difficult issue. We need to have a talk through all

:14:31.:14:34.

parties about how much we are willing to pay for a fantastic

:14:35.:14:38.

health and social care service. Thank you very much for your time.

:14:39.:14:43.

The Chief Executive of the Royal College of Nursing.

:14:44.:14:50.

A little bit nippy today? Just a little bit. Good morning. It gets

:14:51.:14:55.

even more nippy through the weekend. This morning, temperatures aren't

:14:56.:15:00.

especially low, but the increasing wind is adding to the chill. A bit

:15:01.:15:04.

of frost and ice in eastern areas and wintry showers across the

:15:05.:15:09.

eastern half of the country. Waking up to a covering of snow this

:15:10.:15:13.

morning in eastern parts of Scotland and north-east England. Further

:15:14.:15:17.

south, across southern parts of eastern England, this is where it is

:15:18.:15:25.

mainly rain and drizzle. West is best for the weather. Northwest

:15:26.:15:30.

Scotland, lots of lovely sunshine and temperatures picking up a little

:15:31.:15:35.

bit. Eastern Scotland, north-east England, wintry flurries continue.

:15:36.:15:38.

Parts of Cumbria shouldn't fare too badly. A generally grey picture

:15:39.:15:42.

further south throughout the day. There could be some brightness into

:15:43.:15:46.

east Anglia and the south-east later, but further patchy rain and

:15:47.:15:49.

drizzle at times. Still misty over the hills. Across the country

:15:50.:15:55.

temperatures are struggling. There could be the odd shower in the Devon

:15:56.:16:01.

and Cornwall, but much of the south-west will be dry. In Northern

:16:02.:16:06.

Ireland, one or a two rain and sleet showers. They will continue into the

:16:07.:16:11.

afternoon. Many will be dry, with sunshine at times. West is best for

:16:12.:16:15.

the sunshine and for the clear skies as we go into the night, but still

:16:16.:16:20.

plenty of cloud in eastern areas. The showers become more abundant

:16:21.:16:23.

into the morning as well. A mixture of sleet and snow. A good covering

:16:24.:16:28.

in the Pennines and eastern Scotland through the weekend. A cold start to

:16:29.:16:32.

the weekend. There could be ice around. Frost in the west, -10 in

:16:33.:16:38.

Northwest Scotland to begin with. Lots of cloud elsewhere. Stronger

:16:39.:16:43.

wind tomorrow. Make note of that if you are spending any outdoors. And

:16:44.:16:48.

more showers. They will start as sleet and snow. For most it will

:16:49.:16:52.

turn back to rain as we go through the day. Temperatures are little app

:16:53.:16:57.

on the day and the winds making it feel colder. In the Sunday the wind

:16:58.:17:02.

gets stronger, gale force around the coast of England and Wales. The best

:17:03.:17:06.

of the sunshine in Scotland and Northern Ireland. A few showers

:17:07.:17:10.

around. Potentially a little bit of sleet over higher ground, but the

:17:11.:17:14.

wind will make it feel even colder than you would imagine. Before I go,

:17:15.:17:18.

I should tell you that tonight with clear skies in the north and west

:17:19.:17:23.

you may get to see not only the full moon, known at this time of year as

:17:24.:17:29.

a snow moon, but also a lunar eclipse. While the moon won't

:17:30.:17:35.

disappear completely it will just turn a little bit darker in shade.

:17:36.:17:39.

That happens between about 10:30pm tonight and 3am.

:17:40.:17:49.

What's it called? Penumbral. I just want to impress someone later

:17:50.:17:51.

in the day! OK.

:17:52.:17:54.

I hope someone corrects me. Thank you.

:17:55.:17:57.

Everyday is school day with Matt! Space - the final frontier and one

:17:58.:18:04.

where there are fortunes to be made in everything from satellite

:18:05.:18:08.

technology to tourism. How exciting would it be to have the

:18:09.:18:15.

prospect of launching space missions from the UK?

:18:16.:18:16.

Over the next three years, the government is planning

:18:17.:18:18.

on investing millions in the UK's first spaceport.

:18:19.:18:20.

Sean is at the National Space Centre.

:18:21.:18:24.

You are enjoying yourself with a future where is?

:18:25.:18:30.

This is not a Tory! Good morning. -- with a view to ease?

:18:31.:18:36.

I found the astronaut training section. Apparently this helps you

:18:37.:18:42.

get used to spacewalking. I'm not really sure how I am doing at the

:18:43.:18:45.

moment, but Tim Peake started somewhere. Tim Peake was in

:18:46.:18:49.

International Space Station last year for six months and a lot of

:18:50.:18:54.

that was funded by UK cash. The UK space industry... It is worth about

:18:55.:19:01.

?14 billion to the economy and overall it supports about 40,000

:19:02.:19:08.

jobs. I am trying to get over to our guest, what I am struggling at the

:19:09.:19:12.

moment. Come here and give me a hand! It isn't just about... Have to

:19:13.:19:18.

get out of this chair. It is just about learning how to walk in space,

:19:19.:19:22.

one of the things you realise is the UK space industry is more about

:19:23.:19:25.

getting Tim Peake there? Absolutely. There are lots of hidden things. I

:19:26.:19:31.

think Tim Peake has highlighted what is already a thriving industry that

:19:32.:19:34.

has existed since the beginning of the space race, the 1960s. When

:19:35.:19:43.

people use their sat navs to get to work in the morning or the weather

:19:44.:19:47.

forecast... That space ingrained in everyday life and people take it for

:19:48.:19:52.

granted. It is the beach it -- GPS satellites that tell us where we

:19:53.:19:56.

are, the weather satellite systems, the climate monitoring, the disaster

:19:57.:20:00.

monitoring. So the fact that we can look at a country and see whether

:20:01.:20:03.

flooding is happening, whether wildfires are happening. That is all

:20:04.:20:08.

coming from space. We will talk about this later but the potential

:20:09.:20:12.

of a spaceport and take off from the UK, how does that tie in?

:20:13.:20:22.

ALARM BLARES We will have a little bit more later on that spaceport and

:20:23.:20:25.

whether spaceflight could happen for the UK.

:20:26.:20:29.

Thank you. That was brilliant to see you in that machine! Hardly moving!

:20:30.:20:37.

He was still trying to make it work. We will keep him on business.

:20:38.:20:42.

Dog owners who don't clean up after their pet's done its business.

:20:43.:20:45.

We've all seen the results and it drives people mad.

:20:46.:20:48.

Well, following a successful pilot in one London borough,

:20:49.:20:56.

the Isle of Man could be the latest authority about to introduce

:20:57.:20:59.

Irresponsible owners could then be traced and fined.

:21:00.:21:02.

They may be manned's best friend but the mess some leave behind is

:21:03.:21:11.

unpleasant and even dangerous. But soon it could also be evidence and

:21:12.:21:17.

the dog's Ohno brought to justice. But after a pilot scheme in the

:21:18.:21:22.

London borough introduced voluntary DNA testing at the start of last

:21:23.:21:26.

year, after just three months they saw a 50% drop in dog fouling will

:21:27.:21:34.

stop now they hope to make it compulsory and others are taking

:21:35.:21:37.

their lead. The Isle of Man is launching a public consultation in a

:21:38.:21:42.

plan to launch a bear. You can track back from the DNA profile dog poo on

:21:43.:21:47.

the pavement to the dog that has left the mess behind. With all been

:21:48.:21:54.

there. And it seems to present nerve among the main public. It's a cost

:21:55.:22:00.

of about ?30 per dog and it isn't cheap. With UK local authorities

:22:01.:22:03.

already under huge financial constraint, there are questions over

:22:04.:22:09.

who would pay to trace dog owners that have fallen foul of the law.

:22:10.:22:11.

Joining us now is Allison Ogden-Newton, from the charity

:22:12.:22:13.

Good morning. Thanks for joining us. What do you think of this idea? DNA

:22:14.:22:25.

testing dog poo? I think anything that will encourage people to clean

:22:26.:22:29.

after their dogs has got to be a good idea. On that level we think

:22:30.:22:33.

it's good, but I don't think we will be recommending it on a national

:22:34.:22:36.

basis because we think that there might be some financial constraints.

:22:37.:22:40.

It might be an expensive thing? It sounds like quite a technology... A

:22:41.:22:46.

lot of technology involved, presumably? Presumably. That could

:22:47.:22:51.

be quite restrictive and obviously local authorities are experiencing

:22:52.:22:56.

economic constraints. There are other initiatives that get the kind

:22:57.:23:00.

of results that are purported to have been achieved. Some people are

:23:01.:23:04.

suggesting that people who have their dogs chipped and are

:23:05.:23:09.

registered are probably the ones who are most likely to be responsible

:23:10.:23:14.

owners. So the linkup probably isn't there? That's true. We are

:23:15.:23:19.

struggling to get all dogs chipped, but the people who are getting their

:23:20.:23:23.

dogs chipped are the ones who are most likely to be responsible, and I

:23:24.:23:29.

think this survey, this initiative, relies upon people registering their

:23:30.:23:34.

dog's DNA, so again that will be quite expensive and I think we're

:23:35.:23:41.

probably not there yet. Is it still a big problem? You don't see it

:23:42.:23:47.

around as often as you used to. Is it still a big problem? We are

:23:48.:23:53.

making progress. We are running an initiative which gets about a 50%

:23:54.:23:57.

reduction and it has been really well-received. In places like

:23:58.:24:01.

Harrogate, they've seen a production of 90%. How does it work? Luminous

:24:02.:24:10.

frightening eyes remind people that if they are being watched they

:24:11.:24:13.

behave differently. They are just signs that say "we're watching you"

:24:14.:24:21.

at glow-in-the-dark, because people mostly leave dog mess behind in the

:24:22.:24:26.

dark. Is fear of being caught the best incentive? I think so. My local

:24:27.:24:32.

authority, Richmond, has fines of up to ?1000 which is definitely working

:24:33.:24:38.

on people's view of getting caught. It mostly relies on people doing the

:24:39.:24:42.

right thing because they are thinking about what other people

:24:43.:24:45.

would ring. In that sense they are asking people to be responsible. --

:24:46.:24:49.

people would think. It isn't necessarily that they are getting

:24:50.:24:54.

caught, it is that a responsible dog owner doesn't leave a mess behind.

:24:55.:24:59.

You mentioned the fines. Do we know how many are issued? And are fines

:25:00.:25:03.

issued? Different local authorities take different measures, but

:25:04.:25:07.

definitely dog fouling is something that is becoming commonplace, as is

:25:08.:25:12.

the reduction of dog mess, so we think it is making an impact. We've

:25:13.:25:17.

had quite a few e-mails about this. One says perhaps bringing back the

:25:18.:25:21.

dog licence would help. Too many owners don't pick up and that gives

:25:22.:25:25.

responsible owners are bad name as well. Helen, only a good idea if DNA

:25:26.:25:29.

results can be used to prove ownership if the dog is lost or

:25:30.:25:33.

stolen. Thank you very much for coming in.

:25:34.:25:35.

You're watching Breakfast from BBC News.

:25:36.:25:36.

Still to come this morning: Record numbers of dolphins have been

:25:37.:25:39.

spotted off the west coast of Scotland.

:25:40.:25:44.

But nobody really knows for sure why they're there.

:25:45.:25:47.

We'll try to get the bottom of it just before 9am.

:25:48.:25:52.

Time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.

:25:53.:29:11.

Getting less cold and sunnier next week.

:29:12.:29:13.

I'm back with the latest from the BBC London newsroom

:29:14.:29:16.

This is Breakfast, with Steph McGovern and Charlie

:29:17.:29:25.

We'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment.

:29:26.:29:31.

The Health Secretary, Jeremy Hunt, says it's "completely unacceptable"

:29:32.:29:34.

that some patients are waiting up to 13 hours in A

:29:35.:29:36.

In an exclusive BBC interview, he paid tribute to the hard work

:29:37.:29:40.

of staff, but said the problems of high demand were not unique

:29:41.:29:43.

I think it is wrong to suggest to people that these profound

:29:44.:29:54.

challenges, such as we face with an ageing population, has a

:29:55.:29:58.

silver-bullet where we can solve the problem overnight. There is a good

:29:59.:30:02.

plan that has the support of the NHS and it will take a while to deliver.

:30:03.:30:12.

A Federal appeals court has refused to reinstate Donald Trump's ban

:30:13.:30:15.

on travellers from seven mainly Muslim countries.

:30:16.:30:17.

The controversial immigration reform was suspended last week.

:30:18.:30:20.

The US President responded to the ruling saying there will be

:30:21.:30:22.

The case is now likely to go to The Supreme Court.

:30:23.:30:26.

Campaigners will challenge the way the Government deals

:30:27.:30:28.

with unaccompanied child refugees at a High Court hearing today.

