18/03/2017 Breakfast


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18/03/2017

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Hello, this is Breakfast, with Charlie Stayt and Tina Daheley.

:00:00.:00:00.

A third way for Scotland's future as Gordon Brown sets out

:00:07.:00:09.

The former Prime Minister will say a new kind of federal home rule

:00:10.:00:16.

is needed for the United Kingdom, to avoid years of bitter division.

:00:17.:00:35.

Good morning, it's Saturday the 18th of March.

:00:36.:00:37.

Also ahead, more than 100 British troops arrive in Estonia

:00:38.:00:40.

in an attempt to deter Russian aggression.

:00:41.:00:44.

A US security chief dismisses claims that GCHQ carried out surveillance

:00:45.:00:47.

In sport, a world record, and the grand slam is there

:00:48.:00:55.

If they can do what the women did, and beat Ireland to win

:00:56.:01:03.

Paolo! This is only the pre- chamber, where it is only minus 60.

:01:04.:01:18.

It got much colder, when I went to a deep freeze to cool off to see how

:01:19.:01:21.

it could improve sporting performance.

:01:22.:01:21.

Good morning. An unsettled weekend in prospect. Some cloudy weather,

:01:22.:01:31.

some breezy weather, but rainfall amounts will ret -- will vary. Find

:01:32.:01:36.

out how much you will get in about 15 minutes.

:01:37.:01:37.

Gordon Brown says Scotland should be handed a raft of new powers

:01:38.:01:42.

after Brexit to prevent the United Kingdom from splitting.

:01:43.:01:45.

The former Prime Minister will use a speech today to put

:01:46.:01:47.

forward his "third option" for Scotland's future.

:01:48.:01:49.

His intervention comes as the SNP leader Nicola Sturgeon

:01:50.:01:52.

addresses her party conference today.

:01:53.:01:53.

Our political correspondent Ian Watson reports.

:01:54.:01:59.

Smile! Nicola Sturgeon has been saying what her members and

:02:00.:02:07.

supporters want to hear, that a second referendum on Scottish

:02:08.:02:09.

independence should happen before Britain leads the EU. But she knows

:02:10.:02:16.

she does not have support beyond her powerbase, sociable IQ that her call

:02:17.:02:20.

for a referendum is not just about standing up for Scotland, it is

:02:21.:02:23.

about democracy. When Nicola Sturgeon takes to the stage later

:02:24.:02:27.

today she will repeat her demand for a second independence referendum.

:02:28.:02:30.

But it looks like Theresa May isn't for turning. The SNP see their call

:02:31.:02:36.

for a referendum as a win-win. Either Theresa May gives in to them

:02:37.:02:40.

on their timescale, or they believe that a refusal to do so will help

:02:41.:02:44.

them build support for independence in the longer term. I think Theresa

:02:45.:02:49.

May trying to deny the Scottish people their say on this is

:02:50.:02:52.

something that she will have cause to regret. I think the longer

:02:53.:02:57.

Theresa May tries to deny the people of Scotland bears say, the better it

:02:58.:03:00.

is for the campaign for independence. This is everybody's

:03:01.:03:06.

flags, everyone's culture! This former Prime Minister was credited

:03:07.:03:11.

with saving the union when he passionately campaigned against

:03:12.:03:13.

independence at the last referendum. This time, he says, after Brexit,

:03:14.:03:19.

Scotland could get a more powerful parliament without having to break

:03:20.:03:23.

its links to the rest of the UK. Gordon Brown is calling for a

:03:24.:03:26.

federal United Kingdom, with the Scottish Parliament taking powers

:03:27.:03:31.

from Brussels, getting control of VAT rates, and negotiating treaties

:03:32.:03:33.

with other European countries. But from Nicola Sturgeon's respectively

:03:34.:03:39.

choice for voters should be stark. An independent Scotland that wants

:03:40.:03:42.

to be in the EU, or remaining with Grexit written. -- Brexit Britain.

:03:43.:03:47.

The first British soldiers have arrived in Estonia -

:03:48.:03:50.

part of the largest deployment of British troops to Europe

:03:51.:03:52.

Over the next few weeks a total of 800 British soldiers

:03:53.:03:57.

and hundreds of military vehicles will be sent the Baltic state

:03:58.:04:00.

as NATO forces reinforce the border with Russia.

:04:01.:04:02.

Our defence correspondent Jonathan Beale reports.

:04:03.:04:08.

The British Army has been preparing for this moment. These tanks depart

:04:09.:04:16.

for a final exercise in Germany ahead of their move east, towards

:04:17.:04:22.

Russia. They are now among 300 military vehicles that have been

:04:23.:04:26.

loaded onto a ferry destined for the small or click state of Estonia. --

:04:27.:04:33.

Baltic state. This is the start of the biggest deployment since the end

:04:34.:04:37.

of the Cold War, which will cede Tisch troops with tanks and armour

:04:38.:04:41.

deployed on the eastern flank of Nato, ready to reassure our allies,

:04:42.:04:48.

ready to stand up for the collective defence of Nato, and to deter any

:04:49.:04:52.

possible Russian aggression. -- see British troops with tanks. The first

:04:53.:04:56.

British troops are trained and ready to go, not just alert to any

:04:57.:05:01.

military threat, but also from other potential provocations from Russia.

:05:02.:05:05.

Do you think the threat is more military, or is it the Russians

:05:06.:05:09.

playing games and using social media and fake news and all that sort of

:05:10.:05:15.

stuff? It is a mixture of both. There is the cyber threat and all of

:05:16.:05:19.

that stuff, but again, we have trained for every eventuality. We

:05:20.:05:23.

know how to protect ourselves. Are you worried about anything? Not

:05:24.:05:27.

really. There is obviously a credible threats just over the

:05:28.:05:31.

border, but I think we are a credible deterrent. These are the

:05:32.:05:35.

first of 800 richest troops who will be arriving in Estonia over the next

:05:36.:05:39.

few weeks. And it is just the start of what could be a long, open ended

:05:40.:05:43.

deployment to deter Russian aggression. They are not expecting

:05:44.:05:50.

to go to war, but these soldiers will still be caught up in the

:05:51.:05:53.

rising tensions between Russia and the west. They are not alone,

:05:54.:05:58.

though. The US, Canada and Germany are also sending their troops to

:05:59.:06:01.

reinforce Nato's eastern flank. The American surveillance agency -

:06:02.:06:07.

the NSA - has rejected suggestions that British agents spied

:06:08.:06:11.

on Donald Trump, at the request On Wednesday, a White House

:06:12.:06:13.

spokesman discussed an allegation that GCHQ was asked to tap

:06:14.:06:17.

Mr Trump's calls last year. Downing Street says it's been

:06:18.:06:20.

reassured by Washington From Washington,

:06:21.:06:22.

Tulip Mazumdar reports. Two strong leaders with many

:06:23.:06:38.

differences. They discussed immigration, trade and Nato, and

:06:39.:06:42.

then the thorny issue of wiretapping came up. At least we have something

:06:43.:06:48.

in common, perhaps. LAUGHTER

:06:49.:06:54.

. It was an awkward joke that did not seem to particularly amuse the

:06:55.:07:00.

Chancellor. The US admitted in 2015 to tapping Angela Merkel's

:07:01.:07:04.

telephone. There is no evidence supporting Donald Trump's similar

:07:05.:07:08.

claims, and today he distanced himself from suggestions by his own

:07:09.:07:11.

press secretary that British intelligence may have been involved.

:07:12.:07:16.

I didn't make an opinion on it. That was a statement made by a very

:07:17.:07:20.

talented lawyer, on Fox. He shouldn't be talking to me come you

:07:21.:07:25.

should be talking to Fox. Downing Street says it has been ensured the

:07:26.:07:30.

US will not repeat the claims. In an exclusive interview with the BBC,

:07:31.:07:35.

America's equivalent agency to GCHQ had this to say about the

:07:36.:07:39.

allegations of UK involvement. What would be the advantage to the UK

:07:40.:07:42.

government of doing something like that? The cost would be immense, in

:07:43.:07:47.

comparison to any value. So of course they wouldn't do it. It would

:07:48.:07:53.

be epically stupid. Arriving in Florida with his family for the

:07:54.:07:56.

weekend, the President will no doubt be reflecting on yet another

:07:57.:07:58.

controversial week in office. Schools should teach children how

:07:59.:08:01.

to spot "fake news" and recognise lies on social media, according

:08:02.:08:04.

to a leading education expert. The director of the influential

:08:05.:08:08.

think tank the OECD says pupils are becoming too dependent

:08:09.:08:11.

on the internet and need help distinguishing between true

:08:12.:08:13.

and false information online. New research suggests the idyllic

:08:14.:08:21.

image some people have of the countryside is masking

:08:22.:08:24.

pockets of poverty, poor health and social isolation that can

:08:25.:08:26.

exist in rural areas. The report by Public Health England

:08:27.:08:29.

and the Local Government Association says official statistics

:08:30.:08:31.

are often skewed towards gathering information about people living

:08:32.:08:34.

in towns and cities, Nice, soft elbows. Keep it nice and

:08:35.:08:55.

soft. Tina goes to this leisure centre three times a week, in

:08:56.:08:58.

Withernsea. She was referred there by a health train and she is seeing

:08:59.:09:02.

significant improvements. But getting there takes an hour by bus.

:09:03.:09:07.

Lots of people don't drive. Having the transport is essential, because

:09:08.:09:12.

if it wasn't, I couldn't come here. Nearly 10 million people in England

:09:13.:09:16.

within areas defined as rural. Current measures show that overall,

:09:17.:09:20.

their health is better than those living in towns. But a new report

:09:21.:09:24.

says those statistics can mask pockets of deprivation and poor

:09:25.:09:28.

health, at the age demographic is changing, and that it is often

:09:29.:09:31.

difficult to access health and care services. The study says 20% of

:09:32.:09:36.

people in rural areas live more than 2.5 miles from a GP surgery,

:09:37.:09:41.

compound with just 2% in urban areas. -- compared. And that more

:09:42.:09:49.

than 15% of rural households live in relative poverty after housing costs

:09:50.:09:52.

are taken into account. The report also says not enough is known about

:09:53.:09:55.

the health and well-being of people living in the countryside. We have

:09:56.:09:59.

been concerned for some time that official government statistics in

:10:00.:10:02.

other areas do not effectively capture the needs of rural areas.

:10:03.:10:06.

That is not just promote as places. It is also those rural areas on the

:10:07.:10:10.

fringes of towns and cities. The government says it wants everybody

:10:11.:10:13.

to get high-quality healthcare regardless of where they live, and

:10:14.:10:17.

it is targeting the recruitment of new GPs to be areas that need them

:10:18.:10:19.

most. Prince William and the Duchess

:10:20.:10:20.

of Cambridge will meet victims of the attack on the Bataclan

:10:21.:10:23.

concert hall in Paris today. Yesterday the royal couple met

:10:24.:10:26.

French President Francois Hollande. The visit is part of the UK

:10:27.:10:28.

government's charm offensive in Europe ahead of the

:10:29.:10:31.

start of Brexit talks. This report by our Royal

:10:32.:10:34.

Correspondent Nicholas Witchell The high into the glamour of a

:10:35.:10:46.

black-tie dinner at the British Embassy, lies a serious purpose. --

:10:47.:10:50.

be high into the glamour. Visits like this one by William and

:10:51.:10:55.

Katherine to Paris are done at the behest of the Foreign Office and the

:10:56.:10:58.

royal family are being deployed quite deliberately to Europe.

:10:59.:11:01.

Nothing too obviously political, but in a concerted effort to remind

:11:02.:11:05.

Europe of what Britain contributes to the continent and how nothing

:11:06.:11:09.

need change. William read a message from the Queen. The ties between our

:11:10.:11:14.

nations have stood the test of time and will, I am sure, continue to

:11:15.:11:20.

prosper. I hope you have a most enjoyable and memorable event.

:11:21.:11:26.

Signed, Elizabeth second. Earlier in the speech, William talked of the

:11:27.:11:29.

deep friendship and 20 United Kingdom and France, forged, as he

:11:30.:11:35.

put it, in sweat and cloud. And... This partnership will continue,

:11:36.:11:38.

despite Britain's recent decision to leave the EU. The depth of our

:11:39.:11:43.

friendship and the breadth of our co-operation will not change. Today,

:11:44.:11:48.

among other engagements, the Duke and Duchess will meet survivors from

:11:49.:11:52.

the Bataclan massacre of November 20 15. One thing William will not be

:11:53.:11:56.

doing on this first official visit to Paris is to go to the place where

:11:57.:12:00.

his mother died in that car accident 20 years ago this year. The theme of

:12:01.:12:05.

this visit is very much to look to the future.

:12:06.:12:05.

Medical researchers have discovered the world's healthiest hearts -

:12:06.:12:08.

and they belong to a tribe of hunter-gatherers in Bolivia.

:12:09.:12:11.

A study published in the Lancet found that two-thirds of the Tsimane

:12:12.:12:14.

people have unclogged arteries even in old age,

:12:15.:12:18.

probably due to frequent exercise, low smoking rates and a diet rich

:12:19.:12:21.

in lean meat, fish and foraged fruit and nuts.

:12:22.:12:27.

The St Patrick's Day celebrations continued overnight

:12:28.:12:29.

Streets and landmarks were lit up in green around the globe,

:12:30.:12:33.

including the leaning tower of Pisa, and the Christ the Redeemer statue

:12:34.:12:37.

And those are the main stories this morning. Let's have a prick look

:12:38.:12:51.

through some of the front pages. We will start with the Daily Telegraph.

:12:52.:12:58.

Many of the papers, you saw those images a moment ago, concentrating

:12:59.:13:01.

on the Duchess of Cambridge on that official trip to Paris last night.

:13:02.:13:04.

Watts of glamorous outfits on display there. Brexit rigour than

:13:05.:13:09.

union is the headline. Brexit is more important to voters than

:13:10.:13:12.

keeping the UK together. That is according to a Daily Telegraph poll.

:13:13.:13:17.

And on the issue of Scottish independence, will be speaking to

:13:18.:13:20.

the SNP later on this morning. The front page of the guardian, a story

:13:21.:13:26.

everybody is talking about. George Osborne's appointment as the editor

:13:27.:13:29.

of the London Evening Standard. Pressure mounting on the ex-

:13:30.:13:32.

Chancellor to resign as an MP. This news was announced yesterday. Some

:13:33.:13:37.

Conservatives, people in his own party, are questioning whether he

:13:38.:13:40.

can effectively represent his constituents while editing a daily

:13:41.:13:44.

paper on top of four other jobs. No apology after Trump aid repeats GCHQ

:13:45.:13:51.

claim. Damage limitation on the part of the White House, scrambling to

:13:52.:13:56.

limit the damage caused by White House spokesperson's Sean Spicer's

:13:57.:14:00.

repetition of the claim that recession intelligence spied on

:14:01.:14:03.

Donald Trump. And on the front page of the Daily Mail, they are focusing

:14:04.:14:08.

on Google. A row about the material that sometimes appears on Google.

:14:09.:14:13.

Profiting from hatred is the way the Daily Mail is putting it. MPs have

:14:14.:14:18.

said that the tech firm has failed to control online offensive content.

:14:19.:14:22.

This is just about how much Google can do to control the content that

:14:23.:14:27.

is on Google more widely. The times focusing on exactly the same story

:14:28.:14:31.

on their front page. Google lets anti-Semitic videos stay on new

:14:32.:14:37.

chip, that is the headline. One of the world's biggest advertising

:14:38.:14:39.

agencies yesterday pulled its clients out of the advertising

:14:40.:14:44.

network there, after the government also announced it was removing its

:14:45.:14:48.

videos from you should as well. We will have a full review of the

:14:49.:14:51.

papers later this morning. The time right now is 6:14am.

:14:52.:14:57.

You're watching Breakfast from BBC News.

:14:58.:14:59.

Gordon Brown, will call for greater powers to be given to Scotland's

:15:00.:15:05.

government as he warns of the dangers of independence.

:15:06.:15:08.

The American surveillance agency the NSA has rejected claims GCHQ

:15:09.:15:10.

was asked to spy on Donald Trump, calling it "nonsense".

:15:11.:15:15.

From India's record breaking space industry,

:15:16.:15:18.

to finding ways of dealing with its eye-wateringly bad

:15:19.:15:21.

Click is in India to discover how the country is innovating

:15:22.:15:25.

Let's find out what's happening with the weather. Ben, how is it looking,

:15:26.:15:38.

very wet where we are but lovely where you are. This isn't where I

:15:39.:15:43.

am, this is York, where it looked lovely in this picture but largely

:15:44.:15:47.

because of the flowers, not the grey skies and that's the impression I

:15:48.:15:51.

wanted to give this morning. Pretty grey skies for most of this weekend,

:15:52.:15:56.

a lot of cloud around, quite breezy, mild and some rain around at times

:15:57.:16:00.

but not everyone getting too much, most will be out west. You can see

:16:01.:16:04.

we have this pipeline of cloud streaming from the west and it's

:16:05.:16:08.

where your most exposed to that pipeline in western areas that you

:16:09.:16:11.

will see most of the rain this weekend, further east they lot of

:16:12.:16:15.

dry weather and even brightness and this morning in Northern Scotland, a

:16:16.:16:20.

different story with clear skies overnight, some icy stretches,

:16:21.:16:25.

showers here, sunny spells. Southern Scotland, Northern Ireland,

:16:26.:16:27.

north-west England, more cloud, patchy rain and drizzle but mild,

:16:28.:16:33.

double digits for many at 7am! A few clearer spells for the north-east of

:16:34.:16:36.

England and in the southern half of England and Wales, a lot of cloud,

:16:37.:16:40.

and Wales and the south-west will see outbreaks of patchy rain and

:16:41.:16:45.

drizzle, especially for coasts and hills. Through the day for many it

:16:46.:16:51.

will be cloudy, spots of rain and drizzle, especially in the west and

:16:52.:16:53.

more persistent rain spreading through Northern Ireland, south-west

:16:54.:16:57.

Scotland into northern England and north Wales by the end of the day.

:16:58.:17:01.

Chilly with sunshine and showers in Northern Scotland but elsewhere a

:17:02.:17:05.

mild feeling day. A big weekend in the Six Nations, the last weekend to

:17:06.:17:10.

come. In Edinburgh, Paris and Dublin, similar weather, not too

:17:11.:17:16.

much rain and for most it will be mild. Staying mostly cloudy tonight,

:17:17.:17:21.

mist and murk and some heavy rain at times in Northern Ireland, Scotland

:17:22.:17:24.

and northern England. To the south of that, not too much rain and

:17:25.:17:29.

overnight temperatures dropping no lower than 8-10 for many but that

:17:30.:17:33.

bit colder in the northern heart of Scotland. Tomorrow, we do it

:17:34.:17:37.

essentially all again, rain through Northern Ireland, south-west

:17:38.:17:41.

Scotland, northern England, north Wales and blustery winds, maybe

:17:42.:17:45.

gales for coasts in the west, the best chance of any brightness in the

:17:46.:17:51.

south-east and here it will be mild again but further north it will be a

:17:52.:17:55.

bit cooler with a mixture of bright spells and showers. That's all from

:17:56.:17:57.

me, more through the morning. We'll be back with a summary

:17:58.:18:00.

of the news at 6:30am. Now it's time for the Film Review

:18:01.:18:03.

with Jane Hill and Mark Kermode. Hello and welcome to

:18:04.:18:17.

the Film Review on BBC News. To take us through this week's

:18:18.:18:26.

cinema releases is Mark Kermode. We have Get Out, a horror

:18:27.:18:29.

movie-cum-social thriller. We have The Salesman

:18:30.:18:34.

from Asghar Fahadi, I am fascinated to know what you

:18:35.:18:36.

thought Get Out, because even watching the trailer,

:18:37.:18:49.

I felt very tense. The trailer sells it

:18:50.:18:53.

as a horror movie, and it is. The director, Jordan Peele,

:18:54.:18:56.

described it as a social thriller, so essentially, it is a satire

:18:57.:18:59.

about post-racial America, Daniel Kaluuya is this

:19:00.:19:01.

keen-eyed photographer, Alison Williams is his preppy

:19:02.:19:06.

girlfriend, and they are going to her rich parents'

:19:07.:19:09.

house for the weekend, and he says, they do

:19:10.:19:11.

know I'm black, right? to know, they are incredibly liberal

:19:12.:19:14.

people. My father would have voted

:19:15.:19:18.

for Obama for a third time And when they arrive at the

:19:19.:19:21.

Mansion-like house, that is pretty much

:19:22.:19:25.

the first thing he says - I would have voted for Obama

:19:26.:19:27.

for a third time. He's really sort of friendly

:19:28.:19:30.

and chummy in a way which is, How long has this been

:19:31.:19:33.

going on, this thing? Four months.

:19:34.:19:38.

Four months? Atta boy, better get

:19:39.:19:44.

used to saying that! Please.

:19:45.:19:54.

I'm so sorry. At first, everything seems

:19:55.:19:56.

bonhomie and charming, but there are signs that

:19:57.:20:11.

everything isn't quite right. The housemaid and groundskeeper

:20:12.:20:13.

smile in a way that The friends turn up and they are not

:20:14.:20:16.

just attentive, it's almost as if they are treating the guest

:20:17.:20:24.

as some kind of trophy. We then move into something that

:20:25.:20:27.

Ira Levin, the writer of Stepford Wives and Rosemary's

:20:28.:20:30.

Baby would have recognised. The really clever thing

:20:31.:20:32.

about the film is, it manages the shift between being just

:20:33.:20:35.

about credible and going into something rather different

:20:36.:20:37.

very, very gradually. At it's at its best, I think,

:20:38.:20:42.

when all the horror remains hidden. The way to think of it is

:20:43.:20:46.

as something that starts out as a modern version

:20:47.:20:50.

of Guess Who's Coming To Dinner and then it drifts towards

:20:51.:20:52.

