11/02/2017 Breakfast


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11/02/2017

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Hello, this is Breakfast with Charlie Stayt and Steph

:00:07.:00:09.

The latest weapon in the war against hackers, thousands

:00:10.:00:17.

of teenagers are to get lessons in cyber security.

:00:18.:00:37.

It's hoped they'll become the experts of the future

:00:38.:00:39.

and protect Britain from online attacks.

:00:40.:00:41.

Good morning it's Saturday, 11th February.

:00:42.:00:44.

President Trump says he may issue a new order authorising a travel ban

:00:45.:00:47.

after his old one was blocked by the courts.

:00:48.:00:49.

Parks under threat - a new report says funding has

:00:50.:00:52.

reached a tipping point and new ways of paying for them need to be

:00:53.:00:56.

The latest on the battle to save hundreds of whales stranded

:00:57.:01:00.

One of the biggest test yet for England, the first trip to Cardiff

:01:01.:01:13.

for Eddie Jones. Wales are banking on the home advantage to take them

:01:14.:01:15.

to the top of the Six Nations. And find out how I survived

:01:16.:01:17.

the stairway to heaven, even if it did turn

:01:18.:01:20.

my legs to jelly. Good morning to match who has the

:01:21.:01:31.

weather. A cold feeling day for all of us, snow giving a limited

:01:32.:01:38.

coaching in some areas. But for many, that is no will turn back to

:01:39.:01:40.

rain. See you soon. -- Matt. Schoolchildren are to be offered

:01:41.:01:43.

lessons in cyber-security to encourage more younger people

:01:44.:01:47.

to pursue a career in defending It's hoped that thousands

:01:48.:01:50.

of teenagers in England will spend up to four hours a week

:01:51.:01:54.

on the subject, over Here's our home affairs

:01:55.:01:57.

correspondent Tom Symonds. Daniel Kelly is a convicted teenage

:01:58.:02:09.

hacker facing a jail sentence. He took part in a massive digital

:02:10.:02:15.

break-in of TalkTalk. What if his potential had been realised at an

:02:16.:02:20.

earlier age? He may have ended up joining a new breed of apprentices

:02:21.:02:23.

learning to cyber security trade, like these. With that in mind, the

:02:24.:02:30.

government is putting up ?20 million for nearly 6000 schoolchildren aged

:02:31.:02:36.

14 and over to take four hours of cyber security lessons after school

:02:37.:02:41.

each week. We think that will help seriously with the shortage of cyber

:02:42.:02:45.

skills that we've got. We will always keep it under review, in case

:02:46.:02:50.

this needs to get bigger. But getting it going at that scale shows

:02:51.:02:55.

serious ambition to make sure that we can have a pipeline of talent we

:02:56.:02:59.

are going to need. Police are stepping up the fight, but this is

:03:00.:03:05.

not a threat that can be defeated on the ground. The cyber-crime

:03:06.:03:10.

battlefield will be online, and Britain's GCHQ will be it's command

:03:11.:03:16.

centre. 50,000 people are employed in the anti- hacking industry. More

:03:17.:03:20.

will be needed, and the government knows it has to start finding them

:03:21.:03:21.

when they are young. And after 7:00, we'll be

:03:22.:03:27.

joined by Brian Lord, who spent over 20 years

:03:28.:03:29.

as a Deputy Director Donald Trump has said he may rewrite

:03:30.:03:32.

the presidential order imposing restrictions on travel to the US

:03:33.:03:36.

to overcome the legal obstacles that have frustrated his

:03:37.:03:39.

efforts so far. His first order, stopping travel

:03:40.:03:41.

from seven mainly-Muslim countries, Our Washington correspondent

:03:42.:03:43.

David Willis has more. After a federal appeals court backed

:03:44.:03:58.

a stay of his executive order, Donald Trump vowed he would see his

:03:59.:04:04.

opponents in court. With the Supreme Court currently split along

:04:05.:04:07.

ideological lines, pending the confirmation of Neil Gorsuch, taking

:04:08.:04:12.

the matter to the highest court in the land would be a protracted

:04:13.:04:16.

process that might prove unsuccessful. Speaking en route to

:04:17.:04:21.

his weekend retreat in Florida, the president revealed he was waiting

:04:22.:04:25.

other alternatives. We will win the battle, but we also have a lot of

:04:26.:04:29.

other options, including filing a brand-new order. I like to keep you,

:04:30.:04:39.

I'd like to surprise you. It is for reasons of security. It could well

:04:40.:04:43.

be that we do. Unveiled at the end of a frantic first week in office,

:04:44.:04:47.

the original order suspended America's refugee programme and

:04:48.:04:51.

banned travellers from seven majority Muslim nations from

:04:52.:04:55.

entering the US. It caused chaos at airports and sparked protest across

:04:56.:05:00.

the country. Just how the White House might rewrite the order is not

:05:01.:05:03.

clear. Lawyers almost certainly have to address the claim that in its

:05:04.:05:09.

existing form, the order is unconstitutional and blocks entry to

:05:10.:05:14.

the United States on the grounds of religion. Mr Trump has continued to

:05:15.:05:22.

insist that tough immigration policies are essential for the

:05:23.:05:25.

country's security. The funding of parks has reached

:05:26.:05:27.

a tipping point and new ways of paying for them may

:05:28.:05:30.

have to be found. That's according to

:05:31.:05:32.

the Commons Communities and Local Government Committee

:05:33.:05:34.

which says parks are suffering It warns there's a danger

:05:35.:05:37.

of a return to the neglect Instead of regarding parks as only a

:05:38.:05:48.

sort of leisure and recreation area of service, we should be thinking

:05:49.:05:55.

about them as big contributors to public health and environmental

:05:56.:05:59.

policy, and community cohesion. And maybe they can be re- prioritise.

:06:00.:06:03.

There is fundamentally a problem about the number of cuts that local

:06:04.:06:07.

authorities have been experiencing and the distribution across the

:06:08.:06:11.

country, and the difficult decisions that most local authorities are

:06:12.:06:12.

having to make. Labour has issued formal warnings

:06:13.:06:13.

to members of its front-bench team who disobeyed Jeremy Corbyn's order

:06:14.:06:16.

to vote for Brexit. Among those who ignored Mr Corbyn

:06:17.:06:20.

were eleven shadow junior ministers A 16-year-old boy has died

:06:21.:06:25.

after he was stabbed in a busy The wounded teenager was taken

:06:26.:06:31.

from the Harehills area to hospital for treatment, but died

:06:32.:06:35.

a short time later. A 15-year-old boy has been arrested

:06:36.:06:40.

on suspicion of murder. The decision to end a scheme to let

:06:41.:06:43.

unaccompanied refugee children into the UK is shameful according

:06:44.:06:46.

to the Scottish First Minister She's urged the Prime Minister

:06:47.:06:49.

to change her mind saying there is a moral duty

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to help those in need. The scheme's due to end in March

:06:54.:06:58.

with 350 children being admitted far fewer than some campaigners

:06:59.:07:01.

had hoped for. Some distressing pictures

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from New Zealand where volunteers are trying to save around 100 whales

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that have become trapped Hundreds more have already died

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in one of the biggest ever mass It's hoped the pilot whales may be

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able to swim to safety As they wait for high tide,

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volunteers do everything they can to cool the whales, pouring water

:07:24.:07:33.

and covering them with cloth to help regulate body temperature -

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temporary measures until the whales Some hope that singing

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will prove soothing. And then, the sound

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of success, but it is early We had a group of volunteers

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camped out over night. We had a little bit

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of time where the whales But very quickly, this

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tide has come racing in, and we are all up to our knees,

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some up to their waists in water, and we are seeing some

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floating happening. We are assisting them

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with their breathing until the water gets deep enough

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for them to swim out. It is a devastating

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image, one of the worst whale strandings in

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the country's history. It is unclear what brings them en

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masse into Farewell Spit. One theory is that when a whale

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is distressed, it sends out a signal Once they are on the beach,

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it is hard to get them both They try to use the rising waters

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to guide them into the sea, but some swam straight back

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to the beach and most were stranded Today, volunteers are hopeful

:08:54.:08:56.

that the whales will make it out A 30-foot hole has appeared

:08:57.:08:59.

in a section of the tallest dam Large amounts of water can

:09:00.:09:03.

be seen spilling out at the Lake Oroville Dam

:09:04.:09:07.

in Northern California. Officials say there's no immediate

:09:08.:09:13.

threat that it will fail. Water levels in the reservoir had

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risen due to heavy rain and snow. A dramatic crash has been caught

:09:17.:09:21.

on camera in County Armagh CCTV footage shows the moment

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a slurry tank crashes through the garden wall

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of a house in Glenavy. The homeowner, who was in

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the property at the time, said he was just glad

:09:37.:09:38.

no-one had been hurt. Let's take a look

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at this morning's papers. Shall I start us off? The Guardian

:09:58.:10:05.

this morning, a story about Boris Johnson. Pressing Liam Fox to

:10:06.:10:10.

continue exporting weapons to Saudi Arabia after the bombing of a

:10:11.:10:16.

funeral in Yemen last October which killed 140 people and was condemned

:10:17.:10:22.

by UN monitors. The front page includes some famous faces at the

:10:23.:10:31.

Calvin Klein show. Emily Blunt, ahead of the BAFTA is happening

:10:32.:10:38.

tomorrow. And their top story, they can use. Tim Cook, one of the bosses

:10:39.:10:47.

of Apple, calling on governments to launch a campaign to fight the

:10:48.:10:51.

scourge of fake news which he says is killing people 's minds --

:10:52.:10:57.

BAFTA's. The Times has a picture of a steward from the HMS mercy, it was

:10:58.:11:10.

a 13 month mission tackling people smuggling and drug smuggling. The

:11:11.:11:15.

Times is also saying that standing. As are ripping off cash-strapped

:11:16.:11:21.

hospitals by demanding fees of up to ?4000 per day. The Daily Mail, we

:11:22.:11:28.

will be talking about this led this morning as well. It is the end of

:11:29.:11:35.

the Iraqi historic allegations team, that has been called off. One of the

:11:36.:11:42.

human rights lawyers who was struck off over his tack Dicks, you can see

:11:43.:11:51.

the headline, at last an end to the witch-hunt -- tactics. We will also

:11:52.:11:57.

be speaking to the government about what happened. Coming up to 12

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minutes past six, you're watching Breakfast from BBC News. The top

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stories: Schoolchildren in England

:12:05.:12:08.

are going to be offered It's hoped that more than five

:12:09.:12:10.

thousand teenagers will spend up to four hours a week on the subject,

:12:11.:12:14.

over the next five years. President Trump is said to be

:12:15.:12:22.

considering a new executive It follows reports he might not take

:12:23.:12:25.

his case to reinstate his travel ban The team from Click will take a look

:12:26.:12:29.

at the 500 year history of humanity's attempts to create

:12:30.:12:34.

robots that resemble people. Here's Matt with a look

:12:35.:12:40.

at this morning's weather. Good morning. We start the weekend

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on a raw note, some snow around in places and into the afternoon. For

:12:52.:12:56.

many, any snow that you do see will gradually turn back to rain. Do not

:12:57.:13:01.

be fooled, it is very cold. A raw wind. This is a picture of how

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things are shaping up at the moment. A mixture of rain and snow on the

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chart. So in the hills of northern England and eastern Wales, also in

:13:12.:13:16.

Suffolk and into south-east Kent and Surrey. Looking further north and

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west, cold but frosty to start. The best of the brightness across the

:13:24.:13:26.

northern Highlands of Scotland and across Northern Ireland. Sleet and

:13:27.:13:31.

snow across Ireland and northern England. Snow on the hills and quite

:13:32.:13:36.

a bit of snow at the moment across eastern Wales. Elsewhere, it is a

:13:37.:13:44.

cold start. Rain and a slight wind across the south and east. Stronger

:13:45.:13:48.

winds to the south-east. Closer to gale force later. The light colours

:13:49.:13:54.

in the chart starting to diminish, snow retreating to the hills.

:13:55.:13:59.

Temperatures will be up to between three and six degrees this

:14:00.:14:03.

afternoon. But the layers on, because it will feel cold as you

:14:04.:14:07.

head through the day. If you are lucky enough to have tickets for the

:14:08.:14:11.

England- Wales match, you will definitely need to pack something

:14:12.:14:16.

warm. Through the day and tonight, Scotland and Northern Ireland

:14:17.:14:20.

staying dry. The best chance of some frost overnight. Any cloud breaks

:14:21.:14:25.

could turn a touch I see. Rain, sleet and hillslope will take us

:14:26.:14:30.

into Sunday morning. Sunday will be in other predominantly cloudy day

:14:31.:14:33.

for England and Wales. Patchy rain, sleet and snow. Rain for many,

:14:34.:14:39.

staying fairly grey. Many places will stay dry. The best and

:14:40.:14:43.

brightest skies will be to the north. With wind tomorrow, feeling

:14:44.:14:48.

that bit colder. If you aren't enjoying the chill, bear with it. It

:14:49.:14:52.

does look like things will turn left cold into next week. As a little bit

:14:53.:14:58.

of sunshine comes out and temperatures get into double figures

:14:59.:15:03.

next Tuesday and Wednesday, it will feel quite a bit better. Quite a

:15:04.:15:09.

jump in the figures, three degrees to 10 degrees. You will really

:15:10.:15:10.

notice that jump as well. A team of volunteers have been

:15:11.:15:12.

attempting to refloat 100 pilot whales stranded on a

:15:13.:15:17.

New Zealand beach. They were the lucky few that

:15:18.:15:19.

survived after more than 400 were found beached on Farewell Spit

:15:20.:15:30.

on the South Island. We can get the latest

:15:31.:15:33.

now from Andrew Lamason of the Department of Conservation,

:15:34.:15:36.

who has been leading the efforts. We must warn you of some distressing

:15:37.:15:39.

pictures during this interview. Good morning to you in New Zealand.

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It is early evening there. Bring us up to date if you would, Andrew, as

:15:48.:15:52.

to what is happening and what the situation is now. You're right, it's

:15:53.:15:57.

early evening now and we have asked all our volunteers to leave the

:15:58.:16:01.

beach and they are coming off as the tide comes in. You're right, we have

:16:02.:16:07.

worked hard and got the 100 whales off that survived overnight and we

:16:08.:16:12.

lost some of them, but the bad part of the story is a separate pod of

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240 whales are stranded, we've been fighting to keep those ones happy

:16:23.:16:27.

but it's pretty grim out here. Overnight you said that many of the

:16:28.:16:32.

whales had died, they just didn't survive? No, that's not the case.

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Overnight most of them survived but what happens is those ones got

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refloated we believe successfully and while that happened, another pod

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of 240 pilot whales came in and are stranded further south from where we

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were initially doing our work. People have been trying to care for

:16:53.:16:56.

them all afternoon and now we are pulling people of the beach because

:16:57.:17:00.

it's getting dangerous. You say the tide is coming in, is this a time

:17:01.:17:05.

where they may be able to work themselves free again? That's

:17:06.:17:09.

possible. It's not something that usually happens. We could have kept

:17:10.:17:15.

people out there a bit longer but we've had a few people getting

:17:16.:17:19.

hypothermia and we've got large schools of stingrays coming in

:17:20.:17:22.

around the volunteers, so it's too dangerous to leave people out there.

:17:23.:17:28.

There's a lot of speculation about why it is that more of the whales

:17:29.:17:33.

are there than usual and this is the biggest stranding there's been in

:17:34.:17:36.

living memory in New Zealand. Are you clear about why so many are

:17:37.:17:40.

there at this particular time? There's always a lot of marine

:17:41.:17:47.

animal activity around this area and there are a lot of these pilot

:17:48.:17:52.

whales in the Southern Ocean. These ones, Golden Bay is a classic

:17:53.:17:57.

stranding spot. A beautiful location but if you're a whale it is lethal.

:17:58.:18:04.

A big sweep of sea that curves around. The water is very shallow

:18:05.:18:10.

for a long way. As the whales come in, they get disorientated and

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trapped and it's all downhill from there. Looking ahead now, Andrew,

:18:15.:18:19.

it's going to be dark in a few hours time, you said the tide is coming

:18:20.:18:24.

in, what are your hopes for the next 12 hours or so? My hope for the next

:18:25.:18:29.

few hours is that all the people we have taken off the beach and manage

:18:30.:18:32.

to get somewhere warm and have a good meal and prepare themselves for

:18:33.:18:36.

another big push tomorrow morning. Like I said, it's way too risky to

:18:37.:18:42.

have anything going on now. We are trying to keep everyone refreshed

:18:43.:18:45.

and ready to go again for another push in the morning to work with

:18:46.:18:49.

whatever whales we have to work with. Andrew, thanks for your time.

:18:50.:18:53.

Andrew Lamason from the Department of Conservation, looking after the

:18:54.:18:59.

volunteers and the whales involved in the effort to try and free them

:19:00.:19:04.

and we will keep you up to date with that as things develop.

:19:05.:19:07.

We'll be back with a summary of the news at 6:30am.

:19:08.:19:10.

Now it's time for the Film Review with Mark Kermode and Jane Hill.

:19:11.:19:21.

Hello and welcome to The Film Review on BBC News.

:19:22.:19:27.

To take us through this week's cinema releases is Mark Kermode.

:19:28.:19:33.

We have the 20th Century Women, a new film starring Annette Bening.

:19:34.:19:39.

We have the Lego Batman movie, which does what it says on the tin.

:19:40.:19:45.

And Fences, a major awards contender.

:19:46.:19:52.

Let's start with 20th Century Women from Mike Mills.

:19:53.:20:07.

It is an interesting film, set in California at the end

:20:08.:20:09.

Young boy facing an uncertain adulthood, surrounded by strong

:20:10.:20:13.

women of different ages, who both inspire and also confound,

:20:14.:20:16.

brilliantly played by Annette Bening.

:20:17.:20:20.

Stop. What?

:20:21.:20:25.

Thinking that you know everything that's going on.

:20:26.:20:27.

No, I just think that, you know, having your heart broken

:20:28.:20:30.

is a tremendous way to learn about the world.

:20:31.:20:42.

OK. Do you think you're happy?

:20:43.:20:45.

..As happy as you thought you'd be when you were my age?

:20:46.:20:50.

You don't ask people questions like that.

:20:51.:20:54.

Wondering if you're happy is a great short cut to just being depressed.

:20:55.:21:17.

It has terrific performances, partly because they had time

:21:18.:21:28.

to rehearse and get to know the characters.

:21:29.:21:30.

These are characters you want to spend time

:21:31.:21:32.

We want to know about their lives and how they work out.

:21:33.:21:39.

The film has texture, you feel like at any point

:21:40.:21:43.

the camera could go out of the car, out of the house and into the street

:21:44.:21:48.

and the world would be complete around it.

:21:49.:21:50.

It evokes a world that is in many ways lost.

:21:51.:21:53.

It's back to time that now seems so distant,

:21:54.:21:55.

but the issues it deals with feel contemporary.

:21:56.:21:57.

It is not plot driven, it is to do with moments,

:21:58.:22:00.

The narrative flips back and forward to some extent.

:22:01.:22:04.

When I first started watching it, I knew nothing of what to expect,

:22:05.:22:11.

I was drawn into their world and their characters.

:22:12.:22:17.

I loved it, I can't wait to see it again, you will love it.

:22:18.:22:21.

Will it be disparagingly called a women's film?

:22:22.:22:23.

It used to be a term that was used for popular movies.

:22:24.:22:33.

Because females were the majority of the audiences.

:22:34.:22:35.

What they meant was something would be successful and a blockbuster.

:22:36.:22:40.

Anybody could see 20th-Century Women and get something out of it,

:22:41.:22:45.

Same is true of the Lego Batman movie.

:22:46.:22:50.

Which is such a surprise. Did you see the Lego movie? It was really

:22:51.:22:56.

great. It sounded like a stupid idea but it

:22:57.:22:58.

turned out to be very All age groups, I am in my 50s

:22:59.:23:04.

and I laughed all the way through. It is about Lego Batman,

:23:05.:23:10.

a narcissist, and he has to learn to have relationships with people,

:23:11.:23:16.

with Robin, his butler, and The Joker, who is desperate

:23:17.:23:19.

for him to admit he is a special villan and they have

:23:20.:23:22.

a special relationship. And what is great,

:23:23.:23:26.

the visuals are terrific, I kept wanting to hold the frame and

:23:27.:23:36.

say stop, there are so many jokes in this one frame, they're going by too

:23:37.:23:40.

fast, I can't keep up with the speed of these jokes. It is smart, it is

:23:41.:23:47.

cine literate. It is great for all

:23:48.:23:49.

ages, it is funny. Loads of exciting stuff

:23:50.:23:51.

happening on the screen. There are jokes about the '60s

:23:52.:23:53.

Batman and the Christopher Nolan You need to see The Lego Movie,

:23:54.:23:56.

because that is terrific The Lego Batman movie is tiptop

:23:57.:24:02.

stuff and doesn't let the side down. I am already feeling

:24:03.:24:14.

overwhelmed by those two. I haven't seen the film and now

:24:15.:24:16.

I feel I want to see the play. I have seen the film and now I want

:24:17.:24:21.

to see the play. Denzel Washington stars

:24:22.:24:28.

in and directs it. He works in the sanitation

:24:29.:24:32.

department. He brings home his frustrations

:24:33.:24:39.

from his work, from his life. They all come out in

:24:40.:24:42.

the home encounters. The film has got four Oscar

:24:43.:24:44.

nominations including Best Supporting Actress

:24:45.:24:46.

and here's why. You're not listening to me,

:24:47.:24:48.

I'm trying to explain it It's not easy for me to admit I've

:24:49.:24:52.

been standing in the same place Well, I've been standing with you!

:24:53.:24:58.

I've been right here with you, Troy. I've given 18 years of my life

:24:59.:25:03.

to standing in the same spot as you. Don't you think I've ever

:25:04.:25:13.

wanted other things? Don't you think I had

:25:14.:25:15.

dreams and hopes? That scene is so powerful in the

:25:16.:25:31.

play. The only problem is the film feels very stagey.

:25:32.:25:35.

There are plays that have been adapted for the screen

:25:36.:25:38.

This feels like something that has taken the stage play and filmed it.

:25:39.:25:42.

There are slight differences, but it never felt like

:25:43.:25:45.

It felt like great writing, relevant issues.

:25:46.:25:48.

Terrific committed performances that you could absolutely get behind.

:25:49.:25:50.

But it didn't take flight as a piece of film-making.

:25:51.:25:53.

That is a problem because if you take a stage play away

:25:54.:25:56.

from the stage and put it somewhere else, you have to do

:25:57.:26:00.

You really feel you wish you were seeing it live on stage,

:26:01.:26:04.

particularly with the larger speeches.

:26:05.:26:05.

It felt like a theatrical production as opposed

:26:06.:26:09.

The screenplay was written by August Wilson before he died,

:26:10.:26:13.

It is different writing for the screen and it is a craft?

:26:14.:26:24.

It is different directing that work for the screen.

:26:25.:26:27.

The classic screen adaptation of plays, they understand

:26:28.:26:29.

This is clearly a huge reverence from the stage play,

:26:30.:26:36.

I just don't think it is as cinematic as it needs to be.

:26:37.:26:42.

Despite the fact it is great writing, solid performances

:26:43.:26:44.

and great individual moments, but as a piece of cinema

:26:45.:26:47.

Coming up to the Baftas on Sunday, it is something that might win

:26:48.:26:57.

awards for the acting rather than anything else.

:26:58.:26:58.

My feeling is that is where its heart resides,

:26:59.:27:01.

The best thing out in the cinema at the moment is Toni Erdman.

:27:02.:27:10.

It is terrific, it sounds so unlikely, a three-hour

:27:11.:27:15.

a standout performance about father, daughter estrangement.

:27:16.:27:26.

A father turns up at his daughter's place of work pretending to be

:27:27.:27:29.

a life coach, and she cannot get rid of him.

:27:30.:27:32.

It is really edgy and really funny and really painful and really

:27:33.:27:35.

poignant. It is about to be remade

:27:36.:27:36.

starring Jack Nicholson. It is perfect as it is,

:27:37.:27:38.

it doesn't need remaking, I have seen the trailer and

:27:39.:27:43.

the trailer itself is interminable. I am somebody who believes

:27:44.:27:51.

in cutting to the bone, less is more, but in the case

:27:52.:28:00.

of Toni Erdman, I would not I know loads of people who have seen

:28:01.:28:04.

the trailer and not been put off it. It is a story about a young doctor

:28:05.:28:30.

who fails to open the door to a potential patient who is then found

:28:31.:28:31.

dead. No one knows who he was. He has a crisis of conscience

:28:32.:28:35.

and tries to find out who she is. It was a film, when it

:28:36.:28:39.

was in the cinema, that The best thing about DVDs,

:28:40.:28:42.

you can reassess things It is a better film than critics

:28:43.:28:51.

gave it credit for first-time around.

:28:52.:28:51.

It is a thriller, but it has a humanist heart

:28:52.:28:53.

I don't know it, so that is a good recommendation.

:28:54.:28:58.

Thank you. A quick reminder should you need it.

:28:59.:29:09.

and reviews from across the BBC online at bbc.co.uk/markkermode.

:29:10.:29:13.

And you can catch up with our previous programmes

:29:14.:29:15.

And we mentioned the Baftas, let's find out who wins

:29:16.:29:19.

Full coverage from BBC News on the red carpet.

:29:20.:29:26.

Hello, this is Breakfast with Charlie Stayt and Steph

:29:27.:30:17.

Coming up before 7:00, Matt will have the weather for you.

:30:18.:30:32.

But first, a summary of this morning's main news.

:30:33.:30:35.

Schoolchildren are to be offered lessons in cyber-security

:30:36.:30:37.

to encourage more younger people to pursue a career in defending

:30:38.:30:40.

It's hoped that thousands of teenagers in England will spend

:30:41.:30:44.

up to four hours a week on the subject, over

:30:45.:30:47.

Here's our home affairs correspondent Tom Symonds.

:30:48.:30:49.

Daniel Kelly is a convicted teenage hacker facing a jail sentence.

:30:50.:30:55.

In 2015, he took part in a massive digital break-in of TalkTalk.

:30:56.:31:00.

What if his potential had been harnessed at an earlier age?

:31:01.:31:03.

He may have ended up joining a new breed of apprentices learning

:31:04.:31:14.

the cyber security trade, like these at BT's headquarters.

:31:15.:31:16.

With that in mind, the government is putting up ?20 million for nearly

:31:17.:31:20.

6000 schoolchildren aged 14 and over to take four hours of cyber security

:31:21.:31:23.

We think that will help seriously with the shortage of cyber skills

:31:24.:31:28.

We will always keep it under review, in case this needs to get bigger.