:30:29.:30:31.

They say ministers have not worked with local councils to find enough

:30:32.:30:35.

The judicial review comes after the government announced

:30:36.:30:38.

they would close a key humanitarian route into the UK once a total

:30:39.:30:41.

Council tax rises will hit many households in England and Wales

:30:42.:30:46.

The Local Government Information Unit says that 94% of council

:30:47.:30:50.

leaders and senior officials questioned said they would be forced

:30:51.:30:53.

to put up taxes and increase charging for services.

:30:54.:30:55.

Some households will face rises of up to 5%, well above inflation.

:30:56.:31:01.

Rail ticket machines cause so much confusion that a fifth of passengers

:31:02.:31:05.

who use them buy the wrong ticket, according to the rail regulator.

:31:06.:31:08.

While 7% of travellers underpay and could be fined,

:31:09.:31:10.

The Office of Rail and Road wants train companies to refund passengers

:31:11.:31:15.

who accidentally buy tickets which are too expensive

:31:16.:31:17.

The BBC has learned that the organisation responsible

:31:18.:31:31.

for advising English health trusts on the security of staff

:31:32.:31:35.

There were chaotic scenes in the South African parliament

:31:36.:31:37.

as President Jacob Zuma tried to deliver his annual state

:31:38.:31:40.

Opposition MPs called the president a "scoundrel" and "rotten

:31:41.:31:44.

to the core'" because of corruption allegations.

:31:45.:31:46.

The President ordered the deployment of troops around the Parliament

:31:47.:31:48.

building to deal with thousands of protestors.

:31:49.:31:52.

And it's been announced that George Clooney and his wife Amal

:31:53.:31:55.

The news was broken by their showbiz friend pal, Matt Damon,

:31:56.:31:58.

who said he almost started crying when he found out.

:31:59.:32:01.

He added that they will make awesome parents.

:32:02.:32:03.

The A-list couple tied the knot at a lavish wedding

:32:04.:32:06.

We will have the weather soon, but first, the sport. A bit of a hit on

:32:07.:32:27.

the knuckles for the FA from MPs. It is about what happens next. They

:32:28.:32:31.

could lose 30 to ?40 million of money and funding if they do not

:32:32.:32:35.

reform from within. They could take legislation to make them reform if

:32:36.:32:39.

they don't. It has been years in the making, the need for change.

:32:40.:32:42.

It's all about helping the England national team and making

:32:43.:32:45.

the Football Association more reflective, of the millions who play

:32:46.:32:47.

As things stand, there are 122 members that make the big decisions

:32:48.:32:52.

on the FA council, and more than 90% of them are men aged over 60.

:32:53.:32:56.

There have been calls for change for decades.

:32:57.:32:58.

And now, after a vote of no confidence in the FA by MP's,

:32:59.:33:02.

the Government will legislate if English football's governing

:33:03.:33:04.

However, one of the FA members, Keith Compton, responded,

:33:05.:33:07.

saying the FA is changing and added, "it is pity that the MPs have got

:33:08.:33:11.

It wasn't the highest scoring start to the new Super League season,

:33:12.:33:19.

but St Helens fans won't care, as they beat their old rivals Leeds.

:33:20.:33:23.

The game was won by a moment of class, as St Helens,

:33:24.:33:26.

slid across the field, before unpicking the door

:33:27.:33:28.

and finding a gap with Frenchman Theo Farge,

:33:29.:33:31.

squeezing across the line to make it 6-4.

:33:32.:33:33.

There's another big weekend ahead in the Six Nations.

:33:34.:33:35.

Scotland are in France on Sunday, while the roof will be open

:33:36.:33:39.

for the match between Wales and England in Cardiff tomorrow,

:33:40.:33:41.

Before that, Ireland will be looking to bounce back

:33:42.:33:44.

Donnacha Ryan and Cian Healy, have been drafted into the pack

:33:45.:33:48.

for their game against Italy, in Rome.

:33:49.:33:50.

Paddy Jackson remains at fly half, with Jonnie Sexton still injured.

:33:51.:33:55.

It would be easy to feel sorry for ourselves and be quite angry at each

:33:56.:34:03.

other. There is a bit of that. That is naturally there. But we shook

:34:04.:34:07.

ourselves down early in the week and we have to respond positively this

:34:08.:34:12.

weekend and do as best as we can in Italy. The start against Scotland

:34:13.:34:16.

was especially disappointing and what we did in the second half and

:34:17.:34:21.

towards the end of the first half shows what we can do as a team.

:34:22.:34:24.

There's another big weekend ahead in the Six Nations.

:34:25.:34:26.

Scotland are in France on Sunday, Ireland travel to Rome to face Italy

:34:27.:34:30.

tomorrow while the roof will be open for the match between Wales

:34:31.:34:33.

and England in Cardiff, and that is what England wanted.

:34:34.:34:47.

Ronnie O'Sullivan, is out of snooker's World Grand Prix

:34:48.:34:49.

in Preston, after losing in the second round to Australia's Neil

:34:50.:34:52.

O'Sullivan could only sit and watch, as the world number seven knocked

:34:53.:34:56.

in a break 83 to take the match by four frames to one.

:34:57.:34:59.

He went on to lose to Barry Hawkins 4-2 in the quarter finals.

:35:00.:35:06.

Both of them had played two matches in one day.

:35:07.:35:09.

Great Britain's women, can move a big step closer

:35:10.:35:11.

to the promised land and the world elite groups,

:35:12.:35:14.

if they can win their third FED cup round robin match

:35:15.:35:17.

World number one, Johanna Konta, and her teamates are on a roll,

:35:18.:35:21.

thrashing Latvia and Portugal so far.

:35:22.:35:23.

Another win and they'll play in this weekend's play offs and it

:35:24.:35:26.

would give new Team Captain Anne Keothavong, a clean sweep

:35:27.:35:29.

They are tough competitors that notoriously step up to the plate

:35:30.:35:49.

But, you know, I believe in my players and hope in them

:35:50.:35:53.

British Sprinter James Ellington, says he's determined to race

:35:54.:35:58.

at the highest level again, despite being involved in a serious

:35:59.:36:01.

He'll undergo surgery later today and faces three months

:36:02.:36:04.

Yesteray he spoke publicly about the crash for the first time.

:36:05.:36:10.

The crazy thing is I did not get knocked out either.

:36:11.:36:14.

When I was on the floor and I looked at my leg and there was blood

:36:15.:36:20.

everywhere and my leg was in pieces, I lost six pints of blood,

:36:21.:36:23.

and I was laying there thinking, what the hell is going on?

:36:24.:36:27.

Wow. We wish him well in his surgery today.

:36:28.:36:40.

And finally, an Austrian man has broken his own downhill speed

:36:41.:36:43.

It appears he's borrowed his outfit from Britney Spears and the helmet

:36:44.:36:49.

from the Nightmare movie, but it seemed to do the trick.

:36:50.:36:52.

Launching himself down a gravelly hill in the Atacama Desert,

:36:53.:36:56.

Exhausted at the end. A chap has gone even faster, 138 miles per

:36:57.:37:11.

hour, going on a ski slope. I might try that one day. May be without the

:37:12.:37:15.

outset. Hopefully it makes a difference. -- outfit.

:37:16.:37:16.

If you want to add that kind of adrenaline rush

:37:17.:37:18.

to your history lessons, head to the old slate mines

:37:19.:37:21.

of North Wales which have been given a new lease on life

:37:22.:37:24.

I honestly don't really like heights, but I joined a school

:37:25.:37:28.

There are over 300 of them on this site underground.

:37:29.:37:37.

And you then zip wire through them at great speed,

:37:38.:37:40.

getting a history lesson of what it was like for the real

:37:41.:37:44.

They didn't have these. And look at this guy. He fell. I was hoping his

:37:45.:38:01.

dad. They have no fear. He was all right. Did you do it? You will find

:38:02.:38:14.

out tomorrow. There were some monkey bars to get up to the stairway to

:38:15.:38:16.

heaven. Which you will see. Long delays in Accident

:38:17.:38:30.

and Emergency, high bed-rate This winter the pressures

:38:31.:38:32.

on hospitals have been mounting. So what does the man in charge

:38:33.:38:37.

make of the challenges The Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt sat

:38:38.:38:39.

down with our Health Editor Hugh We have seen pictures from the Royal

:38:40.:38:48.

Blackburn of mothers and babies waiting for ours. -- hours. It is

:38:49.:38:52.

incredibly frustrating for me. Doing this job, I want to see the NHS

:38:53.:38:57.

having the best care in the world. That kind of care is completely

:38:58.:39:01.

unacceptable and no one wants it for their own family. What can you do

:39:02.:39:06.

about it? I think you have to recognise that overall, there are

:39:07.:39:12.

positive things as well as negative things. And there is huge commitment

:39:13.:39:16.

in the NHS to sort out those negative things. In the particular

:39:17.:39:21.

pressure point we have is Accident and Emergency. And what we need to

:39:22.:39:27.

do is find ways of treating people, especially with complex conditions,

:39:28.:39:30.

older people with dementia, treating them at home or in the community.

:39:31.:39:34.

That is the big direction of change we have embarked on. That is longer

:39:35.:39:39.

term. What we are seeing right now in hospitals, the things we have

:39:40.:39:43.

seen on the BBC this week, real stress and real strain. Performance

:39:44.:39:47.

targets, the worst since 2004. What can you do about it? Shouldn't you

:39:48.:39:53.

be doing more? I think it is wrong to suggest to people that these

:39:54.:39:57.

profound challenges such as we face with an ageing population are ones

:39:58.:40:01.

where there is a silver-bullet and you can solve the problem overnight

:40:02.:40:05.

We have a very good plan. It has the support of the NHS. It will take

:40:06.:40:10.

time to deliver. But in terms of immediate support, we are doing what

:40:11.:40:13.

we can with extra financial support to the NHS these year. More doctors

:40:14.:40:18.

and more nurses. But we also have to think about the people in the NHS to

:40:19.:40:22.

a working very hard to sort out these problems. And we need the help

:40:23.:40:26.

of the public. We know that a number of people seen in Accident and

:40:27.:40:32.

Emergency could have their needs dealt with another part of the NHS.

:40:33.:40:36.

We need to make sure that as far as we can we free up people in Accident

:40:37.:40:41.

and Emergency departments, especially with older patients with

:40:42.:40:45.

particular needs. Jeremy Hunt, the Health Secretary, speaking to our

:40:46.:40:48.

health editor, Hugh Pym. As we heard, long waits in the Accident

:40:49.:40:56.

and Emergency department are unacceptable according to Jeremy

:40:57.:41:02.

Hunt. Almost a year ago, Greater Manchester became the first local

:41:03.:41:05.

authority in England to take control of its health and social care

:41:06.:41:08.

budget, allowing them to try out new ways of joining up the two services.

:41:09.:41:13.

So has it been successful in providing better

:41:14.:41:15.

Jon Rouse, Chief officer of the Greater Manchester Health

:41:16.:41:18.

and Social Care Partnership joins us.

:41:19.:41:20.

What are the ground rules? Some people may not understand the bigger

:41:21.:41:26.

picture with the money. You now get a lump sum of money that you decide

:41:27.:41:31.

how you are going to spend. Yes. The government and the NHS national

:41:32.:41:35.

bodies in Greater Manchester have been able to make their own

:41:36.:41:39.

decisions, some ?6 billion of resources are spent on the NHS and

:41:40.:41:43.

social care every year... How much money did you get? In total across

:41:44.:41:47.

Greater Manchester, ?6 billion a year. ?6 billion. How long have you

:41:48.:41:53.

been running? We started on the first of April, the first year. It

:41:54.:41:57.

is early days. But we have been able to innovate already. In what way I

:41:58.:42:02.

doing things differently? I would say that what it boils down to is

:42:03.:42:05.

that we are investing far further upstream to try to prevent the sort

:42:06.:42:09.

of problems you have heard about this morning in terms of the

:42:10.:42:12.

interview with Jeremy Hunt from being the reality on the ground.

:42:13.:42:17.

What does upstream in? It means investing in people is health and

:42:18.:42:20.

well-being. We know that, for example, a large number of

:42:21.:42:23.

admissions for the frail and elderly going to hospital are due to the

:42:24.:42:27.

fact that either they have had a fall, or they are dehydrated, or

:42:28.:42:32.

suffering from some kind of malnutrition. If we can get some

:42:33.:42:35.

programmes for them into their homes and care homes to make sure they do

:42:36.:42:39.

not fall over and are receiving the right food and drink, then they are

:42:40.:42:43.

far less likely to end up in hospital and Accident and Emergency.

:42:44.:42:46.

That sounds like a lot. That is either a medium or long-term goal.