Red State or Greenroom, There is humour all the way through,

:20:53.:20:55.

and there are really dark The satire is really sort

:20:56.:20:59.

of piercing, and then when it needs to turn into something thrilling,

:21:00.:21:03.

shocking, it doesn't hold back. I thought it was a really

:21:04.:21:06.

effective piece of work. I saw it with a full screening room

:21:07.:21:13.

of people who were jumping, shrieking and laughing

:21:14.:21:17.

when they were meant to. It's a really, really smart social

:21:18.:21:19.

thriller/ horror film. Weirdly, it is about the underlying

:21:20.:21:22.

racism of the Liberal elite, It is not a film in which

:21:23.:21:33.

rednecks are the bad guys. The Liberals, who appear to be

:21:34.:21:37.

incredibly egalitarian, but there is something really

:21:38.:21:40.

sinister beneath the surface. As you say, the trailer is a real

:21:41.:21:42.

teaser and will get a lot of people The Salesman, this won the best

:21:43.:21:48.

foreign-language Oscar. Asghar Fahadi, the director,

:21:49.:21:54.

wasn't at the Acadamy Awards, he was boycotting them as a result

:21:55.:22:01.

of Donald Trump's travel ban. This isn't quite on a par

:22:02.:22:05.

with The Salesman. I think this is still a very

:22:06.:22:09.

fine piece of work. Husband-and-wife, part-time actors,

:22:10.:22:12.

putting on the play, She's attacked in the new apartment

:22:13.:22:14.

and his thoughts turned The real-life relationship

:22:15.:22:18.

spills onto the stage. Some people have complained

:22:19.:22:25.

the film is too schematic, that the bridge between the play

:22:26.:22:27.

and real life is too contrived. I thought it slipped from social

:22:28.:22:31.

observation into psychological I think it is a really humane work

:22:32.:22:34.

and you can absolutely believe in the characters

:22:35.:22:42.

and their situations. I think it's a film that

:22:43.:22:46.

blends the personal and the political

:22:47.:22:48.

rather beautifully. It's strangely mysterious

:22:49.:22:54.

and rather heartbreaking. Having heard a few lukewarm reviews,

:22:55.:22:55.

I was very, very impressed by it. That is in a league of its own

:22:56.:22:59.

and it's not as good as that, It is a smart, intelligent,

:23:00.:23:07.

melancholic, insightful drama about people you can

:23:08.:23:11.

really believe in. You mentioned good

:23:12.:23:13.

performances in that. That seems to be the overriding

:23:14.:23:14.

theme of your third film Kristin Stewart is absolutely

:23:15.:23:18.

brilliant in Olivier Assayas's film. It juxtaposes the spiritual

:23:19.:23:25.

and material world. It is literally a search

:23:26.:23:27.

for the afterlife and a search She is a personal shopper

:23:28.:23:31.

for a rich celebrity, so she spends her life

:23:32.:23:41.

going round choosing her wardrobe. However, she is also bereaved,

:23:42.:23:45.

having lost a brother, and she's trying to make

:23:46.:23:48.

contact with her brother Whoever died first would

:23:49.:23:50.

send the other a sign. You could call it that,

:23:51.:24:10.

you could call it a million things. At the beginning, it looks

:24:11.:24:24.

like being a really creepy ghost story, has her walking around

:24:25.:24:42.

the house, attempting Then, she starts getting text

:24:43.:24:45.

messages, and it's almost like her phone is working

:24:46.:24:53.

as a Ouija board. She doesn't know whether the text

:24:54.:24:55.

messages are coming from her brother, another spirit,

:24:56.:24:58.

a real-life stalker, or whether as the film suggests,

:24:59.:25:00.

they are coming from herself, The texts are asking,

:25:01.:25:03.

what are you afraid The phone almost

:25:04.:25:06.

becomes a confidante. As the film slips between the

:25:07.:25:11.

genres, as far as the supernatural stuff is concerned, it starts to be

:25:12.:25:14.

less sure-footed and drifts into territory that

:25:15.:25:17.

could be rather foolish. The reason that holds it together

:25:18.:25:19.

is because of her performance. She is in almost every shot,

:25:20.:25:22.

and it's a really sort She is brilliant, someone

:25:23.:25:25.

who is trying out different identities in the way she tries

:25:26.:25:28.

out different clothes. Somebody caught between this

:25:29.:25:32.

world and the next. For all the flaws of the film,

:25:33.:25:36.

and there are many, she is so good that she just carries it through,

:25:37.:25:42.

and I was mesmerised by her. As I said, I have been a huge fan

:25:43.:25:45.

of hers for a while. I love the Twilight movies,

:25:46.:25:49.

but in this, she is really fine This is a properly

:25:50.:25:52.

brilliant performance. The film is fine, interesting

:25:53.:25:55.

and adventurous, but it is flawed, but I would rather something aimed

:25:56.:26:01.

high and fell slightly short of the mark than just

:26:02.:26:04.

settled for something. This isn't something that

:26:05.:26:06.

you've seen every day. We always like to talk

:26:07.:26:08.

about film of the week. You and I could still be

:26:09.:26:13.

talking about Moonlight, and it's still on, because it won

:26:14.:26:16.

the best picture Oscar. We should perhaps pick

:26:17.:26:19.

out something else. There is another choice, this anime

:26:20.:26:23.

called A Silent In a macro released It is a schoolyard drama dealing

:26:24.:26:27.

with serious subjects - bullying, isolation,

:26:28.:26:36.

loneliness, self harm, suicidal thoughts, disability,

:26:37.:26:40.

in a way that is uplifting. A beautiful score, the animation

:26:41.:26:42.

is really well done, and it is one of those films

:26:43.:26:47.

that is all about learning to look the world in the eye,

:26:48.:26:51.

about learning to apologise It is a film with a lot

:26:52.:26:53.

of crying in it, and I don't I thought it was very

:26:54.:26:58.

touching, very impressive, DVD of the week is, and anyone

:26:59.:27:02.

who follows me on Twitter knows that Very stylish but hugely anti-women,

:27:03.:27:16.

and a difficult watch as a woman, I have to say, I don't think it is,

:27:17.:27:24.

but I understand that point of view. There is an LA art dealer

:27:25.:27:32.

who receives a manuscript from her ex-husband,

:27:33.:27:36.

which is a violent story which seems to have parallels with their life

:27:37.:27:38.

together, and the way in which one reads that story within a story,

:27:39.:27:42.

the fiction within a fiction, I know that a lot of people

:27:43.:27:46.

really don't like it, and I utterly respect

:27:47.:27:53.

that they don't. I have to say that I don't think

:27:54.:27:55.

that it is offensive in the way that some people do, but it is worth

:27:56.:27:59.

flagging up the fact that there are some people who have

:28:00.:28:02.

seen it and thought, this is just a film

:28:03.:28:05.

that is revelling in this violence. In its defence, on the violence

:28:06.:28:08.

issue, there is very little I mean, I think that one

:28:09.:28:11.

of the reasons it is powerful is because its ideas are powerful,

:28:12.:28:15.

and unpleasantly powerful. You're right, you don't

:28:16.:28:18.

actually see that much. But it's so powerfully conveyed that

:28:19.:28:20.

it's deeply unsettling. And that may account for the fact

:28:21.:28:23.

that it is only a 15 as well. It would be less unsettling

:28:24.:28:27.

if it was not as well made It is a 15 because there is very

:28:28.:28:30.

little actually displayed, but you think it is worse

:28:31.:28:34.

because it is tense. I absolutely understand your

:28:35.:28:37.

reservations, I just That's the DVD for this week -

:28:38.:28:39.

Nocturnal Animals made by Tom Ford. Before we go, you will find

:28:40.:28:48.

all our film news and reviews And all our previous

:28:49.:28:55.

programmes are there, Hello this is Breakfast,

:28:56.:29:09.

with Charlie Stayt and Tina Daheley. Coming up before 7:00,

:29:10.:30:20.

Ben will have the weather. But first, a summary of this

:30:21.:30:22.

morning's main news. Gordon Brown says Scotland should be

:30:23.:30:31.

handed a raft of new powers after Brexit to prevent

:30:32.:30:34.

the United Kingdom from splitting. The former Prime Minister will use

:30:35.:30:37.

a speech today to put forward his "third option"

:30:38.:30:40.

for Scotland's future. His intervention comes as the SNP

:30:41.:30:42.

leader Nicola Sturgeon, who has called for another

:30:43.:30:44.

independence referendum, addresses her party

:30:45.:30:46.

conference today. The first British soldiers

:30:47.:30:52.

have arrived in Estonia as part of the largest deployment of British

:30:53.:30:54.

troops to Europe since the end Over the next few weeks,

:30:55.:30:58.

a total of 800 British soldiers and hundreds of military vehicles

:30:59.:31:06.

will be sent the Baltic state in an attempt to deter

:31:07.:31:09.

Russian aggression. The American surveillance agency,

:31:10.:31:11.

the NSA, has rejected suggestions that British agents spied

:31:12.:31:13.

on Donald Trump, at the request On Wednesday, a White House

:31:14.:31:16.

spokesman discussed an allegation that GCHQ was asked to tap

:31:17.:31:20.

Mr Trump's calls last year. Downing Street says it's been

:31:21.:31:22.

reassured by Washington that the claim

:31:23.:31:25.

will not be repeated. What would be the advantage to the

:31:26.:31:37.

UK government of doing something like that? The cost would be immense

:31:38.:31:42.

in comparison to any value, so of course they wouldn't do it. It would

:31:43.:31:44.

be epically stupid. Schools should teach children how

:31:45.:31:46.

to spot "fake news" and recognise lies on social media, according

:31:47.:31:49.

to a leading education expert. The director of the influential

:31:50.:31:52.

think tank, the OECD, says pupils are becoming too

:31:53.:31:54.

dependent on the internet and need help distinguishing between true

:31:55.:31:57.

and false information online. US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson

:31:58.:32:04.

arrives in China today for the final leg of his tour of East Asia,

:32:05.:32:09.

which has been dominated by anxieties over North Korea's

:32:10.:32:12.

nuclear and ballistic missile Yesterday, Mr Tillerson warned

:32:13.:32:14.

Pyongyang that a military response would be "on the table" if it

:32:15.:32:19.

threatened South Korea or US forces and President Donald Trump tweeted

:32:20.:32:23.

that North Korea was "behaving very New research suggests the idyllic

:32:24.:32:26.

image some people have of the countryside is masking

:32:27.:32:31.

pockets of poverty, poor health and social isolation that can

:32:32.:32:37.

exist in rural areas. The report by Public Health England

:32:38.:32:40.

and the Local Government Association says official statistics are often

:32:41.:32:43.

skewed towards gathering information about people living

:32:44.:32:46.

in towns and cities. The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge

:32:47.:32:48.

will meet victims of the attack on the Bataclan concert

:32:49.:32:51.

hall in Paris today. Last night, the royal couple had

:32:52.:32:54.

dinner at the British embassy, where Prince William spoke

:32:55.:32:57.

of the enduring ties between France The visit is part of the British

:32:58.:33:00.

government's charm offensive in Europe ahead of the

:33:01.:33:07.

start of Brexit talks. Medical researchers have found the

:33:08.:33:19.

world's healthiest parts. They belong to a tribe of hunter

:33:20.:33:22.

gatherers in Bolivia. A study published in the Lancet found that

:33:23.:33:27.

two thirds of these people have unclogged arteries even in old age,

:33:28.:33:32.

will lead due to lots of exercise, no smoking, and they'd diet rich in

:33:33.:33:38.

lean meat, fruit and nuts. We have just described you, haven't we Mike?

:33:39.:33:43.

Yes, I am always foraging for meat and nuts. This is why you look so

:33:44.:33:47.

good at this time in the morning. Your secret is out. Thank you,

:33:48.:33:55.

Charlie. What do you have borrowers? Well, it is interesting. A second

:33:56.:33:59.

grand slam in a row would be fantastic, a world record is not

:34:00.:34:02.

something you can lift like trophy, but to beat the record of New

:34:03.:34:06.

Zealand is something that may never be repeated. The world record of

:34:07.:34:10.

consecutive wins Best and Mark yes, we are after 19. They run 18 at the

:34:11.:34:15.

moment. If they can beat Island in Dublin, no easy feat, they will be

:34:16.:34:19.

ahead of New Zealand, who have 18. They are regarded as the world

:34:20.:34:22.

number one. Now there is this potential match in the autumn

:34:23.:34:24.

between the two as well. So, yes, England are going for rugby

:34:25.:34:26.

union history later. If they beat Ireland in Dublin

:34:27.:34:29.

they'll break New Zealand's record of consecutive wins and win a second

:34:30.:34:32.

Six Nations Grand Slam in a row. They've already won the tournament,

:34:33.:34:36.

but Ireland are hoping We have ever East Ryde, with every

:34:37.:34:47.

dive, England get closer to the unprecedented. -- every stride. No

:34:48.:34:52.

nation has won 19 top-level rugby matches in a row. If England can do

:34:53.:34:56.

it it will be a world record constructive from the ashes of their

:34:57.:34:59.

World Cup, a tournament they exited in the group stage. Eddie Jones has

:35:00.:35:03.

coached them from disaster to triumph, what is still some way from

:35:04.:35:09.

his summit. To go from where we go to greatness takes another step of

:35:10.:35:13.

endeavour. It takes greater focus, it takes greater persistence. It

:35:14.:35:18.

takes greater in motion output, you know? It is like climbing up a

:35:19.:35:23.

mountain. -- emotional output. How do you measure this team's rights?

:35:24.:35:28.

No England side has won back Grand Slams in the professional era. The

:35:29.:35:34.

last Saturday jobs, will Carling's heroes of 1991 and 1992. This run

:35:35.:35:40.

will eclipse out. They have gone to Australia and won 3-0, that has

:35:41.:35:43.

never been done before by an English team. Back to back Grand Slams, a

:35:44.:35:47.

world record run, you know, we are just left in the wake. I think it

:35:48.:35:55.

would be exceptional. "Would Be" The conditional tense. Appropriate,

:35:56.:35:58.

because when England go to Dublin, nothing is certain. For island, this

:35:59.:36:02.

team has been a disappointment, which could yet have one redeeming

:36:03.:36:05.

feature. We are well aware of everything that England are going

:36:06.:36:09.

for tomorrow, but for us, it is St Patrick's Day weekend, we are at

:36:10.:36:13.

home with a very proud record, at home, and we take huge confidence

:36:14.:36:17.

from that. So just one more lift from England. At its May require the

:36:18.:36:20.

biggest yet. So it England do it, they will

:36:21.:36:28.

emerge the women, who trialled in Dublin to seal their own Grand Slam.

:36:29.:36:30.

-- they will emulate in Dublin A victory for either side

:36:31.:36:34.

would have secured the title, but it was England who ran away

:36:35.:36:37.

with it, with 5 tries, It's the first time they've won

:36:38.:36:40.

the competition since 2012. it was always going to be a really,

:36:41.:36:48.

really tough first half. We said all along, it was going to be a game

:36:49.:36:52.

that would probably go to the wire. We got away from the Irish girls at

:36:53.:36:56.

the end a bit, but they were awesome in the first art in particular. We

:36:57.:37:00.

just knew we had to weather the storm. That's defensive bit at the

:37:01.:37:02.

end of the first half was immense. Scotland and Italy is at 12:30 p.m.,

:37:03.:37:11.

then it is France and Wales, then Ireland and England. Now, I do feel

:37:12.:37:15.

guilty this morning. Yesterday morning at around this time, I was

:37:16.:37:18.

sitting in the press room at Cheltenham, and an Irish journalist

:37:19.:37:22.

came up next to me and whispered, Sizing John. And walked off. And I

:37:23.:37:26.

didn't tell anybody, did I? I did put some money on. What did he say?

:37:27.:37:33.

Sizing John. Which is the name of the horse? Yes, which won the gold

:37:34.:37:38.

cup. In case people were wondering. Just to clarify that. That is why I

:37:39.:37:46.

didn't understand it. Anyway, the seven to one shot won the gold cup.

:37:47.:37:51.

with her first entry in the famous race.

:37:52.:37:55.

The favourite, Djakadam, finished in fourth after hitting

:37:56.:37:57.

a fence and Sizing John powered clear to repeat his triumph

:37:58.:38:00.

Jockey Robbie Power, also rode the 2007 Grand National

:38:01.:38:05.

It is unbelievable. To say that I was 25 101 the Grand National, and

:38:06.:38:14.

I'm 35 now, I appreciate this a lot more. It is a fantastic feeling. To

:38:15.:38:20.

be a gold cup winning jockey, that sounds very sweet.

:38:21.:38:21.

Leicester City will face Atletico Madrid,

:38:22.:38:23.

in the quarterfinals of the Champions League.

:38:24.:38:25.

The English Champions are the only British side left

:38:26.:38:28.

Atletico have been runners up in the Champions league twice,

:38:29.:38:31.

Meanwhile in the Europa League quarterfinals, Manchester United,

:38:32.:38:35.

will meet the Belgian side Anderlecht.

:38:36.:38:36.

Chelsea can extend their lead at the top of the Premier League,

:38:37.:38:40.

to thirteen points, if they beat Stoke City later.

:38:41.:38:42.

That's one of seven matches taking place today, including an important

:38:43.:38:45.

match for Arsenal at West Brom this lunchtime, as they try to catch

:38:46.:38:49.

They are currently five points off fourth place.

:38:50.:38:57.

In Scotland, if 2nd-placed Aberdeen lose against Hearts this lunchtime,

:38:58.:39:00.

Celtic can claim the title tomorrow if they beat Dundee.

:39:01.:39:03.

There was a big surprise in the Championship last night

:39:04.:39:07.

as promotion-chasing Huddersfield Town were beaten

:39:08.:39:09.

The result means Huddersfield remain six points behind the top

:39:10.:39:13.

two, and moves City out of the relegation places.

:39:14.:39:15.

In the night's other match Reading, moved fourth, after beating sixth

:39:16.:39:18.

Hull FC, moved level on points with Castleford Tigers,

:39:19.:39:22.

at the top of Super League, after beating struggling

:39:23.:39:28.

Leeds Rhinos, joined them on eight points,

:39:29.:39:32.

after they ran in six tries in their 38-14 victory over

:39:33.:39:35.

We're used to seeing birdies, eagles and even the odd albatross

:39:36.:39:41.

Smylie Kaufman was leisurely strolling up to the green,

:39:42.:39:54.

along the edge of the lake, when he suddenly notices something

:39:55.:39:58.

lurking in the rough - he then tells his caddie who also

:39:59.:40:03.

double takes and gives the alligator a wide berth.

:40:04.:40:08.

And then as they gathered their nerves, they might have

:40:09.:40:11.

expected Sir David Attenborough to pop up, to describe this live

:40:12.:40:17.

but the fish might just be a Dory Mackerel, or Danny Fillett,

:40:18.:40:23.

Those were jokes, by the way. Like Rory McIlroy? What happened to the

:40:24.:40:33.

alligator? They gave it a wide berth. It eventually went back to

:40:34.:40:37.

the water. The day before, one of the players actually nudged it back

:40:38.:40:40.

into the water. Now, talking of giving you a fright.

:40:41.:40:41.

It worked for champions Leicester City last season

:40:42.:40:43.

and a growing number of sports clubs are putting their players

:40:44.:40:46.

into the deep freeze to give them the edge.

:40:47.:40:49.

At Fulham, who are on a great run, they strip off and suffer

:40:50.:40:52.

temperatures of -119 degrees several times a week.

:40:53.:40:55.

To see what happens I went to join them.

:40:56.:40:59.

30 seconds to go. It is like something out of a science fiction

:41:00.:41:13.

movie. But this is how they warm up and warm down now, at Fulham. In a

:41:14.:41:19.

deep freeze. After seeing it works so well for Leicester, the

:41:20.:41:23.

champions, last season, full now have a permanent whole-body

:41:24.:41:28.

cryotherapy trainer at their training ground, which they use

:41:29.:41:31.

several times a week. It produces the recovery time between games,

:41:32.:41:34.

reduces the muscle saunas, and we use it before games as a

:41:35.:41:38.

stimulation. It can also help you sleep, with mood. So much training

:41:39.:41:45.

now for the modern footballer. Reactivation classes like this

:41:46.:41:48.

before training has even begun, and then afterwards, the heart rate has

:41:49.:41:52.

gone up, and before the warm-ups, we have the big freeze. OK, gentlemen.

:41:53.:42:00.

It yourselves ready. I first went in with players Tom Kearney and Scott

:42:01.:42:04.

Malone. The coldest place recorded on earth ever has been -89.2. We are

:42:05.:42:10.

going in to -100 19. And you do the seven times a week now? You'd get

:42:11.:42:16.

down to such depths in two stages. Hello! This is only the pre-

:42:17.:42:24.

chamber. It is only minus 60. You can't breathe at first. Then it was

:42:25.:42:31.

into the main, and coldest chamber, for two whole minutes. I also went

:42:32.:42:36.

in here with goalkeeper David button. It feels like knives,

:42:37.:42:40.

doesn't it? It feels like knives in your legs and arms. So in this

:42:41.:42:45.

controlled environment, the body is sent into a state of shock, which

:42:46.:42:48.

stimulates our natural recovery mode. And it is believed this is

:42:49.:42:53.

beneficial for the immune system and energy levels which the players say

:42:54.:42:57.

the last two days. You are relieved to get out at the start, but I think

:42:58.:43:03.

if it is the day before a match, you feel a lot better, yeah. Definitely

:43:04.:43:07.

found it a lot fresher going into training, and into games. You don't

:43:08.:43:11.

get frostbite, because stay here the two minutes. The mindnumbing

:43:12.:43:15.

temperatures are created by gas, so it is a very dry cold. In countries

:43:16.:43:19.

were started, the uses extend beyond sport. This is mainstream practice

:43:20.:43:24.

in Poland for rheumatoid arthritis. Any inflammatory pathology, multiple

:43:25.:43:30.

sclerosis we have seen. There is the reason, with all the reported

:43:31.:43:33.

feedback about sleep, why this couldn't be used for people with

:43:34.:43:37.

insomnia. Sleep can come later. I came out feeling the rush. It is a

:43:38.:43:42.

great feeling when you come out. You feel rejuvenated and alive, don't

:43:43.:43:46.

you? More flexible. Hormone release, is it? It has happened, suddenly.

:43:47.:43:52.

You feel like you have run, almost to be human. At the end, my

:43:53.:43:57.

heartrate variability had gone from 74 to 92. A real improvement, badly.

:43:58.:44:05.