:31:29.:31:34.

But getting it going at that scale shows serious ambition to make sure

:31:35.:31:48.

that we can have the pipeline of talent we are going to need

:31:49.:31:52.

Police are stepping up the fight, but this is not a threat that can be

:31:53.:31:57.

defeated on the ground by raiding the hackers.

:31:58.:31:59.

The cyber-crime battlefield will be online, and Britain's GCHQ will be

:32:00.:32:02.

58,000 people are employed in the anti-hacking industry.

:32:03.:32:05.

More will be needed, and the government knows it has

:32:06.:32:08.

to start finding them when they're young.

:32:09.:32:11.

And after 7:00, we'll be joined by Brian Lord,

:32:12.:32:14.

who spent over 20 years as a Deputy Director

:32:15.:32:16.

Donald Trump has said he may rewrite the presidential order imposing

:32:17.:32:29.

in a bid overcome legal obstacles which have

:32:30.:32:33.

The President unveiled the ban at the end of his first week

:32:34.:32:37.

in office, barring entry to travellers from seven

:32:38.:32:40.

Earlier this week, an appeals court upheld the suspension

:32:41.:32:42.

The case may now proceed to the Supreme Court.

:32:43.:32:46.

The funding of parks has reached a tipping point and new ways

:32:47.:32:51.

of paying for them may have to be found.

:32:52.:32:53.

That's according to the Commons Communities

:32:54.:32:55.

and Local Government Committee, which says parks are suffering

:32:56.:32:58.

It warns there's a danger of a return to the neglect

:32:59.:33:04.

Instead of regarding parks as only a sort of leisure and recreation

:33:05.:33:08.

area of service, we should be thinking about them as big

:33:09.:33:13.

contributors to public health and environmental policy

:33:14.:33:15.

And maybe they can be re-prioritised.

:33:16.:33:20.

There is fundamentally a problem about the number of cuts that local

:33:21.:33:24.

authorities have been experiencing and the distribution

:33:25.:33:29.

across the country, and the difficult decisions

:33:30.:33:37.

that most local authorities are having to make.

:33:38.:33:41.

Labour has issued formal warnings to members of its front-bench team

:33:42.:33:44.

who disobeyed Jeremy Corbyn's order to vote for Brexit.

:33:45.:33:46.

Among those who ignored Mr Corbyn were 11 shadow junior ministers

:33:47.:33:51.

A 16-year-old boy has died after he was stabbed in a busy

:33:52.:33:56.

street in Leeds. The wounded teenager was taken from

:33:57.:33:58.

the Harehills area to hospital for treatment, but died

:33:59.:34:01.

A 15-year-old boy has been arrested on suspicion of murder.

:34:02.:34:05.

A team of volunteers are trying to save around 100 whales that have

:34:06.:34:08.

become trapped on a beach in New Zealand.

:34:09.:34:11.

A warning, you may find some of these pictures distressing.

:34:12.:34:13.

Hundreds more have already died in one of the biggest ever mass

:34:14.:34:17.

We worked hard and got a 100 Wales of the survived overnight. We have

:34:18.:34:36.

lost sight of them, but the remaining pot of 240 Wales have come

:34:37.:34:42.

and re- stranded just to the south of that. We are fighting to keep

:34:43.:34:46.

them happy, but it is pretty grim out here. The tide is now coming in,

:34:47.:34:54.

we will keep an eye on that story for you.

:34:55.:35:02.

The roof will be open for this one, and history tells us that favours

:35:03.:35:07.

They've won 4 of the 5 matches played with the roof open

:35:08.:35:10.

Wales wanted it shut, to intensify the atmosphere.

:35:11.:35:13.

Nevertheless, it's still sure to be a spine-tingler,

:35:14.:35:15.

in the Principality stadium, with both teams winning

:35:16.:35:17.

their opening games, and both camps have been telling us,

:35:18.:35:20.

Lots of people named Jones. It is quite amazing.

:35:21.:35:43.

We've played a bit of Tom Jones, he is from my era. They weren't too

:35:44.:35:52.

happy about hearing Delilah in the gym, they are not too familiar with

:35:53.:35:58.

that hit. In all seriousness, we have looked at the fact is that we

:35:59.:36:02.

can control and that's all we can do.

:36:03.:36:09.

Slamming the doors, the doorway gets a bit small. We have got them be

:36:10.:36:19.

5000 fans -- we have got 75,000 fans. We are renowned unfortunate

:36:20.:36:26.

Place, hopefully we can put some smiles on faces -- place.

:36:27.:36:31.

Ireland will be hoping to bounce back from their surprise defeat

:36:32.:36:34.

They face Italy in Rome in the early game, while Scotland are in Paris

:36:35.:36:39.

Away from the Six Nations and history was made

:36:40.:36:44.

in the Premiership last night, as Bristol's Tom Varndell,

:36:45.:36:47.

became the league's all-time, top try scorer.

:36:48.:36:49.

The division's bottom side were thrashed by Harlequins,

:36:50.:36:51.

but Varndell scored his 91st Premiership try, to take him

:36:52.:36:53.

A last gasp penalty from, Rhys Priestland, gave third place

:36:54.:37:02.

Bath, a one point victory over Northampton.

:37:03.:37:03.

Elsewhere Sale Sharks beat Newcastle.

:37:04.:37:16.

Scarlets moved into the top four, of the Pro 12, after an important

:37:17.:37:19.

Tom Williams scored one of their two tries.

:37:20.:37:22.

The top two of Munster, and Ospreys, both won,

:37:23.:37:25.

There's confusion over the future of the Rangers manager

:37:26.:37:28.

Rangers said in a statement that he had resigned

:37:29.:37:32.

from his position but Warburton says he wasn't aware of that

:37:33.:37:35.

Rangers are third in the Scottish Premiership but 27

:37:36.:37:39.

Under-20 coach Graeme Murty is set to lead the side in topmorrow's

:37:40.:37:43.

Scottish Cup tie with Greenock Morton.

:37:44.:38:01.

The early kick off in the Premier League is at the Emirates

:38:02.:38:04.

where Arsenal take on a rejuvenated Hull City side.

:38:05.:38:06.

Arsenal are currently in fourth but have lost their last two

:38:07.:38:09.

matches, which has led to renewed speculation over manager

:38:10.:38:12.

Former Arsenal and England striker Ian Wright thinks this will be

:38:13.:38:15.

I was with the boss last night, and to be totally honest, I got the

:38:16.:38:24.

impression that that's it. I genuinely believe, I was with him

:38:25.:38:31.

for a few hours, I just get the impression looking at him that...

:38:32.:38:36.

That's it. I think that's it. It actually mentioned when we were

:38:37.:38:40.

talking that it's coming to the end. I've never heard him say that.

:38:41.:38:42.

In the rest of the days matches, Manchester United take on Watford,

:38:43.:38:45.

Middlesbrough face Everton, Crystal Palace are at Stoke.

:38:46.:38:47.

At the Stadium of Light Sunderland play Southampton whilst West Ham

:38:48.:38:50.

And there's a big one in the late kick off with second place

:38:51.:39:00.

Sheffield Wednesday are still on course to reach the at least

:39:01.:39:14.

the play offs in the Championship after a 3-nil win over

:39:15.:39:17.

Birmingham City. Their opening goal was scored by new signing

:39:18.:39:20.

Jordan Rhodes after just nine minutes of his home debut.

:39:21.:39:23.

Great Britain will play Croatia later in a promotion play-off

:39:24.:39:25.

That's the equivalent of the Davis Cup in women's

:39:26.:39:29.

The British team won all three of their group games.

:39:30.:39:32.

In their latest tie against Turkey a singles victory for Johanna Konta

:39:33.:39:35.

put Great Britain on their way to a 3-0 win.

:39:36.:39:38.

Tiger Woods has withdrawn from the next two events on the PGA

:39:39.:39:41.

The 14 time major winner pulled out of this month's Dubai Desert Classic

:39:42.:39:46.

before the second round with the injury.

:39:47.:39:48.

He only returned to action in December after two back

:39:49.:39:51.

For years now, Snowdonia in North Wales has been establishing

:39:52.:39:57.

itself as a centre for extreme adventure sports, with Europe's

:39:58.:40:00.

longest and fastest zipwire - and a unique surfing lake.

:40:01.:40:03.

Now, former slate mines have been brought back to life,

:40:04.:40:06.

to add a huge adrenalin rush to history lessons.

:40:07.:40:08.

I joined a school party in one of the vast caverns

:40:09.:40:11.

Beneath this sci-fi landscape, there is an industrial world waiting to be

:40:12.:40:25.

discovered again. A labyrinth of over 300 tunnels and caverns, 24

:40:26.:40:31.

stories deep. Former slate mines, now to be explored using climbing

:40:32.:40:36.

skills and declines, giving you an insight into the life of a minor.

:40:37.:40:45.

This is a horrible dream! All that supports you are staples humbled

:40:46.:40:50.

into the rock. You are say thank you to a harness. But your mind

:40:51.:41:05.

paralysed as you with fear -- miner. What is so incredible is when you

:41:06.:41:09.

look down and around, this is where people work. Some working here were

:41:10.:41:19.

as young as six years old. I learned about what the miners had to do. We

:41:20.:41:26.

have a great safety system now, but they just had chains around their

:41:27.:41:31.

legs. It is crazy to think they did that for 12 hours a day. She -- this

:41:32.:41:41.

man worked in the mines, but is now a safety inspector. You have to

:41:42.:41:48.

bring people in. There is a side, we are very proud of the culture, we

:41:49.:41:57.

have embraced that culture. After the training, it's up to you to get

:41:58.:42:03.

around the three-hour long course. You cold your fears in the head, and

:42:04.:42:09.

then it starts to get a bit more enjoyable -- you conquer. You learn

:42:10.:42:16.

more about yourself going around there than you can looking at your

:42:17.:42:20.

iPhone. The school pupils took it all in their stride. Having seen one

:42:21.:42:27.

might fall of the monkey bars 200 feet up... It was really scary. I

:42:28.:42:34.

thought I was just going to fall. I gave this is, taking a different

:42:35.:42:37.

route to the final challenge. I don't want to look down. This is the

:42:38.:43:03.

stairway to heaven. They saved the steepest zip wire to last.

:43:04.:43:08.

I felt like I was in a different dimension, everyone else didn't seem

:43:09.:43:15.

scared at all. I was absolutely terrified. I think maybe as you get

:43:16.:43:20.

older... The stairway thing, you have a cable thing to hold on to an

:43:21.:43:30.

end... 200 feet of nothing. You are on these little staples, that is all

:43:31.:43:36.

you are treading on. It's your mind, isn't it? Wants UK net, it is a

:43:37.:43:40.

great feeling. 20 of opportunities to get involved. -- plenty of

:43:41.:43:52.

opportunities -- once you get it. Very good. We will see you later on.

:43:53.:43:58.

The main stories this morning: Schoolchildren in England

:43:59.:44:02.

are going to be offered It's hoped that more than five

:44:03.:44:04.

thousand teenagers will spend up to four hours a week on the subject,

:44:05.:44:08.

over the next five years. President Trump is said to be

:44:09.:44:12.

considering a new executive It follows reports he might not take

:44:13.:44:14.

his case to reinstate his travel ban Three cyclists have been killed

:44:15.:44:19.

on London's roads over We'll be in Trafalgar Square

:44:20.:44:32.

where campaigners are calling on ministers to make

:44:33.:44:35.

cycling safer. Here's Matt with a look

:44:36.:44:40.

at this morning's weather. What's with all the snow, Matt? It's

:44:41.:44:46.

cold out there, Charlie and Steph. Cold and wintry for some this

:44:47.:44:58.

morning. Not a great morning for emerging from under the duvet but as

:44:59.:45:02.

temperatures rise, a lot of the snow will turn back to rain with not much

:45:03.:45:07.

disruption around. A slight covering here and over the hills. To show you

:45:08.:45:12.

where it's been over the last few hours, parts of eastern Scotland and

:45:13.:45:15.

the Pennines and eastern parts of Wales. The odd flurry elsewhere in

:45:16.:45:19.

England and Wales and especially to the south and east. Not cloudy and

:45:20.:45:23.

raining and snowing everywhere because western Scotland and

:45:24.:45:27.

Northern Ireland have sunshine this morning but a frost sees

:45:28.:45:30.

temperatures down to -10 in parts of the Highlands. Eastern Scotland

:45:31.:45:34.

above freezing just about but rain on the coast, a bit of sleet and

:45:35.:45:38.

snow inland, the same in northern England and to eastern parts of

:45:39.:45:42.

Wales, mainly light snow falling at the moment. Some in the south-west

:45:43.:45:46.

and Wales will see some sunshine but for most in England and Wales, a

:45:47.:45:50.

great start, some snow possible in Kent, Sussex and Southwark. A lot of

:45:51.:45:57.

places that sees no first thing will get rain and drizzle later in the

:45:58.:46:03.

day -- Suffolk. The best of the dry and sunny weather west of Scotland,

:46:04.:46:06.

Northern Ireland but even though temperatures are up on yesterday,

:46:07.:46:10.

the wind will make it feel colder so bear that in mind if you're going to

:46:11.:46:14.

the Six Nations match in Wales later. Quite a bit of cloud coming

:46:15.:46:19.

your way and it will feel cold in the wind. That wind gets even

:46:20.:46:23.

stronger through tonight, near gale force wind parts of eastern England.

:46:24.:46:27.

Were further rain, drizzle, Hill sleet and snow. Some breaks in the

:46:28.:46:33.

cloud and in Northern Ireland and Scotland we will have temperatures

:46:34.:46:37.

close to freezing on Sunday morning but even colder tomorrow, the wind

:46:38.:46:41.

stronger for England and Wales, lots of cloud around, rain and drizzle,

:46:42.:46:45.

sleet and snow in the hills are especially in northern England. A

:46:46.:46:49.

few breaks possible in the south and in Northern Ireland and Scotland we

:46:50.:46:53.

will continue to see the driest and brightest whether. Still feeling

:46:54.:46:57.

cold wherever you are. If it is too cold for you at the moment, stay

:46:58.:47:02.

waiting because things turn warmer next week. 10 degrees, not exactly

:47:03.:47:07.

tropical but when you hit double figures after this weekend, a bit of

:47:08.:47:11.

sunshine, probably feeling a bit like spring.

:47:12.:47:13.

We'll be back with the headlines at 7am.

:47:14.:47:17.

Few things say the future better than robots.

:47:18.:47:48.

We seem to be in an era of massive advances at the moment.

:47:49.:47:52.

This week, a leaked video from Boston Dynamics shows

:47:53.:47:56.

off its latest machine, called Handle, something its founder

:47:57.:47:59.

Rolling on with the wheel theme, Piaggio, known for its Vespa

:48:00.:48:10.

motorcycles, has revealed a new robot servant called Gita.

:48:11.:48:15.

This robo-suitcase follows its owner's every move,

:48:16.:48:18.

using cameras in its body and in the user's belt.

:48:19.:48:21.

But sometimes it's good to look at where we've come from.

:48:22.:48:34.

The robots exhibition at the London science musician is an attempt to

:48:35.:48:43.

resemble behaviours. There are more than 100 robots here, including some

:48:44.:48:45.

old friends that we've met before. There are more than 100 robots here,

:48:46.:48:58.

including some old friends that And this amazing swan,

:48:59.:49:01.

made from silver, is all the more incredible because it was made over

:49:02.:49:05.

200 years ago, in 1773. It was these mechanical marvels that

:49:06.:49:21.

made the Industrial Revolution possible, mobilising hundreds

:49:22.:49:23.

of workers to be at the same place at the same time, enabling

:49:24.:49:26.

goods to be transported, trains to run accurately,

:49:27.:49:28.

and allowing industry to become The Industrial Revolution was also

:49:29.:49:31.

the catalyst for massive social change across the world,

:49:32.:49:34.

bringing about the rise of the working class, and sparking

:49:35.:49:37.

ideas like capitalism and Marxism. Now, in the West, Cuba found itself

:49:38.:49:40.

at the epicentre of this shift. It was the poster child

:49:41.:49:43.

for communism in the West, right in the back garden of the US,

:49:44.:49:46.

the heart of capitalism. Richard Taylor has been to Cuba

:49:47.:49:49.

to see how the island is now moving The iconic images are

:49:50.:49:53.

strikingly familiar. Cuba today still feels

:49:54.:50:02.

in some ways otherworldly, Life for most of its 11

:50:03.:50:07.

million citizens is simple. They've been living in

:50:08.:50:16.

a state-enforced digital wilderness. A decade ago, you needed

:50:17.:50:18.

a permit just to buy a PC. Today, if you're lucky enough

:50:19.:50:21.

to own a smartphone, There's no mobile data,

:50:22.:50:24.

so Cuban apps are designed to work Until recently, even basic internet

:50:25.:50:33.

access could only be found at desktop computers inside state

:50:34.:50:38.

communication centres. Long queues persist but now people

:50:39.:50:40.

are coming to buy internet scratchcards which can finally get

:50:41.:50:43.

them online elsewhere. In this Havana park,

:50:44.:50:49.

small gatherings of Cubans But getting online is

:50:50.:50:51.

slow, unreliable and, Luis Rondon Paz is a self-proclaimed

:50:52.:50:56.

hack-tivist, and as a former government IT administrator,

:50:57.:51:03.

knows the system well. Everything in Cuba is restricted,

:51:04.:51:08.

filtered, as the rest of the world. Basically, they censor

:51:09.:51:11.

everything that might It might be porn, gay,

:51:12.:51:13.

or political things. But the biggest barrier

:51:14.:51:20.

for locals - the price. A single hour of full

:51:21.:51:25.

web access costs $2, They don't have the time to see

:51:26.:51:28.

what's the internet, The government says expanding

:51:29.:51:40.

the internet is a priority and central Havana is now conducting

:51:41.:51:42.

trials of in-home net access And it boasts of a growing number

:51:43.:51:45.

of public wifi hotspots, too, around 300 in

:51:46.:51:49.

total, and growing. Still, not exactly blanket coverage

:51:50.:51:51.

for a country 700 miles wide. Cuba blames its ageing

:51:52.:51:55.

communications network on the six-decade-old trade

:51:56.:51:57.

embargo with the US. Critics say that's a convenient

:51:58.:52:01.

excuse for a communist state that fears losing control

:52:02.:52:04.

over information. Relations with America

:52:05.:52:08.

are now at best uncertain In the aftermath of the President's

:52:09.:52:10.

historic visit here two years ago, prospects for American companies

:52:11.:52:20.

doing digital business Company boss Eric Schmidt inking

:52:21.:52:22.

a deal in December that gives Cubans fast access to content from services

:52:23.:52:30.

like YouTube and Gmail. The thing is, when you're running

:52:31.:52:33.

an internet-based business, the last thing you want to do

:52:34.:52:35.

is traipse across town So some Cubans who are fed up

:52:36.:52:38.

with the government strategy on access have come up with their

:52:39.:52:42.

own rather inventive solutions. The results are found

:52:43.:52:45.

on rooftops in towns and cities across the nation in the form

:52:46.:52:48.

of pole-mounted antennaes which are pointed towards the local

:52:49.:52:52.

communications centre, giving them internet

:52:53.:52:56.

access and even wifi. The practice isn't exactly legal

:52:57.:52:59.

but as I discovered that minor detail doesn't deter Cubans

:53:00.:53:04.

from getting their information fix. This is the paquete semanal,

:53:05.:53:06.

literally the weekly packet. It refers to a highly organised

:53:07.:53:09.

service in back streets and front rooms across the country,

:53:10.:53:12.

giving locals content downloaded often only hours

:53:13.:53:15.

earlier via satellite. There's pirated movies,

:53:16.:53:19.

news shows, documentaries, It's hugely popular with customers

:53:20.:53:22.

who can fill their USB drives with an entire terabyte,

:53:23.:53:31.

hundreds of hours, for the price And the rise of the paquete

:53:32.:53:33.

is the price the Cuban regime itself is paying, a reaction

:53:34.:53:38.

to the state dogma of keeping Cuban authorities should be less

:53:39.:53:41.

afraid of the free flow of information because the need

:53:42.:53:47.

for information functions People need information and people

:53:48.:53:50.

will get information, no matter if you are going

:53:51.:53:56.

to provide it or not. There's a political need

:53:57.:53:59.

to understand differently Progress is undoubtedly too

:54:00.:54:01.

slow for many Cubans. But recent overtures do

:54:02.:54:09.

at least give some people Ever wondered what cats get up

:54:10.:54:11.

to when no one's there? Meet Roxy and Zara, who seemed

:54:12.:54:32.

agreeable to taking part If you've ever wanted to watch,

:54:33.:54:34.

talk to or even play with your cats when you're not with them,

:54:35.:54:51.

then this could help. Once the device is connected

:54:52.:54:53.

to your home wifi, you can login anywhere you can get

:54:54.:54:56.

your phone online. There's a laser game to play,

:54:57.:55:02.

snacks at the tap of an icon, and a function to proudly make

:55:03.:55:06.

and share videos and cat snaps. This smart collar has been around

:55:07.:55:20.

a little while now and is available It allows owners to keep

:55:21.:55:24.

an eye on temperature, pulse, breathing rate,

:55:25.:55:27.

heart rate variability and even the positions a pet is in,

:55:28.:55:30.

so could be particularly beneficial if there are health concerns

:55:31.:55:33.

or an injury to keep an eye on. Meanwhile, there seems to be a game

:55:34.:55:36.

of cat and mouse going on here, the latter played by

:55:37.:55:44.

a remote control rodent. Although it actually consists

:55:45.:55:49.

of the mouse chasing the cat, which probably says it

:55:50.:55:52.

all about my day's filming. That was Lara, and this is Maria,

:55:53.:55:55.

the first blockbuster robot from the ground-breaking

:55:56.:55:58.

1927 film Metropolis. The visual effects in that movie

:55:59.:56:03.

were absolutely stunning, given that it is

:56:04.:56:06.

actually 90 years old. Next, we're going to continue our

:56:07.:56:10.

look at some of the visual effects behind the latest

:56:11.:56:13.

blockbuster movies. We have Adam Valdes,

:56:14.:56:24.

BAFTA and Oscar nominee, to tell us more about the visual

:56:25.:56:26.

effects he used to bring back Every time you see the world

:56:27.:56:30.

in Jungle Book, someone has fabricated plants, trees,

:56:31.:56:38.

the dead twigs and dead leaves And it's only really

:56:39.:56:41.

when the surround around Mowgli makes him feel

:56:42.:56:57.

present within it that the magic that this is just a photograph,

:56:58.:57:00.

that we went somewhere and shot it. So we take a shot like Mowgli saying

:57:01.:57:05.

goodbye to his mother and we say, John really wants some sort

:57:06.:57:09.

of physical contact. It needs to be an intimate moment,

:57:10.:57:11.

their eyes need to be locked We can't have a feeling that he's

:57:12.:57:15.

acting to a tennis ball, We really need to feel

:57:16.:57:19.

the scene emotionally. We can locate the positions

:57:20.:57:22.

of his hands, the puppet And we can track it really

:57:23.:57:25.

carefully in three dimensions That way we make sure

:57:26.:57:29.

the contact is correct, and then we simulate the fur

:57:30.:57:32.

on the mother's neck. And we actually replace the better

:57:33.:57:37.

part of his hand with the digital double of his hand, so that the CG

:57:38.:57:41.

hand and the CG fur of the mother wolf are actually in

:57:42.:57:47.

the computer together, and when we put our lighting on that

:57:48.:57:53.

and create the final images, The magic trick is blending

:57:54.:57:56.

the hand into his arm. The render power required

:57:57.:58:11.

to generate a movie like this, I think it was 240 million renderer

:58:12.:58:14.

hours, or something like that. Which means if it was one computer

:58:15.:58:17.

it would have taken 3000 years, These individual frames

:58:18.:58:21.

that you see can be 40, 50, 60 hours on a computer just

:58:22.:58:24.

rendering one frame. I think we'll see more and more

:58:25.:58:29.

imagery where we really start to not be able to tell the difference

:58:30.:58:33.

between something that's That was Adam Valdes on the magic

:58:34.:58:35.

behind the Jungle Book. That's it for the shortcut of Click

:58:36.:58:51.

at Robots at the London science Museum.

:58:52.:58:53.

I'll put a load of photos up on Twitter for you to browse

:58:54.:59:01.

Hello, this is Breakfast with Charlie Stayt and Steph

:59:02.:00:36.

The latest weapon in the war against hackers, the government

:00:37.:00:39.

funds lessons in cyber security for teenagers.

:00:40.:00:41.

It's hoped they'll become the experts of the future

:00:42.:00:44.

and protect Britain from online attacks.

:00:45.:00:53.

Good morning, it's Saturday, 11th February.

:00:54.:01:03.

Also ahead, President Trump says he may issue a new order authorising

:01:04.:01:06.

a travel ban after his old one was blocked by the courts.

:01:07.:01:10.

Parks under threat - a new report says funding has

:01:11.:01:12.

reached a tipping point and new ways of paying for them need to be

:01:13.:01:16.

The latest on the battle to save hundreds of whales stranded

:01:17.:01:20.

And in sport, it's one of the biggest tests yet

:01:21.:01:30.

It's a first trip to Cardiff, for their coach Eddie Jones,

:01:31.:01:34.

and Wales are banking on home advantage to take them top of the 6

:01:35.:01:38.

And I am in Trafalgar Square where hundreds of cyclists are staging a

:01:39.:01:45.

protest following the deaths of three cyclists on London's roads in

:01:46.:01:48.

just one week. A cold feeling day for all of us

:01:49.:01:58.

today, limited slow to begin. A coating in some places, but for

:01:59.:02:02.

many, that snow will turn back to rain.

:02:03.:02:03.

Schoolchildren are to be offered lessons in cyber-security

:02:04.:02:07.

to encourage more younger people to pursue a career in defending

:02:08.:02:10.

It's hoped that thousands of teenagers in England will spend

:02:11.:02:14.

up to four hours a week on the subject, over

:02:15.:02:17.

Here's our home affairs correspondent Tom Symonds.

:02:18.:02:25.

Daniel Kelly is a convicted teenage hacker facing a jail sentence.

:02:26.:02:28.

In 2015, he took part in a massive digital break-in of TalkTalk.

:02:29.:02:33.

What if his potential had been harnessed at an earlier age?

:02:34.:02:36.

He may have ended up joining a new breed of apprentices learning

:02:37.:02:40.

the cyber security trade, like these at BT's headquarters.

:02:41.:02:49.

With that in mind, the government is putting up ?20 million for nearly

:02:50.:02:53.

6000 schoolchildren aged 14 and over to take four hours of cyber security

:02:54.:02:56.