:42:47.:42:50.

In the short time you have been operating the system, are using less

:42:51.:42:54.

people turning up in Accident and Emergency? Because I think Jeremy

:42:55.:42:58.

Hunt described it as that being the pressure point. Are there fewer

:42:59.:43:02.

people turning up in Accident and Emergency? We are not seeing a

:43:03.:43:06.

significant increase in attendance in Accident and Emergency. Where we

:43:07.:43:10.

are studying is enabling people to move out of hospital, especially the

:43:11.:43:14.

frail and elderly. And that is due to the pressures on the social care

:43:15.:43:19.

system. Our view is that if there is one point on the system that needs

:43:20.:43:22.

fixing more urgently than any other it is investment in social care to

:43:23.:43:26.

enable people to go home with the right package or go suitable care.

:43:27.:43:33.

Are you putting more money in for that? We are using some of the NHS's

:43:34.:43:37.

resources to invest in social care. But that is not a complete fix We

:43:38.:43:44.

also need additional national investment if we are going to

:43:45.:43:47.

achieve our goals. Because of the way this has been broken down, so,

:43:48.:43:51.

you look after a specific area, do you know, you talk about the 6

:43:52.:43:54.

billion pounds figure, which is what you got last time around, if you

:43:55.:43:58.

were the person writing the cheque with which you, as the man who is

:43:59.:44:01.

running this very important area, with a lot of health problems, if

:44:02.:44:06.

you were writing that check in order to make it possible to do what you

:44:07.:44:10.

think you need to do, how much would that figure rise by? -- cheque. If

:44:11.:44:16.

we had that cheque authorised for social care, if all the priorities

:44:17.:44:20.

we have, that is what is most pressing, the gap for social care

:44:21.:44:23.

next year in Greater Manchester is ?76 million. The government, through

:44:24.:44:29.

allowing increases in the Council Tax, has allowed us to raise about

:44:30.:44:32.

?9 million extra next year. So we have still got a very significant

:44:33.:44:37.

gap of ?60 million that we have got to find a way to close. Said the

:44:38.:44:41.

most pressing, without any question in terms of the sustainability of

:44:42.:44:46.

the system, is to Schalke. How do you close that gap? If the recesses

:44:47.:44:51.

were available, what you would do is invest in capacity within the

:44:52.:44:56.

committee. -- resources. In Glasgow, they have reduced the delays in

:44:57.:44:59.

transfer out of hospital with intermediate care investment. That

:45:00.:45:04.

is the rehabilitation you need one to come out of hospital if you are

:45:05.:45:15.

frail and old. Enabling you to make a cup of tea again, a six support to

:45:16.:45:21.

allow people to live confidently. Just noting down some of the

:45:22.:45:25.

numbers, that 76 million which you say is the difference between

:45:26.:45:31.

offering what you want and the situation, relative to the 6 billion

:45:32.:45:34.

that is allocated it doesn't sound like that much in numbers. Remember,

:45:35.:45:40.

that 6 billion is also paying for all of the central NHS services, all

:45:41.:45:44.

of the cancer services, all other forms of diagnosis, all conditions.

:45:45.:45:49.

We are trying to use it creatively and innovatively. We are read our

:45:50.:45:53.

thing more money into community services, but they're still a

:45:54.:45:56.

significant gap. -- we are redirecting. Thanks for a much for

:45:57.:46:03.

coming in this morning. -- thanks very much.

:46:04.:46:07.

Let's have a look at the weather forecast. No surprises, it is cold!

:46:08.:46:16.

A rather grey and misty start this morning. Patchy rain and drizzle and

:46:17.:46:20.

a cold wind which will get stronger throughout the day. That's the story

:46:21.:46:25.

for many today. Some of us waking up to a bit of ice and a slight

:46:26.:46:28.

covering of snow in eastern Scotland and north-east England in

:46:29.:46:31.

particular. The wintry showers continue in eastern areas. Sleet and

:46:32.:46:37.

snow for north-east England, maybe a little bit of sleet further south

:46:38.:46:40.

and east. To the west, cloud will break up. The best of the sunshine

:46:41.:46:46.

in the north-west of Scotland. Here, sunshine continues into the

:46:47.:46:49.

afternoon. Across eastern Scotland and north-east England, another

:46:50.:46:53.

temporary covering of snow. To the west of the Pennines, not faring

:46:54.:46:58.

badly as far as sunshine is concerned. Through much of England

:46:59.:47:03.

and Wales it is grey and misty. Further patchy rain and drizzle and

:47:04.:47:07.

no temperature is, 1- five Celsius for many. There may be some breaks

:47:08.:47:12.

in the cloud to the south-east. A better chance further west. Even

:47:13.:47:16.

Devon and Cornwall could have the odd shower pushing through. Wales

:47:17.:47:21.

should stay dry. Cardigan bay the best for the sunshine. In Northern

:47:22.:47:25.

Ireland we have some wintry flurries around, maybe some into the

:47:26.:47:31.

afternoon, but the vast majority will be dry, with occasional quinces

:47:32.:47:34.

of sunshine. Overnight west is best for the breaks. Many central and

:47:35.:47:41.

eastern areas stay cloudy and showers become more abundant to the

:47:42.:47:46.

east overnight, as the wind continues to pick SAP. Temperatures

:47:47.:47:49.

for many around freezing. There is the risk of ice. In clear spots lows

:47:50.:47:56.

of minus ten. A cold start to the weekend for all. The wind does pick

:47:57.:48:03.

up on that day, making it feel even colder -- on Saturday. Sleet and

:48:04.:48:08.

snow to begin with. Turning back to rain through the afternoon and there

:48:09.:48:12.

could be a good covering of snow in the Pennines and the hills of

:48:13.:48:15.

south-east Scotland. Temperatures not far off today, but the wind will

:48:16.:48:20.

make it feel colder. On Saturday and Sunday the best of the weather will

:48:21.:48:24.

be in the north-west of Scotland. The hats more in the way of brighter

:48:25.:48:29.

breaks in England and Wales on Sunday, but more showers to come.

:48:30.:48:35.

Mainly rain, drizzle and sleet. Touching gale force in places. It is

:48:36.:48:40.

going to feel colder than you think if you were to look at your

:48:41.:48:46.

thermometers. Freezing all day long. Keep yourself wrapped up warm

:48:47.:48:51.

through the weekend! Next week the winds turned to a more southerly

:48:52.:48:54.

direction and perhaps something a little bit less chilly.

:48:55.:48:59.

We don't need to look at a thermometer, we can just look at

:49:00.:49:01.

you! I got my telling off from you

:49:02.:49:06.

earlier, so I thought I'd better put my scarf on. I took my jacket off so

:49:07.:49:11.

I did feel the benefit when I left. Lovely! Thank you.

:49:12.:49:17.

He took his jacket off in order to feel the benefit when he put it back

:49:18.:49:19.

on? That the one!

:49:20.:49:20.

Thank you. The race is on to save around 100

:49:21.:49:23.

whales stranded on a beach The pilot whales were discovered

:49:24.:49:27.

on Farewell Spit, on the South Distressing pictures show hundreds

:49:28.:49:33.

more that have already died. Andrew Lamason of the Department

:49:34.:49:37.

of Conservation joins us We've seen some of the pictures.

:49:38.:49:49.

What the situation the moment? The tide is coming back in. We are

:49:50.:49:54.

trying to get the last of the people off the beach and we will leave the

:49:55.:50:01.

remaining whales on the beach overnight and get here first thing

:50:02.:50:04.

in the morning. Are you able to save some of them? That's the ultimate

:50:05.:50:14.

goal, that's what we are trying for. It is quite unusual, the way the

:50:15.:50:21.

port has behaved. A number of them are already dead when we first

:50:22.:50:24.

arrived this morning, indicating there is something going on with

:50:25.:50:28.

these guys and they probably aren't that healthy. The ones that are

:50:29.:50:33.

alive haven't behaved that well and the ones on the beach, they didn't

:50:34.:50:40.

really want to leave. How do you actually get them off and what

:50:41.:50:49.

happens next? So during the low tide we have the whales on the beach and

:50:50.:50:54.

we do what we can to keep them as calm and comfortable as possible. We

:50:55.:50:58.

put sheets over them and we wait for the tide to come in. This part of

:50:59.:51:02.

New Zealand, we have really big tides. So when that tide comes in

:51:03.:51:10.

that's an opportunity to try and refloat these whales and get them

:51:11.:51:14.

back out into the sea. You mentioned this being unusual, but what you

:51:15.:51:19.

think has happened? Why are there so many? It isn't unusual to get

:51:20.:51:23.

strandings. What is unusual is that this number, or the number who have

:51:24.:51:31.

died so quickly... On other occasions we have had big strandings

:51:32.:51:35.

but have managed to get most of them off again. These ones died quickly,

:51:36.:51:39.

so that's more of a challenge for us. Yes, so we have to work our way

:51:40.:51:45.

through. We are doing what we can. 100 11 as still on the beach. --

:51:46.:51:51.

111. There are some swimming out in the day, but they aren't looking

:51:52.:51:56.

great either. It is too dangerous to have people around the whales at

:51:57.:52:00.

night in the water, as you can appreciate, so we will wait for

:52:01.:52:05.

light and we will go for it again. Good luck to your teams out there.

:52:06.:52:12.

That was Andrew from the New Zealand Department of conservation.

:52:13.:52:21.

Imagine how exciting it would be to launch a rocket into space from the

:52:22.:52:26.

UK? Sean is with us. Right now I am in a

:52:27.:52:32.

replica of the Mercury Capshaw. That was the US capsule used for the

:52:33.:52:38.

first US astronaut to go into orbit. This morning we are talking about

:52:39.:52:42.

the UK industry, money put into things like this, a replica of the

:52:43.:52:46.

module from International Space Station that Tim Peake spent a lot

:52:47.:52:51.

of time in last year. Shall we get on-board? This is pretty important.

:52:52.:52:56.

?14 billion is put into the UK economy by the space industry it

:52:57.:52:59.

supports tens of thousands of jobs, and if we get on-board... This is

:53:00.:53:07.

pretty important. You are from the National Space Centre, where we are.

:53:08.:53:12.

What kind of links with the UK have with a capsule like this? This is

:53:13.:53:17.

the: this module, the European Space Agency module. -- Columbus module.

:53:18.:53:23.

When Tim Peake was up for six months last year, he would have worked in

:53:24.:53:31.

here. It is a research laboratory. He would have spent a lot of time in

:53:32.:53:37.

something just like this. Martin, that word, European Space Agency, a

:53:38.:53:40.

lot of questions around the current relationship the UK might have with

:53:41.:53:45.

that after leaving the EU. Will that change anything? Hopefully not. It

:53:46.:53:49.

is important to make sure we get that right, because the European

:53:50.:53:52.

Space Agency is essentially the way we do almost all about space

:53:53.:53:56.

research at the moment. Especially our Earth observation science will

:53:57.:54:00.

stop if we don't keep access to that, we will have some problems

:54:01.:54:08.

when we leave Europe. But actually it isn't the European Union, which

:54:09.:54:12.

is comfortable. And our relationship will continue. But separately we do

:54:13.:54:19.

a lot of trade with Europe, 50% of our exports goes to Europe. Are

:54:20.:54:25.

there concerns that this might change? Everyone is worried about

:54:26.:54:30.

the uncertainties, but I don't think it will change much because space is

:54:31.:54:33.

a global business, these relationships will have to continue.

:54:34.:54:38.

While we can't live without them, they can't live without as, I think

:54:39.:54:42.

we will be able to keep that going. Space is a global business. Andy,

:54:43.:54:47.

you run a business that looks at space technologies and we've heard

:54:48.:54:50.

this week the government wants to push plans along for us to get a

:54:51.:54:54.

spaceport in the UK, where we can take off and launch things

:54:55.:54:57.

ourselves. How will would businesses capitalise on that? Woodley the

:54:58.:55:02.

biggest cost in all space missions is the launch. -- Robert Lee. It is

:55:03.:55:07.

the biggest barrier to the space industry growing. Furthermore we can

:55:08.:55:11.

do to reduce the cost of launch, the more we can do to enable our access

:55:12.:55:16.

to space. For lower costs. It will help to grow the industry and it

:55:17.:55:19.

means we can get more satellites into space, which will create more

:55:20.:55:23.

data, it will create more applications and therefore more

:55:24.:55:27.

revenue. Are there many satellites already in space? There are, but

:55:28.:55:31.

there's always space for more. And you have to replace them? That's

:55:32.:55:38.

another part. We will just switch to gravity, because you can actually

:55:39.:55:43.

get quite a good replica of what it is like... I will have to turn that

:55:44.:55:50.

off. What it is like in the International Space Station. We will

:55:51.:55:54.

be learning a little bit more throughout the morning.