Now, though, time to get warm. Where is your dressing gown? I feel ready

:44:06.:44:07.

to bet. Apparently it is the same effect if

:44:08.:44:14.

you released a bunch of lions at the ground and cut them to chase the

:44:15.:44:17.

players. That obviously might be dangerous. This is a more controlled

:44:18.:44:21.

way of giving them that shock, that fear, to stimulant all those nice,

:44:22.:44:24.

beneficial things. Did it have an impact?? Yes, I slipped deeper. For

:44:25.:44:30.

two days, I did feel like they ran a six mile run, actually, I did run a

:44:31.:44:35.

six mile run and I was three minutes quicker than I normally. I mean, it

:44:36.:44:39.

was under conditions, as well. And I stay, I'd do so many hills. It

:44:40.:44:44.

wasn't scientific. Well, we will see later on. And if you have had, what

:44:45.:44:49.

is it called? Cryotherapy. If you have a cryotherapy experience,

:44:50.:44:53.

sharer to a bus. Obviously it is not something you can try out home, you

:44:54.:44:56.

have to do it in controlled conditions. Do not jump into your

:44:57.:44:58.

freezer. Not cold enough for any cryotherapy

:44:59.:45:11.

this weekend, a mild weekend in prospect but unsettled, a lot of

:45:12.:45:16.

cloud around. For many it will be quite breezy and some rain at times

:45:17.:45:20.

but not all the time and not for everyone, many areas in the east

:45:21.:45:24.

won't see that much rain but further west you will be exposed to this

:45:25.:45:28.

pipeline of cloud ploughing across the frantic so there will be

:45:29.:45:32.

outbreaks at times, much of it quite light and patchy. A different type

:45:33.:45:37.

of whether to start the day in Northern Scotland, a bright start

:45:38.:45:41.

here, some sunshine with a few showers but cold enough for ice UIC

:45:42.:45:45.

stretches but southern Scotland into Northern Ireland, north-west

:45:46.:45:48.

England, more cloud but fairly mild, double digits even by 8am. A bit of

:45:49.:45:55.

brightness for north-east England, may be used angry, the further west

:45:56.:46:00.

Uecomm, a lot of cloud to start the day, outbreaks of patchy rain, mild

:46:01.:46:04.

but fairly breezy. Through the day we will see a lot of cloud, patchy

:46:05.:46:10.

rain in the west. The best chance of brightness in eastern Scotland and

:46:11.:46:13.

eastern England and it will feel mild here. Through the afternoon

:46:14.:46:17.

more persistent rain in Northern Ireland, south-west Scotland,

:46:18.:46:20.

northern England and the Wales as well. A mixture of sunny spells and

:46:21.:46:24.

showers for Northern Scotland, chilly here, but further south, mild

:46:25.:46:29.

especially if things brighten up where you are. Six Nations this

:46:30.:46:34.

weekend, a big week end, matches in Edinburgh, Paris and Dublin, not

:46:35.:46:37.

much going on with the weather, a lot of cloud and maybe patchy rain

:46:38.:46:42.

at times. Heavy rain this evening in Northern Ireland, Scotland and

:46:43.:46:46.

northern England. To the south of that, cloudy conditions, the odd

:46:47.:46:50.

spot of drizzle, fairly breezy and for the majority it will be a mild

:46:51.:46:55.

night. Tomorrow in many ways we do it all again. Some rain especially

:46:56.:46:59.

in the west, heavy and persistent rain in Northern Ireland, parts of

:47:00.:47:02.

Scotland and northern England. Further south, not much rain, even

:47:03.:47:07.

some brightness at times, especially towards the south-east and that will

:47:08.:47:10.

lift temperatures to the mid-teens and cooler towards the north-west.

:47:11.:47:17.

Gradually into next week, a change we lose the mild weather and we

:47:18.:47:21.

bring in cooler weather from the west but it will still be pretty

:47:22.:47:23.

unsettled. Back to thank you, Ben. Bad news for next

:47:24.:47:30.

week. We will be back at 7am with the headlines but now time for Click

:47:31.:47:33.

with Spencer Kelly. Get ready, your Indian experience

:47:34.:47:55.

starts now. As soon as you step off the plane,

:47:56.:48:13.

India hits you like a big, hot wall of noise. It is everything you ever

:48:14.:48:20.

imagined it to be. It is life turned up to 11. The first thing you'll

:48:21.:48:27.

will be the traffic. It's always the traffic. Is that it just to kind of

:48:28.:48:33.

step out and... OK, this looks like a gap -- is the tip. The sound is

:48:34.:48:40.

deafening. Everyone's on King. For 70 years this country has been

:48:41.:48:44.

independent of British rule and the cities that have sprung up around

:48:45.:48:48.

the old colonial grandeur seemed chaotic, but they do kind of work...

:48:49.:48:56.

Kind of. -- seem. And India has found a niche in the wider world.

:48:57.:49:02.

Half of its 1.2 billion people are aged 35 or under. Maybe that's why

:49:03.:49:08.

it's known for its IT know-how, its outsourcing. And the bosses of some

:49:09.:49:12.

of the biggest tech companies in the world are Indian. But it hasn't had

:49:13.:49:17.

as much luck in taking over the world of consumer technology. After

:49:18.:49:22.

all, how many Indian tech brands can you name? The trick is, although

:49:23.:49:26.

there is a middle-class consumers here willing to buy brands, it's not

:49:27.:49:35.

actually that big or that rich. We're here to find out how India is

:49:36.:49:40.

preparing for its future. And let me tell you, it is reaching for the

:49:41.:49:42.

stars. In 2013, India became the fourth

:49:43.:49:55.

spacefaring nation to launch a probe into orbit around Mars. And unlike

:49:56.:50:00.

those who came before them, they did it on their first attempt. The

:50:01.:50:06.

Indian Space Research Organisation, Isro, has been gaining a reputation

:50:07.:50:10.

for doing tons of successful space stuff on a shoestring budget. Their

:50:11.:50:16.

Mars mission came in at just $74 million. That's less than it cost to

:50:17.:50:21.

make the film Gravity. And in February this year, they made

:50:22.:50:25.

history again by launching a record 104 satellites on a single rocket.

:50:26.:50:31.

It could just be that India has created the perfect combination of

:50:32.:50:35.

big brains with big space experience, but a mentality for

:50:36.:50:39.

doing things on the cheap. Just the sort of place you might go if you

:50:40.:50:45.

wanted to, say, land a robot on the moon for the space equivalent of

:50:46.:50:48.

small change. How confident are you that this will work? LAUGHTER

:50:49.:50:59.

welcome to the earthbound HQ of Team Indus, one of a handful of start-ups

:51:00.:51:04.

competing for the Google Lunar XPRIZE, that's $20 million for the

:51:05.:51:08.

first commercial company to land a rover on the Moon.

:51:09.:51:15.

December, 2017, blast of! The Team Indus spacecraft goes into two days

:51:16.:51:22.

of Earth orbit and then, boom, 4.5 days to the Moon. 12 days of

:51:23.:51:27.

spiralling down to the surface and, if all goes well, out comes the

:51:28.:51:31.

rover, travels half a kilometre, sends back HD video and winds the

:51:32.:51:37.

prize. What could possibly go wrong? Team Rahul Narayan is the co-founder

:51:38.:51:44.

of Team Indus and he has been here since the very start of the project

:51:45.:51:48.

way back in 2010. At that point you had no idea how you would achieve

:51:49.:51:56.

it? Yes, I googled and figured out what Wikipedia had to say about

:51:57.:51:59.

landing on the mood. You did an internet search on how to land on

:52:00.:52:07.

the moon? Absolutely. Did it have any useful information? Yes. It said

:52:08.:52:11.

there had been 85 attempts and I think every second attempt failed to

:52:12.:52:14.

the moon. Six years later there are around 100 people working very hard

:52:15.:52:18.

here and it certainly looks like they know their space stuff. Star

:52:19.:52:23.

Wars in particular. Even the toilets are appropriately labelled. And they

:52:24.:52:29.

built themselves all the things a serious space company should have,

:52:30.:52:33.

like a Mission control room, a model lander that makes smoke, and a

:52:34.:52:40.

simulated lunar surface complete with a rover to go in it. Just like

:52:41.:52:47.

national space agencies, testing every component and simulating every

:52:48.:52:50.

stage of the mission is a huge part of what they're doing here. We're

:52:51.:52:53.

making sure we're doing everything right, we're just not making it

:52:54.:52:57.

fancy. We're going to make it frugal, specific to the mission, but

:52:58.:53:00.

there's absolutely no corners that we're cutting. And, to look at it

:53:01.:53:05.

from a more philosophical way, we have one shot to wind this. We don't

:53:06.:53:10.

have a flight spare, so if one blows up we can go and fly the other, we

:53:11.:53:18.

have to get this right. Team Indus is one of five start-ups from around

:53:19.:53:22.

the world that have secured launch contracts for their rovers. While

:53:23.:53:25.

they can't say for sure, they think they'll launch before any other team

:53:26.:53:29.

and so perhaps be the first team to land and wind! Well, that's except

:53:30.:53:32.

for the fact that to save costs they've had to sell some of their

:53:33.:53:36.

spare launch weight to a competitor rover. Japan's Team Hakuto will

:53:37.:53:39.

onboard too. You're both going to get to the moon at the same time.

:53:40.:53:45.

Yes. How is that going to work, it is whoever touches down first and

:53:46.:53:49.

who has the fastest rover, it's going to be crazy? In a manner of

:53:50.:53:54.

speaking, yes. What do you expect to happen? It's a race, it's going to

:53:55.:53:59.

be a very interesting race and once we touched down and both the rovers

:54:00.:54:02.

are deployed, let's see which one makes 500 metres first. I would so

:54:03.:54:09.

put a laser gun on yours. All of that assumes of course that the

:54:10.:54:13.

rovers make it to the moon in the first place. Space exploration is a

:54:14.:54:17.

risky business and when it goes wrong it tends to go really wrong.

:54:18.:54:20.

Six years, hundreds of thousands of hours of effort and millions spent.

:54:21.:54:23.

There's certainly a lot riding on getting things right. You mitigate

:54:24.:54:27.

the peak pieces and then you start mitigating the smaller risks and

:54:28.:54:30.

then at the end of the day, absolutely, one small wrong piece of

:54:31.:54:35.

code that somehow made its way through could kill the entire

:54:36.:54:36.

mission. There is a word here in India that I

:54:37.:54:45.

think describes Team Indus's low cost make do approach. Jugaad. I've

:54:46.:55:00.

come to the centre of Mumbai to Dharavi, Asia's second-largest slum.

:55:01.:55:06.

Here in its tiny alleyways, jugaad is all around as a desperately poor

:55:07.:55:11.

population reuses as much as is physically possible. Built by

:55:12.:55:15.

workers who flocked to the city of hundreds of years, some of the

:55:16.:55:20.

houses here date back to the 1840s. Up ahead there's a pile of shredded

:55:21.:55:24.

denim which they use for fuel, they burn it to fuel the kilns, just like

:55:25.:55:29.

they burn a lot of stuff for fuel here. There is smoke everywhere

:55:30.:55:34.

here, you can really tell the air-quality is very poor. You just

:55:35.:55:45.

have to take a few lung fulls and it starts to burn the back of your

:55:46.:55:48.

throat, it makes your highs sting. The smoke is a necessary evil for

:55:49.:55:52.

the people of Dharavi, and like most of the developing world, pollution

:55:53.:55:55.

has been the price India is paying for a booming economy. The smog that

:55:56.:56:03.

gives Mumbai its spectacular sunsets has also made it the fifth most

:56:04.:56:07.

polluted mega city in the world. And when the sun disappears before it

:56:08.:56:12.

hits the horizon, you can well believe it. In November, 2016, the

:56:13.:56:21.

Indian government declared the air pollution in Delhi a national

:56:22.:56:25.

emergency, with harmful pollutants more than 16 times the safe limit.

:56:26.:56:31.

And it's not just caused by all that traffic. So where does it come from?

:56:32.:56:36.

I was surprised to find out a lot of it comes from diesel generators. The

:56:37.:56:45.

electricity in India is an very reliable but plenty of businesses

:56:46.:56:49.

need guaranteed power so they have their own individual generators that

:56:50.:56:53.

fire up whenever the electricity goes down and that means there are

:56:54.:56:57.

loads of exhaust pipes like this all over the city which regularly belch

:56:58.:57:01.

out all kinds of unpleasant stuff. Hello. Here in Bangalore, we've come

:57:02.:57:12.

across a small project to capture the soot and turn it into art.

:57:13.:57:20.

What we have built is we have built a retrofit device that attaches to

:57:21.:57:27.

the exhaust pipe of the chimneys and this can be attached to pretty much

:57:28.:57:31.

any exhaust pipe, irrespective of the age or type of engine you are

:57:32.:57:35.

linked and it captures practically whatever matter comes out of it.

:57:36.:57:42.

Once you capture matter that is substantially carbon, which is like

:57:43.:57:45.

the basis of everything that exists in the world, at present we recycle

:57:46.:57:49.

it into inks, which we believe is something used by practically

:57:50.:57:57.

everybody on the planet. The headquarters of Graviky Labs is a

:57:58.:58:07.

mix of art studio and mad laboratory, the perfect combination

:58:08.:58:11.

if you ask me. Their so-called air Inc does have a few restrictions. It

:58:12.:58:21.

will only ever come in black and at the moment it's not good enough

:58:22.:58:24.

quality to be used in printers. Graviky is giving it to artists, who

:58:25.:58:34.

are finding their own uses for it. Painting and screenprinting, for

:58:35.:58:36.

example, for use on clothes and bags. And while the ink may only

:58:37.:58:40.

have limited uses at present, Nikhil insists it is still better to put

:58:41.:58:44.

the carbon to good use rather than just collect it and dump it. There

:58:45.:58:47.

are a lot of technologies that have captured pollution in one way or

:58:48.:58:51.

another. If you don't recycle it you are actually leaving it for future

:58:52.:58:54.

generations. I'm afraid that's all we have time

:58:55.:58:59.

for in the shortcut of Click, the full-length version is on iPlayer

:59:00.:59:03.

for you to watch right now and there's loads of extra photos from

:59:04.:59:06.

our trip to India on Twitter at: Thanks for watching and we'll see

:59:07.:59:10.

you soon. Hello, this is Breakfast,

:59:11.:00:20.

with Charlie Stayt and Tina Daheley. A third way for Scotland's future

:00:21.:00:23.

as Gordon Brown sets out a plan The former Prime Minister will say

:00:24.:00:27.

a new kind of federal home rule is needed for the United Kingdom,

:00:28.:00:33.

to avoid years of bitter division. Good morning. It is Saturday

:00:34.:00:56.

Saturday. Also ahead. More than 100 British troops head to Estonia in an

:00:57.:01:00.

attempt to deter Russian aggression. A US you security chief dismisses

:01:01.:01:05.

claims that GCHQ carried out surveillance of Donald Trump as

:01:06.:01:09.

nonsense. In the sport a world record and a Grand Slam is there for

:01:10.:01:13.

England's men if they can do what the women did and beat Ireland to

:01:14.:01:19.

win their Six Nations trophy. Hello. This is only the...

:01:20.:01:26.

Prechamber. It is only minus 60! Boy, did it get colder. I have been

:01:27.:01:30.

to cool off in a deep freeze to see how it could improve sporting

:01:31.:01:33.

performance. And Ben has the weather. Good morning. It is an

:01:34.:01:40.

unsettled weekend. We'll have cloudy weather and breezy weather, but

:01:41.:01:45.

rainfall amounts will vary. Find out how much rain you're going to get in

:01:46.:01:49.

15 minutes. Good morning. First, Gordon Brown says Scotland should be

:01:50.:01:53.

handed a raft of new powers after Brexit to prevent the United Kingdom

:01:54.:01:59.

from splitting. The former Prime Minister will use a speech today to

:02:00.:02:02.

put forward his third option for Scotland's future. His intervention

:02:03.:02:06.

comes as Nicola Sturgeon addresses her party conference today. Our

:02:07.:02:12.

political Iain Watson reports. Nicola Sturgeon has been saying what

:02:13.:02:15.

her members and supporters want to hear. That a second referendum in

:02:16.:02:20.

Scottish independence should happen before Britain leaves the EU. But

:02:21.:02:25.

she knows she has to broaden her support beyond her power base so she

:02:26.:02:28.

will argue her call for a referendum isn't just about standing up for

:02:29.:02:32.

Scotland, it is about democracy. When Nicola Sturgeon takes to this

:02:33.:02:35.

stage later today, she will repeat her demand for a second independence

:02:36.:02:39.

referendum. But it looks like Theresa May isn't for turning. The

:02:40.:02:45.

SNP see their call for a referendum as a win-win because either Theresa

:02:46.:02:50.

May gives in in their time scale or they believe that her refusal to do

:02:51.:02:56.

so will help them build for for independence in the slightly longer

:02:57.:03:00.

term. I think Theresa May trying to deny the Scottish people their say

:03:01.:03:03.

on this is something she will have cause to regret, but I think the

:03:04.:03:06.

longer Theresa May tries to deny the people of Scotland their say, the

:03:07.:03:09.

better it is for the campaign for independence. This is everyone's

:03:10.:03:15.

flag, everyone's country. Everyone's culture and everyone's street. This

:03:16.:03:19.

former Prime Minister was credited with saving the Union, when he

:03:20.:03:23.

passionately campaigned against independence at the last referendum.

:03:24.:03:27.

This time, he says, after Brexit, Scotland could get a more powerful

:03:28.:03:30.

Parliament without having to break its links to the rest of the UK.

:03:31.:03:35.

Gordon Brown is calling for a federal United Kingdom with the

:03:36.:03:38.

Scottish Parliament taking powers from Brussels, getting control of

:03:39.:03:43.

VAT rates, and negotiating treaties with other European countries. But

:03:44.:03:46.

from Nicola Sturgeon's prospective the choice for voters should be

:03:47.:03:50.

stark. An independent Scotland that wants to be in the EU, or remaining

:03:51.:03:59.

with Brexit Britain. The first British soldiers have

:04:00.:04:03.

arrived in Estonia as part of the largest deployment of British troops

:04:04.:04:06.

to Europe since the end of the Cold War. A total of 800 British soldiers

:04:07.:04:10.

and hundreds of military vehicles will be sent to the Baltic state as

:04:11.:04:15.

Nato forces attempt to deter Russian aggression. Jonathan Beale reports.

:04:16.:04:23.

The British Army has been preparing for this moment, these tanks took

:04:24.:04:27.

part in a final exercise in Germany ahead of the move east towards

:04:28.:04:33.

Russia. And they're now among 300 military vehicles that have been

:04:34.:04:38.

loaded on to a ferry destined for the small Baltic state offest tonia.

:04:39.:04:46.

-- of Estonia. This is the start of the biggest deployment since the end

:04:47.:04:49.

of the Cold War that will see British troops with tanks and armour

:04:50.:04:53.

deployed on the eastern flank of Nato ready to reassure our allies,

:04:54.:04:59.

ready to stand up for the collective defence of Nato and to deter any

:05:00.:05:05.

possible Russian aggression. The first British troops are trained and

:05:06.:05:09.

ready to go, not just alert to any military threat, but also from other

:05:10.:05:20.

potential provocations. Do you think it is the Russians playing games and

:05:21.:05:24.

using social media and fake news and all that stuff? It is a mixture of

:05:25.:05:29.

stuff. I hear about cyber threat and all that stuff, but again we've

:05:30.:05:35.

trained for every eventuality. We know how to protect ourselves. Are

:05:36.:05:39.

you worried about anything? There is a credible threat over the border,

:05:40.:05:43.

but I think we're credible deterrent. These are the first of

:05:44.:05:47.

800 British troops who will be arriving in Estonia over the next

:05:48.:05:50.

few weeks and it is just the start of what could be a long, open-ended

:05:51.:05:55.

deployment to deter Russian aggression. They're not xwpting to

:05:56.:06:00.

go to war, but these soldiers will still be caught up in the rising

:06:01.:06:04.

tensions between Russia and the West. They are not alone though. The

:06:05.:06:10.

US, Canada and Germany are also sending their troops to reinforce

:06:11.:06:13.

Nato's eastern flank. The American surveillance agency,

:06:14.:06:23.

the NSA rejected suggestions that British agents spied on Donald Trump

:06:24.:06:26.

at the request of President Obama's administration. On Wednesday, a

:06:27.:06:32.

White House spokesman discussed an allegation that GCHQ was asked to

:06:33.:06:35.

tap Mr Trump's calls last year. Jewel jewel reports. Tulip Mazumdar

:06:36.:06:41.

reports. Two strong leaders with many differences. They discussed

:06:42.:06:45.

immigration, trade and Nato, and then the thorny issue of wire

:06:46.:06:49.

tapping came up. At least we have something in common perhaps.

:06:50.:06:57.

LAUGHTER It was an awkward joke that didn't

:06:58.:07:01.

seem to particularly amuse the Chancellor. The US admitted in 2015

:07:02.:07:07.

to tapping Angela Merkel's phone, there is no evidence supporting

:07:08.:07:11.

Donald Trump's similar claims and today he distanced himself from

:07:12.:07:19.

suggestions by his own press secretary that British intelligence

:07:20.:07:22.

could have been involved. I didn't make an opinion on it. That was a

:07:23.:07:27.

statement made by a talented lawyer on Fox. So you shouldn't k talking

:07:28.:07:31.

to me, you should be talking to Fox. Downing Street has been assured the

:07:32.:07:35.

US will not repeat the claims. In an exclusive interview with the BBC,

:07:36.:07:40.

America's equivalent agency to GCHQ had this to say about the

:07:41.:07:44.

allegations of UK involvement. What would be the advantage to the UK

:07:45.:07:47.

Government of doing something like that? The cost would be immense in

:07:48.:07:52.

comparison to any value. So, of course, they wouldn't do it. It

:07:53.:07:56.

would be end I canically stupid. Arriving in Florida with his family

:07:57.:08:01.

for the weekend, the president will no doubt be reflecting on yet

:08:02.:08:04.

another controversial week in office.

:08:05.:08:11.

US Secretary of State, Rex Tillerson, arrives in China today

:08:12.:08:14.

for the final leg of his tour of East Asia which has been dominated

:08:15.:08:20.

by anxieties over North Korea nuclear and ballistic missile

:08:21.:08:24.

programmes. Yesterday, Mr Tillerson warned Pyongyang that a military

:08:25.:08:31.

response would be on the table if it threatened South Korea. President

:08:32.:08:37.

Trump tweeted that North Korea was behaving badly. Schools should teach

:08:38.:08:41.

children how to recognise lies on social media. The director of the

:08:42.:08:51.

think-tank the OECD pupils are becoming to reliant on the internet.

:08:52.:09:01.