We think that will help seriously with the shortage of cyber skills

:02:57.:03:01.

We will always keep it under review, in case this needs to get bigger.

:03:02.:03:15.

But getting it going at that scale shows serious ambition to make sure

:03:16.:03:19.

that we can have the pipeline of talent we are going to need

:03:20.:03:22.

Police are stepping up the fight, but this is not a threat that can be

:03:23.:03:28.

defeated on the ground by raiding the hackers.

:03:29.:03:30.

The cyber-crime battlefield will be online, and Britain's GCHQ will be

:03:31.:03:33.

58,000 people are employed in the anti-hacking industry.

:03:34.:03:36.

More will be needed, and the government knows it has

:03:37.:03:39.

to start finding them when they're young.

:03:40.:03:45.

And in a few minutes we'll be joined by Brian Lord,

:03:46.:03:48.

who spent over 20 years as a Deputy Director

:03:49.:03:50.

Donald Trump has said he may rewrite the presidential order imposing

:03:51.:03:55.

restrictions on travel to the US to overcome the legal obstacles that

:03:56.:03:59.

have frustrated his efforts so far.

:04:00.:04:02.

His first order, stopping travel from seven mainly-Muslim countries,

:04:03.:04:04.

Our Washington correspondent David Willis has more.

:04:05.:04:11.

After a federal appeals court backed a stay of his executive order,

:04:12.:04:16.

Donald Trump vowed he would see his opponents in court.

:04:17.:04:25.

Speaking en route to his weekend retreat in Florida, the president

:04:26.:04:31.

revealed he was weighing other alternatives.

:04:32.:04:32.

We will win the battle, but we also have a lot of other

:04:33.:04:36.

options, including filing a brand-new order.

:04:37.:04:39.

I like to keep you, I'd like to surprise you.

:04:40.:04:48.

We need speed for reasons of security.

:04:49.:04:50.

Unveiled at the end of a frantic first week in office,

:04:51.:04:54.

the original order suspended America's refugee programme

:04:55.:04:56.

and banned travellers from seven majority Muslim nations

:04:57.:04:59.

It caused chaos at airports and sparked protest

:05:00.:05:03.

Just how the White House might rewrite the order is not

:05:04.:05:08.

Lawyers would almost certainly have to address the claim that

:05:09.:05:13.

in its existing form, the order is unconstitutional

:05:14.:05:17.

in that it blocks entry to the United States

:05:18.:05:19.

Mr Trump has continued to insist that tough immigration

:05:20.:05:27.

measures are crucial for the country's security.

:05:28.:05:29.

The funding of parks has reached a tipping point and new ways

:05:30.:05:32.

of paying for them may have to be found.

:05:33.:05:35.

That's according to the Commons Communities

:05:36.:05:41.

and Local Government Committee which says parks are suffering

:05:42.:05:44.

It warns there's a danger of a return to the neglect

:05:45.:05:48.

Instead of regarding parks as only a sort of leisure and recreation

:05:49.:05:52.

area of service, we should be thinking

:05:53.:05:54.

about them as big contributors to public health and environmental

:05:55.:05:57.

And maybe they can be re-prioritised.

:05:58.:06:03.

There is fundamentally a problem about the number of cuts that local

:06:04.:06:06.

authorities have been experiencing and the distribution

:06:07.:06:11.

across the country, and the difficult decisions

:06:12.:06:12.

that most local authorities are having to make.

:06:13.:06:17.

Labour has issued formal warnings to members of its front-bench team

:06:18.:06:20.

who disobeyed Jeremy Corbyn's order to vote for Brexit.

:06:21.:06:22.

Among those who ignored Mr Corbyn were 11 shadow junior ministers

:06:23.:06:29.

A 16-year-old boy has died after he was stabbed in a busy

:06:30.:06:35.

The wounded teenager was taken from the Harehills area to hospital

:06:36.:06:39.

for treatment, but died a short time later.

:06:40.:06:41.

A 15-year-old boy has been arrested on suspicion of murder.

:06:42.:06:48.

The decision to end a scheme to let unaccompanied refugee children

:06:49.:06:51.

into the UK is shameful according to the Scottish First Minister

:06:52.:06:54.

She's urged the Prime Minister to change her mind, saying

:06:55.:07:02.

there is a moral duty to help those in need.

:07:03.:07:05.

The scheme's due to end in March with 350 children being admitted far

:07:06.:07:10.

fewer than some campaigners had hoped for.

:07:11.:07:14.

Some distressing pictures from New Zealand where volunteers

:07:15.:07:16.

are trying to save around 100 whales that have become trapped

:07:17.:07:19.

Hundreds more have already died in one of the biggest ever mass

:07:20.:07:23.

It's hoped the pilot whales may be able to swim to safety

:07:24.:07:28.

Some of the imagines in this report are distressing.

:07:29.:07:39.

As they wait for high tide, volunteers do everything they can

:07:40.:07:42.

to cool the whales, pouring water and covering them with cloth to help

:07:43.:07:46.

regulate body temperature - temporary measures until the whales

:07:47.:07:48.

Some hope that singing will prove soothing.

:07:49.:07:52.

And then, the sound of success, but it is early

:07:53.:07:55.

We had a group of volunteers camped out over night.

:07:56.:08:08.

We had a little bit of time where the whales

:08:09.:08:11.

But very quickly, this tide has come racing

:08:12.:08:14.

in, and we are all up to our knees, some up to their waists in water,

:08:15.:08:19.

and we are seeing some floating happening.

:08:20.:08:21.

We are assisting them with their breathing until the water

:08:22.:08:23.

gets deep enough for them to swim out.

:08:24.:08:25.

It is a devastating image, one of the worst

:08:26.:08:28.

whale strandings in the country's history.

:08:29.:08:29.

It is unclear what brings them en masse into Farewell Spit.

:08:30.:08:33.

Some believe they may be sick or injured, or have simply lost their

:08:34.:08:36.

way. One theory is that when a whale

:08:37.:08:36.

is distressed, it sends out a signal Once they are on the beach,

:08:37.:08:40.

it is hard to get them both We have lost sight of 100 that were

:08:41.:08:51.

released overnight, but the sad part is that 240 Wales have re- stranded

:08:52.:08:56.

themselves just south of that. We will be fighting to keep them happy,

:08:57.:08:58.

but it is pretty grim out here. They try to use the rising waters

:08:59.:09:01.

to guide them into the sea, but some swam straight back

:09:02.:09:05.

to the beach and most were stranded With dangerous conditions on the

:09:06.:09:13.

water, the operation has been stood down for now.

:09:14.:09:20.

Time to take a look at different pages.

:09:21.:09:32.

Emily Blunt, ahead of the BAFTAs happening

:09:33.:09:34.

Tim Cook, one of the bosses of Apple, calling on governments

:09:35.:09:40.

to launch a campaign to fight the scourge of fake news

:09:41.:09:45.

which he says is killing people's minds.

:09:46.:09:49.

Emily said she needed a drink before calling on the red carpet, is that

:09:50.:10:05.

the worst thing? There is also anger over Brussels preparing to hit the

:10:06.:10:11.

UK with a ?49 billion fine for leaving the EU. That is in the

:10:12.:10:14.

Express this morning. The Daily Mail, we will be talking

:10:15.:10:20.

about this later this It is the end of the Iraqi

:10:21.:10:23.

historic allegations team, One of the human rights

:10:24.:10:27.

lawyers who was struck off over his tactics, Phil Shiner,

:10:28.:10:38.

you can see the headline, We will also be speaking

:10:39.:10:42.

to the government about The Times is looking at the

:10:43.:10:54.

situation with the NHS. Local doctors have said standing doctors

:10:55.:10:58.

are ripping off cash-strapped holster -- hospitals with fees of

:10:59.:11:10.

over ?4000 per day. The Times has a picture of a steward

:11:11.:11:23.

from the HMS Mersey, it was a 13 month

:11:24.:11:26.

mission tackling people And you can see the quotes here, I

:11:27.:11:40.

tried to wake him for an hour. That is an excerpt from the 999 tape.

:11:41.:11:53.

Schoolchildren in England are going to be offered

:11:54.:12:01.

It's hoped that more than five thousand teenagers will spend up

:12:02.:12:05.

to four hours a week on the subject, over the next five years.

:12:06.:12:09.

President Trump is said to be considering a new executive

:12:10.:12:11.

It follows reports he might not take his case to reinstate his travel ban

:12:12.:12:16.

Also, coming up, one of the biggest games in world rugby. Wales hosts

:12:17.:12:23.

England in the Six Nations. We hear from one player on what he makes of

:12:24.:12:25.

Eddie Jones' mind games. We have been told that the roof will

:12:26.:12:32.

be open in Cardiff, what does that mean about the weather? We have

:12:33.:12:37.

actually got some flurries of slowdown in Cardiff. Should not

:12:38.:12:47.

cause too much disruption. One of those days. It is bubbly a good day

:12:48.:12:51.

to snuggle up and watch the rugby from the comfort of your sofa. We

:12:52.:12:58.

will show you where the rain, sleet and snow is at the moment. Snow

:12:59.:13:04.

across parts of eastern Scotland and the Pennines, eastern Wales, down

:13:05.:13:09.

into the south-west and across parts of Suffolk, Kent and Sussex. A bit

:13:10.:13:16.

slippery in one or two spots, snow over the hills. West of Scotland and

:13:17.:13:21.

Northern Ireland, frost to content with. At least you will see some

:13:22.:13:26.

sunshine. Generally good conditions elsewhere. A mix of rain, sleet and

:13:27.:13:33.

snow. In Wales and lower-level sites for a time. Temperatures will slowly

:13:34.:13:40.

start to rise and we will see it turn back to mainly rain and

:13:41.:13:46.

drizzle. A good covering of the tops of the Pennines, the hills and

:13:47.:13:50.

eastern Scotland. Not just grey out there, also quite windy this

:13:51.:13:55.

afternoon. Looking at the temperatures, a bit higher than

:13:56.:13:59.

yesterday. That wind has been close to gale force across parts of

:14:00.:14:02.

Scotland and northern England. Feeling much colder than

:14:03.:14:07.

temperatures suggest. Actually to come. Frost Limited to the of

:14:08.:14:11.

Scotland. Lots of cloud elsewhere. Rain, drizzle, sleet and snow coming

:14:12.:14:16.

and going throughout the night, but Italy through eastern England. That

:14:17.:14:19.

makes for another gloomy start to tomorrow. Maybe not as much snow in

:14:20.:14:25.

the afternoon compared to today. Engineering across the high ground.

:14:26.:14:31.

Patchy rain elsewhere. A few breaks in rain elsewhere. In Scotland and

:14:32.:14:37.

Northern Ireland we could see the sunniest of the conditions. A bit

:14:38.:14:41.

more cloud than today. Temperatures feeling even colder because of the

:14:42.:14:44.

strength of the wind. The temperature profile for the rest of

:14:45.:14:49.

the coming five days is one which clients. When you compare it to what

:14:50.:14:56.

we have right now, ten or 11 degrees might feel like spring -- climbs. I

:14:57.:15:06.

am glad I've got my jump on. We've all found good reasons to take a

:15:07.:15:10.

trip to the local park, but that could soon become more difficult.

:15:11.:15:17.

Pressures to find land for housing means parks are facing a period of

:15:18.:15:21.

decline. That is according to a group of MPs who say they need to be

:15:22.:15:26.

fundamental changes to the way that parks are managed. What have parks

:15:27.:15:31.

ever done for us? It feels almost wild even though you

:15:32.:15:45.

are in the centre of London. This is close to my house, we don't have far

:15:46.:15:48.

to walk with the children. The perfect place to walk, it is quite

:15:49.:15:53.

big and there is a cafe over there. They may be loved, but the crucial

:15:54.:15:56.

question surrounds their value and of course their cost. For the past

:15:57.:16:01.

six months a committee of MPs has been asking that question and

:16:02.:16:06.

listening to the answers. It found that with council budgets are tight

:16:07.:16:10.

many local parks are at a tipping point. What of their viability, what

:16:11.:16:15.

of their future. How can they be saved? Instead of regarding parks is

:16:16.:16:21.

only a leisure and recreation area of service, we should be thinking

:16:22.:16:27.

about parks as the contributors to public health and to environmental

:16:28.:16:31.

policy and to community cohesion. And maybe they can be re-

:16:32.:16:36.

prioritise. But there is a fundamental question about the level

:16:37.:16:39.

of cuts that local authorities have been experiencing. We started to do

:16:40.:16:43.

some work and eventually created a ten acre nature reserve. We have

:16:44.:16:47.

planted 60,000 trees to encourage flora and fauna. The innovation

:16:48.:16:54.

started here on the edge of the Pennines, more than 30 years ago. It

:16:55.:16:59.

is vital for the community to have this sort of open space. If it is

:17:00.:17:02.

looked after and maintained, it is for their benefit. As well as the

:17:03.:17:06.

nature reserve there is a community garden and a football pitch. It is

:17:07.:17:10.

the result of partnerships between the council, the charity Ground work

:17:11.:17:15.

and local volunteers. A model example of how public green spaces

:17:16.:17:22.

can determine their own future. If it was a redundant piece of land,

:17:23.:17:26.

fly tipping and things like that, from that, we were able to create

:17:27.:17:30.

this community garden and help out with adding some elements to the

:17:31.:17:34.

sports pitch. Really, it helped the group. It helped the group service

:17:35.:17:40.

to community a lot more, and more and more people could get involved

:17:41.:17:43.

with that. Long-term it is a cost saving to the council, but the

:17:44.:17:47.

councils have to be responsible about what they are doing. The MPs

:17:48.:17:52.

are calling on the government and local authorities to ensure they

:17:53.:17:56.

have strategic lands in place for these emeralds, these green jewels

:17:57.:18:01.

in the Crown. They believe parks must remain publicly owned, open to

:18:02.:18:06.

all and free of charge. From flood management to healthy living to

:18:07.:18:09.

biodiversity of wildlife, our parks and green spaces can be the lungs

:18:10.:18:16.

and the heart of our increasingly urbanised lives.

:18:17.:18:21.

I love a good park. We have been asking you to send in your pictures

:18:22.:18:28.

of your local parks and tell us why you love yours. We have a view to

:18:29.:18:35.

show you this morning. Karen sent us this from Craigavon Park in Northern

:18:36.:18:39.

Ireland. That is a gorgeous photo. We have a sunny one by way of

:18:40.:18:43.

contrast. This is Duthie Park in Aberdeen from Maddie. That is not

:18:44.:18:50.

today, I don't think that is from today. Certainly not right now,

:18:51.:18:54.

anyway. But that is a lovely image. We have more sunshine in one of

:18:55.:18:59.

these parks. This is cheap Park from Vanessa in London, describing it as

:19:00.:19:04.

full of deer and beautiful wide open spaces for bike riding and walking.

:19:05.:19:08.

And the last once an hour, central park in Chelmsford. Linda takes part

:19:09.:19:12.

in a running group every Saturday. So that would be this morning. She

:19:13.:19:17.

was finishing her run, number 100. I'm not sure if that means 100 runs

:19:18.:19:24.

that she has done. Who knows. Maybe she can tell us. We will find out.

:19:25.:19:28.

Lots of people will be running in the parks this morning, nine o'clock

:19:29.:19:32.

is park run, lots of people doing that. Send us some pictures and we

:19:33.:19:36.

will try to show them later in the programme. In the past week, three

:19:37.:19:39.

cyclists have been killed in the space of four days on London's

:19:40.:19:44.

roads. This morning, campaigns are gathering to demand that ministers

:19:45.:19:49.

make cycling safer. But figures nationally show that could really be

:19:50.:19:53.

the case with the number of cycling deaths going down over the past

:19:54.:19:57.

decade. Holly is in Trafalgar Square. Good morning.

:19:58.:20:02.

Good morning. Yes, it does seem that more of us than ever are taking onto

:20:03.:20:07.

the on two wheels, whether it is for fitness or fun or commuting. The

:20:08.:20:11.

number of cyclists in the UK has gone up in the past two decades by

:20:12.:20:15.

more than a quarter. That has meant obviously that there have been more

:20:16.:20:18.

road safety initiatives in place to try to keep us safe. As you mention,

:20:19.:20:23.

it seems to be working. Content to ten years ago the number of road

:20:24.:20:27.

deaths has gone down. But sadly, those three deaths on the road in

:20:28.:20:31.

London in the space of just one week this week has really hit home with

:20:32.:20:35.

people, which has renewed calls for further investment in infrastructure

:20:36.:20:38.

and further investment in roads, and there will be a protest taking place

:20:39.:20:42.

this afternoon with people asking, why can't there be more cycle paths,

:20:43.:20:46.

more done to try to protect people? We are going to speak to some of the

:20:47.:20:51.

people who will be taking part in a protest. Andrew, I will speak to you

:20:52.:20:54.

first. You are an experienced cyclist. What is it like cycling in

:20:55.:20:58.

London Day today? Good morning. I have been cycling to work for 15

:20:59.:21:02.

years now, from Surrey. There and back. In many ways it is a joy. You

:21:03.:21:07.

are your own boss, you can go where you want, when you want, you are

:21:08.:21:10.

stuck in congestion. You come to work full of energy and it feels

:21:11.:21:14.

really good. And you are going past cars that are going nowhere, filling

:21:15.:21:18.

the air with rubbish, and that is what we need to change. But do you

:21:19.:21:22.

feel safe when you are cycling? I have been cycling for a long time. I

:21:23.:21:27.

have had some near misses and a minor can ill -- minor collision. We

:21:28.:21:31.

need to recognise that the main hazard caused by the motor vehicles

:21:32.:21:35.

is the 25 people per day dying from pollution. Compare to that, the

:21:36.:21:39.

collision risk is small. It is tragic we have had three deaths this

:21:40.:21:43.

week, but that is an unusual week. For me, you can look at me, you can

:21:44.:21:47.

see that only the exercise, and the health benefits of the exercise far

:21:48.:21:51.

outweigh the risk of collisions. The problem with the collisions is that

:21:52.:21:54.

it is tragic for people involved and it scares people off the roads and

:21:55.:21:58.

keeps them in their vehicles, they are by increasing the risk you are

:21:59.:22:01.

trying to prevent. It is important to mention, we do want to say that

:22:02.:22:06.

it is safe to cycle. We do not want to be scaremongering and putting

:22:07.:22:09.

people off, but those deaths have highlighted a really serious issue

:22:10.:22:12.

on our roads. We will speak to roost and and baby Alan, who has joined us

:22:13.:22:16.

here. Ruth and, the number of deaths has gone down, but what more needs

:22:17.:22:23.

to be done? -- Ruth-Anne. I cycle every day with my children, we do

:22:24.:22:27.

not have a car. It is our way of getting around, when is the third of

:22:28.:22:31.

three children. I find it quick and convenient and easy. We sold our car

:22:32.:22:37.

because we didn't need it. But most parents I speak to say that they do

:22:38.:22:41.

not feel safe, cycling with their children in London. I cannot say I

:22:42.:22:45.

blame them. You just need one aggressive driver, one close pass,

:22:46.:22:49.

one driver tailgating you, honking, scaring children, and it is going to

:22:50.:22:53.

put you off. That is just the opposite of what we need. So

:22:54.:22:56.

although it is brilliant that the deaths are going down, we need

:22:57.:23:00.

people to feel safe as well. And he did quality and protective

:23:01.:23:05.

infrastructure of cycle paths away from motor vehicles is what makes

:23:06.:23:08.

people feel safe, and that is what will get families on two wheels,

:23:09.:23:12.

which is what we need. Thank you, Ruth-Anne, and thank you, baby Alan.

:23:13.:23:19.

Donnie, you are from the campaign group Stop Killing Cyclists. What do

:23:20.:23:22.

you hope to achieve with this protest? All we are bringing the

:23:23.:23:26.

letters to the doors of the Treasury, because we believe the

:23:27.:23:29.

Chancellor is responsible for the carnage on the roads. 40,000 people

:23:30.:23:32.

die from traffic pollution. Another 11,000 are dying because they are

:23:33.:23:36.

afraid to cycle. We must make the roads safe. We need ?3 billion per

:23:37.:23:40.

year invested in cycling infrastructure, and a Chancellor is

:23:41.:23:42.

investing nothing in cycling infrastructure at the moment. We

:23:43.:23:47.

will bring the protest to his doors and demand that he invests in

:23:48.:23:50.

infrastructure that will save cyclists' lives. Do some cyclists to

:23:51.:23:56.

take responsibility for their safety as well? So many people tell us

:23:57.:23:59.

about irresponsible cyclists. Over the last four years one person has

:24:00.:24:03.

been killed by a cyclist on a footpath. Yet something like 50,000

:24:04.:24:07.

are being killed because of the traffic system. The level of damage

:24:08.:24:14.

being caused by cyclists is tiny compared to the traffic. We need to

:24:15.:24:18.

train kids in schools to be safe but we need the infrastructure to enable

:24:19.:24:22.

their parents to feel safe for the kids to cycle to school. It is

:24:23.:24:26.

really urgent. Thank you for joining us this morning. The Department of

:24:27.:24:30.

Transport as they are doing everything they can to try invest in

:24:31.:24:33.

cycling. It has in fact rippled spending in the past five years

:24:34.:24:37.

alone. I must add that this protest taking place this afternoon is also

:24:38.:24:41.

a vigil to pay homage to those who died on the road this week and

:24:42.:24:45.

previously, as both sides you have said, it really is a case of one

:24:46.:24:48.

death being just too many. Thank you.

:24:49.:24:52.

It's 7:25 and you're watching Breakfast from BBC News.

:24:53.:24:55.

Back to our top story, ?25 million is being invested in teaching our

:24:56.:25:01.

schoolchildren about cyber security in the hope they will become the

:25:02.:25:05.

experts of the future to protect Britain from online attacks. We are

:25:06.:25:14.

going to speak now to Brian Lord, who has spent more than 20 years as

:25:15.:25:18.

a deputy director at GCHQ and now runs his own cyber security firm.

:25:19.:25:22.

Thank you for joining us this morning, Mr Lord. What do you make

:25:23.:25:27.

of this, this idea of getting schoolchildren to learn cyber

:25:28.:25:30.

security. Do you need to -- do we need to? I think we do, and I think

:25:31.:25:35.

primarily it is because there is still a lot of misinformation about

:25:36.:25:39.

careers in cyber security. In fact, a lot of people don't know anything

:25:40.:25:44.

about them. There are a lot of misperceptions that the school age

:25:45.:25:48.

level about what a career looks like. So the more exposure they can

:25:49.:25:54.

get, it's prepares them for a future career and is not only that, as that

:25:55.:25:57.

generation needs to understand how to be safe online, you get a double

:25:58.:26:02.

benefit. I think it is an essential initiative, yes. You say that about

:26:03.:26:06.

misinformation and people not knowing what a career in cyber

:26:07.:26:10.

security is like. What is it like? I think first of all there is this

:26:11.:26:14.

perception that cyber security is all about techno geeks with long

:26:15.:26:19.

hair and glasses wearing heavy metal T-shirts and drinking red Bull.

:26:20.:26:23.

There are those, and they do an extraordinarily good job. But there

:26:24.:26:28.

is a whole range of other activities, information security,

:26:29.:26:31.

management systems, forensics, cyber threat intelligence analysis. A

:26:32.:26:36.

whole range of professional strands there which can appeal to quite a

:26:37.:26:40.

wide cross-section of children and graduates and apprentices. And at

:26:41.:26:44.

the moment they do not know what there is to offer, which is why

:26:45.:26:48.

there is a very slow uptake in this profession. So these lessons will be

:26:49.:26:54.

extra curricular ones. For hours a week. -- four hours. For any

:26:55.:26:58.

children watching, or their parents, what type of skills are you looking

:26:59.:27:02.

for? Who are the young people we should see going into these lessons?

:27:03.:27:06.

I don't want to pigeonhole a particular profile into it, because

:27:07.:27:11.

once again, I think you risk saying, well, you have to understand

:27:12.:27:15.

technology. You don't. What we actually want from children who want

:27:16.:27:20.

to perhaps be interested in this area is an inquisitive mind, the

:27:21.:27:26.

ability to be able to apply logic to problems, and just a general

:27:27.:27:30.

interest in the modern world of technology which doesn't mean being

:27:31.:27:35.

a technologist. All these children use computers, they use iPhones.

:27:36.:27:39.

Just an interesting how modern world works. Obviously these lessons are

:27:40.:27:44.

not going to be compulsory. So how do we get young people interested in

:27:45.:27:48.

them in the first place? I mean, that is a very good point. What we

:27:49.:27:54.

probably need to be able to do is being able to integrate knowledge of

:27:55.:27:58.

this across all the different curricula strands. My fear is that

:27:59.:28:03.

what will immediately happen is that this will be thrown into the ICT

:28:04.:28:08.

domain in schools, and once again there is an element of that. But we

:28:09.:28:13.

need to integrate into PH C, we need to integrate it into social logic,

:28:14.:28:16.

we need to integrate it into business studies, into politics.

:28:17.:28:20.

There is a whole swathe of this activity which needs to be

:28:21.:28:25.

integrated into all these strands of curricular rather than pigeonholing

:28:26.:28:29.

it into the IT strand, which will limit its appeal to a community. It

:28:30.:28:36.

feels slightly strange to be saying that we need more teenagers to keep

:28:37.:28:40.

doing cyber security to keep us safe. Are things that desperate now?

:28:41.:28:47.

I think we have to not misinterpreted can say that the only

:28:48.:28:50.

people who can keep us safe are teenagers. Although there probably

:28:51.:28:54.

is an element to that. But, yes, this is a Twitter century threat and

:28:55.:28:58.

we are dealing with a workforce who has grown up outside this threat. --

:28:59.:29:05.

21st century. To be able to get an entire workforce ready to be able to

:29:06.:29:09.

deal with the explosion of technology and the inherent risks

:29:10.:29:12.

that come with that technology is quite challenging for lots of the

:29:13.:29:16.

workforce. However, I think it is fair to say, and I am not always

:29:17.:29:20.

fair to government on this, that this initiative on schools is just

:29:21.:29:24.

one of many they are doing. They are also running a major risk killing

:29:25.:29:27.

programme were people can change career and move into this field, as

:29:28.:29:31.

well as developing apprenticeships. -- Major reskilling programme. So it

:29:32.:29:36.

is only one of a number of strands to increase the people that we do

:29:37.:29:40.

need in this industry. Given that you spent 20 years in the industry,

:29:41.:29:44.

how worried should we be about cyber security at the moment? I think... I

:29:45.:29:47.

don't think we should panic, but I think we should be aware of it and

:29:48.:29:52.

be able to deal with it quickly. I think once again, we need to be

:29:53.:29:56.

careful that we don't sort of just pigeonhole the cyber threat into

:29:57.:29:59.

nasty Russians doing nasty things in elections. Because there is a whole

:30:00.:30:05.

swathe of activity, and primarily this is just pure online

:30:06.:30:08.

criminality, that we need to be able to counter. A lot of that is just

:30:09.:30:12.

about education. It is not about having deep technical skills, it is

:30:13.:30:16.

just about learning how to be safe online. So I think it is something

:30:17.:30:20.

we have to worry about but not panic about. Brian Lord, thank you very

:30:21.:30:22.

much for your time. Still to come this morning: I'm on a

:30:23.:30:39.

wooden play, 100 feet in the air. A bit of high-stakes action. We will

:30:40.:30:52.

see that coming up shortly -- plank. Do you have any prior motoring

:30:53.:30:54.

convictions? Hello, this is Breakfast

:30:55.:31:26.

with Charlie Stayt and Steph Coming up before 8:00,

:31:27.:31:28.