:55:55.:55:57.

That's just looked like bad dad Stan Singh, to be honest!

:55:58.:56:05.

-- dad dancing. They are very similar. Thanks very

:56:06.:56:06.

much. Time now to get the news,

:56:07.:56:07.

travel and weather where you are. Don't forget, you can get more on

:56:08.:59:31.

our website. See you in half an hour.

:59:32.:00:03.

This is Breakfast, with Steph McGovern and Charlie Stayt.

:00:04.:00:08.

The NHS under pressure - the Health Secretary admits

:00:09.:00:10.

the situation at some hospitals in England is totally unacceptable.

:00:11.:00:13.

Jeremy Hunt says there's no silver bullet but the government has a plan

:00:14.:00:17.

in place to prevent patients being left for hours on trolleys.

:00:18.:00:21.

I'm doing this job, because I want NHS care to be the safest and best

:00:22.:00:31.

in the world and that kind of care is completely sun yepable. --

:00:32.:00:38.

Unacceptable. Donald Trump vows to fight

:00:39.:00:45.

on as a US appeals court says Could we sigh space flights taking

:00:46.:01:07.

off from the UK. I will be looking to see what is possible.

:01:08.:01:13.

In the sport, change now, or face government action.

:01:14.:01:15.

That's the warning from MP's to the Football Association,

:01:16.:01:18.

after a vote of no confidence, in English football's,

:01:19.:01:20.

Good morning, one or two waking up to a dusting of snow. Further wintry

:01:21.:01:30.

showers this weekend and a wind that gets stronger and colder. All the

:01:31.:01:33.

details in 15 minutes. The Health Secretary, Jeremy Hunt,

:01:34.:01:37.

says it's "completely unacceptable" that some patients are waiting

:01:38.:01:39.

up to 13 hours in A He said there was no excuse

:01:40.:01:45.

for some of the difficulties highlighted during the BBC's NHS

:01:46.:01:47.

week, and the Government had a plan A series of reports have

:01:48.:01:50.

revealed patients being left NHS England figures this winter

:01:51.:01:53.

show the worst waiting time performance in A

:01:54.:02:03.

units since records began Jeremy Hunt paid tribute

:02:04.:02:05.

to the work of staff, but said that the problems of high

:02:06.:02:13.

patient demand were not unique to the NHS and all leading health

:02:14.:02:16.

systems were grappling with the I think it's wrong to suggest

:02:17.:02:19.

to people that these profound challenges such as we face

:02:20.:02:24.

with an ageing population are ones where there's a silver bullet that

:02:25.:02:27.

you can solve the problem overnight. We have a very good plan,

:02:28.:02:32.

which has the support of NHS, Asked about BBC coverage

:02:33.:02:35.

this week of patients enduring lengthy waits in A

:02:36.:02:42.

and an elderly woman having to spend six months in hospital,

:02:43.:02:45.

because no care home place was available, he said

:02:46.:02:47.

he didn't want to make excuses and these examples were

:02:48.:02:51.

completely unacceptable. It is you know incredibly

:02:52.:02:56.

frustrating for me. I'm doing this job, because I want

:02:57.:02:59.

NHS care to be the safest and best And that kind of care

:03:00.:03:03.

is completely unacceptable. No one would want it for members

:03:04.:03:07.

of their own family. He added that problems over

:03:08.:03:11.

the sustainability of social care were not being actressed

:03:12.:03:13.

by the Government. But Sir Robert Francis,

:03:14.:03:17.

who carried out an inquiry into the mid-Staffordshire scandal,

:03:18.:03:25.

said it was inevitable that the same mistakes would be made again,

:03:26.:03:27.

if the current pressure on NHS A Federal Appeals Court has refused

:03:28.:03:30.

to reinstate Donald Trump's ban on travellers from seven mainly

:03:31.:03:37.

Muslim countries. The controversial immigration reform

:03:38.:03:39.

was suspended last week. The US President responded

:03:40.:03:40.

to the ruling saying The case is now likely to go

:03:41.:03:42.

to the Supreme Court. Donald Trump's sudden ban

:03:43.:03:50.

on visitors from seven mainly Muslim nations caused chaos at airports

:03:51.:03:57.

and sparked protesting Then, last week, a district judge

:03:58.:03:59.

in Seattle granted a stay, and now, a San Francisco-based

:04:00.:04:06.

appeals court has backed that stay, citing, among other things,

:04:07.:04:08.

that no one from those seven nations The decision infuriated

:04:09.:04:11.

Donald Trump. Prompted the leader of one

:04:12.:04:18.

of the states leading the challenge An appeal to the highest court

:04:19.:04:29.

in the land, the US Supreme Court, But that could put the decision

:04:30.:04:38.

in the hands of a court that's currently evenly devided,

:04:39.:04:47.

and a tie would leave Donald Trump maintains his ban

:04:48.:04:49.

is necessary in order to protect the US from terrorism, but it may

:04:50.:04:55.

yet be proven unconstitutional. And until he has his day in court,

:04:56.:05:01.

refugees from around the world and citizens of those seven Muslim

:05:02.:05:04.

nations can continue to come Campaigners will challenge the way

:05:05.:05:07.

the Government deals with unaccompanied child refugees

:05:08.:05:17.

at a High Court hearing today. They say ministers have not

:05:18.:05:19.

worked with local councils to find enough places

:05:20.:05:22.

for vulnerable children. The judicial review comes

:05:23.:05:26.

after the government announced they would close a key humanitarian

:05:27.:05:27.

route into the UK once a total Council tax rises will hit many

:05:28.:05:31.

households in England and Wales The Local Government

:05:32.:05:38.

Information Unit says that 94% of council leaders and senior

:05:39.:05:48.

officials questioned said they would be forced to put up taxes

:05:49.:05:50.

and increase charging for services. Some households will

:05:51.:05:57.

face rises of up to 5%, The BBC has learned

:05:58.:06:00.

that the organisation responsible for advising English health trusts

:06:01.:06:08.

on the security of staff That's despite a steep increase

:06:09.:06:10.

in attacks on doctors and nurses. NHS Protect has confirmed

:06:11.:06:14.

that its role in hospital security will continue only until the end

:06:15.:06:16.

of March. One of the things that NHS Protect

:06:17.:06:23.

have done is supported staff when the police and Crown Prosecution

:06:24.:06:26.

Service have not taken it further and got some convictions through it.

:06:27.:06:30.

So they have been supportive to the staff on the front line.

:06:31.:06:36.

There were chaotic scenes in the South African parliament

:06:37.:06:38.

as President Jacob Zuma tried to deliver his annual state

:06:39.:06:41.

Opposition MPs called the president a 'scoundrel'

:06:42.:06:43.

and 'rotten to the core' because of corruption allegations.

:06:44.:06:46.

The president ordered the deployment of troops around

:06:47.:06:49.

the Parliament building to deal with thousands of protestors.

:06:50.:07:01.

Rail ticket machines cause so much confusion that a fifth of passengers

:07:02.:07:04.

who use them buy the wrong ticket, according to the rail regulator.

:07:05.:07:09.

While 7% travellers underpay and could be fined,

:07:10.:07:13.

The Office of Rail and Road wants train companies to refund passengers

:07:14.:07:17.

who accidentally buy tickets which are too expensive

:07:18.:07:19.

Buying a train ticket can be difficult at the best of times.

:07:20.:07:24.

This report says that buying one from a machine without any human

:07:25.:07:27.

The independent regulator, the Office of Rail and Road,

:07:28.:07:31.

carried out a study using mystery shoppers.

:07:32.:07:33.

It found that many people bought the wrong tickets.

:07:34.:07:36.

13% paid more for their tickets than they needed to.

:07:37.:07:40.

6% paid less than they should have done, opening themselves to the risk

:07:41.:07:43.

And 65% couldn't find any information about which type

:07:44.:07:47.

One person found that buying a ticket with a rail card

:07:48.:07:57.

was actually more expensive than buying one without.

:07:58.:07:59.

The consumer group Which described the situation as a mess,

:08:00.:08:01.

saying it was unacceptable that some passengers were paying

:08:02.:08:04.

In December, the Department of Transport launched an action plan

:08:05.:08:07.

Last week, rail operators announced a trial scheme that

:08:08.:08:13.

would automatically offer the cheapest fares to passengers.

:08:14.:08:17.

The Rail Minister, Paul Maynard, welcomed this latest report,

:08:18.:08:21.

saying the ticketing was often too complicated and hard to navigate.

:08:22.:08:24.

The rail operator said it was difficult to offer simple

:08:25.:08:27.

options because of what they called decades-old rail regulations

:08:28.:08:29.

Some distressing pictures from New Zealand where hundreds

:08:30.:08:43.

of whales have died on a beach after they became stranded.

:08:44.:08:45.

The pilot whales were discovered on Farewell Spit,

:08:46.:08:47.

Conservation Department staff and volunteers are trying

:08:48.:08:54.

to save one hundred of them that are still alive.

:08:55.:08:56.

Whale strandings at Farewell Spit are fairly common but this

:08:57.:08:59.

This is the third largest mass stranded we have recorded.

:09:00.:09:10.

Lodgistically it is a massive undertaking. They started stranding

:09:11.:09:15.

last night and we were notified of that and then this morning when they

:09:16.:09:22.

went out and checked on them, most of the whales were dead.

:09:23.:09:25.

A fountain of bright lava that gushed from a hole in the side

:09:26.:09:29.

of a cliff for a month before disappearing has

:09:30.:09:31.

You can see it here, it's known as the "fire hose" and it

:09:32.:09:35.

seemed to have vanished from Hawaii's Kilauea

:09:36.:09:37.

Volcano last week, but it's since re-emerged,

:09:38.:09:40.

pouring a stream of molten lava over a metre wide into the ocean.

:09:41.:09:50.

All the sport coming up and the weather for the weekend.

:09:51.:09:56.

There are around 90,000 unaccompanied migrant

:09:57.:09:57.

Many have fled fighting in countries like Syria,

:09:58.:10:00.

The UK said it would help some of those who wanted to come

:10:01.:10:06.

to Britain, but one of the schemes is now being closed

:10:07.:10:09.

by the Government amid fears it may encourage people trafficking.

:10:10.:10:11.

So what is it like making the journey

:10:12.:10:13.

Seven years ago brothers Jawad, Fawad and their cousin

:10:14.:10:16.

They eventually ended up in Staffordshire, where the county

:10:17.:10:23.

council helped them to get fostered by Jackie and Bob Meredith.

:10:24.:10:25.

Thank you for joining us. Good morning. Ahmad, just tell us how did

:10:26.:10:39.

you end up coming to the UK, because it is quite a story, you were all so

:10:40.:10:44.

Young when you travelled here. Tell us about what happened. We basically

:10:45.:10:53.

got from Afghanistan to here, we got handed from person-to-person and got

:10:54.:10:56.

sold from one person to the other and we ended up in the UK after

:10:57.:11:01.

being put in a fridge for 48 hours. You came by lorry, you were on your

:11:02.:11:07.

own through that? It was a mix. Sometimes we would mix with other

:11:08.:11:11.

people and everyone would go to their own destiny nations. But we

:11:12.:11:15.

ended up in the UK and most of it was walking. But in some parts we

:11:16.:11:21.

had to catch a lorry or cars and so we have used all sorts of transport.

:11:22.:11:29.

Jawad, you're 18 now, how old were you when this journey started? I was

:11:30.:11:38.

about... When I came here I was 13. It is an extraordinary time to go

:11:39.:11:42.

through an ordeal like that. When you think back now about what you

:11:43.:11:46.

went through the, what are your thoughts? Sorry that with one is for

:11:47.:11:53.

you. When you think back on that journey, what are your thoughts. I

:11:54.:11:58.

can't explain. I still think it is unreal. I still don't think it's

:11:59.:12:03.

happened. But it has actually happened to me. And we have

:12:04.:12:10.

completely changed now. Jackie, obviously, you fostered the lads

:12:11.:12:14.

seven years ago now, tell us how that came about. We had a call, I

:12:15.:12:21.

was at work and Bob was retired, just to say there is these young

:12:22.:12:26.

guys and I was hesitant, because it was something I was like, oh, I'm

:12:27.:12:30.

not sure about this. Bob is brilliant and said come home and

:12:31.:12:34.

let's talk about it. We met the guys, who were eleven and 13 and

:12:35.:12:39.

they were just little tiny dots. Frightened. Terrified. They had got

:12:40.:12:48.

no one. And when you knew, well, we didn't really know what a horrendous

:12:49.:12:53.

time they had getting here. It took a few years for it to come out. We

:12:54.:12:59.

had to get through post traumatic stress with them. But they have

:13:00.:13:05.

flourished and they were so determined and dedicated to get a

:13:06.:13:13.

new life. When they first came, when you walked in the room, they would

:13:14.:13:19.

all stand up. We were like sit down, you're home, you're safe. People

:13:20.:13:23.

know it is raw for you. You're not here to talk about politics, but

:13:24.:13:28.

when you hear about a scheme to bring more youngsters in similar

:13:29.:13:31.

situations and you here about that closing down, what are your

:13:32.:13:37.

thoughts? Not knowing the full ins and outs of it, you don't want to be

:13:38.:13:42.

too judgmental. But it does seem to think if we have agreed to take

:13:43.:13:48.