New research suggest the idyllic imimage people have the countryside

:09:02.:09:06.

is mask social isolation. A report says official statistics are often

:09:07.:09:09.

skewed towards gathering information about people living in towns and

:09:10.:09:20.

cities as Daniel Boettcher reports. Sheila Wallis go to this leisure

:09:21.:09:23.

centre in Withernsea three times a week. She was referred there by a

:09:24.:09:28.

health trainer and she is significant improvements, but

:09:29.:09:31.

getting there takes an hour by bus. A lot of people don't drive so

:09:32.:09:35.

having the transport is essential because if it wasn't, I couldn't

:09:36.:09:39.

come here. Nearly ten million people in England live in areas defined as

:09:40.:09:45.

rural. Current measures show that overall their health is better than

:09:46.:09:49.

those living in towns, but a new report says the statistics can mask

:09:50.:09:53.

pockets of deprivation and poor health, that the age demographic is

:09:54.:09:56.

changing and it is often difficult to access health and care services.

:09:57.:10:03.

The study says 20% of people in rural areas live more than

:10:04.:10:06.

to-and-a-half miles from a GP surgery, compared with just 2% in

:10:07.:10:14.

urban areas and that almost 15% of rural households living in relative

:10:15.:10:17.

poverty after housing costs are taken into account. The report says

:10:18.:10:20.

that not enough is known about the health and well-being of people

:10:21.:10:24.

living in the countryside. We have been concerned for sometime that

:10:25.:10:28.

official Government statistics in other areas don't effectively

:10:29.:10:31.

capture the needs of rural areas and that's not just the remotest places,

:10:32.:10:34.

it is the rural areas on the fringes of our towns and cities. The

:10:35.:10:39.

Government says it wants everyone to get high quality healthcare

:10:40.:10:42.

regardless of where they live and it is targeting recruitment of new GPs

:10:43.:10:50.

to the areas that need them most. Prince William and the Duchess of

:10:51.:10:54.

Cambridge will meet victims of the attack on the Bataclan concert hall

:10:55.:11:00.

in Paris today. Yesterday the royal couple met French President,

:11:01.:11:06.

Francois Hollande. This report by our royal correspondent, Nicholas

:11:07.:11:10.

Witchell, contains flashing images. Behind the glamour of a black-tie

:11:11.:11:15.

dinner at the British Embassy, lies a serious purpose. Visits like this

:11:16.:11:19.

one by William and Catherine to Paris are done at the behes of the

:11:20.:11:25.

Foreign Office and the Royal Family are being deployed to Europe.

:11:26.:11:29.

Nothing too obviously political, but in a concerted effort to remind

:11:30.:11:33.

Europe of what Britain contributes to the Continent and how nothing

:11:34.:11:38.

need change. William read a message from the Queen. The ties between our

:11:39.:11:44.

nations have stood the test of time and will I'm sure continue to

:11:45.:11:48.

prosper. I hope you have a most enjoyable and memorable evening.

:11:49.:11:54.

Signed Elizabeth R. Earlier in a speech, William talked of the deep

:11:55.:11:56.

friendship between the United Kingdom and France, forged as he put

:11:57.:12:02.

it in sweat and blood and... This partnership will continue despite

:12:03.:12:05.

Britain's recent decision to leave the European Union. The depth of our

:12:06.:12:11.

friendship and the breadth of our co-operation will not change. Today,

:12:12.:12:18.

among other engagements the duke and duchess will meet survivors from the

:12:19.:12:21.

Bataclan massacre of November 2015. One thing William will not be doing

:12:22.:12:25.

on this visit official visit to Paris is to go to the place where

:12:26.:12:29.

his mother died in that car accident 20 years ago this year. The theme of

:12:30.:12:34.

this visit is very much to look to the future.

:12:35.:12:40.

The St Patrick's Day celebrations continued overnight across the

:12:41.:12:43.

world. Streets and landmarks were lit up in green all over the globe

:12:44.:12:49.

including the leaning tower of Pisa and the Christ the Redeemer in Rio

:12:50.:12:52.

de Janeiro. Those are the main stories this morning. It is 7.12am.

:12:53.:12:58.

It is the largest deployment of British troops in Europe since the

:12:59.:13:03.

end of the Cold War and as the first of 800 soldiers arrive in Estonia,

:13:04.:13:09.

eyes will turn to Moscow to see how rid spond. Sir Michael Fallon says

:13:10.:13:16.

it is part of a longer term commitment to deter Russian

:13:17.:13:19.

aggression. Paul Rogers is a security and diplomacy expert from

:13:20.:13:23.

the University of Bradford and joins us now. Gorge. Put us in some kind

:13:24.:13:28.

of context for us. Well, let's look at it from both sides. If you take

:13:29.:13:32.

it from the western side, they're concerned about Russian aggression.

:13:33.:13:36.

There is the involvement in Syria, the take-over over of Crimea and the

:13:37.:13:40.

problems in eastern Ukraine and this see this as a defence pact which

:13:41.:13:44.

many people support. Turn the whole thing round from the Russian point

:13:45.:13:47.

of view and what 30 years ago, they were part of the Soviet Union, they

:13:48.:13:50.

were central to it and they lost that. They sort of lost an empire

:13:51.:13:54.

overnight. They feel they were treated with contempt then in the

:13:55.:13:58.

1990s and Putin plays on that successfully. You're in the position

:13:59.:14:03.

of the Russians seeing Nato getting closer to them and we see Russia as

:14:04.:14:06.

a threat. What makes it extraordinary you have Donald Trump

:14:07.:14:11.

wanting to make America great and Vladimir Putin wanting to make

:14:12.:14:14.

Russia great. This is a potential source of tension. It doesn't have

:14:15.:14:17.

to go that way, but you have to be careful on these occasions. This

:14:18.:14:22.

might be seen as provocative by Russia. What is their response

:14:23.:14:27.

likely to be? I think their response will not be to involve themselves in

:14:28.:14:32.

any further adventure overseas. They will say this is proof that Nato is

:14:33.:14:39.

out to get us. Russia is still a significant military power. It has

:14:40.:14:42.

nuclear weapons, but at the same time, you know, the Russian economy

:14:43.:14:47.

is half of that Britain, let alone Nato combined and it is a fairly

:14:48.:14:52.

weak country economically. So Putin is a brilliant card player, in many

:14:53.:14:56.

ways, but to see it as a great threat is probably an over reaction,

:14:57.:15:01.

but the big danger is when you have two states, two enforcers in crisis,

:15:02.:15:09.

things can go wrong. Those are the kinds of things which can happen

:15:10.:15:12.

when there is a high state of tension and this is where diplomacy

:15:13.:15:17.

is needed. One dimension is political. On a practical level,

:15:18.:15:20.

where you have an increase in the number of troops, in a place, and we

:15:21.:15:27.

heard one of the servicemen talked about a credible threat across the

:15:28.:15:31.

border. The defence secretary said this is about deterring possible

:15:32.:15:35.

military aggression. Now, something could happen. That's always the

:15:36.:15:42.

danger, isn't it? A minor incident could become something more. This is

:15:43.:15:46.

where you have to be careful. It requires cool heads on both sides,

:15:47.:15:51.

but the international political situation with Putin in Moscow and

:15:52.:15:56.

basically Trump in Washington, this is difficult. Now, Trump is the

:15:57.:16:00.

maverick in a sense because we don't know what his real reaction to

:16:01.:16:03.

Russia is. He is saying some things and doing other things. It is the

:16:04.:16:07.

uncertainty which I think is tricky and I don't think any threat of a

:16:08.:16:13.

major war, but you could slip into a crisis and you have got to have cool

:16:14.:16:18.

heads to avoid this. Russia wants to scale back its overseas deployments.

:16:19.:16:24.

It is finding that Syria and Crimea are costing it an arm and a leg and

:16:25.:16:27.

it doesn't have that money, but Putin is playing it to show that

:16:28.:16:31.

Russia is a major country again. When we talk about aggression, it is

:16:32.:16:35.

not just military aggression, it is a cyber threat. Yes. That's true,

:16:36.:16:42.

but they will say well, we interfered in the Ukraine election

:16:43.:16:49.

to make sure that a proleader didn't stay in power. That's part of the

:16:50.:16:53.

new war we're in. But this is where you need, you need political wisdom.

:16:54.:16:59.

Putin is not easy to handle. It is a really tricky problem, but what you

:17:00.:17:02.

do not want to do is do what he wants you to do which is to up the

:17:03.:17:08.

ante. I wouldn't like to be a British politician in charge at the

:17:09.:17:10.

present because the way forward is tricky, but at least caution, I

:17:11.:17:14.

think, is called for. Thank you very much.

:17:15.:17:25.

It is 7.17am. The main stories: The former Prime Minister Gordon Brown,

:17:26.:17:28.

will call for greater powers to be given to Scotland's Government as he

:17:29.:17:32.

warns of the danger of independence. American surveillance agency, the

:17:33.:17:36.

NSA, rejected claims GCHQ was asked to spy on Donald Trump calling it

:17:37.:17:44.

nonsense. Let's find out what's happening with

:17:45.:17:47.

the weather this morning. Here is Ben. Good morning, Ben. I had Tina.

:17:48.:17:53.

Hi Charlie. For most of us, not a particularly inspiring start to the

:17:54.:17:57.

day. This is the view that many are waking up to including our Weather

:17:58.:18:03.

Watcher Blue Sky Bob. Not much blue sky at the moment in Kent. Quite

:18:04.:18:07.

mild and breezy and there will be some rain at times particularly in

:18:08.:18:11.

the west. It is because of this string of cloud, a real pipeline

:18:12.:18:17.

ploughing its way across the Atlantic. It is places in the west,

:18:18.:18:22.

most exposed to the westerly winds, where you're going to see most of

:18:23.:18:25.

the rain today. The further east you are, the chance of seeing a little

:18:26.:18:30.

bit of brightness. A different sort of weather altogether across

:18:31.:18:33.

Northern Scotlandment here cold enough for icy stretches and

:18:34.:18:38.

sunshine and wintry showers, for Northern Ireland and north-west

:18:39.:18:42.

gland, a cloudy start. Maybe breaks in the cloud and brightness across

:18:43.:18:45.

north-east England with shelter from the Pennines and through East

:18:46.:18:48.

Anglia, the Midlands, Wales and the south-west, generally a lot of

:18:49.:18:51.

cloud, some spots of patchy rain and drizzle. It is mild. It is breezy as

:18:52.:18:55.

well, but not quite as windy as it was yesterday. And really the

:18:56.:18:59.

pattern for the day is that western areas will see rain at times and

:19:00.:19:04.

thick cloud and murky conditions. Further east, the better chance of

:19:05.:19:07.

seeing some brightness and Northern Scotland different weather. Sunny

:19:08.:19:11.

spells, showers, wintry over high ground and on the cool sidement

:19:12.:19:14.

further south, it will be mild and if things brighten up towards the

:19:15.:19:17.

South East we could see 15 or 16 Celsius. A big day in the Six

:19:18.:19:22.

Nations and for the fixtures in Edinburgh, Paris and Dublin,

:19:23.:19:25.

generally a lot of cloud. Generally dry, maybe just the odd spot of rain

:19:26.:19:30.

at times. This evening and tonight, southern areas will stay pretty

:19:31.:19:33.

cloudy and quite murky. Drizzly in places, but largely dry. However,

:19:34.:19:36.

some heavier rain will move through Northern Ireland and Scotland and

:19:37.:19:40.

into Northern England. Generally a mild night. Just a little bit chilly

:19:41.:19:44.

across the far north of Scotland. Tomorrow is very similar. Cloudy,

:19:45.:19:48.

the best chance of any brightness in the east. We have this lump of rain

:19:49.:19:52.

moving through Northern Ireland and Southern Scotland and into Northern

:19:53.:19:56.

England and Wales. To the north of that, things will brighten up and it

:19:57.:19:59.

will turn cooler. To the south of that, generally a lot of cloud and

:20:00.:20:02.

still mild with temperatures of 15 Celsius. Charlie, Tina, back to you.

:20:03.:20:07.

Ben, thank you very much. We will look through the front pages. The

:20:08.:20:12.

Daily Telegraph. Many of the papers taking the images from the Royal

:20:13.:20:15.

trip to Paris. If I can get hold of the paper properly. The Duchess of

:20:16.:20:20.

Cambridge at the main event last night. Brexit more important to

:20:21.:20:25.

voters than keeping the United Kingdom together. That's according

:20:26.:20:29.

to a poll for The Daily Telegraph. More pictures of the couple in the

:20:30.:20:34.

Express as well. And also showing Kate drinking a pint of Guinness!

:20:35.:20:38.

The front page of the Express focussing on a different story.

:20:39.:20:41.

Drink tea to fight dementia is their headline. Drinking three cups of tea

:20:42.:20:47.

a day could cut the risk of dementia by half, that's according to new

:20:48.:20:50.

research. Good news for tea drinkers.

:20:51.:20:59.

The Times newspaper, on Google. This is about the material that's on

:21:00.:21:07.

YouTube and criticism that it has not removed offensive material and

:21:08.:21:11.

again Paris on the front page. The same focus on the front page of the

:21:12.:21:18.

Daily Mail. Their headline "Google on rack over cash from hate views."

:21:19.:21:24.

MPs saying this week that they failed to control offensive content

:21:25.:21:28.

online. One story from the inside pages. So Monopoly. You know the

:21:29.:21:34.

little things that you push around. You're given one at the beginning.

:21:35.:21:39.

There has been a tradition around what those items are... Like a boot.

:21:40.:21:43.

The boot has gone. The boot has gone. The wheelbarrow has gone and t

:21:44.:21:51.

themble. They asked people what they wanted instead and they have come up

:21:52.:21:58.

with a dinosaur, a penguin and toy duck. So they asked people, they had

:21:59.:22:03.

to vote for what they wanted as those items. The winner was a

:22:04.:22:10.

Scottie dog, T-rex second, a car was fourth, duck fifth, and the closest

:22:11.:22:15.

unsuccessful candidate, so when people are asked what they wanted,

:22:16.:22:20.

some people, 5 # 00 people voted for a tortoise. Awh, the tortoise missed

:22:21.:22:30.

out. I thought it would have been a mobile phone or something! We will

:22:31.:22:34.

have the weather coming up shortly. Mike will have the sport as well. It

:22:35.:22:40.

was one of the world's worst environmental disasters, 50 years

:22:41.:22:44.

ago, the supertanker Torrey Canyon hit rocks off Cornwall spilling

:22:45.:22:47.

hundreds of thousands of tonnes of crude oil. Around 15,000 birds died

:22:48.:22:52.

and parts of British and French coasts took years to recover.

:22:53.:22:59.

Eleanor Parkinson reports. Impaled on a reef seven miles north of

:23:00.:23:03.

Scilly, the Torrey Canyon lies broken. Oil pouring from her tanks.

:23:04.:23:07.

She is carrying 120,000 tonnes of crude oil. The oil slick expands.

:23:08.:23:13.

Eventually stretching across 270 square miles as it creeps towards

:23:14.:23:18.

the Cornish Coast a massive operation begins to save beaches and

:23:19.:23:22.

wildlife. The army, the RAF, and the Navy are involved along with 78 Fire

:23:23.:23:27.

Brigades. Among them fire officers Eric and John. John recorded the

:23:28.:23:33.

event as an official photographer. Today, they're recalling the horrors

:23:34.:23:38.

of what they found. Well, the smell. That hit you first was the smell.

:23:39.:23:42.

You got your feet on it and you slid all over the place. It was

:23:43.:23:49.

diabolical. It really was. It was like looking at the bath and when

:23:50.:23:52.

you had a bath and leave a scum around the bath. That's what it was

:23:53.:23:56.

like. All the way around all the faces of all the cliffs and all

:23:57.:24:01.

around us. Over the next few days tens of thousands of tonnes of

:24:02.:24:04.

detergent was sprayed over the beaches to try and break up the oil.

:24:05.:24:10.

The main role of the fire service was setting pumps in, washing down

:24:11.:24:15.

after the detergent had been applied to the rocks or to the sands or

:24:16.:24:21.

whatever. There has been criticism of the detergent because that caused

:24:22.:24:25.

problems, didn't it? Well, that's true. What I did hear in the end, it

:24:26.:24:31.

would have been probably better to have let nature do its thing.

:24:32.:24:35.

Because the organisms in the sand and everything would have eaten it

:24:36.:24:40.

faster than what we did by killing off the organisms by putting

:24:41.:24:46.

detergent on them. It was an environmental catastrophe, 15,000

:24:47.:24:48.

seabirds died after being covered in oil. A week after she was grounded

:24:49.:24:53.

the Torrey Canyon began to break up, releasing even more oil into the

:24:54.:24:57.

sea. The desirbs was taken to destroy the vessel. For two whole

:24:58.:25:04.

days the RAF and the Navy bombed the ship. You could see the smoke. When

:25:05.:25:09.

we came down, we could see the smoke. Occasionally you could smell

:25:10.:25:17.

the smoke coming ashore above the smells of the other. It was not a

:25:18.:25:23.

nice thing. The Torrey Canyon sank leaving behind a legacy that would

:25:24.:25:25.

last for many years. Incredible pictures. Vice-Admiral

:25:26.:25:35.

Sir Jonathan Tod was a Royal Navy pilot who took part in the mission

:25:36.:25:40.

to bomb the stricken ship. He joins us now from our Exeter studio. Good

:25:41.:25:43.

morning to you. What do you remember from that operation 50 years ago? It

:25:44.:25:49.

seemed to be very dangerous. Well, it certainly was a very lovely day

:25:50.:25:57.

and it was a beautiful spring day. I was flying a aircraft out of

:25:58.:26:00.

Lossiemouth and we were detailed off to go and bomb the Torrey Canyon. As

:26:01.:26:07.

we set off, flying down south, I was in the second aircraft going down

:26:08.:26:11.

there. As we crossed the Scottish Border going south, I could actually

:26:12.:26:17.

see a great flume of smoke going up to 30,000 feet, way, way in the

:26:18.:26:22.

distance. Quite extraordinary. As we got closer, you could see the smoke

:26:23.:26:26.

was getting thicker and thicker and blacker and blacker. This was

:26:27.:26:31.

because the first wave of planes had gone through and had set fire to the

:26:32.:26:36.

ship which was burning then very, very fiercely. As we approached you

:26:37.:26:40.

could see that there was a lot of oil over the sea and the sea was

:26:41.:26:45.

very nice and calm, but clearly the oil was being swept up on to the

:26:46.:26:48.

beaches of Cornwall and the Channel Islands and all sorts of places like

:26:49.:26:53.

that. The job that we had was actually to try and set the oil on

:26:54.:26:59.

fire and to make holes in all 16 of the tanks on the Torrey Canyon. What

:27:00.:27:07.

was the thinking behind doing that, bombing the ship? How would that

:27:08.:27:13.

have helped? Well, sorry, probably to put a pun on it, the Government

:27:14.:27:19.

was between a rock and a hard place. We had tried the detergent. We had

:27:20.:27:23.

tried putting fires on board the ship and so on, but the oil on the

:27:24.:27:28.

ship was so very, very thick, it was like treacle and it is not the sort

:27:29.:27:32.

of oil that we're used to. It was very, very cold as well. So it was

:27:33.:27:37.

extremely hard to actually get it to burn and the only way you could get

:27:38.:27:50.

if it to bomb was to bomb it and get a big explosion and that would cause

:27:51.:27:57.

the oil to burn. The problem was we had was the ship had sunk. It had

:27:58.:28:04.

torn its bottom out. As the tide came in that would come in and put

:28:05.:28:08.

out the fires that we had just started and we had to wait until the

:28:09.:28:12.

tide went out and we could go back and start the fires again because it

:28:13.:28:15.

was very important to burn off as much oil as we possibly could before

:28:16.:28:20.

that was washed out of the wreck. If we hadn't been doing that then all

:28:21.:28:26.

of that oil would have gradually, gradually, all through the tourist

:28:27.:28:29.

season and all through that summer, would have just started washing up

:28:30.:28:33.

on this beach here and that beach there and there would have been a

:28:34.:28:36.

very significant environmental disaster. So the solution was... It

:28:37.:28:42.

is interesting that the attitude to the environment was very different

:28:43.:28:48.

back then. At the time the priority was to clean it up as quickly as

:28:49.:28:53.

possible because of the effect on tourism and local trade? That is

:28:54.:28:58.

very true. The quickest way of doing it and the most thorough way of

:28:59.:29:02.

doing it was to get the oil out of the ship. There was no other way you

:29:03.:29:07.

could get it out except by burning it off or let it leak out in one

:29:08.:29:12.

fell swoop because we didn't want it leaking it out over the whom of the

:29:13.:29:16.

summer months. A little bit at a time, every time there was a gale or

:29:17.:29:21.

a strong wind, another patch of oil would have come out. So the answer

:29:22.:29:25.

was to do it once and for all. I'm sure when you joined the Royal Navy,

:29:26.:29:29.

you didn't imagine you would be bombing a sunken ship to help with

:29:30.:29:33.

an environmental ka it is a throfy? Well, we always like to help

:29:34.:29:38.

whenever one can, but certainly I hadn't imagined that particular

:29:39.:29:41.

scenario. This was the first time that we had a tanker grounding in

:29:42.:29:47.

Western Europe and so it was a completely new experience for

:29:48.:29:51.

everybody that was trying to deal with disaster. Things have got so

:29:52.:29:54.

much better now because of the regulations for double hulls on

:29:55.:29:58.

tankers, much better collision avoidance and generally a much

:29:59.:30:02.

better oversight of the control of shipping at sea and please God, it

:30:03.:30:08.

is going to make those nasty incidents well, extremely rare. You

:30:09.:30:13.

can never say never and I really hope it doesn't happen again. We

:30:14.:30:17.

hope it doesn't too. Thank you very much for joining us, Vice-Admiral

:30:18.:30:21.

Sir Jonathan Tod. It is 7.30am. We're back with the

:30:22.:30:24.

headlines in a moment. Hello, this is Breakfast,

:30:25.:30:58.

with Charlie Stayt and Tina Daheley. Coming up before 8am,

:30:59.:31:06.

Ben will have the weather. But first, a summary of this

:31:07.:31:11.

morning's main news. Gordon Brown says Scotland should be

:31:12.:31:13.

handed a raft of new powers after Brexit to prevent

:31:14.:31:17.

the United Kingdom from splitting. The former Prime Minister will use

:31:18.:31:19.

a speech today to put forward his "third option"

:31:20.:31:22.

for Scotland's future. His intervention comes as the SNP

:31:23.:31:24.

leader Nicola Sturgeon, who has called for another

:31:25.:31:28.

independence referendum, addresses The first British soldiers have

:31:29.:31:30.

arrived in Estonia as part of the largest deployment of British

:31:31.:31:37.

troops to Europe since Over the next few weeks a total

:31:38.:31:40.

of 800 British soldiers and hundreds of military vehicles will be sent

:31:41.:31:44.

to the Baltic state in an attempt The American surveillance agency,

:31:45.:31:47.

the NSA, has rejected suggestions that British agents spied

:31:48.:31:52.

on Donald Trump, at the request On Wednesday, a White House

:31:53.:31:54.

spokesman discussed an allegation that GCHQ was asked to tap

:31:55.:32:00.