Matt will have the weather for you. But first, a summary of this

:31:29.:31:33.

morning's main news. A 20 million-pound drive to find

:31:34.:31:37.

the future experts capable of defending Britain

:31:38.:31:40.

from cyber-attacks has been Lessons in cyber-security

:31:41.:31:42.

will become part of the curriculum for thousands of schoolchildren

:31:43.:31:45.

in England - after a Commons committee highlighted a skills

:31:46.:31:48.

shortage and labelled our current And after 7:00, we'll be

:31:49.:31:51.

joined by Brian Lord, who spent over 20 years

:31:52.:32:00.

as a Deputy Director of Cyber Operations at GCHQ.

:32:01.:32:03.

Donald Trump has said he may rewrite the presidential order imposing

:32:04.:32:06.

restrictions on travel to the US in a bid overcome legal

:32:07.:32:09.

obstacles which have The President unveiled the ban

:32:10.:32:11.

at the end of his first week in office, barring entry

:32:12.:32:20.

to travellers from seven Earlier this week, an appeals court

:32:21.:32:22.

upheld the suspension The case may now proceed

:32:23.:32:25.

to the Supreme Court. The funding of parks has reached

:32:26.:32:29.

a tipping point and new ways of paying for them

:32:30.:32:32.

may have to be found. That's according to

:32:33.:32:34.

the Commons Communities and Local Government Committee,

:32:35.:32:36.

which says parks are suffering It warns there's a danger

:32:37.:32:39.

of a return to the neglect Instead of regarding parks as only

:32:40.:32:43.

a sort of leisure and recreation area of service, we should be

:32:44.:32:47.

thinking about them as big contributors to public health

:32:48.:32:50.

and environmental policy And maybe they can

:32:51.:32:52.

be re-prioritised. There is fundamentally a problem

:32:53.:32:55.

about the number of cuts that local authorities have been experiencing

:32:56.:32:58.

and the distribution of those cuts across the country,

:32:59.:33:01.

and the difficult decisions that most local authorities

:33:02.:33:03.

are having to make. Labour has issued formal warnings

:33:04.:33:13.

to members of its front-bench team who disobeyed Jeremy Corbyn's

:33:14.:33:16.

order to vote for Brexit. Among those who ignored Mr Corbyn

:33:17.:33:21.

were 11 shadow junior ministers A 16-year-old boy has died

:33:22.:33:25.

after he was stabbed in a busy The wounded teenager was taken

:33:26.:33:33.

from the Harehills area to hospital for treatment, but died

:33:34.:33:37.

a short time later. A 15-year-old boy has been arrested

:33:38.:33:39.

on suspicion of murder. More than 200 more Wales have become

:33:40.:33:52.

stranded on a beach in New Zealand. A warning, you may find some

:33:53.:33:57.

of these pictures distressing. Hundreds more have already died

:33:58.:33:59.

in one of the biggest ever mass We have heard this morning from the

:34:00.:34:07.

team of volunteers working to refloat 100 survivors.

:34:08.:34:10.

We got 100 Wales of that have survived overnight, and we have lost

:34:11.:34:19.

sight of them. The bad part of the story is that a separate pod of 240

:34:20.:34:26.

whales have re- stranded by south of that -- whales. We will be fighting

:34:27.:34:29.

to keep them happy. It is pretty grim out here. Rescue effort is

:34:30.:34:37.

still under way, although it is getting towards evening so it is

:34:38.:34:44.

becoming more difficult. Those are our main stories. Another big

:34:45.:34:50.

weekend in the rugby? What a day ahead. Italy and Ireland in the Six

:34:51.:35:07.

Nations, then Wales against England. It is always the highlight.

:35:08.:35:10.

Wales against England in Cardiff, especially, with the Welsh having

:35:11.:35:13.

this chance to end England's winning run under Eddie Jones.

:35:14.:35:15.

For more on the build-up to the match let's speak to former

:35:16.:35:18.

Wales centre Tom Shanklin, who's at the Principality Stadium.

:35:19.:35:21.

Morning Tom, what do you make of Eddie Jones and his cheeky

:35:22.:35:30.

comments about Welsh tricks, and playing Tom Jones' "Delilah"

:35:31.:35:33.

That's all about mind games, there was also the conversation about the

:35:34.:35:44.

roof, now it is open even though it is snowing in Wales. This is all

:35:45.:35:49.

part and parcel of international rugby, especially because of the

:35:50.:35:52.

rivalry and the history between Wales and England.

:35:53.:35:57.

of all sorts of shannigans, traffic jams to delay the team,

:35:58.:36:02.

phonecalls in the night, no lighting or heating

:36:03.:36:04.

There was nothing like that, at the traffic will be bad because there

:36:05.:36:19.

will be 76,000 people trying to get into Cardiff. Sometimes the heat

:36:20.:36:25.

doesn't work in the change rooms, that is just a fact of life. It is

:36:26.:36:33.

all about mind games now! It is a big fixture!

:36:34.:36:36.

What effect will be roof being open have, bearing in mind that England

:36:37.:36:39.

have won 4 of 5 the previous games with the roof open?

:36:40.:36:44.

I know! When the roof closes, it becomes absolutely electric. The

:36:45.:36:52.

roof is open today, it is not going to make a difference between who

:36:53.:36:57.

wins and who loses, but when it is closed it is just intense. So

:36:58.:37:03.

intense, so loud, you can't hear anyone. But it is not a big factor.

:37:04.:37:09.

One of the things people have noticed about the English setup in

:37:10.:37:16.

this game is that in certain areas, they lack experience, compared with

:37:17.:37:19.

Wales. Given what you described about the atmosphere in the sense of

:37:20.:37:25.

the occasion, is that one area where possibly Wales have the edge going

:37:26.:37:32.

in? It is. It is an inexperienced back row. The Welsh back row, the

:37:33.:37:37.

experience they have got, it is certainly an area I think Wales will

:37:38.:37:43.

take the lead on. Whoever can get their front foot forward, what

:37:44.:37:49.

you've got is too incredible defence sides. It is how you break down

:37:50.:37:53.

that. You do that by getting a quick ball on the front foot. Just two,

:37:54.:37:59.

also asking about the mind games, as a player, what is it like Indy

:38:00.:38:07.

tunnel in the final minutes before the match starts? Everyone 's

:38:08.:38:22.

different. -- in the. It is the last few moments that you can

:38:23.:38:25.

concentrate. Once you get out there, your mind goes blank and autopilot

:38:26.:38:31.

takes over. You are very nervous, but these guys will have a sense of

:38:32.:38:36.

how big this occasion is. It will be absolutely huge in Cardiff. It is

:38:37.:38:40.

only half past seven and there are already people walking around in

:38:41.:38:45.

their scarves and hats. It is quite quite in the stadium. You could hear

:38:46.:38:55.

a pin drop. -- quiet. I think the fans will be just as nervous as you

:38:56.:39:00.

were. We look forward to it, the coverage starts at 415 on BBC One.

:39:01.:39:05.

Away from the Six Nations and history was made

:39:06.:39:07.

in the Premiership last night, as Bristol's Tom Varndell,

:39:08.:39:10.

became the league's all-time, top try scorer.

:39:11.:39:12.

The division's bottom side were thrashed by Harlequins,

:39:13.:39:14.

but Varndell scored his 91st Premiership try, to take him

:39:15.:39:17.

A last gasp penalty from Rhys Priestland gave third

:39:18.:39:26.

place Bath a one point victory over Northampton.

:39:27.:39:28.

Elsewhere Sale Sharks beat Newcastle.

:39:29.:39:41.

Scarlets moved into the top four, of the Pro 12, after an important

:39:42.:39:44.

There's confusion over the future of the Rangers manager

:39:45.:39:48.

Rangers said in a statement that he had resigned

:39:49.:39:52.

from his position but Warburton says he wasn't aware of that

:39:53.:39:55.

Rangers are third in the Scottish Premiership but 27

:39:56.:39:59.

Under-20 coach Graeme Murty is set to lead the side in topmorrow's

:40:00.:40:14.

Scottish Cup tie with Greenock Morton.

:40:15.:40:22.

The early kick off in the Premier League is at the Emirates

:40:23.:40:25.

where Arsenal take on a rejuvenated Hull City side.

:40:26.:40:28.

Arsenal are currently in fourth but have lost their last two

:40:29.:40:31.

matches, which has led to renewed speculation over manager

:40:32.:40:33.

Former Arsenal and England striker Ian Wright thinks this will be

:40:34.:40:37.

I was with the boss last night, and to be totally honest,

:40:38.:40:42.

I genuinely believe, I was with him for a few hours,

:40:43.:40:46.

I just get the impression looking at him that...

:40:47.:40:49.

He actually mentioned when we were talking that it's

:40:50.:40:56.

In the rest of the days matches, Manchester United take on Watford,

:40:57.:41:06.

Middlesbrough face Everton, Crystal Palace are at Stoke.

:41:07.:41:11.

Leigh's return to rugby league's Super League got off

:41:12.:41:13.

to a disappointing start as they were comfortably beaten

:41:14.:41:16.

The Tigers ran in seven trys including this from winger Greg

:41:17.:41:20.

Elsewhere, Huddersfield Giants beat Widnes 28-16.

:41:21.:41:27.

For years now, Snowdonia in North Wales has been establishing

:41:28.:41:30.

itself as a centre for extreme adventure sports, with Europe's

:41:31.:41:33.

longest and fastest zipwire - and a unique surfing lake.

:41:34.:41:36.

Now, former slate mines have been brought back to life,

:41:37.:41:38.

to add a huge adrenalin rush to history lessons.

:41:39.:41:41.

I joined a school party in one of the vast caverns

:41:42.:41:44.

Beneath this sci-fi landscape, there is an industrial world waiting

:41:45.:41:48.

A labyrinth of over 300 tunnels and caverns,

:41:49.:42:00.

Former slate mines, now to be explored using climbing skills

:42:01.:42:15.

and zipwires, giving you an insight into the life of a miner.

:42:16.:42:20.

All that supports you are staples hammered into the rock.

:42:21.:42:31.

But your mind paralysed has you with fear.

:42:32.:42:43.

What is so incredible is when you look down and around,

:42:44.:42:46.

Some working here were as young as six years old.

:42:47.:43:00.

I learned about what the miners had to do.

:43:01.:43:02.

We have a great safety system now, but they just had chains

:43:03.:43:06.

It is crazy to think they did that for 12 hours a day.

:43:07.:43:10.

This man worked in the mines, but is now a safety inspector.

:43:11.:43:13.

It has given the villiage a new lease of life.

:43:14.:43:29.

There is a side, we are very proud of the culture,

:43:30.:43:32.

After the training, it's up to you to get around

:43:33.:43:36.

You conquer your fears in your head, and then it starts to get a bit more

:43:37.:43:49.

You learn more about yourself going around there than you can

:43:50.:43:56.

The school pupils took it all in their stride.

:43:57.:44:00.

Having seen one lad fall of the monkey bars 200 feet up...

:44:01.:44:03.

I gave this a miss, taking a different route

:44:04.:44:15.

They saved the steepest zip wire to last.

:44:16.:44:43.

Some people do this every day. I was so petrified, nobody else seemed of

:44:44.:44:57.

it. My legs were completely wobbly, they were like jelly. Some people go

:44:58.:45:04.

completely quiet, I was not. That is part of coping with fear. It was a

:45:05.:45:10.

great challenge over three hours. Get on the website and we will tell

:45:11.:45:13.

you where to go. It is 7:45am. Let's find out what is

:45:14.:45:26.

happening with the weather. When I got up at 3:30am it was snowing, and

:45:27.:45:30.

I thought today would not look so good. How was it?

:45:31.:45:36.

Not horrendous. But a queue of you will be waking up to a coating of

:45:37.:45:40.

snow, as we have here at Blackwood near Caerphilly. That's no, as you

:45:41.:45:45.

just heard, is falling near the centre of Cardiff as well, and some

:45:46.:45:49.

picturesque snow across Dover Castle in Kent as well. Both those pictures

:45:50.:45:55.

sent in by our Weather Watchers. We also have some snow across eastern

:45:56.:45:58.

Scotland and the hills of northern England. But not everybody will have

:45:59.:46:03.

snow, by any means. Some have a dry and bright start, especially in the

:46:04.:46:05.

north-west of Scotland, where temperatures last night dropped to

:46:06.:46:09.

minus ten. A lovely start for much of Northern Ireland. Scotland, Gray,

:46:10.:46:14.

rain along the coast, sleet and snow giving a covering over the hills.

:46:15.:46:18.

The same across northern England. Snow by ten o'clock, mainly across

:46:19.:46:21.

the Pennines and into the Peak District. Patchy drizzle into lower

:46:22.:46:26.

levels. Snow and sleet across eastern Wales, and down towards the

:46:27.:46:29.

south-west. Especially across Kent and Sussex. It adds to a slow start

:46:30.:46:36.

to Saturday morning. The wind is not helping. That would be close to gale

:46:37.:46:39.

force, especially in north-east England and Scotland late on. Most

:46:40.:46:43.

of the snow will turn back towards patchy rain and drizzle and we are

:46:44.:46:46.

not expecting huge disruption by any means. The west of Scotland and

:46:47.:46:50.

Northern Ireland will stay dry with sunny spells throughout.

:46:51.:46:54.

Temperatures up a bit on yesterday. Factoring in the wind, however, it

:46:55.:46:58.

will feel colder than yesterday. That wind will strengthen tonight

:46:59.:47:01.

and into Sunday. It will continue to bring lots of cloud across the

:47:02.:47:04.

country, keeping temperatures just above freezing through the night.

:47:05.:47:09.

There will be clear skies at times in northern Scotland and maybe

:47:10.:47:12.

Northern Ireland, so that is the best chance freight touch of frost,

:47:13.:47:16.

and maybe even in the far south-west, where there will be some

:47:17.:47:19.

ice in the morning. A dusting of snow across the real -- in the

:47:20.:47:25.

hills. That will come and go, some dry moments, maybe bright in times

:47:26.:47:29.

in southernmost counties. Always a bit dry and brighter in northern

:47:30.:47:32.

parts of Scotland and Northern Ireland. But it will feel colder

:47:33.:47:36.

today, given the strength of the wind. Those winds will go gradually

:47:37.:47:40.

into the start of next week. We welcome back the sunshine and

:47:41.:47:43.

temperatures for some of you will be back to double figures. So just bear

:47:44.:47:46.

with the cold. That is very good to hear, double

:47:47.:47:51.

figures. Time now is 7:47 a.m.. We'll be back with the headlines at

:47:52.:47:55.

eight o'clock but now it is time for news watch with Samir Ahmed. --

:47:56.:48:00.

Newswatch. Hello, and welcome to Newswatch

:48:01.:48:01.

with me, Samira Ahmed. Vital insight or just

:48:02.:48:04.

demoralising coverage? The BBC's special NHS reporting

:48:05.:48:05.

is in the spotlight. Is it ever justified to show

:48:06.:48:07.

an image of a child who has just been killed, as Newsnight did

:48:08.:48:11.

in a report about a recent US Reports about the National Health

:48:12.:48:14.

Service have been especially frequent on television news

:48:15.:48:26.

bulletins over the last few weeks of winter, but this

:48:27.:48:28.

week more so than ever. The BBC was running a week

:48:29.:48:31.

of special programmes and reports, which they branded as Health Check,

:48:32.:48:34.

about the state of the NHS, including Monday's Panorama

:48:35.:48:37.

and lengthy items on the 6pm and 10pm bulletins on Monday,

:48:38.:48:39.

Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday. Seven years ago this council spent

:48:40.:48:44.

about a third of its budget providing care and support to people

:48:45.:48:47.

who are older and disabled. But now the cost of adult social

:48:48.:49:01.

care is heading towards half of its budget, with demand still

:49:02.:49:04.

increasing and that is at the heart of the problems they are

:49:05.:49:07.

wrestling with today. The BBC was given unrestricted

:49:08.:49:10.

access to witness the pressures We have had patients here for 6-9

:49:11.:49:14.

hours and we cannot find We were in the corridor

:49:15.:49:27.

for five hours. It isn't what you expect

:49:28.:49:31.

from a country like ours. Hospitals like this one are running

:49:32.:49:33.

at 95% capacity which means they are nearly full so with more

:49:34.:49:36.

emergency cases coming in and difficulty discharging some

:49:37.:49:39.

patients back into the community some of those needing surgery

:49:40.:49:42.

are having to wait longer. Our health editor and special

:49:43.:49:50.

correspondent and social No question about the comprehensive

:49:51.:49:52.

nature of the coverage but some viewers told us by telephone

:49:53.:49:58.

and webcam that they were concerned about the effect of that coverage

:49:59.:50:01.

and that the BBC had Every night this week we have seen

:50:02.:50:04.

the BBC 6pm and 10pm news leading with the story on the current

:50:05.:50:13.

state of the NHS. We all know there are many

:50:14.:50:16.

problems in the NHS, and there are many reasons for this

:50:17.:50:19.

including bed blocking, immigration, lifestyles,

:50:20.:50:22.

health tourism, waste, bad procurement, trivial

:50:23.:50:23.

A visits and so on. And yet BBC news would rather have

:50:24.:50:27.

us believe the problems are all due to so-called Tory cuts and that

:50:28.:50:32.

throwing more money at the problem Please, BBC, get your house in order

:50:33.:50:43.

and start reporting the news This campaign should be reserved

:50:44.:50:51.

for a Panorama programme, I understand there are serious

:50:52.:50:56.

problems in the NHS and I understand that things have got

:50:57.:51:02.

worse by some measures, however, BBC News seems to be trying

:51:03.:51:04.

to make us feel angry. We have better health

:51:05.:51:07.

care than most. Please try and help us to feel

:51:08.:51:19.

grateful for what we have and try to help us make things

:51:20.:51:23.

better rather than constantly I am not newsworthy because I am one

:51:24.:51:26.

of the thousands of people who have received treatment from the NHS over

:51:27.:51:31.

the last few months who have nothing I only have praise for

:51:32.:51:35.

the dedicated, professional staff who have carried out

:51:36.:51:38.

treatment on their behalf. This week we have been bombarded

:51:39.:51:40.

by the news on all channels telling us what is wrong with our

:51:41.:51:44.

National Health Service. What you have as the BBC

:51:45.:51:55.

is responsibility in terms of making sure we do not demoralise the staff

:51:56.:51:59.

any more than they already are. I asked a nurse if she was impacted

:52:00.:52:03.

by the adverse publicity seen She looked at me as if it

:52:04.:52:06.

was a silly question. The BBC has spent the last week

:52:07.:52:11.

with intensive wall-to-wall coverage of bad news about the NHS and some

:52:12.:52:14.

important things are needed to be However, the effect

:52:15.:52:18.

of that is to produce a downwards Come on BBC, it is not that we don't

:52:19.:52:23.

need to know about these bad things and they do need addressing,

:52:24.:52:34.

but I think that the benefit of the NHS and our appreciation

:52:35.:52:37.

of it we should hear some Well, the health editor for BBC News

:52:38.:52:40.

has been on the news for much Viewers, as you can see

:52:41.:52:48.

from looking at those clips, have felt there's been so much

:52:49.:52:54.

coverage focusing on the negative things, waiting times

:52:55.:52:57.

and cancellations, they wonder whether the BBC is hyping

:52:58.:52:59.

up a sense of crisis? There have been several strong

:53:00.:53:03.

newsline is which we would want to cover as part of

:53:04.:53:06.

our BBC News output. We did some research on waiting

:53:07.:53:10.

times, patients who were waiting longer than 18 weeks

:53:11.:53:13.

in England to get surgery. That is the target, they should be

:53:14.:53:16.

seen for a routine surgery, We discovered from our data that

:53:17.:53:19.

nine out of ten hospitals are running at levels

:53:20.:53:27.

that are deemed to be above what is normally

:53:28.:53:30.

considered safe. Institute for Fiscal Studies has

:53:31.:53:48.

said that health spending in England has gone up but per person

:53:49.:53:52.

it will start falling. On Thursday, very bleak figures

:53:53.:53:55.

from NHS England on how the performance in December

:53:56.:53:58.

was the worst since records began and looked like it was going to get

:53:59.:54:00.

worse in January after documents I think it is our job to report

:54:01.:54:04.

on facts and figures In terms of staff morale,

:54:05.:54:08.

I take on board what people were saying there about staff

:54:09.:54:13.

feeling downtrodden because of this. Equally we have had contact,

:54:14.:54:16.

e-mails and calls, from staff who said it is really good

:54:17.:54:18.

that the BBC is focusing on what is really going on,

:54:19.:54:21.

from senior consultants to junior This is what the BBC should be doing

:54:22.:54:24.

and it has not done enough One viewer said that they felt

:54:25.:54:29.

the coverage felt like a downward spiral of despondency

:54:30.:54:36.

and that was so overwhelming that perhaps it needs to be balanced

:54:37.:54:39.

with some coverage that shows There has been quite

:54:40.:54:42.

a lot of positive side. There was a big debate on health

:54:43.:54:51.

involving patients and staff and other health experts,

:54:52.:54:54.

including some patient testimony on the positives they

:54:55.:54:56.

found with the NHS. We have had coverage throughout

:54:57.:55:03.

the week on different aspects of how GPs are coming to terms

:55:04.:55:06.

with the different challenges. The news channel has reports

:55:07.:55:10.

on innovative schemes to link up We had a Yeovil Hospital scheme that

:55:11.:55:13.

aims to look after older patients in their autumn this book facility

:55:14.:55:22.

away from accident and emergency. We tried hard to talk

:55:23.:55:27.

about the positives possible solutions, but equally

:55:28.:55:29.

we have two state the facts It is a difficult balance

:55:30.:55:31.

and we are holding an important institution to account,

:55:32.:55:39.

and it should be about providing the best possible patient care

:55:40.:55:42.

and the government should make sure it is funded adequately

:55:43.:55:45.

and it is making efficient use Some complaints have been

:55:46.:55:47.

but it is felt the BBC is politically campaigning

:55:48.:55:59.

and saying it is about more funding There is the opinion that the NHS

:56:00.:56:02.

should have more funding, but health spending in the UK

:56:03.:56:07.

as a whole as a share of national income is below France and Germany,

:56:08.:56:11.

it is falling, the ISS during the week have made clear that

:56:12.:56:14.

spending will fall in a way it has never done before in terms

:56:15.:56:18.

of spending per head of population. We have taken those arguments

:56:19.:56:28.

and put them forward. We have been accused in the past

:56:29.:56:30.

of not addressing lack of funding. We are not being political,

:56:31.:56:34.

we're stating facts. Equally, we have been very clear

:56:35.:56:37.

that there are some who feel the NHS could make more efficient

:56:38.:56:44.

use of their resources reflected that argument,

:56:45.:56:46.

it is not just about money it is about better ways of joining

:56:47.:56:49.

up care, better ways When is it justified to broadcast

:56:50.:56:52.

close-up images of someone The question was raised

:56:53.:57:08.

after the Newsnight report on Wednesday from a village in Yemen

:57:09.:57:11.

where US special forces attacked Several civilians were killed,

:57:12.:57:14.

including a boy who was showing. We put that

:57:15.:57:24.

point to BBC News and they told us: Finally, we have almost managed

:57:25.:58:15.

to get through an additional Newswatch without mentioning

:58:16.:58:19.

Donald Trump, but not quite. A programme has been running

:58:20.:58:21.

about his first hundred Even some of his fans

:58:22.:58:23.

are not happy with this. Thank you for all your

:58:24.:58:37.

comments this week. If you want to share your opinions

:58:38.:58:54.

on BBC News or appeared on the programme you can

:58:55.:58:57.

call us or e-mail us You can find this on Twitter

:58:58.:59:04.

and do look at our website That is all from us, we will be back

:59:05.:59:10.

to hear your thoughts about BBC News Hello, this is Breakfast, with

:59:11.:59:18.

Charlie Stayt and Steph McGovern. The latest weapon in

:59:19.:00:25.

the war against hackers - the Government funds lessons

:00:26.:00:28.

in cyber security for teenagers. It's hoped they'll become

:00:29.:00:30.

the experts of the future and protect Britain from online

:00:31.:00:32.

attacks. Good morning it's

:00:33.:00:48.

Saturday, 11th February. President Trump says he may issue

:00:49.:00:51.

a new order authorising a travel ban after his old one was blocked

:00:52.:00:55.

by the courts. Parks under threat -

:00:56.:01:00.

a new report says funding has reached a tipping point and new ways

:01:01.:01:02.

of paying for them need to be found. The latest on the battle

:01:03.:01:07.

to save hundreds of whales stranded And in sport - it's one

:01:08.:01:09.

of the biggest tests yet, It's a first trip to Cardiff,

:01:10.:01:19.

for their coach Eddie Jones, and Wales are banking on home

:01:20.:01:23.

advantage to take them Good morning, a cold feeling day out

:01:24.:01:27.

there for all of us today. For some a little bit of snow

:01:28.:01:35.

to begin with, giving a coating in places but for many some of that

:01:36.:01:38.

snow will turn back to rain, all the details coming

:01:39.:01:42.

up in 15 minutes. The government is to fund lessons

:01:43.:01:43.

in cyber security to encourage teenagers to pursue a career

:01:44.:01:49.

in defending Britain It's hoped that thousands of pupils

:01:50.:01:51.

in England will spend up to four hours a week on the subject,

:01:52.:01:55.

over the next five years. Here's our home affairs

:01:56.:01:58.