3,000, we have only taken 350, there is something that doesn't ring right

:13:49.:13:52.

and it shouldn't be happening. With the situation in general, it is just

:13:53.:13:57.

almost unbelievable in this day and age that this sort of thing is going

:13:58.:14:03.

on almost like a sort of... A holocaust sort of situation. So

:14:04.:14:07.

really we should be helping as many of these young people as we can.

:14:08.:14:11.

Because eventually these lads will go on to be useful members of our

:14:12.:14:17.

society and it will start putting into society again. Could I ask you

:14:18.:14:22.

Ahmad, one of the thoughts from the Government is that the danger is by

:14:23.:14:27.

accepting more young people like yourselves, who are in dire

:14:28.:14:31.

situations, it will encourage more people to try and come here. When

:14:32.:14:37.

you hear that, what do you think? To be honest, if people are to come

:14:38.:14:40.

here they would come regardless of whether you take them or not. Even

:14:41.:14:45.

if you send them back, them come back. People who have been deported

:14:46.:14:52.

back to Afghanistan, we hear stories of them all the time, they always

:14:53.:14:57.

come back. Because of how grim the circumstances are they trying to

:14:58.:15:03.

escape? Yes extremely grim. You go to Afghanistan, you can't do

:15:04.:15:06.

anything, you end up under a bridge smoking cocaine or whatever. You end

:15:07.:15:10.

up on drugs. There is no help for you. There is no where for you stay,

:15:11.:15:15.

people like myself f you have no one to go to, if you don't have family,

:15:16.:15:21.

how could you after spending seven or eight years here, how could you

:15:22.:15:26.

do back and reintegrate into society. You would not be accepted.

:15:27.:15:35.

Do you still have contact with your family? No. That must be

:15:36.:15:42.

heartbreaking, not to know where your family are. We don't know if

:15:43.:15:48.

they are still alive. We don't know anything about them. We heard Jackie

:15:49.:15:55.

and Bob talking about their side of the story, about how they helped you

:15:56.:15:59.

at the beginning. What was it like for you when you first arrived? What

:16:00.:16:06.

are your memories? I was completely scared, didn't know what to do. It

:16:07.:16:11.

was a survival challenge for us. We didn't know where to go, but as soon

:16:12.:16:17.

as we got into foster care, with Jackie and Bob, they helped us to

:16:18.:16:23.

get to where we are now. Did you fear initially that you wouldn't be

:16:24.:16:26.

able to stay here permanently? Is very time when that was the real

:16:27.:16:34.

fear? Yeah. With our court cases, we went through it a few times and got

:16:35.:16:43.

rejected. We kept having nightmares, kept thinking we were going to get

:16:44.:16:47.

sent back to Afghanistan, which we didn't want. But in the last month

:16:48.:16:52.

or so, we got the decision that we wanted. You were young teenagers. It

:16:53.:17:03.

took about seven months to get to the UK. We were 11 when we got here.

:17:04.:17:12.

And now you are a University, studying to be a doctor? I am

:17:13.:17:18.

studying biochemistry. I hope to become a medical doctor. Jackie, you

:17:19.:17:23.

must be very proud. You can tell just from the way you look, listen

:17:24.:17:29.

and engage. Absolutely. They are brilliant guys. When you think that

:17:30.:17:33.

they couldn't speak English when they came, their dedication and

:17:34.:17:38.

approach to life is fabulous. And they are such good fun as well.

:17:39.:17:42.

Thank you all very much for coming in. Let's find out what is happening

:17:43.:17:52.

with the weather. It is grey and Chile to start the

:17:53.:18:03.

day. Some people will be waking up to flurries of snow. Parts of

:18:04.:18:08.

Scotland and North East England have seen snow. Those wintry showers will

:18:09.:18:17.

continue through the day. We will see sunshine at times across western

:18:18.:18:21.

areas. Eastern Scotland and England, further showers through the day.

:18:22.:18:29.

Eastern Scotland and north-east England will have a mixture of sleet

:18:30.:18:33.

and snow, East Anglia will see sleet and drizzle. Sunshine at times to

:18:34.:18:42.

the west of the Pennines. All down the eastern strip, while there may

:18:43.:18:47.

be brightness breaking through the cloud, most will continue with grey

:18:48.:18:53.

skies. The showers will come and go. Some showers through the English

:18:54.:18:56.

Channel, running into southern parts of Devon and Cornwall. Not too many.

:18:57.:19:01.

Most places will be dry. A largely dry picture in Wales. The further

:19:02.:19:06.

east you are, the grey the skies will be. -- the more grave. Most

:19:07.:19:16.

showers should fizzle out into the afternoon, and most people will have

:19:17.:19:24.

a largely dry day. Temperatures are between one Celsius and seven

:19:25.:19:26.

Celsius. It will feel cooler as the wind develops, especially for

:19:27.:19:31.

England and Wales. The breeze picks up tonight. Further showers tonight,

:19:32.:19:35.

more abundant in the east. The West sees the clearest conditions.

:19:36.:19:42.

Temperatures will get down to -10 Celsius in some rural parts of

:19:43.:19:46.

Scotland. A lunar eclipse tonight. Into the weekend, wrap up well. The

:19:47.:19:55.

wind will be stronger. Plenty of showers on Saturday, across the

:19:56.:20:01.

whole country. Sleet and snow giving a good covering snow across the

:20:02.:20:06.

Pennines and parts of Scotland. On Sunday, the wind is stronger still.

:20:07.:20:10.

The showers will be fewer. The best of the sunny weather will be across

:20:11.:20:13.

parts of Scotland and Northern Ireland. Because of the strength of

:20:14.:20:18.

the wind on Sunday, temperatures will be made to feel even colder,

:20:19.:20:23.

more like subsea row through many parts of the country. We are well

:20:24.:20:27.

and truly still in the depths of winter. A sign, Charlie, that things

:20:28.:20:30.

will get less cold as we go into next week.

:20:31.:20:34.

Andy -- and the weather delivered with such warmth, Matt!

:20:35.:20:47.

Seeing dolphins in the wild is an experience many people

:20:48.:20:49.

And last year record numbers were spotted off

:20:50.:20:52.

The waters around the Hebrides are home to nearly 70 percent

:20:53.:20:56.

of Europe's dolphin, whale and porpoise species,

:20:57.:20:58.

but despite this we still know remarkably little

:20:59.:21:00.

about their habitats or the threats facing them.

:21:01.:21:02.

Lauren Hartny-Mills is a science officer from the Hebridean Whale

:21:03.:21:04.

This is really interesting, the fact that there are so many of them. Is

:21:05.:21:14.

it something people can see quite easily, all these different types of

:21:15.:21:22.

dolphins? Some species come right into the shore. So if you are

:21:23.:21:27.

walking a dog on the beach or on a ferry crossing, you stand a good

:21:28.:21:31.

chance of seeing some of the species. You filmed from your vessel

:21:32.:21:40.

that you use for filming underwater and on the surface. Are you seeing a

:21:41.:21:48.

substantial rise in numbers? Last year, we had some great sightings.

:21:49.:21:55.

What are these ones? These are common dolphins. That is our

:21:56.:21:59.

research vessel in the background. Just now, they are writing the

:22:00.:22:02.

pressure wave at the front of the vessel. This one has an almost

:22:03.:22:12.

yellow, lovely strike down the side. Why do you think there are so many

:22:13.:22:17.

now? It is hard to tell. It is one of those things where we not

:22:18.:22:22.

entirely sure. It could be that food resources are increasing, but common

:22:23.:22:27.

dolphins in particular, they are generally found in warm waters,

:22:28.:22:32.

around the tropics, in temperate seas, and in the Hebrides, we are

:22:33.:22:38.

seeing the temperature of the sea increasing by 0.5 degrees every

:22:39.:22:40.

decade. That could be encouraging them to go further north. How do you

:22:41.:22:48.

spot the difference between a dolphin and a poor poise? Is there

:22:49.:22:55.

an easy way? Porpoises are quite small, dolphins are a bit bigger.

:22:56.:22:59.

The poor poise has a triangular dorsal fin. Every species is

:23:00.:23:12.

different. We looked at the situation this morning in New

:23:13.:23:18.

Zealand with the stranded whales. We can probably see some pictures now.

:23:19.:23:24.

What do you think could be happening? Why would the whales

:23:25.:23:27.

become stranded in such large numbers? Pilot whales, the species

:23:28.:23:35.

stranded in New Zealand, have very strong family bonds, and they

:23:36.:23:38.

navigate using sound, similar to how we use sonar, and it's possible when

:23:39.:23:44.

they come into the shallow waters that they become disorientated, and

:23:45.:23:48.

sometimes, if one individual goes, the whole group will go with them.

:23:49.:23:54.

We were talking to one of the guys at the conservation unit in New

:23:55.:23:57.

Zealand, and he was saying it was quite dangerous trying to get them

:23:58.:24:02.

back into the sea as well. And sometimes when they have been on the

:24:03.:24:06.

land for a long time, some of their organs can become squashed by the

:24:07.:24:11.

sheer weight of the animal. Although they may be refloated, it may not be

:24:12.:24:17.

successful. We see a lot of volunteers involved, trying to help

:24:18.:24:21.

the whales. You also involve volunteers in your work. If people

:24:22.:24:25.

want to get involved, that is something they can do? Yes, on our

:24:26.:24:31.

research vessel, we have a small crew, and the other spaces are

:24:32.:24:37.

filled by volunteers. We train people to be marine mammal

:24:38.:24:40.

scientists for the trip. When you're in the Hebrides, if you see any

:24:41.:24:47.

whales, dolphins or, do let us know. We can identify individuals. You get

:24:48.:24:57.

to be a marine mammal scientists on board for the week, involved in all

:24:58.:25:03.

aspects of the trip, recording sightings, watching for sea birds,

:25:04.:25:06.

listening to the underwater acoustics. You are truly a scientist

:25:07.:25:10.

for the week. Sounds great. Thank you very much for your time. It 's

:25:11.:25:22.

8:25am. Sean is at the National space Centre in Leicester for us

:25:23.:25:25.

this morning, having another go at the equipment. Have you got it

:25:26.:25:31.

moving? Faster than last time. Smooth as you like. This is supposed

:25:32.:25:37.

to help you learn how to spacewalk, but I don't know how I will have the

:25:38.:25:40.

opportunity to try it out in real life. ?14 million the space industry

:25:41.:25:48.

is worth to the UK economy. It is pretty much the most highly skilled

:25:49.:25:59.

part of the UK economy. 40,000 jobs. This week, we have heard that

:26:00.:26:02.

another part of the jigsaw might start happening, in that a spaceport

:26:03.:26:06.

might be built in the UK. We build a lot of satellites, get them up

:26:07.:26:12.

there, and people slightly more skilled than me are in charge of

:26:13.:26:19.

that stuff. But we can't take from the UK yet. There might be one in

:26:20.:26:25.

Glasgow, or possibly Cornwall. Not quite the big rocket launches we are

:26:26.:26:28.

used to seeing on TV, with things falling apart, but perhaps

:26:29.:26:33.

aeroplanes taking off, and then things like this may take off from

:26:34.:26:39.

the aeroplanes. Space tourism is down the road, and we will talk

:26:40.:26:43.

about that in around half an hour. Could we be sitting in one of these?

:26:44.:26:48.

It costs quite a bit at the minute. But going off on holidays, never

:26:49.:26:51.

mind Cornwall or the south of Spain, we could be taking off, going into

:26:52.:26:55.

space. That is a long way down the line, costing quite a lot of money.

:26:56.:27:00.

We will talk about that later, but first, the news, travel and weather

:27:01.:27:01.

where you are. Hello this is Breakfast, with

:27:02.:30:27.

Steph McGovern and Charlie Stayt. The Health Secretary, Jeremy Hunt,

:30:28.:30:32.

says it's completely unacceptable that some patients are waiting up

:30:33.:30:35.

to 13 hours in A In a BBC interview he paid tribute

:30:36.:30:39.

to the hard work of staff - but said the problems of high demand

:30:40.:30:42.

were not unique to I think it is wrong to suggest to

:30:43.:30:55.

people that is profound challenges that we face with an ageing

:30:56.:31:01.

population are ones where there is a silver bullet to solve the problems

:31:02.:31:05.

overnight. We have a very good plan that has the support of the NHS. It

:31:06.:31:07.

will take time to deliver. A federal appeals court has refused

:31:08.:31:10.

to reinstate Donald Trump's ban on travellers from seven mainly

:31:11.:31:13.