Mr Trump's calls last year. Downing Street says it's been

:32:01.:32:06.

reassured by Washington What would be the advantage to the

:32:07.:32:21.

UK Government of doing something like that? The cost would be immense

:32:22.:32:26.

in comparison to any value. So of course they wouldn't do anything.

:32:27.:32:30.

Schools should teach children how to spot "fake news" and recognise

:32:31.:32:32.

lies on social media, according to a leading

:32:33.:32:34.

The director of the influential think tank, the OECD,

:32:35.:32:37.

says pupils are becoming too dependent on the internet and need

:32:38.:32:40.

help distinguishing between true and false information online.

:32:41.:32:46.

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge will meet victims of the attack

:32:47.:32:49.

on the Bataclan concert hall in Paris today.

:32:50.:32:51.

Last night, the royal couple had dinner at the British embassy,

:32:52.:32:54.

where Prince William spoke of the enduring ties

:32:55.:32:56.

The visit is part of the British government's charm offensive

:32:57.:32:59.

in Europe ahead of the start of Brexit talks.

:33:00.:33:25.

New research suggests the idyllic image some people have

:33:26.:33:27.

of the countryside is masking pockets of poverty, poor health

:33:28.:33:29.

and social isolation that can exist in rural areas.

:33:30.:33:32.

Those are the main stories this morning.

:33:33.:33:36.

The report by Public Health England and the Local Government Association

:33:37.:33:38.

says official statistics are often skewed towards gathering

:33:39.:33:40.

information about people living in towns and cities.

:33:41.:33:44.

There were two things... Be going back to Ireland to sit in front of

:33:45.:33:54.

their TV sets two will Ireland. England are going for rugby

:33:55.:33:59.

union history later. If they beat Ireland in Dublin

:34:00.:34:01.

they'll break New Zealand's record of consecutive wins and win a second

:34:02.:34:03.

Six Nations Grand Slam in a row. They've already won the tournament,

:34:04.:34:07.

but Ireland are hoping With every stride, with every

:34:08.:34:09.

dive, England get closer No nation has won 19 top-level

:34:10.:34:27.

rugby matches in a row. If England can do it it will be

:34:28.:34:34.

a world record constructive from the ashes of their World Cup,

:34:35.:34:37.

a tournament they exited Eddie Jones has coached them

:34:38.:34:39.

from disaster to triumph, what is still some way

:34:40.:34:43.

from his summit. To go from where we go to greatness

:34:44.:34:45.

takes another step of endeavour. It takes greater focus,

:34:46.:34:48.

it takes greater persistence. It takes greater emotional

:34:49.:34:57.

output, you know? How do you measure

:34:58.:34:59.

this team's rights? No England side has won back

:35:00.:35:03.

Grand Slams in the professional era. The last Saturday jobs,

:35:04.:35:07.

Will Carling's heroes They have gone to Australia and won

:35:08.:35:09.

3-0, that has never been done Back to back Grand Slams,

:35:10.:35:18.

a world record run, you know, Appropriate, because when England go

:35:19.:35:22.

to Dublin, nothing is certain. For Ireland, this team has

:35:23.:35:32.

been a disappointment, which could yet have

:35:33.:35:34.

one redeeming feature. We are well aware of everything that

:35:35.:35:36.

England are going for tomorrow, but for us, it is St Patrick's Day

:35:37.:35:39.

weekend, we are at home with a very proud record,

:35:40.:35:42.

at home, and we take huge But it may require

:35:43.:35:45.

the biggest heave yet. If England do it, they'll emulate

:35:46.:35:59.

the women who triumphed in Dublin A victory for either side

:36:00.:36:02.

would have secured the title, but it was England who ran away

:36:03.:36:07.

with it, with five tries, It's the first time they've won

:36:08.:36:10.

the competition since 2012. It was always going to be a very

:36:11.:36:17.

tough first half, we said all along it would be a game that would

:36:18.:36:22.

probably go to the wire. We got away with the Irish goals at the end a

:36:23.:36:26.

little bit, but they were awesome in the first half in particular, and we

:36:27.:36:34.

just knew to weather the storm. And that defensive session in the end of

:36:35.:36:41.

the first half was tremendous. I apologise for not passing on my

:36:42.:36:46.

Cheltenham Gold cup trip. An Irish journalist whispered

:36:47.:37:16.

to me at Cheltenham, early yesterday, "sizing John",

:37:17.:37:18.

and he was right as the 7-1 shot, won the Gold Cup, to give trainer,

:37:19.:37:21.

Jessica Harrington victory, with her first entry,

:37:22.:37:24.

in the famous race. The favourite, Djakadam,

:37:25.:37:29.

finished in fourth after hitting a fence and Sizing John powered

:37:30.:37:31.

clear to repeat his triumph Jockey Robbie Power,

:37:32.:37:34.

also rode the 2007 Grand National To say that I was 25 and won

:37:35.:37:38.

the Grand National, and I'm 35 now, I appreciate

:37:39.:37:54.

this a lot more. To be a gold cup

:37:55.:37:56.

winning jockey, that Leicester City will

:37:57.:38:00.

face Atletico Madrid, in the quarterfinals

:38:01.:38:06.

of the Champions League. The English Champions

:38:07.:38:08.

are the only British side Atletico have been runners up

:38:09.:38:10.

in the Champions league twice, Meanwhile in the Europa League

:38:11.:38:13.

quarter finals, Manchester United, will meet the Belgian side

:38:14.:38:17.

Anderlecht. Chelsea can extend their lead

:38:18.:38:18.

at the top of the Premier League, to 13 points, if they beat

:38:19.:38:21.

Stoke City later. That's one of 7 matches taking place

:38:22.:38:23.

today, including an important match for Arsenal at West Brom this

:38:24.:38:26.

lunchtime, as they try They are currently five

:38:27.:38:28.

points off fourth place. In Scotland, if 2nd placed Aberdeen

:38:29.:38:32.

lose against Hearts this lunchtime, Celtic can claim the title tomorrow

:38:33.:38:34.

if they beat Dundee. There was a big surprise

:38:35.:38:37.

in the Championship last night as promotion chasing

:38:38.:38:45.

Huddersfield Town were beaten 4-0 The result means Huddersfield remain

:38:46.:38:47.

six points behind the top two, and moves City out

:38:48.:38:53.

of the relegation places. In the night's other match

:38:54.:38:56.

Reading moved fourth, after beating sixth-placed

:38:57.:39:01.

Sheffield Wednesday. Hull FC moved level on points

:39:02.:39:05.

with Castleford Tigers, at the top of Super League,

:39:06.:39:07.

after beating struggling Leeds Rhinos joined

:39:08.:39:09.

them on eight points, after they ran in six tries,

:39:10.:39:13.

in their 38-14 victory We're used to seeing birdies,

:39:14.:39:15.

eagles and even the odd albatros on a golf course, they're

:39:16.:39:24.

all golfing terms, but in Florida Smylie Kaufman

:39:25.:39:29.

was leisurely strolling up to the green, unware of that

:39:30.:39:31.

alligator in the rough The fish might just

:39:32.:39:42.

be a Dory Mackerel, Who is Mardy Fish? Oh, a tennis

:39:43.:40:18.

player. At least it has got you thinking. Tweak your suggestions. --

:40:19.:40:33.

tweak It worked for champions

:40:34.:40:34.

Leicester City last season and a growing number of sports clubs

:40:35.:40:37.

are putting their players into the deep freeze

:40:38.:40:39.

to give them the edge. At Fulham, who are on a great run,

:40:40.:40:42.

they strip off and suffer temperatures of minus 119 degrees

:40:43.:40:45.

several times a week. To see what happens

:40:46.:40:47.

I went to join them. It is like something out

:40:48.:40:49.

of a science fiction movie. But this is how they warm up

:40:50.:40:54.

and warm down now, at Fulham. After seeing it work

:40:55.:40:58.

so well for Leicester, the champions, last season,

:40:59.:41:07.

Fulham now have a permanent whole-body cryotherapy trainer

:41:08.:41:09.

at their training ground, It reduces the recovery

:41:10.:41:11.

time between games, reduces the muscle soreness,

:41:12.:41:20.

and we use it before It can also help

:41:21.:41:22.

you sleep, with mood. So much training now

:41:23.:41:26.

for the modern footballer. Reactivation classes like this

:41:27.:41:27.

before training has even begun, and then afterwards,

:41:28.:41:30.

the heart rate has gone up, and before the warm-ups,

:41:31.:41:32.

we have the big freeze. I first went in with players

:41:33.:41:34.

Tom Kearney and Scott Malone. The coldest place recorded on earth

:41:35.:41:44.

ever has been -89.2. And you do the several

:41:45.:41:50.

times a week now? You get down to such

:41:51.:41:59.

depths in two stages. Then it was into the main,

:42:00.:42:01.

and coldest chamber, I also went in here with

:42:02.:42:10.

goalkeeper David button. It feels like knives

:42:11.:42:16.

in your legs and arms. So in this controlled

:42:17.:42:22.

environment, the body is sent into a state of shock,

:42:23.:42:24.

which stimulates our And it is believed this

:42:25.:42:26.

is beneficial for the immune system and energy levels which the players

:42:27.:42:37.

say can last two days. You are relieved to get out

:42:38.:42:39.

at the start, but I think if it is the day before a match,

:42:40.:42:42.

you feel a lot better, yeah. Definitely found it a lot fresher

:42:43.:42:45.

going into training, and into games. You don't get frostbite,

:42:46.:42:55.

because you only stay The mindnumbing temperatures

:42:56.:42:58.

are created by gas, In countries were started,

:42:59.:43:02.

the uses extend beyond sport. This is mainstream practice

:43:03.:43:06.

in Poland for rheumatoid arthritis. Any inflammatory pathology,

:43:07.:43:08.

multiple sclerosis we have seen. There is no reason,

:43:09.:43:12.

with all the reported feedback about sleep,

:43:13.:43:14.

why this couldn't be used It is a great feeling

:43:15.:43:16.

when you come out. You feel rejuvenated

:43:17.:43:21.

and alive, don't you? You feel like you have

:43:22.:43:23.

run, almost superhuman. At the end, my heartrate variability

:43:24.:43:40.

had gone from 74 to 92. Apparently it is the same effect

:43:41.:43:43.

if you released a bunch of lions at the ground and cut them

:43:44.:43:59.

to chase the players. why were you the only one wearing a

:44:00.:44:06.

dressing down? Line I was told to bring one, but I felt like Noel

:44:07.:44:12.

Coward at the end! We have fish names coming in.

:44:13.:44:23.

Arnie Piranha. And we have the name of a proper one coming in from the

:44:24.:44:39.

70s, Mike Fish. Here's Ben with a look

:44:40.:44:49.

at this morning's weather. A bit of cloud around, in fact, a

:44:50.:44:58.

lot of cloud for many of us. It is a pretty poor start of the day across

:44:59.:45:02.

many parts of the country. This is the view of one of the weather

:45:03.:45:06.

watchers from Essex. It will be the eastern parts of the country that

:45:07.:45:12.

get most of the cloud, and perhaps some sunshine. It will be breezy

:45:13.:45:13.

with rain at times. You can see this cloud... A very different

:45:14.:45:34.

weather across Scotland, with a bright start to the day. Someone she

:45:35.:45:39.

showers around, but through southern Scotland and Northern Ireland, some

:45:40.:45:44.

patchy rain and cloudy. Showers across the Pennines and north-east

:45:45.:45:48.

England, but brighter spells here. Some sunshine, perhaps into East

:45:49.:45:51.

Anglia as well. Through the Midlands, Wales and Southwest,

:45:52.:45:55.

cloudy and murky over the hills. Some drizzle, but my old. Quite

:45:56.:45:59.

breezy but not as windy as yesterday. As we go on through the

:46:00.:46:04.

day it is more of the same. Outbreaks of rain in the West

:46:05.:46:08.

particularly, best chance of brightness in the east, lifting

:46:09.:46:12.

temperatures to 15 or 16. For northern Scotland all the while, a

:46:13.:46:15.

mixture of sunshine and wintry showers, and it will be cooler

:46:16.:46:20.

compared with milder conditions further south. A big afternoon of

:46:21.:46:23.

six Nations Rugby. It looks cloudy for the fixtures in Dublin and

:46:24.:46:29.

Paris, but a bit brighter in Edinburgh, with temperatures 9-13.

:46:30.:46:33.

This evening and tonight, particularly in the south, there

:46:34.:46:37.

will be a lot of dry weather, cloudy and grizzly on the hills, but more

:46:38.:46:41.

persistent rain through northern Scotland and England as well. Mild

:46:42.:46:48.

night, but chilly for them far north of Scotland. This band of rain

:46:49.:46:53.

moving through will gradually sinks southwards and eastwards, thinking

:46:54.:46:57.

as it goes. It will brighten into the afternoon, with a mixture of

:46:58.:47:01.

sunshine and showers. In the south-east, cloudy but male does

:47:02.:47:07.

well. Temperatures of 16. Back to you.

:47:08.:47:07.

Thank you very much. We'll be back with

:47:08.:47:10.

the headlines at 8am. Now it's time for Newswatch

:47:11.:47:12.

with Samira Ahmed. Hello, and welcome to Newswatch

:47:13.:47:17.

with me, Samira Ahmed. BBC reports revealed the scale

:47:18.:47:26.

of the famine in East Africa. Is this more charity

:47:27.:47:28.

campaigning than news? And can you have too much of a fun

:47:29.:47:31.

viral moment on the news? First, how significant is it in news

:47:32.:47:34.

terms when politicians listen to criticism

:47:35.:47:43.

and rethink controversial decisions? On Wednesday the Prime Minister

:47:44.:47:46.

announced the scrapping of the plans announced in the budget to raise

:47:47.:47:50.

national insurance payments for Norman Smith described this U-turn

:47:51.:47:53.

to Sophie Raworth like this... Sophie, let's just get this

:47:54.:48:00.

in perspective of grand government U-turns, this is a full-blown

:48:01.:48:03.

howling, screeching, Italian Riviera, hairpin bend,

:48:04.:48:06.

smoke bleeding from the tyres In terms of the speed,

:48:07.:48:08.

just seven days ago Philip Hammond announced this tax rise,

:48:09.:48:16.

and the scale of it, it is a complete abandonment

:48:17.:48:18.

of a key tax rise. Not a tweak, not a nudge,

:48:19.:48:23.

not a review - it's out the window. Some of you thought there was too

:48:24.:48:27.

much relish and shock over a simple change of mind,

:48:28.:48:30.

including Robin Petherbridge. Politicians get all excited

:48:31.:48:33.

about policy U-turn Nicola Sturgeon, First Minister

:48:34.:48:59.

of Scotland, seized the news agenda on Monday when she said there should

:49:00.:49:02.

be another referendum A demand rebuffed by

:49:03.:49:04.

the Prime Minister on Thursday. This is a highly contentious issue,

:49:05.:49:14.

as was seen in the criticism made of the BBC over its coverage

:49:15.:49:17.

of the first referendum in 2014. It exercised several

:49:18.:49:21.

viewers again this week As that debate continues,

:49:22.:49:27.

the BBC's reporting will clearly be under scrutiny again,

:49:28.:49:54.

including an Newswatch. Now, our domestic political concerns

:49:55.:50:02.

have been put into perspective this week by a series of reports running

:50:03.:50:05.

on BBC television about the famine The first declared anywhere

:50:06.:50:08.

in the world in six years. The millions of people facing

:50:09.:50:12.

starvation in Somalia, It's not that there is no

:50:13.:50:14.

food in South Sudan, it's just that people

:50:15.:50:21.

cannot access it. Because of the constant fighting,

:50:22.:50:25.

people can't plant, And if the fighting continues,

:50:26.:50:27.

more and more people will be forced to abandon their homes

:50:28.:50:34.

and become refugees. Many are already dying before

:50:35.:50:40.

they can reach help. With 3 million people on the verge

:50:41.:50:50.

of starvation here, the sense But what about those

:50:51.:50:53.

children who don't make it Where there are no doctors

:50:54.:51:00.

or clinics, where food and water has been looted by retreating

:51:01.:51:05.

Boko Haram fighters. For those children,

:51:06.:51:09.

the end is inevitable. Innocent victims of

:51:10.:51:11.

a man major tragedy. Clive Myrie there,

:51:12.:51:23.

reporting from Nigeria. Before him, Andrew

:51:24.:51:26.

Harding in Somalia. And Catherine Byaruhanga

:51:27.:51:27.

in South Sudan. Grace Dalton was one of those

:51:28.:51:29.

who welcomed the coverage, leaving us this telephone

:51:30.:51:31.

message on Wednesday. I really wanted to

:51:32.:51:33.

thank you so, so much. I was really pleased yesterday that

:51:34.:51:37.

you were covering quite substantially the famine

:51:38.:51:40.

situation in Africa. My only criticism about the BBC's

:51:41.:51:41.

coverage is that you didn't give out the DEC number,

:51:42.:51:44.

I thought you might give out contact for people to be able to donate

:51:45.:51:47.

towards the effort being made Later on Wednesday the BBC

:51:48.:51:50.

did broadcast an appeal from the Disasters Emergency

:51:51.:51:54.

Committee. With full details of how

:51:55.:51:55.

money could be donated. Nobody should be dying

:51:56.:52:00.

of starvation in 2017. For a malnourished child

:52:01.:52:07.

in this situation, ?25 could provide a month's supply

:52:08.:52:09.

of life-saving peanut paste. ?60 could provide clean drinking

:52:10.:52:19.

water for two families for a month. The Disasters Emergency Committee

:52:20.:52:25.

is an umbrella group of major charities which has run many

:52:26.:52:31.

television campaigns following, for instance, the 2010 earthquake

:52:32.:52:33.

in Haiti and Typhoon Haiyan Dawn, and as the sun breaks

:52:34.:52:35.

through the piercing chill of night on the plane outside

:52:36.:52:42.

Coram, it... TV has a long history of bringing

:52:43.:52:43.

humanitarian crisis to the attention of the wider public,

:52:44.:52:47.

most famously through Michael Burke's report

:52:48.:52:49.

on what he called the biblical famine in Ethiopic in 1994,

:52:50.:52:51.

which gave rise to a massive But some people are uncomfortable

:52:52.:52:56.

about the role an impartial and objective BBC can have

:52:57.:53:10.

here in kick-starting The news channel there

:53:11.:53:12.

is to deliver news. This is nothing more

:53:13.:53:16.

than an appeal for money. This does not belong

:53:17.:53:21.

on the main news channel Returning to the Newswatch studio

:53:22.:53:24.

to discuss this is the editor of the BBC News at Six and News

:53:25.:53:29.

at Ten, Paul Royal. Can you explain first how

:53:30.:53:31.

the BBC came to declare All of these countries we've been

:53:32.:53:35.

covering and reporting from over We ran a couple of pieces

:53:36.:53:39.

from north-east Nigeria in December. We've reported from South

:53:40.:53:42.

Sudan through January. So actually these

:53:43.:53:52.

aren't new stories. We've been covering

:53:53.:53:53.

them and the situation What happened about a week ago was

:53:54.:53:55.

a warning from the United Nations, a very stark warning that 21 million

:53:56.:53:59.

people are at risk of And on the basis of that,

:54:00.:54:02.

we felt that was something, the gravity of the situation,

:54:03.:54:11.

the magnitude of the story, that was With those reports viewers commented

:54:12.:54:13.

they noticed reporters talking Even if it's a worthy charitable

:54:14.:54:18.

cause, I guess some viewers were questioning whether BBC News

:54:19.:54:23.

reporters were using the jargon I would argue against that

:54:24.:54:25.

in the sense that what our correspondents were doing

:54:26.:54:33.

is what they always do, which is report with authority

:54:34.:54:37.

and context what is going on in a difficult and

:54:38.:54:39.

dangerous situation. And ,actually say in the case

:54:40.:54:48.

of Andrew Harding, who reported famine in Somalia in 2011,

:54:49.:54:50.

he brought back into his reporting this week to contrast

:54:51.:54:53.

the differences between the situation then and now,

:54:54.:54:54.

and to point out that today the situation is probably less grave

:54:55.:54:58.

than it was in 2011. And the country and aid

:54:59.:55:03.

agencies and international community had learned lessons

:55:04.:55:07.

and were making their appeals and their warnings earlier to try

:55:08.:55:10.

and stop people from dying. Looking at some of those

:55:11.:55:14.

news reports one wonders where the line is, the limit is,

:55:15.:55:19.

on what reporters can say, given that there is also a DEC

:55:20.:55:21.

appeal saying we urgently need Where is the boundary

:55:22.:55:24.

for the reporter? I think the reporters,

:55:25.:55:28.

our correspondents, do These are difficult, dangerous,

:55:29.:55:30.

distressing situations. They describe and they report

:55:31.:55:34.

them as they always do with all the context and background

:55:35.:55:36.

attached to that. So I don't think our correspondents

:55:37.:55:44.

and reporters have got emergency appeals in their minds,

:55:45.:55:47.

in their thoughts, BBC News reports can have a huge

:55:48.:55:49.

impact and a campaign for fundraising appeal

:55:50.:55:54.

will have a huge impact on the BBC. Perhaps there is a case to say why

:55:55.:55:57.

not give more attention of this campaigning kind to other crises

:55:58.:56:00.

maybe closer to home? What we've done this week is not

:56:01.:56:02.

campaigning journalism, Campaigning journalism,

:56:03.:56:07.

which some newspapers will do, and have a long and proud tradition

:56:08.:56:12.

of, is trying to get We've been doing this week

:56:13.:56:15.

what BBC News always does, which is report significantly

:56:16.:56:19.

important stories In terms of why this,

:56:20.:56:21.

why not something else, I would argue we cover a whole range

:56:22.:56:28.

of serious and important I suppose, in this situation,

:56:29.:56:30.