Correspondent Tom Symonds. Daniel's a convicted teenaged Hacker

:01:59.:02:09.

facing a jail sentence. In 2015 he took part in the massive digital

:02:10.:02:16.

break in, of the phone company Talk Talk.. But what if his potential

:02:17.:02:24.

been harnessed. He might have been part of a new breed of apprentices

:02:25.:02:29.

like these. With that in mind the Government's putting up ?20 million,

:02:30.:02:33.

for nearly 6,000 school-children aged 14 and above, to take four

:02:34.:02:38.

hours of cyber security lessons after school each week. We think

:02:39.:02:43.

that will help seriously with this shortage of cyber skills we have

:02:44.:02:48.

got. Now we will always keep it under review in case this needs to

:02:49.:02:53.

get bigger, but getting it going at this scale shows serious ambition,

:02:54.:02:57.

to make sure that we can have the pipeline of talent we are going to

:02:58.:03:00.

need the years ahead. While the police are stepping up the fight,

:03:01.:03:04.

this is not a threat which can be defeated on the ground by raiding

:03:05.:03:09.

the hackers. The cyber crime battlefield will be online, and

:03:10.:03:14.

Britain's GCHQ will be the command centre. 58,000 people are employed

:03:15.:03:18.

in the growing anti-hacking industry. But more will be needed,

:03:19.:03:22.

and the Government knows it has to start fining them, when they are

:03:23.:03:23.

young. Donald Trump has said he may rewrite

:03:24.:03:32.

the presidential order imposing restrictions on travel to the US

:03:33.:03:34.

to overcome the legal obstacles that His first order - stopping travel

:03:35.:03:37.

from seven mainly-Muslim countries - Our Washington correspondent,

:03:38.:03:41.

David Willis, has more. After a federal appeals court backed

:03:42.:03:47.

a stay of his executive order, Donald Trump vowed he would see his

:03:48.:03:50.

opponents in court. Speaking on Air Force One, en route

:03:51.:03:52.

to his weekend retreat in Florida, the President revealed

:03:53.:03:55.

he was actively weighing But we also have a lot of other

:03:56.:03:57.

options, including just filing We need speed, for reasons

:03:58.:04:09.

of security, so it could very Unveiled at the end of a frantic

:04:10.:04:16.

first week in office, the original order suspended

:04:17.:04:21.

America's refugee programme and banned travellers from seven

:04:22.:04:22.

majority Muslim nations It caused chaos at airports

:04:23.:04:28.

and sparked protests Quite how the White House might

:04:29.:04:34.

rewrite the order isn't clear, although lawyers would almost

:04:35.:04:39.

certainly have to address the claim that in its existing form,

:04:40.:04:41.

the order is unconstitutional, in that it blocks entry

:04:42.:04:43.

to the United States Mr Trump has continued to insist

:04:44.:04:45.

that tough immigration measures are crucial

:04:46.:04:52.

to America's national security. The funding of parks has reached

:04:53.:04:54.

a tipping point and new ways of paying for them may have

:04:55.:05:05.

to be found. That's according to

:05:06.:05:07.

the Commons Communities and Local Government Committee

:05:08.:05:08.

which says parks are suffering It warns there's a danger of a

:05:09.:05:10.

return to the neglect of the 1980s. Instead of kind of regarding parks

:05:11.:05:19.

as a kind of only a leisure and recreation area of service,

:05:20.:05:22.

we should be thinking about parks as big contributors to public

:05:23.:05:25.

health, and to environmental policy and to community cohesion,

:05:26.:05:31.

and maybe they can be reprioritised. But there is fundamentally a problem

:05:32.:05:35.

about the level of cuts that local authorities have been experiencing,

:05:36.:05:38.

the distribution of the cuts across the country and the very,

:05:39.:05:40.

very difficult decisions that many local authorities

:05:41.:05:43.

are having to make. Labour has issued formal warnings

:05:44.:05:51.

to members of its front-bench team who disobeyed Jeremy Corbyn's order

:05:52.:05:54.

to vote for Brexit. Among those who ignored Mr Corbyn

:05:55.:05:56.

were eleven shadow junior ministers A 16-year-old boy has died

:05:57.:06:02.

after he was stabbed The wounded teenager was taken

:06:03.:06:06.

from the Harehills area to hospital for treatment,

:06:07.:06:09.

but died a short time later. A 15-year-old boy has been arrested

:06:10.:06:12.

on suspicion of murder. The decision to end a scheme to let

:06:13.:06:18.

unaccompanied refugee children into the UK is shameful according

:06:19.:06:21.

to the Scottish First She's urged the Prime Minister

:06:22.:06:23.

to change her mind saying there is a moral duty to help

:06:24.:06:27.

those in need. The scheme's due to end in March

:06:28.:06:29.

with 350 children being admitted far fewer than some campaigners had

:06:30.:06:32.

hoped for. Volunteers have told Breakfast

:06:33.:06:42.

in the past few hours than 200 more whales have become stranded

:06:43.:06:45.

on a beach in New Zealand. Hundreds more have already died

:06:46.:06:47.

in one of the biggest ever mass It's hoped the pilot whales may be

:06:48.:06:50.

able to swim to safety Just to warn you, you might find

:06:51.:06:54.

some of the scenes in this report As they wait for high tide

:06:55.:07:13.

volunteers do whatever they can to cool them. Pouring water and

:07:14.:07:18.

covering the creatures in cloths helps to regulate body temperature.

:07:19.:07:22.

Temporary measures until they can be released into the ocean.

:07:23.:07:28.

Some hope singing will prove soothing.

:07:29.:07:32.

And then the sound of success. But it is early days.

:07:33.:07:37.

Very quickly the tide has come in and we are up to our knees. Some up

:07:38.:07:41.

to their waists in water and we are getting a bit of floating and we are

:07:42.:07:46.

helping assist the whaling with the breathing until the water is deep

:07:47.:07:50.

enough they can swim It's a devastating image, would be testify

:07:51.:07:54.

worst in the country's history, it is unclear what brings them into the

:07:55.:07:58.

beech. Some believe they may be sick or injured or have lost their way,

:07:59.:08:03.

another theory is when a single whale is beached it sends out a

:08:04.:08:07.

distress signal attracting other members of the pod. Once ashore it

:08:08.:08:12.

is hard to get them back in to the ocean. We have the whales off that

:08:13.:08:18.

have survived overnight and we have lost sight of them, but the bad part

:08:19.:08:24.

of the story is a separate pod of 240 whales have come on and

:08:25.:08:28.

restranded south of that. So, we have been fighting to keep those

:08:29.:08:34.

ones happy, but it is grim out hire. Lifting and moving can prove

:08:35.:08:38.

difficult so it is all down to the tide but with dangerous conditions

:08:39.:08:41.

on the water, the operation has been stood down for now.

:08:42.:08:47.

One other story. Hundreds of people have been competing in a sport that

:08:48.:08:54.

combines dancing and flying indoors. Have a look at this. This is the

:08:55.:08:59.

wind games. That, that doesn't look like real people does it. You can

:09:00.:09:03.

compete in pairs as you can see, fours or as a solo contestant and

:09:04.:09:09.

you get marks for speed and accuracy.

:09:10.:09:13.

That is so... How do they not crash into each other? That is a very

:09:14.:09:18.

strange image, the winds games, I never knew they existed. Nine

:09:19.:09:20.

minutes past eight is the time now, we will have the sport coming up

:09:21.:09:24.

with Mike. The weather for the weekend with Matt in the next few

:09:25.:09:26.

The unit which was set up to investigate claims British troops

:09:27.:09:30.

abused Iraqi civilians is being scrapped,

:09:31.:09:32.

after being described by MPs as an "unmitigated disaster".

:09:33.:09:34.

The work of the Iraq Historic Allegations Team

:09:35.:09:36.

cost 34 million pounds, but has led to no

:09:37.:09:38.

Mark Lancaster, Minister for Defence Personnel

:09:39.:09:51.

Good morning. Thank you for joining us. So, I mean tell us how you ended

:09:52.:10:00.

up being falsely accused of the war crimes. It was on 200414th May,

:10:01.:10:07.

blistering heat, was given a command to dismount from my vehicle we were

:10:08.:10:12.

in, and launch a full frontal assault on a heavily defended

:10:13.:10:19.

trench, occupied by the militia Mehdi Army. Obviously you did what

:10:20.:10:22.

you had to do in the situation and when you came back, how did you find

:10:23.:10:27.

out that you were then being accused of doing something wrong? That day

:10:28.:10:38.

was a five hours intense violent battle which you know, in extreme

:10:39.:10:44.

circumstances decision making had to be had, I was a young commander at

:10:45.:10:49.

23 years old. Thinking that what I did on the ground was the right

:10:50.:10:52.

thing to do and the right decisions that I had made. It wasn't perfect

:10:53.:10:57.

but the guys on the ground with me, and I, we survived to, to get home

:10:58.:11:05.

then, and to then find out about these allegations was hard breaking.

:11:06.:11:09.

What kind of impact it did it have, your family must have been gutted as

:11:10.:11:14.

well? It questioned my integrity as a commander, you know. Like, you

:11:15.:11:21.

know, we go to war, we go on operations for this great country,

:11:22.:11:27.

and you know, to have your actions questioned, when you get home, and

:11:28.:11:30.

the allegations were at the highest order. Unlawful killing. Mutilation,

:11:31.:11:35.

and then mistreatment of prisoners of war. That just did not happen,

:11:36.:11:41.

and I just don't know where they got the fuel from, I really don't.

:11:42.:11:44.

Obviously now that has been completely thrown out, there was no

:11:45.:11:50.

evidence, and lots of cases, there was something like 3500 cases that

:11:51.:11:54.

this unit they were looking at, it has been closed down, how do you

:11:55.:11:59.

feel about it? Steph, it is good news, it is good news. Long overdue,

:12:00.:12:04.

clearly, but it is good news. Look, we had holes in our systems which

:12:05.:12:15.

were exploited, by bloodthirsty dishonest, greedy, with zero

:12:16.:12:22.

integrity organisations to you know, put people's lives and turn them

:12:23.:12:27.

upside down. This has been going on for year, its has had lasting impact

:12:28.:12:31.

on you and your family and other soldier, you say it was long overdue

:12:32.:12:36.

this closure, what do you think the Government should have done then? I

:12:37.:12:42.

can only speak on behalf of me, my soldiers an my regiment and the

:12:43.:12:47.

inquiry which lasted for ten years, because of the seriousness of the

:12:48.:12:52.

allegations, they should have looked into them into so much detail,

:12:53.:12:58.

before you know, releasing it as a public inquiry, going into a court.

:12:59.:13:01.

Radio, I have never had, I have never been in that situation before,

:13:02.:13:05.

never, and having to get cross-examined into an intimidation

:13:06.:13:08.

environment like that, where I have people questioning and questioning

:13:09.:13:12.

and questioning my action, I sort of question my actions also, because I

:13:13.:13:17.

was, you know, getting told that many times they did it wrong, you

:13:18.:13:21.

know, I started to think did I do it wrong? But I knew me and my fellow

:13:22.:13:27.

soldiers and my regiment's integrity and values an standards of the

:13:28.:13:31.

British arm were of the highest order. What impact has it an on your

:13:32.:13:36.

regiment and the soldiers you were with? It is tarnished, without a

:13:37.:13:41.

doubt. I can speak for my and my soldiers and what they have put it

:13:42.:13:46.

through, for that period of time, it was damaging to the glee of careers,

:13:47.:13:55.

marital split ups and fuelling the fire of PTSD, and the trauma that we

:13:56.:14:00.

had seen on the battlefield. Not just me, we had been war fighting

:14:01.:14:04.

for the last ten years so there is a lot of it going on, but just to get

:14:05.:14:08.

these allegations thrown at you, is, it is a bitter pill to swallow. Is

:14:09.:14:12.

there anything the Government could do now? They have done something

:14:13.:14:17.

now, they have put something into place, the cases are now dropped.

:14:18.:14:21.

Any extra they should be doing in hindsight? That is for the

:14:22.:14:24.

Government to decide, and lessons learned. The MoD and the Government

:14:25.:14:28.

have big lessons to learn and do that post action review on the

:14:29.:14:32.

lessons, that, you know, need to be learned and I will leave it like

:14:33.:14:36.

that. Thank you so much for. Coming in to tell us your story. We really

:14:37.:14:39.

appreciate that. Listening to that from the news room

:14:40.:14:45.

is the minister for veterans. Thank you for your time.

:14:46.:14:49.

I hope you were able to hear what he was saying. It is a searing

:14:50.:14:54.

condemnation of an ordeal that he and many other soldiers were put

:14:55.:14:58.

through, what is your immediate thought when you hear the personal

:14:59.:15:03.

and professional impact that the inquiry had? It very moving. I can

:15:04.:15:15.

empathise I joined in army in 19988, I still serve as a reserve, din't

:15:16.:15:20.

serve in Iraq and I absolutely understand and feel for our service

:15:21.:15:23.

personnel who have been through this, I hat was set up for the right

:15:24.:15:28.

reasons, so that our service personnel wouldn't have to go to the

:15:29.:15:32.

international criminal court, but unfortunately in the process it was

:15:33.:15:35.

abused and that is why the Government took the action it did,

:15:36.:15:44.

after the inquiry, by reporting Phil Shine tore the regulatory authority

:15:45.:15:47.

and why after two years, after he has been struck off, we are able to

:15:48.:15:52.

brick this to an end, and so it is just a great #145i78 what was done

:15:53.:15:55.

for the right reasons has been abused. So the Iraq historic

:15:56.:16:04.

allegations team, why wasn't it shut down sooner, because we heard their

:16:05.:16:09.

account from Brian Wood, he was cross-examined, the ordeal that he

:16:10.:16:15.

went through, what stage were there any indications that this set up was

:16:16.:16:20.

fundamentally flawed and if there were signs earlier on why was it not

:16:21.:16:24.

at least paused or halted before people had to go through that? Well,

:16:25.:16:28.

I hope everybody accepts that the Government does have a duty to

:16:29.:16:33.

investigate allegations and that is why in good faith this inquiry, this

:16:34.:16:38.

team was set up. Clearly, after the inquiry, it became clear when the

:16:39.:16:42.

judge gave his judgment, that he felt many of the allegations lacked

:16:43.:16:46.

any basis whatsoever. It was at that point, that the Government took the

:16:47.:16:51.

unprecedented step to report Phil Shiner and that has taken some two

:16:52.:16:56.

yearses. I regret it has taken two years but at least we have a

:16:57.:17:00.

positive outcome. There will be lessons to learned from this as we

:17:01.:17:04.

move forward. It has taken longer than I hoped for but the Government

:17:05.:17:07.

has taken positive accuse sunnion and today we see the is outcome of

:17:08.:17:11.

that. Where then does this leave the other side of the coin, which is the

:17:12.:17:16.

notion that as a result of what has happened here, that genuine cases

:17:17.:17:20.

may now get ignored? Well, that won't be the case, because we do

:17:21.:17:25.

feel that we will move down from about 3,000 cases to probably about

:17:26.:17:28.

20, they will be properly investigated by the Royal Naval

:17:29.:17:32.

police, that is a process that has been running in parallel and now

:17:33.:17:35.

will move forward but equally it is important that is brought to a swift

:17:36.:17:39.

conclusion, so we hope that will be done by, towards the end of the

:17:40.:17:43.

summer. You mentioned your own experience at the begin of the

:17:44.:17:47.

interview, it was interesting talking to Brian a moment ago about

:17:48.:17:51.

the damage he thought that was done possibly more generally, to, if you

:17:52.:17:55.

like, the image of British service personnel and the image of this

:17:56.:18:00.

nation, in relation to wider international irissue, that can be

:18:01.:18:03.

very long-standing, regardless of the fact that now the evidence has

:18:04.:18:07.

been thrown out entirely. Well, I accept that, but that simply

:18:08.:18:11.

underlines why the Government must investigate this, we must give the

:18:12.:18:14.

confidence to the wider public that when allegations are made they are

:18:15.:18:19.

investigated. We can't simply sweep things under the carpet: I regret

:18:20.:18:22.

this process, which is set up in good faith was abused by the likes

:18:23.:18:27.

of Phil Shiner. Now we have got through that process we can move

:18:28.:18:30.

forward. Focus on the few allegations which may have some

:18:31.:18:34.

substance but they will be properly investigated and that hopefully will

:18:35.:18:37.

bring confidence we look at these things properly. Thank you for your

:18:38.:18:39.

time. School-children in England are going

:18:40.:18:53.

to be offered lessons in cyber security, it is hoped that more than

:18:54.:18:57.

5,000 teenagers will spend up to four hours a week on the subject

:18:58.:19:01.

over the next five years. President Trump is said to be considering a

:19:02.:19:05.

new executive order on immigration, it follows reports it might not take

:19:06.:19:13.

his case to reinstate his case to the travel ban to the Supreme Court.

:19:14.:19:17.

We are being warned public parks are at threat because of a lack of

:19:18.:19:23.

funding. We he few find out of how we can keep green spaces free for

:19:24.:19:26.

future generations. We will talk about that later. If

:19:27.:19:31.

you are out in the park this morning, if it is snowy, sunny send

:19:32.:19:35.

Here's Matt with a look at this morning's weather.

:19:36.:19:41.

Good morning. If you are heading off to the park today, certainly wrap up

:19:42.:19:49.

well, it will be a chilly day, raw winds developing and as some have

:19:50.:19:53.

been capturing there has been a dusting of snow. A few centimetres

:19:54.:19:57.

here and there, makes for a pretty start but slippery on some of the

:19:58.:20:02.

roads and pavements but not snow every where, we have rather grey

:20:03.:20:05.

skies for the bullet to have country but a bit of sunshine for one or

:20:06.:20:09.

two, Northern Ireland, western Scotland sunnier spots this morning

:20:10.:20:12.

and throughout the day. Temperatures in the north-west high land down to

:20:13.:20:16.

minus ten through the night. It is rain and drizzle round the coast,

:20:17.:20:20.

sleet and snowover land. Same for northern England. A coating of snow

:20:21.:20:25.

in the Pennines and Peak District. It will be mainly sleet and snow for

:20:26.:20:29.

eastern wails, and the south-west, as well as the far south-east, Kent,

:20:30.:20:35.

Suffolk and Sussex, that will give a further coating of snow. For most it

:20:36.:20:40.

will turn back to rain through the day. Temperatures will rise a bit

:20:41.:20:43.

and as I said some of that snow will melt, not causing much in the way of

:20:44.:20:50.

problems. Still snow on the hills, Scotland and Northern Ireland still

:20:51.:20:53.

have the sunshine, a cold day in store. It won't feel above freezing

:20:54.:21:01.

because of the wind. It is is the layers needed. A few flakes the of

:21:02.:21:06.

snow will continue through the night. Mainly over the hills. There

:21:07.:21:11.

will be some to lower level, the wint continuing to strengthen.

:21:12.:21:16.

Touching gale force in some parts. Lightest winds in northern Scotland.

:21:17.:21:19.

The best chance of frost into Sunday morning. Not as much sunshine

:21:20.:21:22.

tomorrow, same too for Northern Ireland, compared with today. It is

:21:23.:21:26.

a cloudy day, maybe more brightens in the south, for most it is another

:21:27.:21:31.

grey day, a wind away day, bringing in further patchy rain, sleet and

:21:32.:21:36.

snow, and it will make it feel even colder probably than today, given

:21:37.:21:39.

the winds will be that bit stronger. If it is too much for you just have

:21:40.:21:44.

a bit of faith because things are set to get that bit milder. If you

:21:45.:21:49.

get a bit of sunshine to go with that, compared to what we have that

:21:50.:22:02.

will feel like spring. We will have a look at The Papers

:22:03.:22:04.

now. David Davies, Former Chief Executive

:22:05.:22:11.

of the Football Association is here to tell us what's

:22:12.:22:13.

caught his eye. You picked out some of your stories

:22:14.:22:27.

for us. We have had had NHS week, stories highlighted and that is

:22:28.:22:32.

where you started. Yes, you would be a Health Secretary in a winter like

:22:33.:22:40.

this one? Queues in the corridor, cancelled appointment, A

:22:41.:22:45.

nightmares, at the centre of it Jeremy Hunt. I think I am right in

:22:46.:22:49.

saying when he was reappointed as Health Secretary he expected to get

:22:50.:22:54.

sacked, when David Cameron left, so perhaps he wishes he was, but here

:22:55.:23:00.

we have in a number of The Papers NHS crisis is completely

:23:01.:23:06.

unacceptable, he says. And the Daily Mirror says the man responsible. The

:23:07.:23:12.

problem is everyone is as ever looking for blame, but the, I regret

:23:13.:23:18.

to say that the problems of the NHS and the problems of an ageing

:23:19.:23:21.

population and what comes with it, has been talked about in this

:23:22.:23:28.

country to my knowledge for 20 years, and by successive Governments

:23:29.:23:33.

and it is harsh, blaming him, and him alone. One of the arguments is

:23:34.:23:38.

about perhaps we should be paying more tax, and of course, this is

:23:39.:23:42.

something that the Archbishop of Canterbury is talk take about and

:23:43.:23:46.

saying the rich should be paying more. It's the old problem, should

:23:47.:23:52.

the church ever get involved in politics, wasn't there in a previous

:23:53.:23:57.

generation, many, many generations ago, there was a king who once said

:23:58.:24:02.

will no-one rid me of this troublesome priest? That was about

:24:03.:24:08.

Thomas a Beckett. This goes on in our society, the Archbishop of

:24:09.:24:13.

Canterbury stoking a fresh row, the Daily Mail tells us as he called for

:24:14.:24:18.

the rich to pay more tax, inevitably he is saying some people will have

:24:19.:24:22.

to pay more in the future and then the, they go to the Tory MP, in this

:24:23.:24:29.

case Philip Davies, who says if Mr Well by wants to volunteer to pay

:24:30.:24:35.

more income tax he can send his cheque to HMRC and they will be

:24:36.:24:39.

pleased. That is what they always say, that debate has gone on. My own

:24:40.:24:44.

view is the church is damned if it gets involved and it is called

:24:45.:24:48.

irrelevant if it doesn't. The next story you will choose, those are two

:24:49.:24:55.

things we talked about so far, huge, sometimes people feel powerless to

:24:56.:24:58.

affect, the NHS and religion, this is one that is every day life. Life.

:24:59.:25:03.

Little things that can make a big difference. I have to declare an

:25:04.:25:07.

interest about this story, because not very long ago, for the first

:25:08.:25:13.

time in my life, somebody offered to stand up for me, o on the tube, and

:25:14.:25:19.

they obviously took pity on me, and in, at my age, and I didn't know

:25:20.:25:25.

whether to laugh or cry. I wanted to say thank you, thank you, but it's a

:25:26.:25:31.

sign of the time. This, if there a pregnant woman onboard who is the

:25:32.:25:37.

most likely to get up? Women are less likely, they pretend not to

:25:38.:25:42.

notice an expectant mother. The younger generation are more

:25:43.:25:45.

considerate of elderly or pregnant passengers than their older

:25:46.:25:48.

counterparts. Now that doesn't surprise me, some of the rudeness

:25:49.:25:53.

that I see from dare I is a my own generation, on tube trains is far

:25:54.:25:56.

greater than anything I ever see from the young. It is that classic

:25:57.:26:00.

isn't it, where a pregnant lady will get on and everyone, you know, looks

:26:01.:26:06.

to the floor, that annoys me. I have to say on buses and tubes, I often

:26:07.:26:12.

think I see the opposite, which like to think, I see it a, a lot of

:26:13.:26:17.

people being much more engaged and offering up more often. Do you see

:26:18.:26:21.

the opposite? Yes I see a lot of that. There is a conclusion guys,

:26:22.:26:24.

that is really good news for everybody. The conclusion of this, I

:26:25.:26:29.

think it is an Italian, this survey has been done, it has been done in

:26:30.:26:36.

the UK as well, and around 97% of Brits, consider themselves to be

:26:37.:26:42.

nice people. Well that is OK. What is your definition of Nice? OK. Did

:26:43.:26:46.

you take the seat when it was offered to me. I didn't because I

:26:47.:26:51.

was only one station away, if I had been 21 stations, well I probably

:26:52.:26:54.

would have done. And you are perfectly fine I am not bad. Do you

:26:55.:27:00.

want to take a moment to address the issues of the FA this week? Maybe

:27:01.:27:06.

people don't know the ins and outs are thinking we have a butch of --

:27:07.:27:12.

bunch of MPs having a go at an organisation, and where does this

:27:13.:27:16.

get us? That, what you are talking about is precisely the problem, the

:27:17.:27:23.

problem of perception, -- perception. People say whue should

:27:24.:27:28.

fans bother about the governance of the FA? It does matter, because the

:27:29.:27:33.

whole question is, there are no agreed priority, you can't tell me

:27:34.:27:37.

what the agreed priorities of English football are today. I can't

:27:38.:27:40.

tell you either. You would hope it is to run the FA in... Hang on.

:27:41.:27:47.

There aren't any agreed priorities because people come from the Premier

:27:48.:27:51.

League which has priority, the FA has its priority, the Football

:27:52.:27:55.

League has its priorities, there is no one way of governing one agreed

:27:56.:27:59.

set of priorities for the English game as a whole. That is part and

:28:00.:28:06.

parcel, because there is not enough independence, there are not enough

:28:07.:28:08.

women, there are not enough representatives of the society in

:28:09.:28:12.

which we live. So what is the point of them? Hang hang on a minute, the

:28:13.:28:17.

point of them is there are, thousands, hundreds of thousands of

:28:18.:28:21.

good people doing wonderful work, welcome back the FA, week in, week

:28:22.:28:27.

out, running football in the park, running women's teams, developing,

:28:28.:28:32.

but the corporate governance, what we expect, from corporate governance

:28:33.:28:36.

in business in this society, we don't see. So just help us with this

:28:37.:28:41.

one, so this group of 60 plus... People like me. White middle aged

:28:42.:28:47.

men, who run the FA, they get threatened with what is it, ?30

:28:48.:28:51.

million you might lose, do you honestly think that that will make

:28:52.:28:54.

them think, for a second? And of course what you will say is that is

:28:55.:29:00.

a third of the cost of Manchester United's signing Paul Pogba from

:29:01.:29:04.

Juventus or where ever. And that is, I absolutely take that point, but

:29:05.:29:10.

that money is football development, at the grass roots, and that is very

:29:11.:29:13.

important, and that money will have to come from somewhere else, by the

:29:14.:29:18.

way, presumably, you would think the Premier League, but that will be a

:29:19.:29:23.

debate within football, but the Government does have other weapons

:29:24.:29:27.

of course, and for example, nobody could ever successfully bid for a

:29:28.:29:33.

World Cup, without the support of its Government and this Government

:29:34.:29:37.

is saying, we will not do that, unless and until the FA reforms

:29:38.:29:41.

itself. That is punishing the wrong teem isn't it. That is the whole

:29:42.:29:46.

point. You have to ask whose fault that is. I have confidence that this

:29:47.:29:51.

time we have created, we are creating an atmosphere where change

:29:52.:29:55.

will come from within, and the existing chairman, is confidence

:29:56.:29:57.

that he can -- confident he can pull it through. On that note we will

:29:58.:30:02.

stop and you will come back in an hour's time.