Muslim countries. The controversial immigration reform

:31:14.:31:14.

was suspended last week. The US President responded

:31:15.:31:17.

to the ruling saying The case is now likely to go

:31:18.:31:19.

to the Supreme Court. Campaigners will challenge the way

:31:20.:31:23.

the government deals with unaccompanied child refugees

:31:24.:31:25.

at a High Court hearing today. They say ministers have not worked

:31:26.:31:30.

with local councils to find enough The judicial review comes

:31:31.:31:33.

after the Government announced they would close a key humanitarian

:31:34.:31:38.

route into the UK once a total Council tax rises will hit many

:31:39.:31:54.

households in England and Wales, according to new research. The local

:31:55.:31:59.

government information unit says 90% of council leaders questioned said

:32:00.:32:02.

they would be forced to put up taxes and increased charging for services.

:32:03.:32:06.

Some households will face rises of up to 5%, well above inflation.

:32:07.:32:09.

Rail ticket machines cause so much confusion that a fifth of passengers

:32:10.:32:12.

who use them buy the wrong ticket, according to the rail regulator.

:32:13.:32:15.

While 7% of travellers underpay and could be fined,

:32:16.:32:17.

The Office of Rail and Road wants train companies to refund passengers

:32:18.:32:23.

who accidentally buy tickets which are too expensive

:32:24.:32:25.

And its been announced that George Clooney and his wife Amal

:32:26.:32:35.

The news was broken by their showbiz friend pal Matt Damon -

:32:36.:32:39.

The news was broken by their showbiz friend Matt Damon -

:32:40.:32:42.

who said he almost started crying when he found out.

:32:43.:32:44.

He added that they will make awesome parents.

:32:45.:32:46.

The A-list couple tied the knot at a lavish

:32:47.:32:48.

A rare baby antelope just 19 centimetres tall has joined

:32:49.:32:55.

The calf named Thanos was left orphaned when its mother

:32:56.:33:05.

It's one of the world's smallest breeds of antelope and the baby

:33:06.:33:10.

is currently so light it doesn't register on the zoo's scales.

:33:11.:33:15.

Staff are raising it by hand until it is big

:33:16.:33:17.

And coming up here on Breakfast this morning: Boldly

:33:18.:33:33.

going where the UK's never been before.

:33:34.:33:35.

As the Government promises millions of pounds to help build

:33:36.:33:37.

Britain's first spaceport, we're finding out how developments

:33:38.:33:39.

in the space industry could affect us all.

:33:40.:33:43.

And comedian Jack Whitehall's at large.

:33:44.:33:45.

He'll be here to tell us about his new show.

:33:46.:33:56.

And, after nine, she's played the waiting game.

:33:57.:34:03.

Now, after two years in the studio, Una Healy

:34:04.:34:05.

is ready to break away from her girl group roots.

:34:06.:34:07.

She'll be here to tell us about her debut solo album

:34:08.:34:10.

Let's find out what is happening in the sport. The FA got a bit of a

:34:11.:34:23.

knuckle rapping? One MP said you are in extra time, you are 1-0 down, you

:34:24.:34:29.

need to do something now. Sorry for pointing at you like that! I was

:34:30.:34:30.

just making the point. Does not have any binding powers,

:34:31.:34:41.

but it is what happens next. If the FA don't reform, there could be

:34:42.:34:44.

legislation, they could have ?40 million of funding withdrawn. That

:34:45.:34:47.

could hit football. At the moment, more

:34:48.:34:49.

than 90% of the FA council And so this is all about helping

:34:50.:34:51.

the England national team and making the Football Association more

:34:52.:34:56.

reflective of the millions who play After a vote of no confidence

:34:57.:34:58.

in the FA by MPs, the Government will legislate if English football's

:34:59.:35:03.

governing body doesn't change. However, one of the FA members,

:35:04.:35:07.

Keith Compton, responded saying the FA is changing and added,

:35:08.:35:11.

"It is pity that the MPs have got It wasn't the highest scoring start

:35:12.:35:15.

to the new Super League season - but St Helens fans won't care,

:35:16.:35:20.

as they beat their old rivals Leeds. The game was won by a moment

:35:21.:35:24.

of class as St Helens slid across the field before unpicking

:35:25.:35:27.

the door and finding a gap, with Frenchman Theo Farge squeezing

:35:28.:35:30.

across the line to make it 6-4. There's another big weekend

:35:31.:35:37.

ahead in the Six Nations. Scotland are in France on Sunday,

:35:38.:35:41.

Ireland travel to Rome to face Italy tomorrow while the roof will be open

:35:42.:35:44.

for the match between Wales They have won four out of the five

:35:45.:35:59.

matches when the roof has been opened.

:36:00.:36:00.

Coach Eddie Jones had suggested he wasn't bothered and thinks Wales

:36:01.:36:03.

may have some other tricks up their sleeve.

:36:04.:36:05.

We are prepared for any shenanigans that may go on.

:36:06.:36:08.

It is a great opportunity to play in one of the great

:36:09.:36:14.

What are the shenanigans that you are preparing for?

:36:15.:36:17.

I don't know, but they are cunning, the Welsh, aren't they?

:36:18.:36:19.

They have goats, daffodils, everything.

:36:20.:36:24.

Wales are very proud of the ceremonial goat that leads

:36:25.:36:32.

them out and are just as proud of George North, who has recovered

:36:33.:36:35.

from the leg injury he picked up scoring against Italy and is named

:36:36.:36:38.

in the side along with another injury worry Dan Biggar.

:36:39.:36:40.

We are looking forward to playing one of the best sides -

:36:41.:36:46.

if not the best side - in the whole hemisphere

:36:47.:36:48.

Their form says everything about England.

:36:49.:36:53.

Full coverage across the BBC. There is commentary of Italy against

:36:54.:37:06.

Ireland on Sports Extra. And finally an Austrian man,

:37:07.:37:20.

has broken his own downhill speed It appears he's borrowed his outfit

:37:21.:37:23.

from Britney Spears and the helmet from the Nightmare movie,

:37:24.:37:31.

but it seemed to do the trick. Launching himself down a gravelly

:37:32.:37:35.

hill in the Atacama Desert - and without even pedalling -

:37:36.:37:38.

Stokl reached a jaw-dropping speed That is what it has done to him.

:37:39.:37:54.

Double helmet? It is the wind in your face at 104 mph. He is a

:37:55.:38:01.

downhill mountain bike skier, if you like. I have been downhill

:38:02.:38:07.

underground, if you want to add that adrenaline rush to history lessons,

:38:08.:38:12.

headed to Wales. I don't really like heights,

:38:13.:38:16.

but I joined a school party They are so vast and there

:38:17.:38:19.

are over 300 of them And you then zip wire

:38:20.:38:23.

through them at great speed, getting a history lesson

:38:24.:38:27.

of what it was like for the real They didn't have zip wires,

:38:28.:38:30.

just candle and a rope. The worst bit was the monkey

:38:31.:38:33.

bars taking you to Our hearts jumped when

:38:34.:38:35.

this lad slipped off. Of course, he was caught

:38:36.:38:38.

by his safety harness. He didn't mind, he thought it was

:38:39.:38:51.

great fun. People used to work in those minds? Yes, they were as young

:38:52.:38:55.

as six, on the cliff face, with a candle and a bit of rope. Eventually

:38:56.:39:00.

they shut down. It's nice to see the whole town has been revised by those

:39:01.:39:06.

caverns and the adventure side. Mine that used to work in the mines are

:39:07.:39:14.

leading people around. It's a great way to teach history.

:39:15.:39:16.

We've been hearing all week about the enormous

:39:17.:39:18.

Now health-bosses have warned sticking-plaster solutions won't be

:39:19.:39:22.

In South Wales, radical plans are being drawn up to change the way

:39:23.:39:29.

They include building an entire village around the principles

:39:30.:39:33.

of healthy living in the hope that this will ease the strain

:39:34.:39:35.

Our health correspondent in Wales Owain Clarke explains.

:39:36.:39:43.

After 76 years, you can forgive a building for not looking its best.

:39:44.:39:47.

But would you want to be cared for here?

:39:48.:39:50.

This part of Morriston Hospital, near Swansea, was built

:39:51.:39:52.

But few could have imagined then some of what goes on here now.

:39:53.:39:58.

There's more pressure going through that side

:39:59.:39:59.

Here, staff design and build equipment to help seriously injured

:40:00.:40:03.

So, the NHS can do more than ever before and the need for care

:40:04.:40:10.

from an ageing population is also greater than ever.

:40:11.:40:12.

It means hospitals like this one are often stretched to the very limit.

:40:13.:40:19.

One of the main challenges is how to reduce the numbers coming

:40:20.:40:21.

to hospitals like Morriston in the first place.

:40:22.:40:25.

On this industrial site, 50 miles to the west,

:40:26.:40:27.

there are plans to build an entire village with the aim

:40:28.:40:30.

It's going to create a completely new village,

:40:31.:40:33.

which the whole world will look at...

:40:34.:40:38.

Think of what's been planned as an entire community

:40:39.:40:40.

The school would be next door to parks and playing fields.

:40:41.:40:45.

Health checks could be available at the local leisure centre.

:40:46.:40:47.

And what's called the world's first wellness hotel could offer

:40:48.:40:49.

But for those who do need help, there will also be a rehabilitation

:40:50.:40:56.

centre, carer accommodation and specially designed housing.

:40:57.:41:01.

The NHS don't keep us healthy, that's the problem.

:41:02.:41:03.

The NHS come in when we are unhealthy.

:41:04.:41:07.

The whole idea is to put a lot more money into keeping people

:41:08.:41:11.

healthy and to educate, from young children right through,

:41:12.:41:15.

about how important it is to look after their health.

:41:16.:41:20.

You and I, we are responsible, in the first instance,

:41:21.:41:22.

We've got to change the culture, not only of the Health Service

:41:23.:41:27.

and the silos that we have in Wales, but of the community.

:41:28.:41:31.

Back in the early days, when these corridors would have been

:41:32.:41:33.

full of patients and staff, the Health Service's role

:41:34.:41:36.

was a relatively simple one - treating the sick.

:41:37.:41:38.

But if the NHS is to survive for the next 70 years,

:41:39.:41:42.

does it need to do more to keep us well in the first place?

:41:43.:41:46.

We're joined by three health care professionals who are already

:41:47.:41:51.

trialling similar approaches in England -

:41:52.:41:55.

occupational therapist Lucy Leonard, consultant Andrew Weatherburn

:41:56.:41:56.

Thank you for joining us. It's fair to say that you are all running

:41:57.:42:07.

projects to try and ease the pressure on the Health Service and

:42:08.:42:10.

social care system as a whole. Doctor Wedderburn, tell us a bit

:42:11.:42:17.

about the project you are involved in? We have identified across the

:42:18.:42:22.

locality, two or three years ago, that 3% of the local population were

:42:23.:42:27.

using almost 50% of the local health resources. That 3% is the older,

:42:28.:42:36.

frailer, adult group, with long-term conditions and lots of hospital

:42:37.:42:39.

admissions. We wanted to build a team around the patient, so the

:42:40.:42:43.

patient was the focus. Previously we had a lot of different silos looking

:42:44.:42:47.

after patients. What we wanted to do was lift the patient out from normal

:42:48.:42:53.

care structures and put a whole team around them to look after them. What

:42:54.:42:57.

I am thinking straightaway is that those people you are talking about

:42:58.:43:00.

might first have arrived in your practice, as a GP, with another

:43:01.:43:07.

condition, initially? That might be the progression to that point, where

:43:08.:43:11.

they are then occupying time and they needn't be later in the

:43:12.:43:15.

process? You are quite right. What we are doing in Fleetwood, we are

:43:16.:43:24.

focusing on wellness and trying to keep people well. The NHS is

:43:25.:43:28.

fantastic at managing illness, it is fantastic at looking at long-term

:43:29.:43:36.

health problems. But when we look at life expectancy in areas of

:43:37.:43:40.

deprivation, it is significantly lower than in more affluent areas.

:43:41.:43:46.