21 million people are at risk The gravity and magnitude

:56:31.:56:43.

of the situation is such that that is what warrants and justifies

:56:44.:56:47.

an appeal, because it is Perhaps the most widely seen BBC

:56:48.:56:50.

interview of the week was one originally given to BBC world news

:56:51.:56:58.

about the South Korean In case you've been hiding under

:56:59.:57:00.

a rock for the past seven days, here is Professor Robert Kelly

:57:01.:57:06.

and the rest of his family. And what will it mean

:57:07.:57:12.

for the wider region? I think one of your children

:57:13.:57:14.

has just walked in. Shifting sands in the region,

:57:15.:57:19.

do you think relations Erm, I would be

:57:20.:57:21.

surprised if they do. What is this going to

:57:22.:57:27.

mean for the region? Soon an online sensation,

:57:28.:57:39.

the interrupted interview featured in news bulletin headlines,

:57:40.:57:50.

there was a follow-up interview with Professor Kelly,

:57:51.:57:52.

even live coverage of a news conference he gave,

:57:53.:57:55.

mainly in Korean. Plenty of online traffic on Thursday

:57:56.:58:07.

was BBC footage of Mount Etna erupting after lava flow mixed

:58:08.:58:25.

with steam causing a huge explosion. Rebecca Morelle was filming

:58:26.:58:28.

on the volcano at the time and escaped with camerawoman

:58:29.:58:31.

Rachel Price, who kept filming this footage

:58:32.:58:33.

as she ran down the mountain. The crew suffered only minor

:58:34.:58:36.

injuries and many people commended their work and bravery,

:58:37.:58:40.

but Patricia Rosewell had a concern. Thank you for all your

:58:41.:58:50.

comments this week. If you see anything on BBC

:58:51.:58:54.

News and current affairs which you particularly

:58:55.:58:59.

like or dislike, please That's all from us, we'll be back

:59:00.:59:00.

to hear your thoughts about BBC News Hello, this is Breakfast

:59:01.:59:18.

with Charlie Stayt and Tina Daheley. A third way for Scotland's future

:59:19.:00:26.

as Gordon Brown sets out a plan The former Prime Minister will say

:00:27.:00:30.

a new kind of federal home rule is needed for the United Kingdom,

:00:31.:00:36.

to avoid years of bitter division. Good morning.

:00:37.:00:52.

It's Saturday, 18th March. More than 100 British

:00:53.:00:56.

troops head to Estonia in an attempt A US security chief dismisses claims

:00:57.:01:00.

that GCHQ carried out surveillance Prince William and the Duchess

:01:01.:01:06.

of Cambridge will meet victims of the attack on the Bataclan

:01:07.:01:14.

concert hall on the second day In sport, a world record

:01:15.:01:16.

and the grand slam, is there for England's men

:01:17.:01:32.

if they can do what the women did, and beat Ireland to win

:01:33.:01:35.

their Six Nations trophy. Rainfall amounts will vary. Find out

:01:36.:01:44.

how much rain you're going to get in 15 minutes. Ben, thank you.

:01:45.:01:48.

Good morning. First, our main story.

:01:49.:01:51.

Gordon Brown says Scotland should be handed a raft of new powers

:01:52.:01:54.

after Brexit to prevent the United Kingdom from splitting.

:01:55.:01:56.

The former Prime Minister will use a speech today to put

:01:57.:01:59.

forward his "third option" for Scotland's future.

:02:00.:02:01.

His intervention comes as the SNP leader Nicola Sturgeon addresses her

:02:02.:02:03.

Our Political Correspondent Iain Watson reports.

:02:04.:02:08.

Nicola Sturgeon has been saying what her members

:02:09.:02:11.

That a second referendum in Scottish independence should happen before

:02:12.:02:18.

But she knows she has to broaden her support

:02:19.:02:23.

beyond her power base so she will argue her call

:02:24.:02:26.

for a referendum isn't just about standing up for Scotland,

:02:27.:02:29.

When Nicola Sturgeon takes to this stage later today,

:02:30.:02:33.

she will repeat her demand for a second

:02:34.:02:35.

But it looks like Theresa May isn't for turning.

:02:36.:02:41.

The SNP see their call for a referendum as a win-win

:02:42.:02:46.

because either Theresa May gives in in their time scale

:02:47.:02:49.

or they believe that her refusal to do so will help them build

:02:50.:02:56.

support for independence in the slightly longer term.

:02:57.:02:58.

I think Theresa May trying to deny the Scottish people their say

:02:59.:03:01.

on this is something she will have cause to regret, but I think

:03:02.:03:04.

the longer Theresa May tries to deny the people of Scotland their say,

:03:05.:03:07.

the better it is for the campaign for independence.

:03:08.:03:10.

This is everyone's flag, everyone's country.

:03:11.:03:16.

Everyone's culture and everyone's streets.

:03:17.:03:17.

This former Prime Minister was credited with saving the Union,

:03:18.:03:20.

when he passionately campaigned against independence

:03:21.:03:21.

This time, he says, after Brexit, Scotland could get a more powerful

:03:22.:03:27.

Parliament without having to break its links

:03:28.:03:29.

Gordon Brown is calling for a federal United Kingdom

:03:30.:03:34.

with the Scottish Parliament taking powers from Brussels,

:03:35.:03:38.

getting control of VAT rates, and negotiating treaties with other

:03:39.:03:40.

But from Nicola Sturgeon's prospective the choice

:03:41.:03:44.

An independent Scotland that wants to be in the EU,

:03:45.:03:50.

Iain Watson joins us now from Aberdeen.

:03:51.:04:01.

Gordon Brown, those passionate speeches he gave in the referendum.

:04:02.:04:06.

Who will be listening this time around? I think that's the question

:04:07.:04:13.

actually Charlie because last time round certainly his passionate

:04:14.:04:17.

intervention was credited with turning round support for remaining

:04:18.:04:21.

in the UK in the last few days of the referendum campaign, but at that

:04:22.:04:24.

point Labour was the main party of opposition in Westminster and in

:04:25.:04:29.

Scotland. It had the largest number of MPs at Westminster. He had been

:04:30.:04:32.

Prime Minister just four years before. We are in a different

:04:33.:04:37.

landscape now. Labour is in third place in Scotland. Labour looks

:04:38.:04:41.

further from power at Westminster to put it quite bluntly so whether he

:04:42.:04:45.

will carry the same amount of weight this times remains to be seen.

:04:46.:04:48.

Certainly the Labour Party are endorsing his proposals, this idea

:04:49.:04:52.

of more home rule for Scotland and for the Scottish Parliament to have

:04:53.:04:56.

more powers after Brexit. The difficulty is this - last time round

:04:57.:04:59.

when there was a vow to give the Scottish Parliament more powers in

:05:00.:05:03.

the referendum in 2014, the Conservatives were on side, the Lib

:05:04.:05:07.

Dems were on side, and Labour was on side, you have got the party in

:05:08.:05:12.

third place putting forward an idea and there is no guarantee that

:05:13.:05:15.

Theresa May will adopt this and no guarantee it will be an option in a

:05:16.:05:19.

referendum when it comes. Iain, thank you.

:05:20.:05:23.

We will be asking the SNP's deputy leader Angus Robertson

:05:24.:05:26.

in just over an hour about Gordon Brown's comments.

:05:27.:05:32.

And we'll also be hearing from the leader of Scottish

:05:33.:05:34.

Labour Kezia Dugdale later in the programme.

:05:35.:05:35.

The first British soldiers have arrived in Estonia as part

:05:36.:05:38.

of the largest deployment of British troops to Europe since

:05:39.:05:40.

Over the next few weeks a total of 800 British soldiers and hundreds

:05:41.:05:49.

of military vehicles will be sent to the Baltic state as Nato forces

:05:50.:05:52.

Our Defence Correspondent Jonathan Beale reports.

:05:53.:05:57.

The British Army has been preparing for this moment.

:05:58.:06:00.

These tanks took part in a final exercise in Germany ahead

:06:01.:06:03.

And they're now among 300 military vehicles that have been loaded

:06:04.:06:12.

on to a ferry destined for the small Baltic state of Estonia.

:06:13.:06:20.

The first British troops are trained and ready to go, not just alert to

:06:21.:06:27.

any military threat, but to provocations from Russia.

:06:28.:06:33.

Do you think the Russians are playing games and using social media

:06:34.:06:37.

and fake news and all that stuff? It is a mixture of both. You hear about

:06:38.:06:41.

a cyber threat and all of that stuff, but we Ianed for every

:06:42.:06:46.

eventualality. We know how to protect ourselves. Are you worried

:06:47.:06:49.

about anything? There is a credible threat just over the border, but I

:06:50.:06:54.

think we're a credible deterrent. These are the first of 800 British

:06:55.:07:03.

troops who will be arriving in Estonia in the next few weeks and it

:07:04.:07:11.

could be the start of a long, open-ended agreement to end Russian

:07:12.:07:13.

aggression. These soldiers will be caught up in the rising tensions

:07:14.:07:18.

between Russia and the west. They're not alone though. The US, Canada and

:07:19.:07:23.

Germany are also sending their troops to reinforce Nato's eastern

:07:24.:07:24.

flank. The American surveillance agency,

:07:25.:07:32.

the NSA, has rejected suggestions that British agents spied

:07:33.:07:34.

on Donald Trump, at the request On Wednesday, a White House

:07:35.:07:36.

spokesman discussed an allegation that GCHQ was asked to tap

:07:37.:07:40.

Mr Trump's calls last year. From Washington,

:07:41.:07:45.

Tulip Mazumdar reports. Two strong leaders

:07:46.:07:49.

with many differences. They discussed immigration,

:07:50.:07:54.

trade and Nato, and then the thorny At least we have something

:07:55.:07:56.

in common perhaps. It was an awkward joke that didn't

:07:57.:08:02.

seem to particularly The US admitted in 2015 to tapping

:08:03.:08:12.

Angela Merkel's phone, there is no evidence supporting

:08:13.:08:20.

Donald Trump's similar claims and today he distanced himself

:08:21.:08:24.

from suggestions by his own press secretary that British intelligence

:08:25.:08:31.

may have been involved. That was a statement made

:08:32.:08:33.

by a talented lawyer on Fox. So you shouldn't talking to me,

:08:34.:08:39.

you should be talking to Fox. Downing Street say it

:08:40.:08:45.

has been assured the US In an exclusive interview

:08:46.:08:47.

with the BBC, America's equivalent agency to GCHQ had this to say

:08:48.:08:50.

about the allegations What would be the advantage

:08:51.:08:53.

to the UK Government of doing The cost would be immense

:08:54.:09:00.

in comparison to any value. Arriving in Florida with his family

:09:01.:09:03.

for the weekend, the president will no doubt be reflecting on yet

:09:04.:09:18.

another controversial Prince William and the Duchess

:09:19.:09:20.

of Cambridge will meet victims of the attack on the Bataclan

:09:21.:09:25.

concert hall in Paris today. Yesterday the royal couple met

:09:26.:09:29.

French President Francois Hollande. The visit is part of the UK

:09:30.:09:36.

Government's charm offensive in Europe ahead of the start

:09:37.:09:38.

of Brexit talks. Nicholas Witchell is in Paris. A lot

:09:39.:09:47.

of attention on this globally. What's it hoping to achieve? Well,

:09:48.:09:54.

visits such as this always have a kind of political, with a small p

:09:55.:09:58.

purpose. They are in pursuit of British interests and whenever the

:09:59.:10:02.

Royal Family travel abroad it is at the request of the Foreign Office

:10:03.:10:05.

and there is this underlying diplomatic message. Now, they often

:10:06.:10:10.

it's quite a subtle onement on this occasion, it is really explicit.

:10:11.:10:16.

William and Catherine are here to underline the multi-facetted nature

:10:17.:10:19.

of the relationship between the United Kingdom and the countries of

:10:20.:10:24.

Europe and of course, there is this attempt, very explicit really, to

:10:25.:10:29.

reassure European nations in this case France, that the essentials of

:10:30.:10:33.

that relationship will not be changed by Brexit and so last night,

:10:34.:10:38.

prince well yam read a message from his grandmother, from the Queen, in

:10:39.:10:43.

which she commented on the relationship between the United

:10:44.:10:46.

Kingdom and France and said this relationship will continue to

:10:47.:10:49.

prosper in the future. So that really is the principle purpose of

:10:50.:10:52.

this visit. Nicholas Witchell, thank you very

:10:53.:10:53.

much. Schools should teach children how

:10:54.:10:58.

to spot "fake news" and recognise lies on social media,

:10:59.:11:01.

according to a leading The director of the influential

:11:02.:11:03.

think-tank, the OECD, says pupils are becoming too

:11:04.:11:07.

dependent on the internet and need help distinguishing between true

:11:08.:11:10.

and false information online. New research suggests the idyllic

:11:11.:11:14.

image some people have of the countryside is masking

:11:15.:11:17.

pockets of poverty, poor health and social isolation that can

:11:18.:11:19.

exist in rural areas. The report by Public Health England

:11:20.:11:25.

and the Local Government Association says official statistics are often

:11:26.:11:29.

skewed towards gathering information about people living

:11:30.:11:31.

in towns and cities. We will have the sport with Mike and

:11:32.:11:40.

the weather later on. He is credited by some as the man

:11:41.:11:47.

who helped to swing the last Scottish independence referendum

:11:48.:11:50.

in favour of the union. And today the former

:11:51.:11:52.

Prime Minister Gordon Brown will call for Scotland to get

:11:53.:11:55.

more powers after Brexit in a bid to reduce the lure of what

:11:56.:11:57.

he calls,"hard-line nationalism". It comes just days after the SNP

:11:58.:12:00.

demanded a new vote. Their Deputy leader

:12:01.:12:02.

Angus Robertson is in Aberdeen First of all, Gordon Brown is a

:12:03.:12:14.

significant political figure still. What do you make of what he is

:12:15.:12:21.

saying? Well, a very Brown hog day to you. What we are seeing Gordon

:12:22.:12:25.

Brown being wheeled out again when the Union is in trouble. We in

:12:26.:12:29.

Scotland remember the promises that were made during the 2014 referendum

:12:30.:12:34.

about transformational change in Scotland that we would have near as

:12:35.:12:39.

possible federalism, and we're very, very far from that. I don't take it

:12:40.:12:44.

seriously at all, but what it does show you is that Whitehall,

:12:45.:12:48.

Westminster, is losing control of this debate because what the Prime

:12:49.:12:51.

Minister is seeking to do is block democracy in Scotland. People having

:12:52.:12:55.

a choice about our future and the Labour Party trying to pitch in and

:12:56.:12:58.

help the Tories as they did last time. I don't think it will make any

:12:59.:13:04.

difference at all. But we've heard it before, so no doubt we'll hear it

:13:05.:13:10.

again. Yes, you are clearly very dismissive of Gordon Brown's

:13:11.:13:13.

intervention. Some people will say you and your conference, of course,

:13:14.:13:18.

are preaching to the converted so you will get rapturous applause when

:13:19.:13:21.

you make those speeches, but he maybe speaking for some people who

:13:22.:13:24.

have a different view of how they see the future for Scotland, with

:13:25.:13:28.

more power, but still, part of the UK? No doubt about that, yes. No

:13:29.:13:34.

doubt about that at all. Let's be clear, the Labour Party is not in a

:13:35.:13:37.

position to deliver a pizza at the moment. They're in opposition in

:13:38.:13:42.

Westminster. They're divided. The Labour Party is so weak in Scotland

:13:43.:13:46.

now that they are the third force in political, and they are not even a

:13:47.:13:51.

force so we have to understand that what's going on, we have a

:13:52.:13:54.

Government had Scotland elected with a mandate to hold a referendum in

:13:55.:13:56.

the circumstances of Scotland being taken out of the European Union

:13:57.:14:00.

against its will. That is what is happening at the present time. We're

:14:01.:14:05.

going to have a vote in the Scottish Parliament next week and I expect a

:14:06.:14:10.

majority, so not just SNP MSPs, but others will decide that we should

:14:11.:14:14.

have a referendum in Scotland and I just cannot see how a UK Government

:14:15.:14:19.

will deny people in Scotland having their say and I think it is really

:14:20.:14:22.

important for people elsewhere in the UK to be able to understand

:14:23.:14:28.

what's going on here because this is about the forthcoming Brexit

:14:29.:14:33.

negotiations when there will be discussions with the European Union

:14:34.:14:36.

and at the end there is going to be a period to choose and the British

:14:37.:14:39.

Parliament is going to have a choice, the House of Lords which

:14:40.:14:43.

nobody has elected is going to have a choice, the House of Commons, the

:14:44.:14:46.

European Parliament is going to have a choice, 27 member states are going

:14:47.:14:49.

to have a choice about the future of Scotland and it just seems

:14:50.:14:53.

completely unacceptable that the people of Scotland in those

:14:54.:14:56.

circumstances are not going to be able to have a choice about their

:14:57.:15:00.

own future. So I don't think it is sustainable to deny a referendum. I

:15:01.:15:04.

think it will have to happen regardless of any idea that Gordon

:15:05.:15:07.

Brown comes up with when we know that things are really in trouble.

:15:08.:15:12.

Just take me step by step if you would how this works. You mentioned

:15:13.:15:15.

the vote that you're going to have next week and you say you're of can

:15:16.:15:19.

dent that you're going to get that vote. The Scottish Parliament votes

:15:20.:15:22.

in favour of a referendum and Theresa May will be asked once again

:15:23.:15:26.

what she thinks and she will repeat what she says, your leader, energy,

:15:27.:15:30.

says she doesn't seem like someone who is going to change her mind.

:15:31.:15:33.

What happens next? Is it a possibility that you hold a

:15:34.:15:37.

referendum without the backing of Theresa May? Well, let's listen to

:15:38.:15:44.

what she actually said. She said now is not the time for a referendum and

:15:45.:15:49.

it might be a surprise to you, but I agree with her. We don't want a

:15:50.:15:54.

referendum now because there have to be negotiations with the European

:15:55.:15:57.

Union and that's going to take the guts of two years. But the EU side

:15:58.:16:01.

and the UK side have both said that they are looking to try and have an

:16:02.:16:08.

agreement by the autumn of 2018, and all of the approval then needs to

:16:09.:16:11.

take place before the spring of 2019. Now, I'm just making a basic

:16:12.:16:16.

point and this will become obvious the closer we get. Everybody else is

:16:17.:16:19.

going to get a choice over Scotland's future. A choice about it

:16:20.:16:23.

in London. A choice about it in Brussels and a choice in 27 capitals

:16:24.:16:31.

from Tallinn to Vienna, to Zagreb, across Europe, people are going to

:16:32.:16:33.

have a choice about Scotland's future. And I just think it is going

:16:34.:16:39.

to be untenable for a UK Prime Minister to allow everybody else to

:16:40.:16:42.

have a choice over Scotland's future, but us in Scotland not to

:16:43.:16:45.

have a choice and for that reason I don't think she is going to be able

:16:46.:16:51.

to maintain forever a blockade on Scottish democracy. We can discuss

:16:52.:16:56.

hypotheticals about plans B and Cs and all that. I just think there is

:16:57.:16:59.

something that's going to happen. There is going to be a referendum in

:17:00.:17:03.

Scotland. It will happen. If our Parliament votes for it, just think

:17:04.:17:06.

about this for a second, what kind of a state will the UK be? Are we

:17:07.:17:11.

still going to claim that the UK is a properly functioning democracy?

:17:12.:17:14.

The national Parliament of Scotland says it wants a referendum and the

:17:15.:17:18.

UK denies it, I mean what kind of UK is that? It is not a democratic UK

:17:19.:17:26.

where it is based on respect for the different nations and regions of the

:17:27.:17:29.

country. If I may, just a brief thought from you and help us with

:17:30.:17:32.

this one. Nicola Sturgeon, Theresa May, do you know when they last

:17:33.:17:38.

spoke? And how would you describe their relationship right now? I

:17:39.:17:44.

don't know the answer to that question, but there have been

:17:45.:17:48.

regular meetings of what's called the joint ministerial committee,

:17:49.:17:52.

the. JC and that brought together the Prime Minister and the First

:17:53.:17:56.

Minister and the representatives of the other devolved administrations

:17:57.:17:59.

in the UK and it's there that the Scottish Government has been

:18:00.:18:03.

presenting it'st its compromise proposal has been been seeking to

:18:04.:18:06.

try and make progress in this for months, but unfortunately, the UK

:18:07.:18:09.

Government, the Prime Minister, and her colleagues, have not been

:18:10.:18:14.

prepared to move an inch. Now, they have yet to trigger Article 50 and

:18:15.:18:19.

so there are days and perhaps a couple of weeks for the UK

:18:20.:18:22.

Government to deliver on the promise that Theresa May gave that she

:18:23.:18:26.

wanted a UK-wide approach, an agreement before triggering Article

:18:27.:18:30.

50. So I would encourage Theresa May at this late stage to show the same

:18:31.:18:35.

kind of leadership and the willingness to compromise as Nicola

:18:36.:18:38.

Sturgeon has because if she doesn't, and if all she wants to do is

:18:39.:18:43.

blockade Scottish democracy then it's going to be very, very damaging

:18:44.:18:47.

for the union that she says she supports. Angus Robertson, thank you

:18:48.:18:52.

very much for your time. SNP deputy leader. Angus Roberts son. We will

:18:53.:19:02.

be Scottish leader Kezia Dugdale in a bit. Let's go to Ben with the

:19:03.:19:06.

weather. Aberdeenshire getting off to a

:19:07.:19:17.

beautiful start. Lovely sunrace there in Fraserburgh. Further west,

:19:18.:19:24.

it is a cloudy story in Carmarthenshire. A lot of cloud in

:19:25.:19:28.

the forecast. It will be mild and breezy and rain at time. Most of

:19:29.:19:33.

that will be in the west because this pipeline of cloud streaming

:19:34.:19:37.

across the Atlantic and it is always going to be western areas are that

:19:38.:19:42.

exposed to the pipeline of moisture. Further east, shelter, a better

:19:43.:19:50.

chance of seeing dry weather and brightness. Chilly here, one or two

:19:51.:19:55.

wintry showers and maybe icy stretches, but through south-west

:19:56.:19:59.

Scotland and north-west Scotland, but to the east of the Pennines,

:20:00.:20:03.

shelter. You might get brightness across north-east England. Through

:20:04.:20:07.

parts of East Anglia and the South East, maybe some brighter glimpses,

:20:08.:20:10.

but the Midlands Wales and the south-west cloudy and particularly

:20:11.:20:15.

down towards the far south-west murky and drizzly. Breezy as well.

:20:16.:20:20.