:30:03.:30:06.

Still to come this morning. Make cycling safer, that is the call

:30:07.:30:11.

from campaigners in London after three riders were killed in the past

:30:12.:30:15.

four days on the dam's roads. We will talk about that in a few

:30:16.:30:18.

minutes time and headlines in a moment.

:30:19.:30:51.

Hello, this is Breakfast with Charlie Stayt and Steph McGovern.

:30:52.:30:56.

Matt will have the weather and Mike will have the sport. Now a summary

:30:57.:30:59.

of the morning's main news. A ?20 million drive to find

:31:00.:31:03.

the future experts capable of defending Britain

:31:04.:31:05.

from cyber-attacks has been Thousands of schoolchildren

:31:06.:31:07.

in England will learn about cyber security in lessons -

:31:08.:31:10.

after a Commons committee highlighted a skills shortage

:31:11.:31:12.

and labelled our current handling Donald Trump has said he may rewrite

:31:13.:31:14.

the presidential order imposing restrictions on travel to the US

:31:15.:31:19.

in a bid overcome legal obstacles which have

:31:20.:31:22.

frustrated his efforts so far. The President unveiled the ban

:31:23.:31:27.

at the end of his first week in office, barring entry

:31:28.:31:30.

to travellers from Earlier this week an appeals court

:31:31.:31:31.

upheld the suspension The case may now proceed

:31:32.:31:36.

to the Supreme Court. The funding of parks has reached

:31:37.:31:43.

a tipping point and new ways of paying for them may have

:31:44.:31:46.

to be found. That's according to

:31:47.:31:48.

the Commons Communities and Local Government Committee

:31:49.:31:50.

which says parks are suffering It warns there's a danger of a

:31:51.:31:51.

return to the neglect of the 1980s. Labour has issued formal warnings

:31:52.:32:00.

to members of its front-bench team who disobeyed Jeremy Corbyn's order

:32:01.:32:03.

to vote for Brexit. Among those who ignored Mr Corbyn

:32:04.:32:08.

were 11 shadow junior ministers Those are the main stories this

:32:09.:32:35.

morning. Now look at the sport. The song Delilah has been played to the

:32:36.:32:41.

England players by Eddie Jones in the gym. He is a famous Welsh

:32:42.:32:48.

singer. It is mind games. How does that work? Did Eddie Jones' first

:32:49.:32:54.

trip as England coach. He has been full of mind games and he has got

:32:55.:32:59.

his wish, the roof will be open for this one and history tells us that

:33:00.:33:06.

England have won four out of five matches with the roof open in

:33:07.:33:11.

Cardiff. Whales wanted it shut -- Wales wanted it shut for the

:33:12.:33:20.

atmosphere. Both camps have been telling us how they have prepared.

:33:21.:33:26.

Tom Jones is out of my error. The players were not too happy hearing

:33:27.:33:35.

Delilah in the gym. It is not a hit they are happy with. They would

:33:36.:33:39.

prefer songs of the moment. That we have looked at something that we can

:33:40.:33:46.

control and that is all we can do. Standing in the doorway and the

:33:47.:33:49.

doorway gets little bit smaller. You come out and there are 75,000 fans.

:33:50.:33:55.

We hope it will be a good 80 minute game. You realise we are in a very

:33:56.:34:00.

fortunate place. You get to enjoy the anthem before. Hopefully we can

:34:01.:34:07.

put some smiles on faces. The build-up starts on BBC One at

:34:08.:34:10.

4:15pm. Ireland will be hoping to bounce

:34:11.:34:12.

back from their surprise defeat They face Italy in Rome in the early

:34:13.:34:14.

game, while Scotland are in Paris History was made in the Premier

:34:15.:34:30.

League as Tom Varndell became the all-time try scorer, he scored his

:34:31.:34:38.

91st Premiership try to take him beyond Mark Cueto's record.

:34:39.:34:42.

A last gasp penalty from, Rhys Priestland, gave third place

:34:43.:34:45.

Bath, a one point victory over Northampton.

:34:46.:34:46.

Elsewhere Sale Sharks beat Newcastle.

:34:47.:34:48.

Scarlets moved into the top four, of the Pro 12,

:34:49.:34:50.

Tom Williams scored one of their two tries.

:34:51.:34:53.

The top two of Munster, and Ospreys, both won, and so did Ulster.

:34:54.:34:58.

On to football. The big news tonight, I was walking across the

:34:59.:35:09.

park and two big men said, he's gone, he's gone back into work! I

:35:10.:35:15.

thought was it Mark Wolverton? But there is confusion now. Here is down

:35:16.:35:28.

macro -- Dan. I don't think he will be in charge this weekend. We are

:35:29.:35:36.

going to try to get to the bottom of that today. We have a nice piece on

:35:37.:35:42.

Scottish football. Neil Lennon will be talking to us. There is the first

:35:43.:35:46.

Edinburgh derby for Neil Lennon since he took over. There trying to

:35:47.:35:50.

get to the bottom of the Mark Waugh button issue in Scotland. And we

:35:51.:35:55.

also have a fascinating interview with Henrik Mick tarry in. He was

:35:56.:36:05.

not played by Jose Mourinho. The Qatari -- we will ask what it is

:36:06.:36:11.

like to arrive with that price tag. His attitude is a very interesting

:36:12.:36:15.

one will stop here is a bit of the interview. If I was 22, 23 years old

:36:16.:36:23.

when I came to Manchester, I would suffer, maybe I would have many

:36:24.:36:27.

problems, because I would take things very seriously. If I wouldn't

:36:28.:36:32.

play, I be would sad, I would be mad. Maybe I wouldn't talk to my

:36:33.:36:37.

friends or my family. But I said this is life. If you just smile to

:36:38.:36:44.

your life, the world will smile too. I just kept smiling and working and

:36:45.:36:50.

now I am happy. It is fascinating because he did not arrive with a

:36:51.:36:54.

fanfare of Zlatan Ibrahimovic, he was almost under the radar. I think

:36:55.:37:00.

that is at Mike Bushell attitude! Just smile and things will be OK.

:37:01.:37:06.

Have you seen Mike's mining peace? There was not a lot of smiling

:37:07.:37:16.

there. I do noisy scared. If you have no idea what we are talking

:37:17.:37:20.

about, Mike has been down a mine. We will see that in a moment. We have

:37:21.:37:26.

an interview with Paul Clement who arrived at Swansea in the bottom

:37:27.:37:29.

three and when he arrived everyone said he has Championship experience,

:37:30.:37:35.

he must be prepared for going down. He is manager of the month and has

:37:36.:37:40.

turned things around. I know you played Ian Wright's clip last night

:37:41.:37:48.

saying is this the final season for Arsene Wenger? So we have that as

:37:49.:37:53.

well. And also Danny Mills and Martin Keown to discuss that from 12

:37:54.:38:00.

o'clock on BBC One. It will be the full 60 minutes. You go and get

:38:01.:38:06.

ready. Sheffield Wednesday are on course to reach the play-offs in the

:38:07.:38:10.

Championship after beating Birmingham city and their spending

:38:11.:38:13.

in the transfer window is paying off already.

:38:14.:38:28.

That's new boy Jordan Rhodes, after just nine minutes,

:38:29.:38:30.

A special moment as he went off to celebrate with his dad

:38:31.:38:34.

Further goals from another signing Sam Winnall,

:38:35.:38:36.

Leigh's, return to rugby league's Super League,

:38:37.:38:39.

got off to a disappointing start, as they were taught

:38:40.:38:42.

The Tigers ran in seven trys including this

:38:43.:38:45.

Elsewhere, Huddersfield Giants beat Widnes 28-16.

:38:46.:38:49.

Barry Hawkins is into the final of snooker's,

:38:50.:38:53.

Barry Hawkins is into the final of snooker's

:38:54.:38:55.

He eased past Liang Wenbo of China 6-1 - finishing in style

:38:56.:38:59.

He'll now face either Marco Fu or Ryan Day on Sunday.

:39:00.:39:02.

What we were talking about was that Snowdonia has been building itself

:39:03.:39:11.

as a centre for adventure sports. There is the fastest zip wire and a

:39:12.:39:18.

surfing lake and now former slate mines have been brought back to life

:39:19.:39:22.

to add a huge adrenaline rush to history lessons. I don't think I

:39:23.:39:26.

have ever been as scared as when I joined a school party in the vast

:39:27.:39:28.

case at Blaenau Ffestiniog. Beneath this sci-fi landscape, there

:39:29.:39:41.

is an industrial world waiting to be discovered again. Another of 300

:39:42.:39:47.

tunnels and caverns, 24 stories deep. Former slate mines to be

:39:48.:39:52.

explored using climbing skills and zip wires, giving you an insight

:39:53.:39:56.

into the life of a minor 200 feet the rock face. Tell me this is not

:39:57.:40:03.

real, that this is a horrible dream? There are staples hammered into the

:40:04.:40:08.

rock. Of course, your faith due to a harness and special clips which

:40:09.:40:11.

cannot be unhooked at the same time but your mind paralyse is you with

:40:12.:40:15.

fear. I am on a wooden plank 100 feet in the air across an old

:40:16.:40:22.

quarry! See you later. What is incredible as when you stop for a

:40:23.:40:25.

moment and look down and look around and realise this is where people

:40:26.:40:29.

work! How terrifying must that have been? Some forced to work here were

:40:30.:40:36.

as young as six years old. When I first came here I learned what the

:40:37.:40:40.

miners had to do with the tools. We have a great safety system but they

:40:41.:40:44.

just used chains around their legs and hang on the edge of the war. It

:40:45.:40:47.

is crazy that they would do that for 12 hours a day in the pitch black.

:40:48.:40:53.

Erol worked on the open minds here until the 1970s but now he is back

:40:54.:40:58.

working as a safety inspector. It has given them a new lease of life.

:40:59.:41:06.

It brings people and money in. There is a saying that line-up is been

:41:07.:41:09.

York ruled the world so we are very proud of the culture and we have

:41:10.:41:14.

embraced that culture -- Plan A demurred ruled the world. Once it

:41:15.:41:18.

had the training it is up to you to get around the three-hour course.

:41:19.:41:24.

Once you have conquered the fears in your head, it starts to become more

:41:25.:41:29.

enjoyable now. The sensation when you have achieved it is outstanding.

:41:30.:41:34.

You learn more about yourself than you do looking at your iPhone. The

:41:35.:41:40.

ten and 11-year-old school pupils took it in their stride. Having seen

:41:41.:41:47.

one lad fall of the monkey bars 200 feet up... It was really scary, I

:41:48.:41:53.

thought I would fall. I gave it a miss heading for the final heart

:41:54.:41:57.

stopping challenge. This is the stairway to heaven.

:41:58.:42:08.

And they say the steepest zip wire -- and they saved the steepest zip

:42:09.:42:22.

wire to last. Some people do this everyday! Mad! What is it about fear

:42:23.:42:27.

that it gets worse with age? I did not think I was scared of heights

:42:28.:42:33.

and to that. There are vast caverns, 24 stories of them. And the

:42:34.:42:39.

darkness. It is an amazing place to bring back to life.

:42:40.:42:46.

And the youngsters on the trip are learning as well? Once you have had

:42:47.:42:50.

your training, you have three hours to get yourself around. You are

:42:51.:42:53.

responsible for your own safety. You can go to the website for more

:42:54.:42:58.

places to go. I can't believe you have finally found something you are

:42:59.:43:00.

scared of! Oh, yes! Your heating bills are likely to go

:43:01.:43:11.

this year because the three big gas and electricity suppliers have

:43:12.:43:17.

announced price rises. British Gas has announced its customers will

:43:18.:43:22.

have prices frozen until August. We can talk to Paul Lillis, the

:43:23.:43:28.

presenter of Radio 4's money box programme. -- Paul Lewis.

:43:29.:43:36.

It is announce the big companies are putting up their prices? Last year

:43:37.:43:42.

they announced a fall but now they are going up. That is partly because

:43:43.:43:48.

the wholesale price is going up. But also they are blaming government

:43:49.:43:53.

schemes, that schemes to help with installation costs and also this ?11

:43:54.:43:58.

billion programme of changing every metre to what they call a smart

:43:59.:44:04.

meter. That is adding costs. The Scottish Government have said a

:44:05.:44:10.

third of the rise is due to government schemes -- ScottishPower

:44:11.:44:14.

have said. It can be tricky to work out what it means to you. Can you

:44:15.:44:19.

give us an update of what it might mean in terms of pounds in the

:44:20.:44:31.

pocket? The problem is it is all about averages. Npower says about

:44:32.:44:37.

?109 a year on top of what you pay now. ScottishPower says about 80 odd

:44:38.:44:42.

pounds on top of what you pay now. But that is a typical person who

:44:43.:44:49.

takes gas and electricity and uses an average amount. Because

:44:50.:44:53.

electricity is going up more than gas, if you just use electricity,

:44:54.:44:56.

then your average prices will go up a lot more. And if you are a small

:44:57.:45:03.

user, although the pound's rise will be less, the percentage rise will

:45:04.:45:08.

actually be more with some of these rises. So it is complicated but they

:45:09.:45:11.

are going up basically. British Gas is frozen. SSE and E.On are also

:45:12.:45:19.

frozen for now. That may end in March. British Gas says it will end

:45:20.:45:25.

in August. And what about those on prepayment meters? They often get

:45:26.:45:29.

the worst deal? They do but Ofgem the regulator says they are paying

:45:30.:45:32.

pretty much the same as everyone else. It means lower bills for

:45:33.:45:39.

people prepaid gas users but for electricity users only they could

:45:40.:45:42.

actually see a slight rise because the cap has been fixed a bit above

:45:43.:45:46.

what many are paying now. At least it will protect them in future. It

:45:47.:45:52.

is an interesting development that the prepay meters, the price will be

:45:53.:45:56.

capped and it will change every few months. The cap will be there for

:45:57.:46:01.

2020. I think prepayment people are getting a fairer deal than they used

:46:02.:46:07.

to. Thank you, that is Paul Lillis from Moneybox on Radio 4 at midday

:46:08.:46:16.

today. -- that is Paul Lewis. Now Matt has got the weather.

:46:17.:46:23.

Hello. Even though the temperatures are not unusually low, the

:46:24.:46:30.

wind-chill will affect things. This was a scene taken earlier by one of

:46:31.:46:35.

our Weather Watchers. A familiar shop for many with a dusting of snow

:46:36.:46:45.

here and there. The sum it is greying damp but others have a sunny

:46:46.:46:59.

day -- for some it is grey and damp. In Scotland you will have to get on

:47:00.:47:02.

to the hills to see the snow falling. Further south are some

:47:03.:47:11.

coatings of snow. In the west it will turn to rain and drizzle.

:47:12.:47:17.

Inland the temperatures are starting to rise. Snow will continue over the

:47:18.:47:21.

higher ground for many. For most it will be patchy rain and drizzle. The

:47:22.:47:33.

wind is picking up. The winds will knock the temperatures right down. A

:47:34.:47:40.

cold day in store. A chilly night come tonight. Frost in the far north

:47:41.:47:47.

of Scotland. Most will see generally cloudy conditions. A little bit icy.

:47:48.:47:52.

Patchy rain and drizzle continues. Particularly for England and whales.

:47:53.:48:01.

Temperatures just above freezing. -- for England and Wales. The brightest

:48:02.:48:06.

conditions in northern Scotland and Northern Ireland. Maybe bright

:48:07.:48:12.

across southern counties of England and Wales. Snow over the higher

:48:13.:48:20.

ground. Nothing hugely significant and an added wind-chill your day. If

:48:21.:48:25.

you are cranking the heating up this weekend you may be able to step back

:48:26.:48:30.

next week because there will be some sunshine back in the country on

:48:31.:48:34.

Monday and Tuesday. Temperatures climbing back into double figures

:48:35.:48:37.

and heading higher still as we go into Wednesday.

:48:38.:48:43.

Can I ask, I am distracted by your tie, what is on it? It is flowers.

:48:44.:48:55.

When you say distracted... I am not criticising it! That is a nice Thai!

:48:56.:48:59.

He is smiling but he is offended! We have all found good reasons to

:49:00.:49:15.

take a trip to our local park but it can be difficult. Council budgets

:49:16.:49:18.

and pressures to find land for housing means parks are facing a

:49:19.:49:23.

period of decline. MPs say there needs to be a fundamental change to

:49:24.:49:26.

the way they are managed. What have parks ever done for us? We

:49:27.:49:42.

have taken up tennis. It feels wild even though we are in the centre of

:49:43.:49:49.

London. Disclosed to our house. It is somewhere to take the children.

:49:50.:49:55.

There is a cafe over there. The crucial question surrounds their

:49:56.:50:00.

value and the cost. For the past six months, a committee of MPs has been

:50:01.:50:03.

asking the question and listening to the answers. It found with council

:50:04.:50:08.

budgets so tight, many local parks are at a tipping point. What of

:50:09.:50:13.

their viability, what of the future? How can they be saved?

:50:14.:50:21.

Instead of regarding parks is only a leisure and recreation area

:50:22.:50:24.

of service, we should be thinking about parks as the contributors to

:50:25.:50:27.

public health and to environmental policy and to community cohesion.

:50:28.:50:29.

And maybe they can be re-prioritised.

:50:30.:50:35.

But there is a fundamental problem about the level of cuts that local

:50:36.:50:39.

We started to do some work and eventually created

:50:40.:50:42.

We have planted 60,000 trees to encourage flora and fauna.

:50:43.:50:48.

The innovation started here on the edge of the Pennines,

:50:49.:50:50.

It's vital for the community to have this sort of open space.

:50:51.:50:57.

If it's looked after and maintained, it's for their benefit.

:50:58.:51:00.

As well as the nature reserve there is a community garden

:51:01.:51:03.

It is the result of partnerships between the council,

:51:04.:51:07.

the charity Groundwork and local volunteers.

:51:08.:51:10.

A model example of how public green spaces can

:51:11.:51:13.

It was a redundant piece of land, fly tipping and things like that,

:51:14.:51:21.

from that, we were able to create this community garden and help out

:51:22.:51:24.

with adding some elements to the sports pitch.

:51:25.:51:31.

It helped the group service the community a lot more,

:51:32.:51:37.

and more and more people could get involved with that.

:51:38.:51:39.

Long-term it is a cost saving to the council,

:51:40.:51:42.

but the councils have to be responsible

:51:43.:51:43.

The MPs are calling on the government and local

:51:44.:51:52.

authorities to ensure they have strategic plans in place

:51:53.:51:54.

for these emeralds, these green jewels in the crown.

:51:55.:51:56.

They believe parks must remain publicly owned,

:51:57.:51:58.

From flood management to healthy living to biodiversity of wildlife,

:51:59.:52:05.

our parks and green spaces can be the lungs and the heart

:52:06.:52:10.

Watching that with us here, Helen Griffiths is the chief executive of

:52:11.:52:31.

a charity which seeks to preserve open spaces and a member of

:52:32.:52:36.

residents group. People really care about their open spaces. Marina,

:52:37.:52:40.

your group which you set up, because you are in a place where there

:52:41.:52:45.

wasn't much outdoor space and as you explain it to us, maybe we can see

:52:46.:52:49.

the before and after shots which will really illustrate it. Tell us

:52:50.:52:55.

what you had. This is the before shot. It was a disused landlocked

:52:56.:53:01.

council garage site. The houses back all round it. A few houses back onto

:53:02.:53:05.

it and they have gates onto the site now. Residents got together and

:53:06.:53:10.

thought there has to be something we can do with this. It was just being

:53:11.:53:17.

used for fly-tipping and kids congregating. We came up with some

:53:18.:53:21.

ideas and started raising some funding and put things in place. Now

:53:22.:53:27.

it is a well used site for all ages. We have a new group coming from a

:53:28.:53:32.

nursery, from three-year-old up to eight-year-olds. You have vegetable

:53:33.:53:39.

plots as well. We do vegetables, fruit trees, flowers. There are

:53:40.:53:43.

seating areas and a barbecue on site. It is just a well used site.

:53:44.:53:52.

That is really transformed. It must have taken a lot of dedication? We

:53:53.:53:55.

are all really passionate and proud of what we have achieved. We have

:53:56.:53:58.

had school groups who have come on site and done things and then they

:53:59.:54:03.

have gone and done things on their own sites in schools. The Cubs,

:54:04.:54:10.

scouts, everyone uses it. Everyone is saying it is extraordinary. But

:54:11.:54:18.

Nina, the bad parts of the story, reading the figures, some park

:54:19.:54:24.

management funds are being cut up to 97%? Absolutely. The story bit

:54:25.:54:28.

marina told about the fantastic transformation of the site and the

:54:29.:54:32.

way it plays into the community, it is one of the most universal public

:54:33.:54:37.

services to have access to green space from cradle to grave.

:54:38.:54:43.

Unfortunately, local authorities are suffering a terribly challenging

:54:44.:54:47.

time in being able to continue to maintain those spaces, because of

:54:48.:54:51.

the levels of cuts they have experienced over the past few years.

:54:52.:54:57.

And unfortunately, the cuts which are projected to continue. A report

:54:58.:55:00.

says parks are at a tipping point and they really are. Is there

:55:01.:55:07.

anything that can be done which does not involve money? Are there other

:55:08.:55:14.

ways communities can help? There are range of solutions. The

:55:15.:55:17.

recommendation from the report are really welcomed. We are starting to

:55:18.:55:22.

understand the value of our parks. This should go beyond the cost of

:55:23.:55:25.

cutting the grass. We should consider the impacts on all the

:55:26.:55:30.

health and social agendas they can help us to achieve in tackling

:55:31.:55:34.

obesity, anti-social behaviour. I think there is a lot of work to do

:55:35.:55:38.

to revalue and protect those spaces which is the work my organisation

:55:39.:55:43.

has done for along time, to safeguard for future generations

:55:44.:55:47.

access to green spaces. Once they have been developed they are never

:55:48.:55:51.

coming back into recreational use. In terms of funding, I do think and

:55:52.:55:56.

as the report recommends, we are going to need innovative solutions,

:55:57.:56:00.

which will involve community groups like Marina Pospelova and involved

:56:01.:56:04.

and taking some sort of ownership over the site to help with

:56:05.:56:10.

contributing to the ongoing maintenance of that. That low and

:56:11.:56:15.

was council loans so when you first put the idea that there was -- that

:56:16.:56:27.

land was council owned. First we approached the residents to make

:56:28.:56:30.

sure they were OK with the idea and then we went to our council office.

:56:31.:56:37.

They put ?15,000 into it. I applied for lottery funding and after the

:56:38.:56:47.

site was built we approached the local school because we knew the

:56:48.:56:50.

schoolchildren would come on site and they funded us for the big poly-

:56:51.:56:56.

tunnel we now have. It has really helped the children in the area. It

:56:57.:57:02.

can help with other areas of your life, obesity and things like that,

:57:03.:57:06.

have you seen it has made a difference in the community? I have

:57:07.:57:11.

found it has brought the community spirit back which was lacking in the

:57:12.:57:15.

area. More of the elderly will come out. They will fit on the benches,

:57:16.:57:20.

chat and go, that five minutes of being in the fresh air rather than

:57:21.:57:24.

looking at four walls has changed things. We have seen the pictures,

:57:25.:57:32.

it is a complete transformation from what was a derelict area. If your

:57:33.:57:36.

local park is a bit rubbish, people say it is looking rundown, if people

:57:37.:57:41.

go to their local authority and they say they haven't got any money, what

:57:42.:57:47.

happens next? I think it is a really difficult challenge. One of the

:57:48.:57:51.

challenges in having the parks in the state of decline in demise is it

:57:52.:57:56.

threatens the future so much more. If a space is not being well used by

:57:57.:58:01.

the community, the likelihood of being redeveloped for other

:58:02.:58:05.

purposes, it becomes much more likely. I think finding ways for us

:58:06.:58:10.

to collectively address the issue, and that is the approach we need to

:58:11.:58:15.

take, because parks do play such a role in all those different areas.

:58:16.:58:19.

We need to not be looking solely at the Parc's maintenance budget when

:58:20.:58:23.

we look at how parks are funded and how they contributed. We have been

:58:24.:58:29.

asking people to send in their park pictures so let's have a look at

:58:30.:58:36.

some which were sent in. This caught our eye, a beautiful sunrise. It was

:58:37.:58:44.

snapped by Vince. This is Django the springer spaniel doing what he does

:58:45.:58:53.

best! This park is in London. It is funny, sometimes the parks in big

:58:54.:58:58.

cities can be the best maintained in some circumstances. 61% of park

:58:59.:59:10.

users are in urban areas. This is Woodford Park in Berkshire, it is

:59:11.:59:13.

the same picture again, where is this one from Rita? This one is used

:59:14.:59:24.

for sports. It is not just sitting around, they are used for practical

:59:25.:59:36.

uses as well. And this is in Preston. Ben is heading to his 99th

:59:37.:59:43.

park run. That makes a difference as well. Absolutely. We want to come

:59:44.:59:52.

for a visit to your park now! You are welcome any time!

:59:53.:59:54.

You're watching Breakfast from BBC News.

:59:55.:59:56.

Hello, this is Breakfast, with Charlie Stayt and Steph McGovern.

:59:57.:00:27.

The latest weapon in the war against hackers -

:00:28.:00:29.

the Government funds lessons in cyber security for teenagers.

:00:30.:00:32.

It's hoped they'll become the experts of the future

:00:33.:00:34.

and protect Britain from online attacks.

:00:35.:00:53.

Good morning it's Saturday, 11th February.

:00:54.:00:54.

President Trump says he may issue a new order authorising a travel ban

:00:55.:00:57.

after his old one was blocked by the courts.

:00:58.:01:02.

Parks under threat - a new report says funding has

:01:03.:01:04.

reached a tipping point and new ways of paying for them need to be found.

:01:05.:01:10.

The latest on the battle to save hundreds of whales stranded

:01:11.:01:13.

And in sport - it's one of the biggest tests yet,

:01:14.:01:18.

It's a first trip to Cardiff, for their coach Eddie Jones,

:01:19.:01:21.

and Wales are banking on home advantage to take them

:01:22.:01:24.

Good morning, a cold feeling day out there for all of us today.

:01:25.:01:33.

For some a little bit of snow to begin with, giving a coating

:01:34.:01:36.

in places but for many some of that snow will turn back to rain,

:01:37.:01:39.

all the details coming up in 15 minutes.

:01:40.:01:41.

The government is to fund lessons in cyber security to encourage

:01:42.:01:47.

teenagers to pursue a career in defending Britain

:01:48.:01:49.