Why is that, when we are so good at treating illness? Actually, we need

:43:47.:43:48.

a different way in those poorer communities. People that live in

:43:49.:43:54.

poverty and on low income, they really have no hope. They have no

:43:55.:43:59.

hope that things are going to get any better for them. So, why should

:44:00.:44:03.

they stop smoking? Why should they drink less? Why should they take

:44:04.:44:08.

more exercise? Their life, to them, feels rubbish. What we need to do is

:44:09.:44:15.

to give people a real sense of purpose, to give people the ability

:44:16.:44:18.

to connect back into the community and take back control of their own

:44:19.:44:24.

lives. In order to do that, the absolute fundamental health of

:44:25.:44:30.

Fleetwood, it is to listen to our community, listen to the residence,

:44:31.:44:35.

what matters to you? What is important to you? Not what is the

:44:36.:44:38.

matter with you, what matters to you? When you listen, the stories

:44:39.:44:43.

that come out, people want to turn from having things done to them to

:44:44.:44:49.

actually becoming the doers. When they do, the health and social

:44:50.:44:52.

impact is phenomenal. To you have examples of what you

:44:53.:45:02.

have done when you listen to them? We had a Healthier Fleetwood meeting

:45:03.:45:08.

last Tuesday, there were some older residents in that group. One lady

:45:09.:45:11.

started talking about loneliness and isolation. Instantly, the caring

:45:12.:45:18.

profession thinks, OK, let's put somebody in, send somebody ran to a

:45:19.:45:23.

house, make her a cup of tea and talk to her. Actually, she did not

:45:24.:45:27.

want that. She wanted to do something. She wanted to connect

:45:28.:45:31.

with the community again. She told us about the skills that she had,

:45:32.:45:36.

cooking and baking. Watching wanted to do was teach children how to cook

:45:37.:45:41.

and bake, and that was giving her a sense of purpose and connecting her

:45:42.:45:49.

back into the community -- what she wanted to do.

:45:50.:45:51.

Lucy, you are in occupational therapist, what is the work you do?

:45:52.:45:55.

I am primarily an occupational therapist but I manage an integrated

:45:56.:46:00.

team of health professionals, so we have the neighbourhood team linked

:46:01.:46:04.

to two particular GP practices and we very much focus on the needs of

:46:05.:46:10.

the local population. Specifically what? What does an occupational

:46:11.:46:15.

therapist address, what is the health need? Occupational therapists

:46:16.:46:18.

will look at the impact of illness and disability on people's ability

:46:19.:46:24.

to participate in daily activities, my focus is on managing an

:46:25.:46:30.

integrated team at the moment. We have district nurses, care

:46:31.:46:34.

coordinators, a community matron and we provide something called enhanced

:46:35.:46:37.

primary care which is very much looking at the local population and

:46:38.:46:41.

what we need. In Cleveleys where I work we have a high percentage of

:46:42.:46:46.

older people, lots of people experiencing dementia. We recently

:46:47.:46:51.

held a dementia cafe where we put on an information sharing a bed for

:46:52.:46:58.

people with dementia and their carers, -- and information sharing

:46:59.:47:03.

event. We have lots of people who experience falls, so I

:47:04.:47:07.

physiotherapist and team have set up an exercise programme, an education

:47:08.:47:11.

programme to look at people's falls risk and reduce that risk. It is

:47:12.:47:15.

about making people well, that is a big thing on the agenda, preventing

:47:16.:47:19.

ditty reraise should be for it happens. -- preventing

:47:20.:47:29.

deterioration. It sounds expensive, Doctor Andrew?

:47:30.:47:33.

We have been shown lots of the ditch this week across your programmes,

:47:34.:47:37.

what we have been doing is not working. The NHS is under tremendous

:47:38.:47:42.

pressure. Under the Nhs Vanguard Scheme we have been developing ways

:47:43.:47:49.

of looking at people differently. They have physical needs but also

:47:50.:47:53.

mental health and social care needs. We need to team across the area

:47:54.:47:57.

where we are working, mine and Lucy's team work closely together,

:47:58.:48:02.

we need to coordinate the care for that patient. We are keen on the

:48:03.:48:07.

concept of patient activation, so patients being empowered to look

:48:08.:48:11.

after themselves, knowing what to do in a crisis and where to turn. We

:48:12.:48:16.

are keen on working on that. What research is showing is that if a

:48:17.:48:20.

patient is more activated they are less likely to have... To need

:48:21.:48:27.

access to other health services. Doctor Spencer, a GP is often the

:48:28.:48:32.

first point of call, you hear about limited time with the GP. You are

:48:33.:48:37.

talking about getting to know the person, knowing about their life as

:48:38.:48:41.

opposed to just what is wrong. Is that something you can address, you

:48:42.:48:47.

have a busy surgery? We have, often within a GP or nurse consultation

:48:48.:48:51.

people want to talk about their illnesses. We need to get out of our

:48:52.:48:55.

consulting rooms, going to the community and listen to communities

:48:56.:48:58.

about what matters to them and what keeps them well.

:48:59.:49:02.

It has been fascinating talking to you all, thank you for sharing your

:49:03.:49:06.

experiences. Good luck with all the projects.

:49:07.:49:08.

Here's Matt with a look at this morning's weather.

:49:09.:49:12.

It is looking chilly. It is a bit chilly this morning. Good morning.

:49:13.:49:19.

If anything it will get even chillier this weekend as the wind

:49:20.:49:22.

picks up. Nothing untoward for this time of year, even this morning

:49:23.:49:25.

temperatures are not doing too badly. Adding to the wind is the

:49:26.:49:31.

lack of sunshine and it is not feel pleasant. You are waking up to snow

:49:32.:49:35.

this morning across parts of eastern Scotland and north-east England.

:49:36.:49:38.

Wintry showers through the night, they continue through the East of

:49:39.:49:42.

Scotland and North East England through the day. Further south

:49:43.:49:45.

across eastern England it will be a mixture of drizzle and some further

:49:46.:49:52.

sleet. The driest weather will be in the West. With the clouds breaking

:49:53.:49:56.

up at times that will allow some sunshine, the best of which will be

:49:57.:50:00.

a north-east Scotland, even if it is a bit chilly.

:50:01.:50:03.

Nothing untoward. North-east England, some breaks in the cloud,

:50:04.:50:09.

especially across Cumbria -- north-west England. Continuing with

:50:10.:50:12.

showers on the eastern side. A covering of snow for some, the

:50:13.:50:17.

further south you are, more likely to be rain and sleet. Pretty grey

:50:18.:50:21.

across parts of southern England, and misty.

:50:22.:50:27.

Some showers in the English Channel could drift to the south coast of

:50:28.:50:30.

Devon and the will, most will stay dry. In Wales, the best sunshine

:50:31.:50:34.

will be around Cardigan Bay. Some showers at the moment, most of them

:50:35.:50:38.

fading by the rest of the afternoon. Temperatures across the UK between

:50:39.:50:43.

around one and six Celsius at best, feeling cold with the strength of

:50:44.:50:45.

the wind. The wind picks up tonight, bringing

:50:46.:50:49.

more showers to eastern parts of the country to take this into the start

:50:50.:50:54.

of Saturday. Western areas, the clearest skies

:50:55.:50:57.

and coldest conditions. In the north-west Highlands of

:50:58.:51:01.

Scotland it could get as low as minus ten.

:51:02.:51:04.

We have a strong wind elsewhere across the country. It will be a

:51:05.:51:08.

cold start to the weekend, if you are out and about for any length of

:51:09.:51:13.

time, including heading to the Six Nations matches, wrap up well.

:51:14.:51:17.

Lots of Charlotte on Saturday, starting the mixture of sleet and

:51:18.:51:20.

snow. A good covering of snow in some areas. -- lots of showers on

:51:21.:51:26.

Saturday. The best of the driest and sunniest weather again in northern

:51:27.:51:30.

Scotland. That will be the case on Sunday, but by Sunday England and

:51:31.:51:34.

Wales have lots of cloud, there will be some or breaks, fewer showers but

:51:35.:51:38.

the wind a bit stronger, touching Dale -- gale force that time. There

:51:39.:51:43.

will be a bit of an extra bytes to get you to the second half of the

:51:44.:51:47.

weekend, it will feel much colder than the thermometers would suggest.

:51:48.:51:51.

Most places feeling subzero all day long on Sunday.

:51:52.:51:56.

This evening, if you cast your eyes to the skies in western areas with

:51:57.:52:00.

the clearest skies, not only will you see a full moon but it is the

:52:01.:52:05.

Snow Moon at this time of year. There was also a penumbral lunar

:52:06.:52:08.

eclipse, where the Moon passes into the outer side of the earth's

:52:09.:52:13.

shadow, which will darken a little bit in colour between around 10:30pm

:52:14.:52:17.

and 3M. Something to look out for, providing

:52:18.:52:22.

you get rid of the cloud. -- between around 10:30pm and 3am.

:52:23.:52:30.

Did you hear what he said about penumbral, the penumbral moon?

:52:31.:52:36.

Gubler penumbra lunar eclipse. I will give you a penumbra moon when I

:52:37.:52:42.

am in Wembley! They will be crying out for it. Thank you, mat. Snow

:52:43.:52:47.

moon is an easier way of saying that. Have you ever heard of that

:52:48.:52:52.

before? I have never heard of any moons apart from the one you do out

:52:53.:52:58.

of a window on the school bus. He is talking about a different kind of

:52:59.:53:04.

moon! One of those! There was my innocent mind being taken to a new

:53:05.:53:09.

place! Good morning, how are you? You are touring? Yes. Are you a bit

:53:10.:53:15.

weary? Slightly, I am halfway through a 55 day tour, when you book

:53:16.:53:23.

it in you like, it will be fine. I am a young, fit chap, I can do it. I

:53:24.:53:29.

am halfway through and I am... I think you will need a lie down. I

:53:30.:53:34.

might need a lie down, maybe a little hug. Kabasele will have a

:53:35.:53:38.

look at you on stage doing what you do.

:53:39.:53:42.

I'm talking to these ladies, Stu, and this guy comes up to me apropos

:53:43.:53:49.

Muggins has been recognised from the telly.

:53:50.:53:59.

This guy's like, "Mate, you look just like a fat Jack Whitehall."

:54:00.:54:08.

How did you respond to that?! I had to just sort of pretend that I just

:54:09.:54:16.

looked like a fat version of myself rather than accept the insult in

:54:17.:54:21.

front of loads of people. You're onstage persona, we saw a bit of it,

:54:22.:54:24.

I suppose all comedians, it is pretty high-energy. You are saying

:54:25.:54:30.

you feel a bit weary, you have to deliver a lot onstage, yours is

:54:31.:54:35.

quite a physical performance? I think I become quite theatrical the

:54:36.:54:39.

minute I step onto a stage, I can't help it. I always try to pair it

:54:40.:54:45.

down and keep a lid on it but I can't help myself. I am trying to

:54:46.:54:48.

picture you in the wings just before, are you pump to just before

:54:49.:54:55.

you go on? I can myself down, if I go on and I am too excited and I

:54:56.:55:00.

hear that crowd and I go out on stage and I have too much energy

:55:01.:55:04.

than I just garbled the first 15 minutes and power through everything

:55:05.:55:08.

and there will be no pauses and I ruined jokes. Because I am

:55:09.:55:13.

overexcited. So mine is a sense of calming myself down. Because you are

:55:14.:55:17.

touring, you go to so many cities, do you do much research about where

:55:18.:55:23.

you are doing each show? I do, and I like to sort of walk around the city

:55:24.:55:29.

and talk to people and people at the venue and try to get a little bit of

:55:30.:55:37.

local knowledge. On the first night, during the day something happened

:55:38.:55:40.

that I put in for the rest of the tour and I appropriated to wherever

:55:41.:55:44.

I am in. Which is I went on to a man, I was try to find lunch in

:55:45.:55:53.

Northampton and I said, is there a Pret A Manger? You said, I don't

:55:54.:55:56.

speak French. Now I say that in every city, but I have ruined the

:55:57.:56:01.

magic decks formation a few years ago you would have been relatively

:56:02.:56:04.

unknown walking around, but I guess because of the TV stuff and whatever

:56:05.:56:10.

you must get spotted straight up? Fat Jack Whitehall all the time.

:56:11.:56:17.

Especially when you leave London. In London, no one cares. A bitter, a

:56:18.:56:25.

bit. Obviously you have done a show with your dad, am I right in

:56:26.:56:29.

thinking he went to your first night and he was sat next to the reviewer?

:56:30.:56:35.