As we go through the day, it will always be western areas will see the

:20:21.:20:26.

rain. Further east, Eastern Scotland, Eastern England, we might

:20:27.:20:30.

get some brightness. That could lift temperatures to 15 or 16 Celsius.

:20:31.:20:34.

Always chillier across the far north of Scotland. A big day in the Six

:20:35.:20:38.

Nations today for the fixture in Paris and in Dublin and Edinburgh.

:20:39.:20:41.

Generally a lot of cloud. Maybe in Edinburgh we will see brightness at

:20:42.:20:44.

times. Apart from a few spots of rain, there will be a lot of dry

:20:45.:20:48.

weather. This evening and tonight, we will see heavier rain moving

:20:49.:20:51.

through Northern Ireland and Scotland, down into Northern

:20:52.:20:54.

England. The further south you are, largely dry apart from the odd spot

:20:55.:20:58.

of drizzle. It will be breezy and a mild night for many and into

:20:59.:21:01.

tomorrow, well more of the same in many ways. A lot of cloud around. We

:21:02.:21:05.

will have the band of rain through Northern Ireland and Southern

:21:06.:21:09.

Scotland. It will sink no Northern England and Wales. Weakening as it

:21:10.:21:12.

does. To the north of that turning cooler. A mixture of sunshine and

:21:13.:21:15.

showers. To the south of that rain band, it will be windy tomorrow. It

:21:16.:21:19.

will be cloudy, but again, it will be mild with temperatures up to 15

:21:20.:21:24.

Celsius. So by no means, is it all bad news this weekend, Tina and

:21:25.:21:25.

Charlie. Ben, thank you very much. Tens of thousands of people

:21:26.:21:33.

in England and Wales will face what's being called a new death

:21:34.:21:35.

tax from May. At the moment people who sort out

:21:36.:21:38.

the estate of a relative after they die pay

:21:39.:21:41.

a flat rate of ?215. But in the future, changes mean

:21:42.:21:43.

the fee will rise with the value Paul Lewis from Radio 4's Money Box

:21:44.:21:46.

is in our London studio. At the moment it is a flat fee, ?215

:21:47.:22:03.

a bit less if a solicitor does it for you. In the future, it will go

:22:04.:22:07.

up, the more that's left. Once that reaches ?300,000 it will be ?1,000

:22:08.:22:14.

and it will go up to ?4,000, ?8,000, ?12,000 or ?20,000 in some cases.

:22:15.:22:18.

That will be for the biggest estates, but if you leave a house

:22:19.:22:23.

and a B52 savings, you can reach ?300,000 and face ?1,000 fee and in

:22:24.:22:27.

London and the South East of England certainly, people can easily leave

:22:28.:22:32.

more than ?500,000 or ?1 million if you count the value of the family

:22:33.:22:36.

home and they will pay ?8,000. It is going to hit people really hard and

:22:37.:22:39.

that's why it is called a new death tax as you say. I suppose we should

:22:40.:22:44.

say that a lot of people, they may have big houses, they have seen

:22:45.:22:48.

their property values rise, that doesn't necessarily mean they are

:22:49.:22:51.

wealthy. I imagine a lot of people will struggle to pay these fees?

:22:52.:22:55.

Well, yes. And they have to be paid upfront? Yes, they do. That's the

:22:56.:22:59.

point. You have to pay them when you apply for what's called probate

:23:00.:23:02.

which is when you sort out the estate and the courts give you per

:23:03.:23:05.

mirbs to release all the funds and that has to be paid upfront and it

:23:06.:23:09.

could be months before you inherit whatever you're going to inherit

:23:10.:23:14.

from the estate and if that is just or mainly the family home then you

:23:15.:23:18.

don't have any cash to pay the fee even then. There will be problems

:23:19.:23:20.

with people borrowing the money from the bank. They are reluctant to lend

:23:21.:23:24.

it. Solicitors can't really lend you that sort of money. So there will be

:23:25.:23:28.

people who are stuck and they may have to borrow from relatives or

:23:29.:23:31.

friends or try to get a loan themselves, but even the Government

:23:32.:23:34.

admits if you have got a bad credit record you will not be able to get

:23:35.:23:37.

that loan. So there will be problems for many people. So why are these

:23:38.:23:43.

rules changing now? Why not stick to this flat fee of ?215 for everybody?

:23:44.:23:46.

Well, the Government has been quite open about that of the it is to

:23:47.:23:51.

raise money. This will raise 300 odd million pounds a year and that will

:23:52.:23:56.

help pay for the court service. It is being classified as tax in the

:23:57.:24:01.

national statistics, it is way beyond the cost that's estimated at

:24:02.:24:05.

less than ?200. They issue a single piece of paper saying you can go

:24:06.:24:08.

ahead and sort out the estate and it is to raise money. It is raising

:24:09.:24:13.

over ?300 million, it is a tax and they're going ahead with it because

:24:14.:24:17.

frankly they need the money and it was buried, if I can use the phrase

:24:18.:24:22.

in the Budget papers! We have known it was coming for a while with

:24:23.:24:27.

consultations and so on, but it is just to raise money.

:24:28.:24:33.

The time is 8.24am. You're watching Breakfast. It is time for a look at

:24:34.:24:37.

the newspapers. Financial analyst from Deloitte,

:24:38.:24:41.

Margaret Doyle is here to tell us The Duchess of Cambridge in Paris a

:24:42.:25:03.

the British Embassy last night. The first day of that official trip with

:25:04.:25:10.

Prince William. The Daily Mail, "Gog. Google on rack

:25:11.:25:24.

over cash from hate videos." The Daily Telegraph, Brexit is more

:25:25.:25:27.

important to voters than keeping the United Kingdom together. That's

:25:28.:25:31.

according to a Daily Telegraph poll. The last one is the Guardian

:25:32.:25:36.

newspaper. This is about George Osborne and his new jobment one of

:25:37.:25:41.

quite a few jobs he has. So he still is an MP. He is taking on this job

:25:42.:25:45.

as editor of the London Evening Standard Newspaper.

:25:46.:25:53.

Six jobs in total now. Do you want a quick thought on this? He is a very

:25:54.:25:57.

able man and he will make a great editor. Clearly, he will have lots

:25:58.:26:01.

of people questioning whether he can do that while continuing with the

:26:02.:26:04.

other roles that he has. So there will be lots of people who will look

:26:05.:26:11.

him to account. Paul was talking about wills. What's the store story

:26:12.:26:17.

you picked up? It is in the Financial Times money section. There

:26:18.:26:21.

was a case where a daughter who was cut out of her mother's will, took

:26:22.:26:27.

the place and went to the Supreme Court. Her mother wanted to cut her

:26:28.:26:32.

out of her ?500,000 and she ended up getting ?50,000, but the Supreme

:26:33.:26:35.

Court overruled an earlier court judgement that would have given her

:26:36.:26:39.

?163,000. Really what is at stake here is how much freedom does an

:26:40.:26:44.

individual have over their own will? The UK actually is pretty liberal in

:26:45.:26:48.

what it allows individuals to do. Many other countries stipulate

:26:49.:26:52.

exactly how much you have to leave. So Ireland, you have to leave money

:26:53.:26:56.

to your spouse or to your children. In France, there are very strict

:26:57.:27:01.

rules. Anyone who had property in France will know this, but the UK is

:27:02.:27:07.

liberal. But what this says is that it basically restrigts the amount

:27:08.:27:12.

that a child can demand from their parent's estate when they have been

:27:13.:27:15.

cut outment she did get something, but the Supreme Court said no, your

:27:16.:27:21.

mother wanted to cut you out. One of the lessons from this is, if you do

:27:22.:27:25.

want to write an unusual will, what the lawyers are saying is make sure

:27:26.:27:31.

you're explicit, write a letter as well explaining your reasoning. Such

:27:32.:27:38.

a personal issue this, isn't it? You picked out the story from The Sun

:27:39.:27:41.

which is linked. It is played out publicly? Wills are a public

:27:42.:27:45.

document. There is a good reason for wills to be a public document

:27:46.:27:51.

because you don't want relatives to hide away assets. Victoria Wood left

:27:52.:28:01.

money to charity and almost half to her children and she left her house,

:28:02.:28:05.

she had a house in London and the Lake District. She left both to her

:28:06.:28:09.

children. She left legacies to her siblings and friends and god

:28:10.:28:12.

children, but nothing for her ex-husband. That you could say is

:28:13.:28:17.

not surprising. Normally you're adviced to revise your will after

:28:18.:28:22.

you get divorced and the will is invalidated by a big life event like

:28:23.:28:26.

having children or getting divorced, but he was with her when she died

:28:27.:28:31.

and the lesson is here, just be careful with wills because they have

:28:32.:28:37.

the ability to cause pain, bitterness, anguish... Years and

:28:38.:28:42.

years to come. Family rows for years to come. Think carefully. Tell us

:28:43.:28:46.

about this story, the Imperial War Museum? It is 100 years old this

:28:47.:28:51.

year. Unusually they were thinking about setting up a museum about war

:28:52.:28:56.

in the middle of the Great War, the First World War as we've come to

:28:57.:29:01.

know it and the Times is claiming it's part in the story of the

:29:02.:29:06.

Imperial War Museum because there was an editorial in the Times saying

:29:07.:29:10.

it was a good ideament they were actually copying France which is

:29:11.:29:14.

setting up its own war museum and the reasoning behind it, there were

:29:15.:29:17.

so many weapons that they said the public needs to understand this and

:29:18.:29:22.

therefore, we should set-up a museum to teach the public about what life

:29:23.:29:26.

is like at the front because this was the first total war. So, very

:29:27.:29:31.

kind of noble ambitions and in fact, it was done very, very quickly and

:29:32.:29:35.

the museum was set-up later that same year. How is your tea intake so

:29:36.:29:43.

far this morning? Very low. I'm, I've had a decaff latte. How have

:29:44.:29:49.

you fared this morning? One tea and one coffee so far. Two teas and one

:29:50.:29:57.

coffee. Pay parentally you're at lower risk of getting dementia

:29:58.:29:59.

because you have a high uptake of tea. This is a study that suggests

:30:00.:30:04.

if you drink a lot of tea, it will lower your risk of dementia. We get

:30:05.:30:08.

a lot of medical studies and of course, I think we have to wait and

:30:09.:30:12.

that's what the at dimers society is saying, let's wait and see. It is

:30:13.:30:16.

early days yet because caffeine, of course, is not really terrifically

:30:17.:30:19.

good for other things particularly for the heart. It causes tremors and

:30:20.:30:24.

all sorts of other things. So, they do say the Alzheimer's Society that

:30:25.:30:30.

you should eat healthily, exercise, and give up smoking and frankly

:30:31.:30:36.

that's advice that's good if you want to avoid a whole host of other

:30:37.:30:39.

illnesses, diabetes, heart disease, cancer. Thank you, doctor! We will

:30:40.:30:50.

see you in an hour. We will have the headlines in a moment.

:30:51.:31:26.

Hello, this is Breakfast, with Charlie Stayt and Tina Daheley.

:31:27.:31:31.

Coming up before 9am, Ben will have the weather.

:31:32.:31:33.

But first, a summary of this morning's main news.

:31:34.:31:36.

The Deputy Leader of the SNP Angus Robertson has told BBC

:31:37.:31:58.

Breakfast it's a matter of when not if a second referendum on Scottish

:31:59.:32:02.

He was responding to Gordon Brown's call for more powers for Scotland

:32:03.:32:10.

after Brexit to prevent the United Kingdom from splitting.

:32:11.:32:12.

27 member nations are going to have a choice, and make decisions about

:32:13.:32:19.

Scotland. I did not think it is sustainable to deny a referendum. I

:32:20.:32:23.

think it is going to happen regardless of any idea that Gordon

:32:24.:32:28.

Brown comes up with when we know that things are really in trouble.

:32:29.:32:33.

The Scottish Labour leader Kezia Dugdale joins us now

:32:34.:32:35.

The third option, we have heard this before. Why now? Is this just about

:32:36.:32:47.

undermining Nicola Sturgeon's plans for a second referendum Clinton?

:32:48.:32:53.

undermining Nicola Sturgeon's plans for a second referendum Can I

:32:54.:33:00.

against another referendum because of the immense cost. It is no wonder

:33:01.:33:03.

Labour figures are looking for alternatives to talk up, and that is

:33:04.:33:15.

why Gordon Brown is talking today, discussing... I think it is a good

:33:16.:33:23.

intervention and one that the vast majority of Scots will welcome. Can

:33:24.:33:27.

you see what this looks like? Gordon Brown being used as a last resort.

:33:28.:33:32.

This happened just before the referendum as well, and again with

:33:33.:33:36.

Nicola Sturgeon calling for a second referendum. I have been arguing for

:33:37.:33:41.

federalism in Scotland for months. A few weeks ago I took a proposal to

:33:42.:33:45.

my party conference which was backed almost unanimously by the party.

:33:46.:34:01.

This is what we stand for here in Scotland. We're rejecting

:34:02.:34:04.

nationalism that the SNP advocate because of the impact on public

:34:05.:34:07.

services, but also rejecting the Tories' hard Brexit and austerity

:34:08.:34:09.

that would bring. I do not think Scotland want to be forged between

:34:10.:34:12.

these two choices. Got to see a country, together after years of

:34:13.:34:14.

division will stop let us talk about the future, what can we do with the

:34:15.:34:17.

power was coming back from Brussels to create the type of Scotland Bill

:34:18.:34:20.

want to see? And is not asked about Scotland. A federal solution would

:34:21.:34:22.

mean a whole change to the United Kingdom about who has power, how it

:34:23.:34:28.

is exercised. You have figures like Carwyn Jones in Wales calling for a

:34:29.:34:33.

similar thing. And Mayor of London arguing for more powers in London.

:34:34.:34:36.

It is an exciting thing to talk about the future of the whole of the

:34:37.:34:40.

United Kingdom. You talk about the future, but this is the past,

:34:41.:34:44.

history repeating itself. We have heard about the proposals, so what

:34:45.:34:50.

is new this time round? When Gordon Brown made his intervention in the

:34:51.:34:55.

2014 referendum campaign, there was a proposal for new powers to come to

:34:56.:35:00.

the Scottish parliament which have been fulfilled. We just had a

:35:01.:35:06.

Scotland act. The reason we're back here is not because of the Labour

:35:07.:35:09.

Party, it is because of the reckless gamble on Brexit. We're leaving the

:35:10.:35:12.

European Union. Those powers are coming back to Britain, and I think

:35:13.:35:17.

it is right that even Scotland the Labour Party are seeing the power

:35:18.:35:20.

should come to Scotland, not for London to choose. The people of

:35:21.:35:31.

Scotland should have the powers to create the Scotland we want... Here

:35:32.:35:37.

in Scotland it is about finding an answer, it respects the result of

:35:38.:35:42.

the referendum in 2014, and also recognises Scotland wants a

:35:43.:35:44.

different relationship with Europe than the rest of the UK. Jeremy

:35:45.:35:50.

Corbyn has said in response to this, he was questioned about the second

:35:51.:35:55.

referendum, and said he's absolutely fine. He very quickly rectified his

:35:56.:36:05.

words, and has said he was opposed to an independence referendum

:36:06.:36:08.

because of the turbo-charged austerity it would bring. 15,000

:36:09.:36:16.

million less to spend on schools and possible. I am going to continue to

:36:17.:36:22.

champion the idea about bringing the country back together, remaining

:36:23.:36:24.

part of the United Kingdom and making the best of a bad situation.

:36:25.:36:34.

Thank you very much indeed. Want to bring you a piece of breaking news.

:36:35.:36:39.

We're getting reports that there is a police operation underway at Orly

:36:40.:36:49.

International Airport, a man has been shot dead after trying to seize

:36:50.:36:52.

the weapon of a soldier. These reports are coming in from a news

:36:53.:36:59.

agency, but at the moment we know that these as a security operation

:37:00.:37:03.

underway, and reports are that one man has been shot dead, reports are

:37:04.:37:07.

suggesting he tried to seize a weapon from a soldier who was on

:37:08.:37:11.

duty there are. We will bring you more details on that story as soon

:37:12.:37:13.

as it comes in. The first British soldiers have

:37:14.:37:18.

arrived in Estonia as part of the largest deployment of British

:37:19.:37:21.

troops to Europe since Over the next few weeks a total

:37:22.:37:23.

of 800 British soldiers and hundreds of military vehicles will be sent

:37:24.:37:28.

to the Baltic state in an attempt The American surveillance agency,

:37:29.:37:31.

the NSA, has rejected suggestions that British agents spied

:37:32.:37:35.

on Donald Trump, at the request On Wednesday, a White House

:37:36.:37:37.

spokesman discussed an allegation that GCHQ was asked to tap

:37:38.:37:46.

Mr Trump's calls last year. Downing Street says it's been

:37:47.:37:49.

reassured by Washington What would be the advantage

:37:50.:37:51.

to the UK government of doing The cost would be immense

:37:52.:38:02.

in comparison to any value, The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge

:38:03.:38:06.

will meet victims of the attack on the Bataclan concert hall

:38:07.:38:12.

in Paris today. Last night, the royal couple had

:38:13.:38:14.

dinner at the British embassy, where Prince William spoke

:38:15.:38:17.

of the enduring ties The visit is part of the British

:38:18.:38:18.

government's charm offensive in Europe ahead of the start

:38:19.:38:22.

of Brexit talks. New research suggests the idyllic

:38:23.:38:31.

image some people have of the countryside is masking

:38:32.:38:34.

pockets of poverty, poor health and social isolation that can

:38:35.:38:36.

exist in rural areas. The report by Public Health England

:38:37.:38:38.

and the Local Government Association says official statistics are often

:38:39.:38:41.

skewed towards gathering information about people living

:38:42.:38:43.

in towns and cities. Those are the main

:38:44.:38:56.

stories this morning. So England's men are in Dublin,

:38:57.:39:04.

today chasing a world record, 19th consecutive wins

:39:05.:39:07.

and a second grand slam Ireland have spoiled the party

:39:08.:39:09.

before, in 2011. We will have more on this

:39:10.:39:28.

in a few minutes, but England's women have

:39:29.:39:30.

already shown how to win A victory for either

:39:31.:39:32.

Ireland or England would have secured the title,

:39:33.:39:36.

but it was England who ran away with it, with 5 tries,

:39:37.:39:39.

sealing a 34-7 win. It's the first time they've won

:39:40.:39:41.

the competition since 2012. An Irish journalist whispered

:39:42.:39:51.

to me at Cheltenham, early yesterday, "Sizing John",

:39:52.:39:53.

and he was right, as the 7-1 shot won the Gold Cup to give trainer,

:39:54.:39:56.

Jessica Harrington, victory with her first entry,

:39:57.:39:58.

in the famous race. The favourite, Djakadam,

:39:59.:40:00.

finished in fourth after hitting a fence and Sizing John powered

:40:01.:40:02.

clear to repeat his triumph Jockey Robbie Power also rode

:40:03.:40:05.

the 2007 Grand National Good morning. The Premier League is

:40:06.:40:23.

a one horse race. Well, you cannot just have a one horse race! No, it

:40:24.:40:31.

is just a horse. Ten points clear, beat Manchester United in the FA

:40:32.:40:34.

Cup. There is such confidence in the side. We're hearing from Pedro

:40:35.:40:39.

today. We're on early because of the six Nations, so the whole bill up to

:40:40.:40:44.

the afternoon is rugby dominated. We're on for half an hour at

:40:45.:40:51.

11:30am. We will also fuel from Eddie Howe, the Bournemouth manager.

:40:52.:40:58.

A big wind for them last week. Five of the bottom six sides have changed

:40:59.:41:03.

their manager this season. So it is so important for teams like

:41:04.:41:06.

Bournemouth to pick up the points to get themselves away from trouble.

:41:07.:41:13.

He'd is a bit of the interview with. You have got to be different things

:41:14.:41:19.

to the players. I would not say there is one category, some danger

:41:20.:41:23.

to be supportive, sometimes you have to be strict, it depends on the

:41:24.:41:28.

situation. I would like to think I could be there if the players need

:41:29.:41:38.

me on an emotional level. On the pitch, in terms of their playing

:41:39.:41:44.

games, I will be very direct in terms of what I want, that is for

:41:45.:41:48.

sure. It is very important that there is an expectation to say, this

:41:49.:41:53.

is what I want from you as a player. And honest assessment from Eddie

:41:54.:41:57.

Howe. We also have Steve Brooks, Dion Dublin, mandate -- Manchester

:41:58.:42:03.

United team-mates talking about Aston Villa. We will have a look at

:42:04.:42:09.

Manchester city and Liverpool, a big game tomorrow. That is just a

:42:10.:42:14.

reminder, 11:30am on BBC One. For half an hour. Batters ahead of the

:42:15.:42:21.

six Nations, Scotland against Italy. Have you ever had any animal

:42:22.:42:26.

incidents on the golf course? I was once playing with a friend who hit

:42:27.:42:38.

as one in the neck. -- a swan. Not in anger! It was a drive down the

:42:39.:42:47.

middle, went a bit low, and Hecht a swan. Quickly moving on!

:42:48.:42:59.

Smylie Kaufman was leisurely strolling up

:43:00.:43:00.

to the green, unware of that alligator in the rough

:43:01.:43:03.

This is an osprey. We have had a bit of fun with fishy golf names.

:43:04.:43:19.

The fish might just be a Dory Mackerel,

:43:20.:43:21.

And you are known for doing your top teams. Cod Hamilton. Ernie Eels.

:43:22.:43:48.

Eduardo Calamari. Every golfer wants a sole in one.

:43:49.:44:00.

I think the best so far is Cod-rig Herrington. I have been told to move

:44:01.:44:08.

on! We're going to talk about rugby. The six Nations.

:44:09.:44:39.

So as we've been hearing it's a tense day for England

:44:40.:44:42.

Eddie Jones's side haven't lost since 2015, and indeed since he took

:44:43.:44:46.

over, but Ireland have a tradition of ambushing, the men

:44:47.:44:48.

They will be dancing all-round Landsdowne Road. England not taking

:44:49.:44:59.

their place. What a flourish, what a performance! And he scores for

:45:00.:45:17.

Ireland! It is going to be the dashing of England's Grand Slam

:45:18.:45:27.

hopes. You're either a success and failure. We're going to achieve

:45:28.:45:32.

greatness now. Winning back-to-back grand slams. That kicks off at five

:45:33.:45:35.

o'clock this afternoon. Joining us now from Dublin and, Ireland

:45:36.:45:42.

international Mike Ross. I know how much Ireland are on a roll after a

:45:43.:45:46.

great performance at the races at Cheltenham, how much would it mean

:45:47.:45:56.

to the nation for them to beat Eddie Jones's England? They would love it.