It's hoped that thousands of pupils in England will spend up to four

:01:50.:01:53.

hours a week on the subject, over the next five years.

:01:54.:01:56.

Here's our home affairs Correspondent Tom Symonds.

:01:57.:02:02.

Daniel Kelly's a convicted teenage hacker, facing a jail sentence.

:02:03.:02:05.

In 2015, he took part in the massive digital break-in

:02:06.:02:07.

But what if his potential had been harnessed at an earlier age?

:02:08.:02:14.

He might have ended up joining a new breed of apprentices learning

:02:15.:02:22.

the cyber security trade like these at BT's headquarters.

:02:23.:02:24.

With that in mind, the government is putting up ?20 million,

:02:25.:02:27.

for nearly 6000 schoolchildren aged 14 and above to take four hours

:02:28.:02:30.

of cyber security lessons after school each week.

:02:31.:02:37.

We think that will help seriously with this shortage

:02:38.:02:39.

Now, of course, will always keep it under review,

:02:40.:02:43.

in case this needs to get bigger, but getting it going on that scale,

:02:44.:02:46.

I think shows serious ambition to make sure that we can

:02:47.:02:49.

have the pipeline of talent that we will need in the years ahead.

:02:50.:02:52.

While the police are stepping up the fight, this is not a threat

:02:53.:02:55.

which can be defeated on the ground by raiding the hackers.

:02:56.:02:58.

The cyber crime battlefield will be online and Britain's GCHQ

:02:59.:03:00.

58,000 people are now employed in the growing anti-hacking industry.

:03:01.:03:14.

But more will be needed and the government knows

:03:15.:03:16.

it has to start finding them when they are young.

:03:17.:03:26.

Donald Trump has said he may rewrite the presidential order imposing

:03:27.:03:29.

restrictions on travel to the US to overcome the legal obstacles that

:03:30.:03:32.

His first order - stopping travel from seven mainly-Muslim countries -

:03:33.:03:36.

Our Washington correspondent, David Willis, has more.

:03:37.:03:48.

After a federal appeals court backed a stay of his executive order,

:03:49.:03:51.

Donald Trump vowed he would see his opponents in court.

:03:52.:03:53.

Speaking on Air Force One, en route to his weekend retreat in Florida,

:03:54.:04:00.

the President revealed he was actively weighing

:04:01.:04:02.

But we also have a lot of other options, including just filing

:04:03.:04:07.

We need speed, for reasons of security, so it could very

:04:08.:04:19.

Unveiled at the end of a frantic first week in office,

:04:20.:04:23.

the original order suspended America's refugee programme

:04:24.:04:25.

and banned travellers from seven majority Muslim nations

:04:26.:04:27.

It caused chaos at airports and sparked protests

:04:28.:04:33.

Quite how the White House might rewrite the order isn't clear,

:04:34.:04:37.

although lawyers would almost certainly have to address the claim

:04:38.:04:43.

that in its existing form, the order is unconstitutional,

:04:44.:04:46.

in that it blocks entry to the United States

:04:47.:04:49.

Mr Trump has continued to insist that tough immigration

:04:50.:04:52.

measures are crucial to America's national security.

:04:53.:04:54.

The funding of parks has reached a tipping point and new ways

:04:55.:05:02.

of paying for them may have to be found.

:05:03.:05:04.

That's according to the Commons Communities

:05:05.:05:06.

and Local Government Committee which says parks are suffering

:05:07.:05:08.

It warns there's a danger of a return to the neglect of the 1980s.

:05:09.:05:14.

It warns there's a danger of a return to the neglect of the 1980s.

:05:15.:05:19.

Instead of kind of regarding parks as a kind of only a leisure

:05:20.:05:22.

and recreation area of service, we should be thinking about parks

:05:23.:05:25.

as big contributors to public health, and to environmental policy

:05:26.:05:27.

and to community cohesion, and maybe they can be reprioritised.

:05:28.:05:33.

But there is fundamentally a problem about the level of cuts that local

:05:34.:05:37.

authorities have been experiencing, the distribution of the cuts

:05:38.:05:38.

across the country and the very, very difficult decisions that many

:05:39.:05:41.

local authorities are having to make.

:05:42.:05:48.

Labour has issued formal warnings to members of its front-bench team

:05:49.:05:51.

who disobeyed Jeremy Corbyn's order to vote for Brexit.

:05:52.:05:53.

Among those who ignored Mr Corbyn were eleven shadow junior ministers

:05:54.:05:57.

A 16-year-old boy has died after he was stabbed

:05:58.:06:05.

The wounded teenager was taken from the Harehills area

:06:06.:06:08.

to hospital for treatment, but died a short time later.

:06:09.:06:11.

A 15-year-old boy has been arrested on suspicion of murder.

:06:12.:06:17.

The decision to end a scheme to let unaccompanied refugee children

:06:18.:06:19.

into the UK is shameful according to the Scottish First

:06:20.:06:22.

She's urged the Prime Minister to change her mind saying

:06:23.:06:25.

there is a moral duty to help those in need.

:06:26.:06:28.

The scheme's due to end in March with 350 children being admitted far

:06:29.:06:31.

fewer than some campaigners had hoped for.

:06:32.:06:41.

Volunteers have told Breakfast in the past few hours than 200 more

:06:42.:06:44.

whales have become stranded on a beach in New Zealand.

:06:45.:06:46.

Hundreds more have already died in one of the biggest ever mass

:06:47.:06:49.

It's hoped the pilot whales may be able to swim to safety

:06:50.:06:53.

Just to warn you, you might find some of the scenes in this report

:06:54.:06:58.

As they wait for high tide, volunteers do whatever

:06:59.:07:10.

Pouring water and covering the creatures in cloths helps

:07:11.:07:13.

Temporary measures until the whales can be released into the ocean.

:07:14.:07:22.

Some hope singing will prove soothing.

:07:23.:07:26.

Very quickly, this tide has come racing in, and now we're

:07:27.:07:38.

Some people are up to their waists in water, and we are starting

:07:39.:07:43.

to get a bit of floating, and we're helping assist the whales

:07:44.:07:46.

with their breathing until the water gets deep enough they can swim.

:07:47.:07:48.

It's a devastating image, one of the worst whale strandings

:07:49.:07:51.

It's unclear what brings them en masse onto the beech.

:07:52.:07:55.

Some believe they may be sick or injured, or have

:07:56.:07:57.

Another theory is tht when a single whale is beached it sends

:07:58.:08:01.

out a distress signal, attracting other members of the pod.

:08:02.:08:04.

Once ashore, it is hard to get them back in to the ocean.

:08:05.:08:07.

We worked hard and got those 100 whales off that had survived

:08:08.:08:14.

overnight and we have lost sight of them, but the bad part

:08:15.:08:18.

of the story is a separate pod of 240 whales have come

:08:19.:08:20.

So we have been fighting to keep those ones happy,

:08:21.:09:15.

Hundreds of people from across the world have been competing this

:09:16.:09:17.

week in a sport that combines dancing and flying - indoors.

:09:18.:09:20.

You can compete in pairs, fours or as a solo contestant.

:09:21.:09:24.

You get marks for speed and accuracy.

:09:25.:09:25.

Matt will give us the weekend weather later.

:09:26.:09:30.

The Iraq Historic Allegations Team, which has been investigating claims

:09:31.:09:32.

of abuse by British forces against Iraqi civilians,

:09:33.:09:34.

will be shut down after MPs called the operation an "unmitigated

:09:35.:09:37.

A report yesterday blamed the Ministry of Defence

:09:38.:09:40.

for empowering law firms to bring cases on "an industrial scale", many

:09:41.:09:43.

Earlier Mark Lancaster told us the Government did the right thing in

:09:44.:09:58.

scrapping the unit. IHAT was set up for the right

:09:59.:10:03.

reasons so that our service personnel wouldn't have to go to the

:10:04.:10:06.

international criminal court, but unfortunately in the process, it was

:10:07.:10:09.

abused and that is why the Government took the action it did.

:10:10.:10:17.

We also spoke to Brian Wood who was falsely accused of war crimes in

:10:18.:10:22.

Iraq. I was a young commander at 23 years old, thinking that what I did

:10:23.:10:25.

on the ground was the right thing to do, and the right decisions that I

:10:26.:10:29.

had made. It wasn't perfect but the guys on the ground with me and I, we

:10:30.:10:38.

survived. To get home and to then find out about these allegations, it

:10:39.:10:42.

Joining us now from our London newsroom is John Cooper,

:10:43.:10:45.

a human rights lawyer who has defended armed forces

:10:46.:10:47.

Thank you for your time, it is interesting hearing Brian Wood, one

:10:48.:10:56.

of those accused. What are your thoughts when you hear him talking

:10:57.:11:01.

about the ordeal that he and his colleagues, those who fought, went

:11:02.:11:05.

through. As one who has represented members of the Armed Forces and

:11:06.:11:10.

bereaved members of the armed force, have nothing but sympathy for his

:11:11.:11:14.

experience, it is a very important principle in our democratic country

:11:15.:11:18.

that the same law that applies to civilians must apply to all people.

:11:19.:11:21.

That takes into account an must take into account the stresses of war but

:11:22.:11:26.

that doesn't mean that people don't have the same basic

:11:27.:11:28.

responsibilities. So, as it stands now, do you then have a concern,

:11:29.:11:35.

because of this sequence of events, and Phil Shiner in particular, the

:11:36.:11:39.

attention to what he was doing, how he was going about his business, are

:11:40.:11:43.

you concerned now, that legitimate cases won't get the attention they

:11:44.:11:49.

need? Let me make this clear, I am not here as an apologist for Phil

:11:50.:11:53.

Shiner. The conduct he committed is rightly being kit sighed. Neither am

:11:54.:11:58.

I here as an apologist for the IHAT debacle which I will agree it was,

:11:59.:12:03.

but the point you made is right at the top of this issue, there is

:12:04.:12:08.

still accountability, there must be proper investigation, and the

:12:09.:12:13.

concern is that there won't be. I hope that when allegation are

:12:14.:12:15.

brought against any individual, particularly in this field, they are

:12:16.:12:18.

completely exonerated. But confidence and the perception of

:12:19.:12:23.

justice for all, civilian in this country and the law applying to the

:12:24.:12:26.

same to military personnel means there should be proper

:12:27.:12:28.

investigation, my concern goes this way, that now we are going to have

:12:29.:12:34.

the military invest spating the military, -- investigating. This has

:12:35.:12:40.

been outlawed as crimes in this country are concerns or allegations,

:12:41.:12:43.

but if there are allegation when people have lost their lives in

:12:44.:12:47.

military premises the civilian police have precedence, to ensure

:12:48.:12:51.

that there is independence, what we won't have here is an independent

:12:52.:12:56.

body, IHAT was a disaster, misconceived on many fronts but

:12:57.:13:00.

there is a vacuum and that causes concern for any right minded

:13:01.:13:02.

individual, including members of the Armed Forces. So what do you see as

:13:03.:13:08.

the middle ground then, that can stop the accusation, of not being

:13:09.:13:15.

not enough being done to investigate legitimate claims but at the same

:13:16.:13:16.

time protecting those who shouldn't be investigated? Those are two

:13:17.:13:20.

counter balancing principles which the police day in, day out have to

:13:21.:13:25.

consider the civilian police, in my opinion, the civilian police should

:13:26.:13:28.

have a precedence and conduct of these investigations, now I hear the

:13:29.:13:32.

argument it is difficult to investigate potential crimes that

:13:33.:13:42.

have committed overseas but police officers in this country, skilled

:13:43.:13:42.

police officerings, are doing that day in, day out in fraud

:13:43.:13:43.

investigation, when it comes to investigations overseas involving a

:13:44.:13:48.

death and fatality, we only have to look at the Madeleine McCann

:13:49.:13:52.

incident. We have a track record of police being able to investigate

:13:53.:13:54.

overseas, that is not a problem. So the direct answer to your question

:13:55.:13:58.

is the civilian police should investigate proper allegations, I

:13:59.:14:02.

don't know whether these allegations, the 1500 that remain

:14:03.:14:06.

have credence, what I will say is this, we are already being told the

:14:07.:14:11.

military police will whittle the remaining cases down to about 20.

:14:12.:14:16.

How are they going to do this? It is a rather swift announcement to make,

:14:17.:14:20.

one would hope they have come to that conclusion after carefully

:14:21.:14:23.

considering the 1500, and if they have, and they have whittle it it

:14:24.:14:26.

down to 20, I am please for the members of the Armed Forces and

:14:27.:14:30.

their families but in whittling down 1500 to 20, so quickly, does give me

:14:31.:14:35.

cause for concern as to how deep their inquiry has gone. It is

:14:36.:14:40.

interesting you are talking about the alarm bells and the idea of the

:14:41.:14:42.

military investigating the military. In the same breath and we asked this

:14:43.:14:50.

of Mark Lancaster earlier on, the sign, was enough attention paid to

:14:51.:14:56.

what Phil Shiner was doing? Were through rumours in your profession?

:14:57.:15:00.

It must be a fairly tight Knight group of people, were there rumour,

:15:01.:15:04.

did no-one call it up soon enough as to what was going on? As far as we

:15:05.:15:11.

are concerned no, certainly not. We are all independent practitioners,

:15:12.:15:15.

certainly the bar and the solicitor works within their own firm, there

:15:16.:15:19.

was no concern whatsoever. When they were raised and brought before his

:15:20.:15:23.

own professional tribunal, they properly dell with the matter and

:15:24.:15:28.

all professional tribunals in the law, be it is the bar, Council for

:15:29.:15:33.

barristers or the bar standards board for barristers or the

:15:34.:15:39.

solicitor's regulatory authority, they give no favour, once it was

:15:40.:15:43.

brought to their attention firm steps were taken, and, but I nit is

:15:44.:15:47.

very important, to emphasise again here and now, that was one

:15:48.:15:55.

individual, there many hundreds of human rights lawyers practise, often

:15:56.:15:58.

doing work for no payment whatsoever, and human rights lawyers

:15:59.:16:01.

aren't just involved with military work, they are involved with making

:16:02.:16:05.

sure elderly people have proper homes to go to, we have proper

:16:06.:16:08.

education, freedom of speech, we have rights to fair trial, let us

:16:09.:16:13.

not throw the baby out with the bath water on the human rights' lawyers

:16:14.:16:18.

prospective. One potential bad apple doesn't change that. One bad

:16:19.:16:22.

journalist doesn't make the whole cad rein any way poor. Let us get

:16:23.:16:28.

perspective here. Thank you very much for your time.

:16:29.:16:31.

Here's Matt, with a look at this morning's weather.

:16:32.:16:42.

A bit wintry. A typical scene, a slight dusting of snow, not causing

:16:43.:16:52.

huge problems. It makes for a few slippery roads an pavement, most of

:16:53.:16:56.

the snow will turn back to rain. I have managed to locate a bit of

:16:57.:16:59.

sunshine from our weather watchers here in Northern Ireland, just a

:17:00.:17:03.

short while ago, cracking but frosty start and in western Scotland, got

:17:04.:17:07.

down to minus 10 in parts of the Highlands but the exception rather

:17:08.:17:11.

than the rule. Most grey starts, raw in the wind, patchy rain and drizzle

:17:12.:17:16.

east in Scotland and eastern England to the north, on the hills we are

:17:17.:17:21.

seeing sleet and snow. It is sleet and snow in wail, the Midlands and

:17:22.:17:25.

the far south-east. It will come and do. It will turn back to rain and

:17:26.:17:30.

sleet and it will feel particularly raw because of the wind. The wind

:17:31.:17:35.

strengthens through the day, parts of south-east Scotland, northern

:17:36.:17:38.

England could get close to gale force and blowy in western Wales, it

:17:39.:17:42.

will continue to feed in patchy rain drizzle and a bit of sleet in the

:17:43.:17:49.

afternoon, the driegtest -- driest bigoter weather is in eastern

:17:50.:17:52.

Scotland. A few lair required if you are outdoors and that will be the

:17:53.:17:56.

case if you are off to watch the rugby in Cardiff between Wales and

:17:57.:18:01.

England. Not too much trouble on the roads and through the night it will

:18:02.:18:06.

be mainly rain or drizzle for many. There will be sleet and snow in

:18:07.:18:09.

places overnight. Giving a dusting of snow, more especially to the

:18:10.:18:12.

hills. Temperatures above freezing, a few breaks in the west and to

:18:13.:18:17.

northern Scotland and Northern Ireland. But as for Sunday, it is a

:18:18.:18:21.

great cloud that will dominate once more, and further rain or drizzle at

:18:22.:18:26.

times. Mainly this stretch from East Anglia, Wales, through into northern

:18:27.:18:31.

England and Scotland. Snow over the hiring ground, far north of

:18:32.:18:34.

Scotland, Northern Ireland, a bit of sunshine, not as much as today. It

:18:35.:18:39.

is here where we will see the best of any of the brightness as we go

:18:40.:18:43.

into Monday, across southern areas but notice over the necks few days

:18:44.:18:47.

the temperature trend is an upward one, if you a not enjoying the chill

:18:48.:18:52.

in the air, bear with it, things will turn milder necks week and feel

:18:53.:18:57.

more spring like. Is that new graph Matt? We have used it a few time,

:18:58.:19:04.

you change it according to the situation. You haven't been paying

:19:05.:19:05.

attention! Volunteers have told Breakfast

:19:06.:19:19.

in the past few hours than 200 more whales have become stranded

:19:20.:19:22.

on a beach in New Zealand. Hundreds more have already died

:19:23.:19:24.

in one of the biggest ever mass It's hoped the pilot whales may be

:19:25.:19:27.

able to swim to safety Just to warn you, you might find

:19:28.:19:31.

some of the scenes in this report You are right, we worked hard and

:19:32.:19:48.

got the 100 Wales off that survived overnight, and, we have lost sight

:19:49.:19:53.

of them, but the bad part of the story is a separate pod of 240

:19:54.:19:59.

whales have come on and restranded just south of that, so, we have been

:20:00.:20:03.

fighting to keep those ones happy, but yes, it is pretty grim out here.

:20:04.:20:08.

So what, overnight you said that many of the whales had died, they

:20:09.:20:15.

had just not survived. No, overnight most of them survived but what has

:20:16.:20:21.

happened and those ones got refloated and rebelieve successful.

:20:22.:20:28.

Another pod of pilot whales, 240 at last count have stranded further

:20:29.:20:31.

south where we were doing our work. People have been trying to care for

:20:32.:20:38.

them all afternoon. So you say the tide is coming in, and now, in

:20:39.:20:43.

theory does that mean this is a possible time they may be able to

:20:44.:20:47.

work themselves free again? Yes, that is possible. It's not something

:20:48.:20:52.

that usually happens, and, we could have kept people out there a bit

:20:53.:20:57.

longer but we have had a few people who got hypothermic and we have

:20:58.:21:01.

large schools of stingrays coming in, so it is too dangerous to leave

:21:02.:21:07.

people out there. Now, there is a lot of speculation about why it is

:21:08.:21:10.

that more of the whales are there than usual, this is I think the

:21:11.:21:13.

biggest stranding there has been in living memory in New Zealand. Are

:21:14.:21:17.

you any clearer about why so many are at that particular place at that

:21:18.:21:23.

time. Yes, well, there is always a lot of marine mammal activity round

:21:24.:21:29.

this area, and there are a lot of these pilot whales, in the Southern

:21:30.:21:35.

Ocean this is a class sieve stranding spot, a beautiful

:21:36.:21:41.

location, but if you a whale it is lethal. There is a big swathe of

:21:42.:21:47.

sand, and the water is very shallow for a long way, and so as the whales

:21:48.:21:51.

come in, they get disorientated and trapped and it is all down hill from

:21:52.:21:55.

there. So looking ahead now, Andrew, it is going to be dark in a few

:21:56.:22:00.

hours' time. You said the tide is come. What are your hopes for the

:22:01.:22:06.

next few hours, 12 hours or so? My hope for the next few hours is all

:22:07.:22:10.

these people we have taken off the beach manage to get somewhere warm

:22:11.:22:13.

and have a good meal and prepare themselves for another big push

:22:14.:22:18.

tomorrow morning, like I said, it is way too risky to have anything going

:22:19.:22:24.

on from now, so we trying to keep refreshed and go for another push in

:22:25.:22:27.

the morning to work on whatever whales we have left to deal with.

:22:28.:22:34.

That Odyssey Pavilionration is ongoing. We will keep you

:22:35.:22:40.

up-to-date. It is coming up to 23 minutes past nine.

:22:41.:22:41.

Time for a look the newspapers. David Davies, Former Chief Executive

:22:42.:22:56.

of the Football Association is here to tell us what's

:22:57.:22:58.

caught his eye. We will start with Trump. There is

:22:59.:23:03.

stuff going on on Twitter. Hillary Clinton has made a come back. She

:23:04.:23:08.

has. He continues to be everywhere. If you see that picture in the Daily

:23:09.:23:12.

Mirror. Wouldn't you like to be inside his mind? Perhaps you

:23:13.:23:18.

wouldn't, I don't know. But, I think he must have some self-doubt, hear

:23:19.:23:24.

is dear old Hillary Clinton. I suspect President Trump taught he

:23:25.:23:30.

had seen her off but she helping him with a short tweet saying 3-0, that

:23:31.:23:34.

he is losing these battles in the court. Law courts. I just detect

:23:35.:23:41.

this week there's been a subtle difference in Donald Trump. He is at

:23:42.:23:48.

last, he is changing his mind a bit on China, he's being rather nicer to

:23:49.:23:53.

one or two people, the Mexicans of course, are undermining him a bit,

:23:54.:23:58.

why he isn't building the wall yet, they seem to be plotting as to how

:23:59.:24:03.

they will come through and overand under the wall, when it is finally

:24:04.:24:07.

built. So reality is dawning, on even this President. Nonetheless,

:24:08.:24:11.

Air Force One, the latest line is that he pledges that if he can't get

:24:12.:24:17.

that, bill through the courts just have another one. He will have

:24:18.:24:22.

another one, but you know, the reality of this job, he, ultimately,

:24:23.:24:29.

I mean his popularity levels are at are low but it is entirely true that

:24:30.:24:35.

for example on his, the existing policy, that is causing so much

:24:36.:24:39.

controversy in the court, he appears to have a majority. And a

:24:40.:24:45.

majority... That put him in. On the other side, he lost the popular vote

:24:46.:24:53.

substantially. Not but a few Al Gore 100 votes or so, but three, four

:24:54.:24:57.

million I think. So it is a difficult line for him. You are

:24:58.:25:01.

going to talk about back pain. This will mean a lot for a lot of people.

:25:02.:25:06.

It is so prevalent. The Guardian is highlighting what I think is one of

:25:07.:25:14.

the great medical disasters of certainly my life time millions of

:25:15.:25:17.

people suffer from back pain and they get contradictory advice, I

:25:18.:25:21.

declare my interest. I had a back interest some 25 years ago, touch

:25:22.:25:27.

wood, which was a great success but a lot of people struggle, they are

:25:28.:25:31.

told exercise, it doesn't get better, so they go to see somebody

:25:32.:25:35.

else who says rest, rest, rest. And here we have in this, in this story,

:25:36.:25:41.

low back and neck pain is a widespread and expensive condition

:25:42.:25:52.

worldwide, costing the US alone, ?88 billion, $88 billion, despite

:25:53.:25:54.

evidence that most treatments don't work. It it is amazing. How is back

:25:55.:26:04.

right now? Touch wood, OK. It was a great triumph for me, personally, at

:26:05.:26:09.

the time, buzz it was, there was the question I ask is, am I go, is it

:26:10.:26:13.

going to be worse, what are the risks of, what is the percentage

:26:14.:26:17.

risk of something getting worse? I was told many my case it was 15, 20%

:26:18.:26:23.

on this unusual back operation, that I had, and it worked. So, I am very

:26:24.:26:28.

grateful. Pleased to hear about that. Wine tasting now? Is that what

:26:29.:26:34.

we are saying? Experts are out of fashion, and not just experts in

:26:35.:26:39.

politics, after Michael Gove in the election an Brexit. Experts

:26:40.:26:44.

generally. And in a blind test, where the labels were hidden they

:26:45.:26:48.

were asked to identify different red wines by smell, and the predictive

:26:49.:26:54.

powers were found to be no better than those of novices, there were 12

:26:55.:26:58.

professional, 20 novices and there was no difference in the outcome.

:26:59.:27:02.

Isn't that because it is totally subjective though, whether you like

:27:03.:27:07.

wine or not? That is what I think. I am volunteering to be in the next

:27:08.:27:12.

group of novices, in this, I think it is... Smelling not tasting. To be

:27:13.:27:17.

fair it was smelling, but that is meant to be the one or two experts

:27:18.:27:22.

who I have listened to, they tell me they can tell whether it is good or

:27:23.:27:27.

bad from the smell. Just drink it! Give us a quick line on sport, that

:27:28.:27:34.

is your thing. Netball. Controversy in netball buzz the Government is to

:27:35.:27:41.

spend 17 million encouraging women to play netball: A columnist this

:27:42.:27:46.

express says netball, about as friendly and inclusive as the hunger

:27:47.:27:50.

game, I would sooner break rocks with a teaspoon. I love netball.

:27:51.:27:55.

That was one of my favourite sports at school. 165,000 adult women are

:27:56.:28:01.

playing netball, but the rivalry, when we were pushing, in my time,

:28:02.:28:06.

women's football, girls football, you cannot believe how it used to

:28:07.:28:10.

upset some of the other sports, dare I say including netball and hockey.

:28:11.:28:14.

But, I love them all. I think they are great sports. I love netball.

:28:15.:28:20.

Good to see you. It is just coming up to 29 minutes past nine. We are

:28:21.:28:27.

on BBC One until 10.00, when Matt takes over in the Saturday Kitchen.

:28:28.:28:31.

What you got for us? Our special guest used to be in the brilliant

:28:32.:28:37.

band The Saturdays, she is going solo. It is Una Healy. You are here

:28:38.:28:43.

to face food heaven or hell. Scary times. What is your idea of heaven?

:28:44.:28:51.

A lovely juice I can cod. Hell? A mackerel. We have two great chefs. I

:28:52.:29:05.

am cooking OK pus with a sauce. Nice cod, mackerel and octopus and from a

:29:06.:29:10.

restaurant serving English and Russian food... I am cooking crispy

:29:11.:29:16.

chicken with sprout Shaw. That sounds very English. All that and

:29:17.:29:25.

wine. See you at ten. Sprout Shaw! That is a new one.

:29:26.:29:34.

What did she get here? Probably nowt! A special bond of five-a-side

:29:35.:29:39.

football, journalist James Brown will be here to tell us about the

:29:40.:29:43.

story inspired by the death of one of his team-mates. Stay with us.