What happened? Mickaela lives in Northampton, they met on some show,

:56:36.:56:46.

so he came in with Nick Hewer, that was my front row. They are both

:56:47.:56:50.

scowling at me for the whole show. They did not laugh once. To make it

:56:51.:56:55.

worse that was a reviewer behind him, who in his review said everyone

:56:56.:56:58.

was laughing other than Michael Whitehall, who did not crack a smile

:56:59.:57:04.

for two hours. Insight does he find it funny? Lagarde someone turned to

:57:05.:57:09.

him and said did you enjoy that, it did not look like it? He said, I was

:57:10.:57:16.

inwardly laughing. I have no interest in inward laughers, they do

:57:17.:57:20.

nothing. That must be the nightmare for a comedian, no one laughing is

:57:21.:57:24.

the main nightmare? But people who don't react, you can't see them

:57:25.:57:31.

being emotive? I like them completely in darkness, that is the

:57:32.:57:35.

problem in those big venues, you can see all the audience and the lights

:57:36.:57:39.

off their eyes. That is where it gets scary. What about hecklers, I

:57:40.:57:44.

always panic for comedians when you are heckled. Do you like that

:57:45.:57:48.

because it gives you more to go on? The problem with hecklers is you

:57:49.:57:52.

only hear about the really amusing once, the reality is that the vast

:57:53.:57:56.

majority are completely incomprehensible or complete

:57:57.:58:00.

nonsense. People get a false sense that if you shout something and you

:58:01.:58:03.

will get a great reaction from the audience and everybody will be

:58:04.:58:07.

patting you on the back and you will leave the auditorium... Carried out?

:58:08.:58:12.

Exactly, but it is normally complete rubbish. I had a very posh hackle

:58:13.:58:16.

which could only have happened at one of my gigs, I was in Putney,

:58:17.:58:21.

again, this could only happen in my set, I made reference to turning on

:58:22.:58:31.

an Aga. A man at the back of the room shouted out, you can switch on

:58:32.:58:34.

an Aga, that is the point! Did you have a comeback? I just had to

:58:35.:58:37.

apologise to getting my Aga etiquette wrong. You take your tour

:58:38.:58:44.

internationally? Does Ireland count? Scotland? I thought you were going

:58:45.:58:50.

further afield? Ireland. Northern Ireland, I have never been there!

:58:51.:58:55.

That did not work well. Didn't you say you're going somewhere? I am

:58:56.:58:59.

doing a travel shall afterwards. I thought you were taking the show out

:59:00.:59:04.

there? I don't do any shows in Thailand. It is not out of the

:59:05.:59:16.

question? It is perfectly possible, I am going to Thailand. I am going

:59:17.:59:19.

to get some jabs in my arms for rabies and stuff. Not for the tour.

:59:20.:59:22.

I want to make that clear. That is a really fun way to warm up for a

:59:23.:59:26.

show. An armful of rabies. So tonight was much could be very good.

:59:27.:59:30.

I literally go straight from this to a travel clinic in Leeds. And

:59:31.:59:33.

Japanese encephalitis. How are you with the needle thing?

:59:34.:59:44.

Not great, and it makes your arm go dead. If it is floppy tonight, that

:59:45.:59:49.

is why. You have a lot of TV programmes you do.

:59:50.:59:51.

In the last episode of Bad Education, your character

:59:52.:59:56.

Alfie Wickers, decided to leave teaching.

:59:57.:59:57.

Why don't these tills come with a panic button?

:59:58.:00:14.

Do you prefer doing television or stage? I like being able to do both.

:00:15.:00:41.

I know that is a copout answer. I really miss doing stand-up, I hadn't

:00:42.:00:44.

done a show since 2014. I was desperate to do stand-up again and

:00:45.:00:49.

go back on the road. By day 55, if you asked me that question again, I

:00:50.:00:54.

will probably say TV, anything other than this. That the moment I love

:00:55.:00:58.

doing it and I love being on stage. Is there anything you haven't done

:00:59.:01:01.

that you would love to do? I'd love to do play, something in the West

:01:02.:01:06.

End. I think I would struggle with having to do the same script every

:01:07.:01:10.

night. Not being able to ad-lib, change it, do a bit of crowd work,

:01:11.:01:15.

talking to the guy in the front row, which is frowned upon in a serious

:01:16.:01:20.

play. Just break out of Macbeth and ask someone what his job is. That is

:01:21.:01:24.

why stand-up is so good. You can keep it refreshing. If you are bored

:01:25.:01:28.

of doing it, you get rid of it and do something else knew. I really

:01:29.:01:34.

like that. I hope your injections go all right today. Thanks very much!

:01:35.:01:37.

Will you really be thinking of him later?

:01:38.:01:42.

Not really. Can I get a lollipop, if I am brave? Thank you very much for

:01:43.:01:49.

coming in. Jack Whitehall, on tour with At Large until February.

:01:50.:01:53.

Space, the final frontier and one where there are fortunes to be made

:01:54.:01:56.

in everything from satellite technology to tourism.

:01:57.:01:58.

Over the next three years the Government is planning

:01:59.:02:00.

on investing millions in the UK's first spaceport, so is time to start

:02:01.:02:03.

Sean is at the National Space Centre.

:02:04.:02:07.

Good morning. Good morning. At the minute, we are looking at one of the

:02:08.:02:15.

big rockets that has been manufactured here in the UK in the

:02:16.:02:19.

past. It goes to show that, even though you might see the big

:02:20.:02:23.

take-offs on TV when it happens, the UK space industry, the 40,000 jobs,

:02:24.:02:31.

there was a lot more that goes into it. I am joined by Martin from the

:02:32.:02:35.

University of Leicester. When you look at something like this rocket

:02:36.:02:40.

as a example, how does it filter down into the economy? It's about

:02:41.:02:44.

having a supply chain, you need a lot of components to put this

:02:45.:02:48.

together. You will be bringing parts from all over the country, Bristol,

:02:49.:02:54.

Stevenage, hopefully Leicester. Parts of this were made in those

:02:55.:02:59.

places? Yes. These rocket engines were tested on the Isle of Wight the

:03:00.:03:04.

test stands still there today. It is about creating a supply chain that

:03:05.:03:09.

builds everything from the cradle to grave, satellite components. We have

:03:10.:03:13.

a fantastic opportunity the UK to develop new businesses around

:03:14.:03:16.

constellations of satellites, large numbers of satellites around the

:03:17.:03:19.

earth. That is what we are trying to develop in the Midlands and further

:03:20.:03:23.

afield. If we had our own Spaceport, that might help. Andy runs a

:03:24.:03:30.

business about space technologies. If this Spaceport that we heard

:03:31.:03:34.

about from the Government yesterday was built, what opportunities would

:03:35.:03:38.

that mean for small businesses like yourself? If we can create low-cost

:03:39.:03:42.

access to space from the UK, it opens up fantastic opportunities for

:03:43.:03:47.

the UK space industry. We can launch more satellites more cost

:03:48.:03:50.

effectively. That means more data coming to Earth that we can do more

:03:51.:03:55.

things with. How would that help people at home? We can use it in

:03:56.:03:59.

different markets, agriculture, tracking crop growth, insurance

:04:00.:04:03.

companies, tracking cars or vehicles, ships for instance. There

:04:04.:04:09.

is a very big market for tracking maritime ships. The big growth

:04:10.:04:14.

areas, in developing the data streams, and then exploiting them.

:04:15.:04:19.

Just before we go, to get into space there has been some talk that there

:04:20.:04:23.

might be some tourism, space tourism happening from the UK. If it went

:04:24.:04:28.

ahead, would you be first in the queue? I would be one of the people

:04:29.:04:34.

very keen to go. It's really amazing to see Tim Peake being that role

:04:35.:04:38.

model today. In our lifetimes, perhaps we will see human tourists

:04:39.:04:44.

going into space from the UK. It's important to see that might happen,

:04:45.:04:49.

for the industry? Something like this Spaceport has the potential to

:04:50.:04:53.

be a nice landmark, keeping people in the UK, making people realise you

:04:54.:04:58.

can be in the UK, having an industry job in the space industry, living

:04:59.:05:03.

and working in the UK. The stuff you were saying about sending Charlie

:05:04.:05:06.

into space, it could be happening at some point in our lifetimes. We can

:05:07.:05:11.

all hope! That wasn't me trying to get rid of Charlie! It's fine, I

:05:12.:05:16.

quite like that idea. Fantastic. Thank you for showing us round

:05:17.:05:17.

today. We'll be speaking to singer

:05:18.:05:19.

Una Healy from The Saturdays But first a last, brief

:05:20.:05:21.

look at the headlines For now though thanks for watching

:05:22.:05:25.

and have a good day. As part of one of the biggest girl

:05:26.:07:08.

bands of the last decade Una Healy conquered the charts

:07:09.:07:12.

with The Saturdays' giddy mix But now she's decided to go it alone

:07:13.:07:14.

and her first solo album returns We'll speak to Una in a moment

:07:15.:07:19.

but first let's have a listen # You hold my heart right

:07:20.:07:24.

in your hands # Even just for one more

:07:25.:07:37.

day, my love # You hold my heart

:07:38.:08:07.

right in your hands You got the car going, then? Yes, it

:08:08.:08:47.

wasn't me driving it, though. I was worried it was never going to go. We

:08:48.:08:52.

mentioned at the top that there is a distinctly... What is it, it is EU

:08:53.:08:58.

with the guitar, it is quite a simple sound? -- you with a guitar.

:08:59.:09:03.

That is one of the slowest songs. It is all original music, songs I have

:09:04.:09:07.

written myself and co-written. That is a ballad, but there are some more

:09:08.:09:15.

up-tempo, folk rock, a country vibe. I was surprised by that, with The

:09:16.:09:20.

Saturdays, I was expecting it to be more like pop music? It's sort of

:09:21.:09:26.

going back to my roots. Before the Saturdays, I was embarking on a

:09:27.:09:29.

singer-songwriter path. I was playing in pubs and clubs around

:09:30.:09:33.

Ireland, recording my own music. I had been writing since I was 12,

:09:34.:09:38.

playing the guitar. It was almost a transition from that, to go into a

:09:39.:09:46.

girl group, so it is full circle. Is it exciting, doing it on your own?

:09:47.:09:51.

Are you scared? It is scary, but brilliant at the same time. I'm so

:09:52.:09:55.

excited about it. It's a second chance to do the music I always

:09:56.:10:00.

really wanted to do. It is so different, it is so different. But

:10:01.:10:04.

I'm very excited. Country music often has a reputation of singing

:10:05.:10:07.

about very personal things. People often think of it like that, tails

:10:08.:10:12.

being told about lives, lifestyles. Are you comfortable writing about

:10:13.:10:18.

your own life like that? The whole album is all about my feelings, my

:10:19.:10:22.

emotions, my philosophies on life and the Waiting Game, that is about

:10:23.:10:30.

how you have to take the rough with the smooth, hard times and amazing

:10:31.:10:36.

times. My children, my husband, my friends and family inspire me so

:10:37.:10:40.

much. I write from the heart, it is all very relatable, people can put

:10:41.:10:44.

themselves in my shoes and learn some things for them self.

:10:45.:10:49.

Songwriters, they talk about hard times, and people go, what are they?

:10:50.:10:53.

There are hard times for everybody, that is just life. The industry, you

:10:54.:11:02.

have to travel a lot, work crazy hours. You're a mother, how does

:11:03.:11:14.

that work? I have great support from my husband, and people looking after

:11:15.:11:20.

the kids. It's different, for me, I have never do known anything else.

:11:21.:11:29.

I've managed to find a balance. Do you miss the camaraderie of having a

:11:30.:11:34.

band alongside you? It's quite unique, to have girl band, great

:11:35.:11:38.

success, travelling the world. Do you miss that camaraderie? I miss

:11:39.:11:43.

the girls, travelling. The fun that we had, and everything. But I'm not

:11:44.:11:47.

alone, I do have a band that I perform with, a live band. I am

:11:48.:11:52.

doing my first showcase gig in London. I have a live band with me

:11:53.:12:04.

and I have traded the girls in for a few lads. It's a bit different. Of

:12:05.:12:10.

course, I miss the girls all the time. This is your first solo album.

:12:11.:12:18.

Is the plan to do a number of them? I would love to. My dream is to do

:12:19.:12:28.

that tour, but I would love to tour with the album. You mentioned Ben

:12:29.:12:32.

Foden, your husband, he was an England rugby player. Does that

:12:33.:12:38.

cause tensions, given the Six Nations, England, Ireland? Very

:12:39.:12:42.

disappointing, being Irish, that we lost. But it is good banter at home.

:12:43.:12:49.

We have a lot of rugby banter. I suppose that gives you sympathy, the

:12:50.:12:53.

dedication you have to give to sport, like the music career, it

:12:54.:13:00.

takes you away? When I was pregnant, he was gone for ten weeks. He missed

:13:01.:13:08.

a quarter of my pregnancy. But he celebrated one of his tries when I

:13:09.:13:12.

was pregnant by doing this, which was really sweet. Lovely to see you

:13:13.:13:17.

Una Healy's album is called The Waiting Game.

:13:18.:13:22.

Now it's time for Food - Truth or Scare with Gloria

:13:23.:13:29.