:29:44.:29:46.

Headlines Hello, this is Breakfast, with

:29:47.:30:15.

Charlie Stayt and Steph McGovern. Coming up before ten,

:30:16.:30:19.

Matt will be here with the weather. But first, a summary of this

:30:20.:30:22.

morning's main news. A ?20 million drive to find

:30:23.:30:24.

the future experts capable of defending Britain

:30:25.:30:27.

from cyber-attacks has been Thousands of schoolchildren

:30:28.:30:28.

in England will learn about cyber security in lessons -

:30:29.:30:35.

after a Commons committee highlighted a skills shortage

:30:36.:30:38.

and labelled our current handling Donald Trump has said he may rewrite

:30:39.:30:40.

the presidential order imposing restrictions on travel to the US

:30:41.:30:44.

in a bid overcome legal obstacles which have

:30:45.:30:48.

frustrated his efforts so far. The President unveiled the ban

:30:49.:30:52.

at the end of his first week in office, barring entry

:30:53.:30:55.

to travellers from seven Earlier this week an appeals court

:30:56.:30:57.

upheld the suspension The case may now proceed

:30:58.:31:01.

to the Supreme Court. The funding of parks has reached

:31:02.:31:08.

a tipping point and new ways of paying for them may have

:31:09.:31:11.

to be found. That's according to

:31:12.:31:13.

the Commons Communities and Local Government Committee

:31:14.:31:14.

which says parks are suffering It warns there's a danger of a

:31:15.:31:17.

return to the neglect of the 1980s. Labour has issued formal warnings

:31:18.:31:28.

to members of its front-bench team who disobeyed Jeremy Corbyn's order

:31:29.:31:31.

to vote for Brexit. Among those who ignored Mr Corbyn

:31:32.:31:33.

were 11 shadow junior ministers Hundreds of people from across

:31:34.:31:37.

the world have been competing this week in a sport that combines

:31:38.:31:47.

dancing and flying - indoors. You can compete in pairs,

:31:48.:31:53.

fours or as a solo contestant. Going as two might be difficult

:31:54.:32:13.

enough but wait, two go out and income four of them.

:32:14.:32:18.

I don't understand how they control their body. You get marks for speed

:32:19.:32:24.

and accuracy. Just watching it makes me feel a bit dizzy.

:32:25.:32:31.

Have you seen that? I saw a team who were going to participate in the

:32:32.:32:35.

world outdoor skydiving championships. This year, the

:32:36.:32:39.

British team are in with a chance of a medal at the world indoor

:32:40.:32:44.

Championships. It requires a lot of practice. It looks fun.

:32:45.:32:51.

Building up to one of the biggest sporting events of the year. Wales

:32:52.:33:00.

have the chance to end the winning run of Eddie Jones. He is filling

:33:01.:33:08.

the shoes of Warren Gatland. It is a fascinating match with shenanigans

:33:09.:33:09.

going on in the week. One of the oldest fixtures in rugby

:33:10.:33:12.

union will kick off later today when Wales welcome England

:33:13.:33:15.

to Cardiff on the second Our sports correspondent Joe Wilson

:33:16.:33:17.

is at the Principality stadium Good morning, you have got the place

:33:18.:33:28.

to yourself just about. Let's first of all talk about Eddie Jones

:33:29.:33:33.

playing Tom Jones the Welsh singer and playing Delilah to the England

:33:34.:33:37.

team. You have been talking about all the shenanigans. Is this a sign

:33:38.:33:41.

that Eddie Jones is worried about this one? I don't know. The thing

:33:42.:33:47.

about Eddie Jones is we have to take everything he says with a certain

:33:48.:33:51.

degree of a pinch of salt. What he does is generate interest in not

:33:52.:33:57.

only England but rugby union. It is a Saturday morning and we are not

:33:58.:34:01.

talking about football and that is unusual at this time of year. In

:34:02.:34:05.

terms of the specific shenanigans, I saw a couple of daffodils poking

:34:06.:34:10.

through the snow this morning. No sign of any goats yet. What we do

:34:11.:34:15.

have I'm delighted to say is perhaps the most important thing, the trophy

:34:16.:34:20.

itself. This is a redesigned Six Nations trophy. It is it decided to

:34:21.:34:26.

reflect the Six Nations which came in in 2000. Italy have not yet

:34:27.:34:39.

lifted this and neither have Scotland. Scotland will be in a

:34:40.:34:41.

great position if they win in France tomorrow. That will be Sunday's

:34:42.:34:43.

drama. With a weight of international caps, you have to say

:34:44.:34:46.

the Wales when a very strong position but England, it is such a

:34:47.:34:50.

long time since they lost to anybody as we have heard so many times,

:34:51.:34:56.

winning is a habit. England showed last weekend even though they were

:34:57.:34:59.

not for a good against France they found the composure to win that

:35:00.:35:05.

game. History shows that the roof matters. Given the record the

:35:06.:35:09.

England have with the roof being open, so different to when it is

:35:10.:35:15.

closed? Absolutely. If you are in Eddie Jones' shoes, why would you

:35:16.:35:20.

choose anything else than to have the roof open. There is just a light

:35:21.:35:24.

drizzle falling at the moment. Rugby union is an outdoor sport. This

:35:25.:35:29.

place. Be a cauldron even if you take the roof off. What I love about

:35:30.:35:35.

this stadium which was originally called the Millennium Stadium and is

:35:36.:35:40.

now the Principality Stadium, even though you get 70,000 people in here

:35:41.:35:44.

it feels smaller because the seats are so close to the action. We will

:35:45.:35:48.

have a great feeling here whether the roof is open or not. They're all

:35:49.:35:54.

the back row forwards who have not been to Cardiff before, how they

:35:55.:35:58.

deal with the occasion as well as dealing with Wales. And there is the

:35:59.:36:07.

interim coach who has to decide whether to risk George North and Dan

:36:08.:36:11.

Biggar after the knocks in the last game? We saw them training in the

:36:12.:36:16.

light training session here yesterday. It has been a big talking

:36:17.:36:22.

point. I wonder if it could be another shenanigan mind game from

:36:23.:36:26.

Rob Howley? There is the possibility that neither of those guys will

:36:27.:36:32.

start the game for Wales. Sam Davies could come on and make an impact

:36:33.:36:35.

like he did last weekend against Italy. It is interesting, Rob

:36:36.:36:42.

Howley's position, because he is like the caretaker coach or the

:36:43.:36:47.

supply teacher. Does he do something different to changing into his team

:36:48.:36:51.

or does he hand them back to Warren Gatland and say not too much damage

:36:52.:36:58.

done? I cannot wait for it all to begin! The coverage begins at 4:15pm

:36:59.:37:00.

on BBC One this afternoon. Away from the Six Nations

:37:01.:37:04.

and history was made in the Premiership last night,

:37:05.:37:06.

as Bristol's Tom Varndell, became the league's

:37:07.:37:08.

all-time, top try scorer. The division's bottom side

:37:09.:37:10.

were thrashed by Harlequins, but Varndell scored his 91st

:37:11.:37:12.

Premiership try, to take him A last gasp penalty from,

:37:13.:37:14.

Rhys Priestland, gave third place Bath, a one point victory over

:37:15.:37:21.

Northampton. Elsewhere Sale Sharks

:37:22.:37:23.

beat Newcastle. Scarlets moved into the top

:37:24.:37:26.

four of the Pro 12, Tom Williams scored one

:37:27.:37:28.

of their two tries. The top two of Munster and Ospreys,

:37:29.:37:33.

both won, and so did Ulster. The big football news this

:37:34.:37:36.

morning is confusion, over the future of the Rangers

:37:37.:37:38.

manager Mark Warburton this morning. Rangers said in a statement,

:37:39.:37:41.

that he had resigned from his position, but Warburton

:37:42.:37:43.

says he wasn't aware of that, Rangers are third in

:37:44.:37:46.

the Scottish Premiership, Rangers play Greenock Morton

:37:47.:37:50.

tomorrow, in the Scottish cup fifth round, and under-20 coach

:37:51.:38:01.

Graeme Murty, is set to lead Celtic are the early kick off today

:38:02.:38:03.

- they play Inverness. There is one game in

:38:04.:38:07.

the Premiership today - The early kick off in the Premier

:38:08.:38:10.

League is at the Emirates, where Arsenal take on a rejuvenated

:38:11.:38:14.

Hull City. Arsenal are currently in fourth,

:38:15.:38:17.

but have lost their last two matches, which has led to renewed

:38:18.:38:19.

speculation over manager Former Arsenal and England striker

:38:20.:38:22.

Ian Wright thinks this will be I was with the boss last night and

:38:23.:38:36.

if I am going to be totally honest, I get the impression that that is

:38:37.:38:41.

it. I genuinely believe... I was with him for a few hours last night.

:38:42.:38:45.

He did not say I am leaving at the end of the season, but I get the

:38:46.:38:49.

impression looking at him, that is it. I think that's it. He actually

:38:50.:38:55.

mentioned while we were talking last night that he is coming to the end.

:38:56.:38:57.

I have never heard him say that. Elsewhere, Manchester

:38:58.:39:01.

United take on Watford. And there's a big one in the late

:39:02.:39:04.

kick off with second place Sheffield Wednesday

:39:05.:39:08.

are still on course to reach the play offs at least,

:39:09.:39:13.

in the Championship, Their spending in the transfer

:39:14.:39:15.

window is already paying off. That's new boy Jordan Rhodes,

:39:16.:39:19.

after just nine minutes, A special moment as he went off

:39:20.:39:21.

to celebrate with his dad Further goals from another

:39:22.:39:25.

signing Sam Winnall, Leigh's return to rugby

:39:26.:39:28.

league's Super League, got off to a disappointing start,

:39:29.:39:32.

as they were taught The Tigers ran in seven

:39:33.:39:34.

tries including this Elsewhere, Huddersfield Giants

:39:35.:39:37.

beat Widnes 28-16. England's Danny Willett is well

:39:38.:39:47.

placed to win golf's Last year's Masters champion

:39:48.:39:49.

will head into the final round with a three shot lead

:39:50.:39:54.

over his nearest rival after Willet made six birdies,

:39:55.:39:57.

including one on each Barry Hawkins is into

:39:58.:40:00.

the final of snooker's He eased past Liang Wenbo of China

:40:01.:40:06.

6-1 - finishing in style He'll now face either Marco Fu

:40:07.:40:10.

or Ryan Day on Sunday. In tennis Great Britain's women

:40:11.:40:16.

continue their Fed Cup It's all rather complicated,

:40:17.:40:18.

but if they beat Croatia in today's promotion play-off they'll progress

:40:19.:40:24.

to another play off. If they win that they'll get

:40:25.:40:27.

into the second tier So far it's going well -

:40:28.:40:30.

Heather Watson is one set up Heather Watson has just won her

:40:31.:40:48.

first rubber to give Great Britain a 1-0 lead.

:40:49.:40:51.

For years now Snowdonia in North Wales has been establishing

:40:52.:40:53.

itself as a centre for extreme adventure sports, with Europe's

:40:54.:40:56.

longest and fastest zipwire - and a unique surfing lake.

:40:57.:40:58.

Now former slate mines have been brought back to life,

:40:59.:41:03.

to add a bit of an adrenalin rush to history lessons.

:41:04.:41:06.

I joined a school party in one of the vast caverns,

:41:07.:41:09.

Beneath this sci-fi landscape, there is an industrial world

:41:10.:41:20.

A labrynth of 300 tunnels and caverns, 24 storeys deep.

:41:21.:41:28.

Former slate mines to be explored using climbing skills and zip wires,

:41:29.:41:36.

giving you an insight into the life of a minor 200 feet the rock face.

:41:37.:41:49.

Tell me this is not real, that this is a horrible dream?

:41:50.:41:52.

All that supports you are staples hammered into the rock.

:41:53.:42:03.

Of course, you have a harness and two special clips

:42:04.:42:06.

which cannot be unhooked at the same time but your mind

:42:07.:42:08.

I am on a wooden plank 100 feet in the air across an old quarry!

:42:09.:42:13.

What is incredible is when you stop for a moment and look down and look

:42:14.:42:17.

around and realise this is where people worked!

:42:18.:42:19.

Some forced to work here were as young as six years old.

:42:20.:42:24.

When I first came here I learned what the miners

:42:25.:42:26.

We have a great safety system but they just used to wrap chains

:42:27.:42:32.

around their legs and hang on the edge of the wall.

:42:33.:42:34.

It is crazy that they would do that for 12 hours a day

:42:35.:42:37.

Ewell worked on the open mines here until the 1970s

:42:38.:42:41.

but now he is back working as a safety inspector.

:42:42.:42:43.

It has given them a new lease of life.

:42:44.:42:45.

There is a saying that Blaenau Ffestiniog rooved the world

:42:46.:42:51.

so we are very proud of the culture and we have embraced that culture.

:42:52.:43:00.

Once you've had the training it is up to you to get around

:43:01.:43:03.

Slowly but surely you conquer the fears in your head, it starts

:43:04.:43:16.

The sensation when you have achieved it is outstanding.

:43:17.:43:20.

You learn more about yourself than you do looking at your iPhone.

:43:21.:43:22.

The ten and 11-year-old school pupils took it in their stride.

:43:23.:43:26.

Having seen one lad fall off the monkey bars 200 feet up...

:43:27.:43:29.

It was really scary, I thought I would fall.

:43:30.:43:35.

I gave it a miss, heading for the final heart stopping challenge.

:43:36.:43:44.

And they save the steepest zip wire to last.

:43:45.:44:05.

I think the fear does get worse as you get older. I felt like a hobbit

:44:06.:44:21.

in Lord of the rings. The youngsters take it in their stride, even the

:44:22.:44:26.

chap who fell off. He had a harness on.

:44:27.:44:30.

And a really fascinating way to learn about history of the minds.

:44:31.:44:35.

The youngsters were only six and they had a chain which they had to

:44:36.:44:39.

put in the rocks themselves with just a Campbell. They were working

:44:40.:44:45.

in the dark -- just a candle. Amazing. Do you want to give a

:44:46.:44:50.

prediction for the score for England and whales? -- England and Wales.

:44:51.:45:09.

Whales 15, England 22. You are watching Breakfast from BBC News.

:45:10.:45:19.

Schoolchildren in England are going to be offered lessons in cyber

:45:20.:45:25.

security. President Trump is said to be

:45:26.:45:28.

considering a new executive order on immigration. He may not take his

:45:29.:45:34.

case to reinstate the travel ban to the Supreme Court.

:45:35.:45:40.

Now it is time to find out what is happening with the weather. There is

:45:41.:45:41.

a bit of snow around at the moment. Yes, there certainly is for some.

:45:42.:45:56.

This was the view of one of our Weather Watchers in County Durham.

:45:57.:46:01.

There is a centimetre or two on the ground. You will still be able to

:46:02.:46:05.

get around your day without too much hindrance. It is not a completely

:46:06.:46:13.

wintry picture. In the Shetland Isles, as you can see, Sun clear

:46:14.:46:25.

skies. Clouding over in Northern Ireland. The north-west islands

:46:26.:46:31.

continue to see some sunshine. Eastern Scotland have rain and

:46:32.:46:36.

drizzle along the coasts. Some rain and sleet inland. We will see the

:46:37.:46:40.

snow pep up on the hills of northern England. It is sleet, snow and

:46:41.:46:45.

drizzle anywhere across the South. If you are in parts of Sussex and

:46:46.:46:50.

ethics and also Kent, the snow will get heavier in the next hour or two.

:46:51.:46:57.

It is pushing him off the North Sea. Elsewhere, when you have seen some

:46:58.:47:00.

flurries of snow this morning, it will turn to sleet or rain and

:47:01.:47:08.

drizzle. The best of the weather across the North of Scotland and the

:47:09.:47:12.

West of Ireland. Temperatures, much of the muchness wherever you are.

:47:13.:47:19.

The wind strengthens through tonight. It will bring more cloud,

:47:20.:47:26.

rain, drizzle, sleet and snow in. A few clearer skies towards parts of

:47:27.:47:30.

Northern Ireland, Devon and Cornwall. If you do see those

:47:31.:47:34.

breaks, there will be a touch of frost. Most Frost free but every bit

:47:35.:47:40.

as cold into tomorrow morning. It will probably feel colder given the

:47:41.:47:44.

winds are stronger. A few brighter Brent to the day -- brighter breaks

:47:45.:47:52.

to the day. What we do see from the cloud is the mix of rain, drizzle,

:47:53.:47:58.

sleet and health snow and temperatures feeling close to

:47:59.:48:03.

freezing rather than for 6 degrees. If it is too cold for you, there is

:48:04.:48:07.

a bit of light at the end of the tunnel. Temperatures slowly rise on

:48:08.:48:11.

Monday. Still chilly for Scotland and Ireland. Many of you by the time

:48:12.:48:16.

of it to Wednesday will see temperatures into double figures. It

:48:17.:48:20.

will feel a bit more like spring which is fantastic news for those of

:48:21.:48:25.

you entering a week off for half term. So there is some light at the

:48:26.:48:28.

end of the tunnel. Back to you both. Have a lovely

:48:29.:48:30.

weekend! In the past week, three cyclists

:48:31.:48:36.

have been killed in the space of four days on London's roads,

:48:37.:48:39.

and campaigners are gathering this morning to demand

:48:40.:48:41.

ministers make cycling safer. But figures nationally show that

:48:42.:48:43.

could already be the case, with cycling deaths falling over

:48:44.:48:46.

the past decade. Our reporter Holly Hamilton has more

:48:47.:48:48.

on this, she's in Trafalgar Square Morning, Holly. Good morning. It

:48:49.:48:59.

does seem that more people than ever are taking to the roads on two

:49:00.:49:04.

wheels. In the past two decades, the number of cyclists has gone up by

:49:05.:49:08.

more than a quarter. There have been plenty of road safety initiatives

:49:09.:49:11.

that have been put in place by the government, and it does seem to be

:49:12.:49:15.

working. In the past ten years, the number of road deaths has been going

:49:16.:49:21.

down. Sadly, three deaths in one week in London has prompted a

:49:22.:49:33.

protest here in Trafalgar Square later this afternoon. One of those

:49:34.:49:38.

taking part joins me now. You are quite an experienced cyclist.

:49:39.:49:46.

You cycle with baby Owen. What is it like? I cycle in London every day.

:49:47.:49:57.

We do not have a car so this is my car equivalent. I have three

:49:58.:50:01.

children and we go everywhere by bike because I find it the most

:50:02.:50:05.

quickest and convenient. My husband and I work long hours and it is the

:50:06.:50:11.

only way we can get from a to B and get the children to school and

:50:12.:50:18.

nursery. My overwhelming experience is positive. Especially with a bike

:50:19.:50:22.

like this. I get a lot of positive feedback from people. But a lot of

:50:23.:50:27.

people stop me to say they think it is great but they feel too scared to

:50:28.:50:34.

cycle. Ultimately, that is what we have to work on. It is tragic that

:50:35.:50:39.

we have had deaths this week. It is great that the death rate overall is

:50:40.:50:44.

improving but until people feel safe, which I'm afraid most people

:50:45.:50:48.

would not feel safe cycling alongside a bus or an HGV with a

:50:49.:50:53.

baby, and I totally sympathise with those people and I can see why. We

:50:54.:50:59.

need to be concentrating on separating bicycles from HGVs and

:51:00.:51:04.

buses and keeping them separate. What are you hoping to achieve from

:51:05.:51:08.

this protest which you will be attending this afternoon? We are

:51:09.:51:12.

asking for what I think is a pretty modest request which is 10% of the

:51:13.:51:18.

transport budget for 2020 to be allocated to protected cycling and

:51:19.:51:21.

walking infrastructure. Given that most of us will walk or cycle at

:51:22.:51:25.

some point in our lives feels like not throw much to ask for but it

:51:26.:51:29.

feels very far-off from what we have at the moment. The UN is calling for

:51:30.:51:39.

20% by 2025. We have thousands of people dying from air pollution

:51:40.:51:44.

related to diseases and inactivity, type two diabetes and heart disease.

:51:45.:51:49.

I am actually a doctor is well. So we cannot afford not to have people

:51:50.:51:53.

walking and cycling really, but we have to make it safer and more

:51:54.:51:58.

pleasant for them to do. I think a lot of campaigners this afternoon

:51:59.:52:02.

will agree with you. One of the things you mentioned is that HGVs

:52:03.:52:07.

are an issue for you. We are joined by Rod McKenzie fund the Road

:52:08.:52:12.

haulage Association. One of those who died this week, it was an HGV

:52:13.:52:16.

that was involved, how serious is this issue? We do not know the

:52:17.:52:22.

circumstances and one road death is one too many. We are committed to

:52:23.:52:29.

road safety. An HGV driver's training is all about safety,

:52:30.:52:34.

protecting vulnerable road users. This stuff really matters. You see

:52:35.:52:40.

lorries going around with four stickers on, that is a fleet

:52:41.:52:44.

operator scheme which is designed to produce the very best safest

:52:45.:52:49.

training. But everyone has a stake in this. All road users must play

:52:50.:52:54.

their part. There are some great cyclists out there but there are

:52:55.:52:59.

also some dangerous cyclists who bring cycling into an area of risk.

:53:00.:53:04.

We think it is about education. Everyone needs better training to be

:53:05.:53:09.

safer from the roads. Thank you for joining us this morning. I think the

:53:10.:53:14.

messages everyone has the same goal. Everyone wants no deaths on our

:53:15.:53:18.

roads. The Department for Transport have said they are doing everything

:53:19.:53:22.

they can to increase the amount of investment on our infrastructure and

:53:23.:53:25.

it has tripled in the past five years. The event taking place here

:53:26.:53:30.

in Trafalgar Square is a protest. It is also a memorial to those who have

:53:31.:53:36.

died. Everyone is in agreement that one death is one too many. Thank

:53:37.:53:39.

you. There's something quite unique

:53:40.:53:42.

about the bond between a group of middle-aged footballers

:53:43.:53:46.

who gather once or twice a week But it wasn't until our next guest,

:53:47.:53:48.

journalist James Brown suddenly lost one of his team mates

:53:49.:53:53.

that he realised just how So much so that he decided

:53:54.:53:56.

to write a book about it. Morning to you. Tell us the tale.

:53:57.:54:09.

This is a group of middle-aged men? I have been playing amateur football

:54:10.:54:13.

all my life. 14 months ago a friend died. He was the organiser of our

:54:14.:54:20.

team. I realise that the funeral I have never seen any of the mourners

:54:21.:54:24.

in clothes before, they were always in shorts and tight tops. It was

:54:25.:54:29.

very sad that James passed away. He had not been ill or anything. I just

:54:30.:54:34.

thought about this world of passionate footballers. We play in

:54:35.:54:39.

rain and shine. No one cheers us on. You're basically living out the

:54:40.:54:44.

dream. Every week someone scores an amazing goal. If it had been on

:54:45.:54:47.

Match Of The Day it would be goal of the week. I really wanted to get

:54:48.:54:53.

into that world of what I call sporting karaoke. What is

:54:54.:54:57.

interesting is the point you make that you can play together every

:54:58.:55:01.

week for years and years but actually not know that much about

:55:02.:55:05.

each other? James was a friend who introduced me to the game but I play

:55:06.:55:09.

three games a week, the majority of the guys I do not know their

:55:10.:55:14.

surnames, I don't know what they do for a living, I don't know if they

:55:15.:55:18.

are married or they have kids. I know what their personalities are

:55:19.:55:22.

like on the pitch. That particular game I have been playing for 17

:55:23.:55:28.

years. The feedback I have got from other players, I have asked for a

:55:29.:55:34.

lot of stories through Twitter and so on, people say the same thing. It

:55:35.:55:38.

might be through workmates or an ever expanding group and the game

:55:39.:55:43.

evolves all the time, unless you are in the legal something. Do think

:55:44.:55:47.

that is why people like it so much. It is not as if you are living each

:55:48.:55:51.

other's lives, you're not next-door neighbours. It is when you don't

:55:52.:55:56.

have to deal with all the other stuff, is that part of the

:55:57.:55:59.

attraction? Definitely when you get older. When you get the

:56:00.:56:05.

responsibilities of family, work, pressures of health, this is just an

:56:06.:56:11.

escape. It is a very noisy version of yoga. You clear your mind, you

:56:12.:56:15.

have to look at what everybody is doing. If you make a great save or

:56:16.:56:19.

score a great goal, that stays in your mind for ages. What do you

:56:20.:56:26.

cover in your book? I start with James' death. I cover all of the

:56:27.:56:31.

things that go on every day, every week. Anybody who lives in an

:56:32.:56:36.

inner-city sees people at lunchtime with big coats and football kits.

:56:37.:56:41.

Every time the ball goes over a fence in an outdoor pitch it will

:56:42.:56:45.

not come back first time, you stand around and wait for a kid to throw

:56:46.:56:49.

it back. There are goalkeepers who wear gloves but cannot catch the

:56:50.:56:53.

ball. There are fact guys who can shoot, skinny guys who cannot

:56:54.:56:58.

tackle, there is everything, the camaraderie. I love playing

:56:59.:57:05.

football. I was never good enough to be a professional footballer but I

:57:06.:57:09.

think it is that love of playing. Half a million people play every

:57:10.:57:14.

week. Did the death of the guy you play with, did that make you think a

:57:15.:57:21.

bit harder about whether you should know people better? Did you think,

:57:22.:57:26.

we should spend time together or did you settle back again? The thing

:57:27.:57:32.

that was really touching was the following week, nobody organised us

:57:33.:57:37.

but we went to the middle and we stood there and shut up for a minute

:57:38.:57:42.

and thought about him. Specifically, James was the organiser of our game

:57:43.:57:47.

and they are the unsung heroes. Not the guys who play at Power league or

:57:48.:57:52.

goals, the ones who play amongst themselves, who get the bids, who

:57:53.:57:57.

make sure we have got a ball. He was the one who kept the score. We never

:57:58.:58:02.

know the score any more. It is moving. There will be people this

:58:03.:58:06.

morning heading out in the rain or the snow or whatever. James' book is

:58:07.:58:17.

called Above Head Height. Now before we go we have been

:58:18.:58:21.

talking about parks and a lot of you have been sending in your pictures.

:58:22.:58:29.

We have a misty sunrise. James has snapped this one. This was last year

:58:30.:58:37.

apparently but it is a nice picture! And this is Ruby having an afternoon

:58:38.:58:45.

run in water with her owner -- a run in Rotherham. We have some great

:58:46.:58:56.

amateur autocracies here. -- some great amateur photographers here. If

:58:57.:59:01.

you are at in the park, have a great day. We are back tomorrow at 6am.

:59:02.:59:03.

That

:59:04.:59:04.