:45:57.:45:59.

It has not been a great six Nations for Ireland, we have lost two games,

:46:00.:46:04.

and the last thing you want to do after heading out of the

:46:05.:46:08.

international environment is quite to a loss. Here, at home, six

:46:09.:46:13.

Nations, that is a lot for them at stake. Is it easier to be the party

:46:14.:46:20.

pooper than a team who has all the pressure on them? It probably is,

:46:21.:46:26.

but that said, Ireland would love to be in the situation we're in now.

:46:27.:46:30.

We're going through consecutive grand slams which has not been done

:46:31.:46:36.

before, so it is a great bit of history to make. The boys wish they

:46:37.:46:43.

would in that situation. -- wished. Ireland had a famous wind over New

:46:44.:46:48.

Zealand, and then they lost one. How do you feel watching those games?

:46:49.:46:57.

England join the all Black figures, who hold the record at the moment.

:46:58.:47:07.

They compare favourably. It would have been against southern

:47:08.:47:13.

hemisphere opposition, it is just a difference and where we play. What

:47:14.:47:20.

is key for Ireland today? Basically just getting in the England faces? I

:47:21.:47:29.

think key to us is making sure our defence is spot-on, that our

:47:30.:47:33.

line-out functions well, because England are very dangerous in the

:47:34.:47:37.

park and you do not want to give them a turnover ball. Scotland found

:47:38.:47:43.

that out to their cost. I mentioned earlier that England came a cropper

:47:44.:47:49.

with the Grand Slam relations -- ambitions in 2011. How does the

:47:50.:47:53.

Ireland team compare with that and I be capable of doing it again? I

:47:54.:48:00.

played in the 2011 team, and I think the personnel we had then versus

:48:01.:48:05.

mode compares favourably. That I think England have a better team now

:48:06.:48:13.

than then. To be honest, I think it is going to be very tough for

:48:14.:48:20.

Ireland, but if we do it, we will have a very good chance. England

:48:21.:48:26.

need to bring the Scottish form with them, to have a chance of winning

:48:27.:48:33.

themselves. What has impressed you most about Eddie Jones, they have

:48:34.:48:43.

not lost under him? He seems a very smart rugby coach. When the are

:48:44.:48:46.

playing, they are very difficult to defend against, lots of runners

:48:47.:48:52.

coming from different corners. They play a wide expanse of game, and are

:48:53.:48:59.

nice to watch at times. Would you like to give as a prediction? I

:49:00.:49:08.

think it will be close. I certainly hope it is not a similar result to

:49:09.:49:13.

the Scotland match, but I think Ireland will probably wind by 45

:49:14.:49:20.

points. That would make me happy. I'll bet! The game should be a

:49:21.:49:22.

fantastic atmosphere. And to balance And we will be speaking to former

:49:23.:49:32.

England international We'll just remind you of a story

:49:33.:49:42.

that's just breaking this morning - A man has been shot dead at one

:49:43.:49:54.

of the main airports in Paris, This is the scene at

:49:55.:49:58.

Paris-Orly - where a police People have been told to avoid the

:49:59.:50:04.

airport while the operation is underway. This happened this

:50:05.:50:09.

morning, and is part of the operation around Paris protecting

:50:10.:50:13.

sensitive sites that we know about. France's under a state of emergency

:50:14.:50:18.

at the moment, following a number of attacks. We understand that the

:50:19.:50:25.

sequence of events, a man tried to seize the weapon of a soldier. One

:50:26.:50:32.

of the soldiers who was guarding Paris Orly airport. The moment -- at

:50:33.:50:42.

the moment the airport remains closed. This is the immediate

:50:43.:50:45.

aftermath. We will keep you up-to-date with that. Line the time

:50:46.:50:52.

is 8:50am. Let us have a look at the weather.

:50:53.:50:57.

Many of you are getting the day of the rack the start. People are

:50:58.:51:05.

waking up to views like this one in Derbyshire. Throughout the day, we

:51:06.:51:09.

will have mild conditions, breezy conditions and rain at times for

:51:10.:51:14.

some of us. Most of the rain is out West. This line of moisture

:51:15.:51:20.

streaming across the Atlantic. The western areas will be exposed to

:51:21.:51:24.

that, so it is the West that will see most of the rain. To the east,

:51:25.:51:28.

that is a bit more shelter, more in the way of dry weather and sunshine.

:51:29.:51:34.

If you are about to head out this is how it will look at ten o'clock. In

:51:35.:51:38.

the north-east of Scotland it is chilly. Fairly bright, with sunshine

:51:39.:51:42.

and wintry showers. Further south more cloud, and in Northern Ireland

:51:43.:51:48.

heavy rain is moving in. North-east England has shelter from the

:51:49.:51:51.

Pennines, with a chance of seeing greatness. A similar story for the

:51:52.:51:56.

south-east. Thicker cloud and spots of drizzle. It is not as windy as it

:51:57.:52:03.

was yesterday. Throughout the day there will be a lot of cloud. Rain

:52:04.:52:10.

in the West. Some of it will be heavy. The eastern areas have a

:52:11.:52:15.

chance of seeing some brightness. Fairly chilly across Scotland, five

:52:16.:52:20.

in Lerwick. 15 in London. If there is brightness, there may be looking

:52:21.:52:30.

at 16 degrees. The odd spot of rain for the six Nations, but the

:52:31.:52:36.

emphasis in Edinburgh is probably dry weather. Later on, the rain will

:52:37.:52:41.

move up through Northern Ireland and Scotland. Some drizzle through Wales

:52:42.:52:46.

and the generally dry across the South West. Tomorrow we have this

:52:47.:52:51.

band of rain through Northern Ireland and southern Scotland,

:52:52.:52:53.

moving into Wales and the Midlands, fizzling as it goes. Behind it,

:52:54.:53:01.

showers turning cooler. It will be largely cloudy, with brightness

:53:02.:53:05.

towards the south-east, with highs of 17 degrees.

:53:06.:53:24.

Two schoolchildren have won an award for inventing technology that can

:53:25.:53:27.

predict an epileptic seizure up to eight minutes in advance.

:53:28.:53:29.

To explain how the MediVest works, we're joined by its creators

:53:30.:53:32.

and winners of the UK Young Engineer of the Year, Sankha and David.

:53:33.:53:34.

Also joining them is their teacher, Daljit Kaur

:53:35.:53:39.

Good morning to you. So we have the best. David, you said this is very

:53:40.:53:50.

strict and for today. Just talk us through what you were trying to

:53:51.:53:59.

achieve. We're trying to achieve with Medi-vest, predicting an

:54:00.:54:06.

epileptic fit before it occurs. So we're trying to calm them down, get

:54:07.:54:11.

them into an environment where they can be themselves, they do not have

:54:12.:54:14.

to stand out and worry all the time. So the vest uses two types of

:54:15.:54:20.

variables. Temperature sensors, which we have here, and also heart

:54:21.:54:25.

rate sensors. We do not have them on the vest at the moment, because we

:54:26.:54:29.

have been warned about taking all the technology and showing it to

:54:30.:54:37.

everyone. Very canny. So it takes the information and runs it through

:54:38.:54:40.

the system, and the microprocessor on the back of the best will then

:54:41.:54:45.

talk by Bluetooth to the user's phone and alert them so they can get

:54:46.:54:50.

comfortable and possibly self medicate so they cannot have a

:54:51.:54:54.

seizure. Why did you come up with this idea in particular, why did you

:54:55.:54:59.

focus on epileptic seizures? It is about an experience I had two

:55:00.:55:05.

usable. I saw someone have an epileptic seizure and convulse. That

:55:06.:55:08.

drove me to research what was going on in the UK for these people, what

:55:09.:55:13.

medication is there that they can get, what the NHS does, what you can

:55:14.:55:20.

get privately. And I found that there is very little, actually. With

:55:21.:55:28.

our medical scape, it is so much filled with the junior doctors

:55:29.:55:35.

crisis, and influx of diabetes. One in 103 of as have epilepsy, and it

:55:36.:55:44.

is often overshadowed. Someone very close to me suffered from epilepsy

:55:45.:55:48.

when I was growing up, and it is terrifying for a person who has it,

:55:49.:55:53.

but also a few around all the time and worried about triggering a

:55:54.:55:55.

seizure or when it is going to happen. This would really help if

:55:56.:56:03.

you can get to save space and get help. Totally. We all have that

:56:04.:56:06.

person. We all have a family friend or relative that has epilepsy. It is

:56:07.:56:11.

so common, yet we never think about it something -- as something we have

:56:12.:56:17.

to queue. You must be a very proud teacher. Some ideas are very simple.

:56:18.:56:22.

I did not mean to disparage it at all. But you wonder why no one has

:56:23.:56:27.

thought of this before. Batter straight. Students come up with

:56:28.:56:31.

ideas, and I do not deter them, we had a look to see how we could make

:56:32.:56:42.

this work. -- at is right. We were speaking to the students and saying,

:56:43.:56:48.

how about this and that? These boys have done a superb job, two years of

:56:49.:56:54.

hard work and learning how to use electronics and everything,

:56:55.:56:57.

culminating in an amazing result. Brilliant. And you are fresh from

:56:58.:57:02.

collecting this award a couple of nights ago. What has the reaction

:57:03.:57:07.

been? It has been absolutely crazy. We went back yesterday, and it has

:57:08.:57:13.

been like a hotline, inundated with phone calls. So many people in the

:57:14.:57:15.

community will appreciate something like this. The demand is there a.

:57:16.:57:23.

Can I ask David, briefly, how close are you to having a proper working

:57:24.:57:28.

model? At the moment we are a bit of a way off, but that is because we

:57:29.:57:37.

are very busy. We have GCSEs in less than two months. What we are mainly

:57:38.:57:39.

looking for is partners and sponsors to work with us so we can bring it

:57:40.:57:44.

to market as soon as possible because, really, we want the idea to

:57:45.:57:48.

get out there and help people. That is the whole point of the concept,

:57:49.:57:53.

it is not about us to make a quick buck, it is to make is help people

:57:54.:57:59.

in the real world. Very impressive. Thank you so much, congratulations

:58:00.:58:03.

on your work. Thank you. And good luck with your GCSEs.

:58:04.:58:17.

It was one of the world's worst environmental disasters.

:58:18.:58:19.

50 years ago, the super tanker Torrey Canyon

:58:20.:58:21.

hit rocks off Cornwall, spilling hundreds of thousands

:58:22.:58:23.

Around 15,000 birds died and parts of the British and French coasts

:58:24.:58:31.

The army, the RAF and the Navy are involved, along with 78 Fire Brigade

:58:32.:58:57.

is. Among them fire officers Eric and John. John recorded the event as

:58:58.:59:01.

an official photographer. Today they are recalling the horrors of what

:59:02.:59:09.

they find. The smell, that hit you first. The smell. You got your feet

:59:10.:59:14.

on it and slid all over the place. It was horrible, it really was. It

:59:15.:59:23.

was like the scum around the bar. All event all the cliffs around us.

:59:24.:59:30.

Over the next few days, tens of thousands of tonnes of detergent was

:59:31.:59:32.

sprayed over the beaches, to try to break up the oil. The main role of

:59:33.:59:38.

the Fire Service was setting in pumps, washing down after the

:59:39.:59:44.

detergent was applied to the rocks or the sand or whatever. There has

:59:45.:59:51.

been some criticism now because of the detergent because that caused

:59:52.:59:55.

problems in itself. That is true. I heard in the end it would have

:59:56.:59:58.

probably been better just to let nature do its thing. Because the

:59:59.:00:04.

organisms in the sand and everything would have eaten it faster than what

:00:05.:00:08.

we did by killing the organisms by putting detergent on it. It was an

:00:09.:00:14.

environmental catastrophe. 15,000 sea birds died after being covered

:00:15.:00:19.

in oil. A week after she was grounded, the vessel started to

:00:20.:00:23.

break up, releasing even more oil into the sea. The decision was taken

:00:24.:00:28.

to destroy all the vessel. For two days, the RAF and Navy bombed the

:00:29.:00:34.

ship, and dropped napalm to try to burn the oil. You could see the

:00:35.:00:41.

smoke. It was clear. You could see it. Occasionally the smell would

:00:42.:00:48.

come ashore above the smell of the others. It was not an main thing --

:00:49.:00:53.

and I think. It sank leaving behind a legacy that would last for many

:00:54.:00:55.

years. We are back in just a moment. Hello, this is Breakfast

:00:56.:01:21.

with Charlie Stayt and Tina Daheley. A third way for Scotland's future

:01:22.:01:24.

as Gordon Brown sets out a plan The former Prime Minister will say

:01:25.:01:27.

a new kind of federal home rule is needed for the United Kingdom,

:01:28.:01:33.

to avoid years of bitter division. Good morning.

:01:34.:01:50.

It's Saturday, 18th March. A man has been shot dead

:01:51.:01:52.

and a police operation is underway More than 100 British troops head

:01:53.:01:58.

to Estonia in an attempt In sport, a world record

:01:59.:02:04.

and the grand slam, is there for England's men

:02:05.:02:10.

if they can do what the women did, and beat Ireland to win

:02:11.:02:14.

their Six Nations trophy. The iconic 70s toy making

:02:15.:02:18.

an unexpected comeback. We'll meet the men who have decided

:02:19.:02:20.

to revive their father's Good morning. It is an unsettled

:02:21.:02:31.

weekend in prospect. We will have cloudy weather. Some breezy weather,

:02:32.:02:35.

but rainfall amounts will vary. Find out how much rain you're going to

:02:36.:02:37.

get in about 15 minutes. Gordon Brown says Scotland should be

:02:38.:02:44.

handed a raft of new powers after Brexit to prevent

:02:45.:02:46.

the United Kingdom from splitting. The former Prime Minister will use

:02:47.:02:49.

a speech today to put forward his "third option"

:02:50.:02:51.

for Scotland's future. His intervention comes as the SNP

:02:52.:02:53.

leader Nicola Sturgeon addresses her Our Political Correspondent

:02:54.:02:56.

Iain Watson reports. Nicola Sturgeon has been

:02:57.:03:01.

saying what her members That a second referendum in Scottish

:03:02.:03:04.

independence should happen before But she knows she has

:03:05.:03:09.

to broaden her support beyond her power base

:03:10.:03:15.

so she will argue her call for a referendum isn't just

:03:16.:03:19.

about standing up for Scotland, When Nicola Sturgeon takes

:03:20.:03:21.

to this stage later today, she will repeat her demand

:03:22.:03:24.

for a second But it looks like Theresa May

:03:25.:03:26.

isn't for turning. The SNP see their call

:03:27.:03:31.

for a referendum as a win-win because either Theresa May gives

:03:32.:03:33.

in in their time scale or they believe that her refusal

:03:34.:03:37.

to do so will help them build support for independence

:03:38.:03:41.

in the slightly longer term. I think Theresa May trying to deny

:03:42.:03:47.

the Scottish people their say on this is something she will have

:03:48.:03:50.

cause to regret, but I think the longer Theresa May tries to deny

:03:51.:03:53.

the people of Scotland their say, the better it is for

:03:54.:03:56.

the campaign for independence. This is everyone's flag,

:03:57.:04:00.

everyone's country. Everyone's culture

:04:01.:04:04.

and everyone's streets. This former Prime Minister

:04:05.:04:08.

was credited with saving the Union, when he passionately campaigned

:04:09.:04:10.

against independence This time, he says, after Brexit,

:04:11.:04:11.

Scotland could get a more powerful Parliament without having

:04:12.:04:17.

to break its links Gordon Brown is calling

:04:18.:04:20.

for a federal United Kingdom with the Scottish Parliament taking

:04:21.:04:25.

powers from Brussels, getting control of VAT rates,

:04:26.:04:28.

and negotiating treaties with other But from Nicola Sturgeon's

:04:29.:04:30.

prospective the choice An independent Scotland that

:04:31.:04:36.

wants to be in the EU, A man has been shot dead at one of

:04:37.:04:55.

the main airports in Paris after taking a soldier's gun. Yes, a

:04:56.:04:59.

police operation Sunday way at the airport right now. Police there are

:05:00.:05:04.

saying a man was shot to death after trying to seize the weapon of a

:05:05.:05:08.

soldier who was guarding the airport. The latest information from

:05:09.:05:13.

the airport, this is Orly Airport is the security operation is underway

:05:14.:05:18.

there. They're conducting, the police are conducting a bomb sweep

:05:19.:05:22.

to ensure the dead man was not wearing an explosive belt. We're

:05:23.:05:27.

getting confirmation from the Interior Ministry. We can speak to

:05:28.:05:30.

our Paris correspondent Hugh Schofield now. Hugh, just take us

:05:31.:05:37.

through the sequence of events. It was at 8.30am our time this

:05:38.:05:42.

happened. So an hour-and-a-half ago. We started getting word of it in

:05:43.:05:46.

tweets about 20 minutes after that. A man, as you said, approached, made

:05:47.:05:52.

at a patrol of soldiers at Orly South Terminal. If you have been in

:05:53.:05:58.

Paris you will know there are soldiers regularly patrolling places

:05:59.:06:02.

like airports. They go around in groups of two or four. A man

:06:03.:06:07.

attacked one of these men and succeeded in seizing the gun from

:06:08.:06:11.

him and he then ran with the gun into a shop on the concourse inside

:06:12.:06:17.

at Orly South terminal and at that point there were shots fired and it

:06:18.:06:23.

is not known if the man opened fire first, but he was shot dead by

:06:24.:06:29.

security forces we're told, we're not clear if that was the other

:06:30.:06:35.

soldiers or plain clothed people, he was shot dead, but that's not the

:06:36.:06:39.

end of the matter, as you said there is a security sweep going on and a

:06:40.:06:47.

total lockdown. All people who are waiting to board were taken out of

:06:48.:06:52.

the airport and are clocking up the access roads as specialist police

:06:53.:06:55.

arrive and right now, are checking to see if the man was wearing an

:06:56.:06:59.

explosive belt and checking to see if there is another or other

:07:00.:07:02.

accomplices hiding in the building. So, there is a scene not of chaos,

:07:03.:07:10.

but of severe disruption at Orly Airport and anyone travelling there

:07:11.:07:14.

today will find their plans, certainly this morning, having to be

:07:15.:07:17.

put on hold. Hugh, we know, of course, trance is in a heightened

:07:18.:07:20.

security alert as it stands at the moment anyway. There are reports

:07:21.:07:26.

from one of the other news agencies, cautious about how we report these,

:07:27.:07:29.

but of a separate incident north of Paris at a road check, do you know

:07:30.:07:34.

anything about that? Well, I know probably what you're seeing on the

:07:35.:07:38.

wires which is that there was a separate incident, but at the moment

:07:39.:07:43.

there is nothing to link the two. This happened half an hour before

:07:44.:07:48.

the airport incident. It was a road check on the north side of Paris. So

:07:49.:07:51.

the other side of Paris from Orly Airport. So a road check. The police

:07:52.:07:58.

stopped a car. The man instead of producing his documents produced a

:07:59.:08:01.

gun and fired at the police, injuring, wounding one of them and

:08:02.:08:06.

made off in the car. It maybe completely unrelated to Orly. There

:08:07.:08:09.

is nothing to suggest that it is related to Orly, but until they can

:08:10.:08:14.

rule out a connection I suppose police investigators will be keeping

:08:15.:08:17.

open a possible dwrilt that there is a connection between the two. Hugh,

:08:18.:08:21.

thank you very much. Our correspondent Hugh Schofield,

:08:22.:08:24.

Orly Airport just to remind you. This is breaking news. A man has

:08:25.:08:29.

been shot dead after grabbing a soldier's gun at Orly Airport. It is

:08:30.:08:34.

understood that the man approached a police officer and we can see the

:08:35.:08:37.

major security operation underway there as we speak. Visitors are

:08:38.:08:42.

being warned to avoid the airport while the police operation is going

:08:43.:08:45.

on. We will, of course, keep you

:08:46.:08:47.

up-to-date on those developments. The first British soldiers have

:08:48.:08:53.

arrived in Estonia as part of the largest deployment of British

:08:54.:08:56.

troops to Europe since Over the next few weeks a total

:08:57.:08:58.

of 800 British soldiers and hundreds of military vehicles will be sent

:08:59.:09:03.

to the Baltic state as Nato forces Our Defence Correspondent

:09:04.:09:06.

Jonathan Beale reports. The British Army has been

:09:07.:09:10.

preparing for this moment. These tanks took part in a final

:09:11.:09:14.

exercise in Germany ahead And they're now among 300 military

:09:15.:09:17.

vehicles that have been loaded on to a ferry destined for the small

:09:18.:09:27.

Baltic state of Estonia. The first British troops

:09:28.:09:32.

are trained and ready to go, not just alert to any military

:09:33.:09:37.

threat, but also from other Do you think the threat is more

:09:38.:09:39.

military or do you think it is Russians playing game

:09:40.:09:52.

and using social media and fake news You hear about cyber threat

:09:53.:09:54.

and all of that stuff, but again, we've trained

:09:55.:09:59.

for every eventualality. There is obviously a credible threat

:10:00.:10:01.

just over the border, but I think These are the first of 800 British

:10:02.:10:08.

troops who will be arriving in Estonia over the next few weeks

:10:09.:10:17.

and it is just the start of what could be a long,

:10:18.:10:20.

open-ended deployment to deter They're not expecting to go to war,

:10:21.:10:22.

but these soldiers will still be caught up in the rising tensions

:10:23.:10:30.

between Russia and the west. The US, Canada and Germany are also

:10:31.:10:33.

sending their troops to reinforce The American surveillance agency,

:10:34.:10:39.

the NSA, has rejected suggestions that British agents spied

:10:40.:10:50.

on Donald Trump, at the request On Wednesday, a White House

:10:51.:10:54.

spokesman discussed an allegation that GCHQ was asked to tap

:10:55.:10:58.

Mr Trump's calls last year. Downing Street says it has been

:10:59.:11:13.

reassured by Washington that the claim won't be repeated. What would

:11:14.:11:17.

be the advantage of the UK Government doing something like

:11:18.:11:19.

that? The cost would be immense to any value. Of courts, they wouldn't

:11:20.:11:23.

do it, it would be end I canically stupid.

:11:24.:11:29.

Prince William and the Duchess of Cambridge will meet victims

:11:30.:11:31.

of the attack on the Bataclan concert hall in Paris today.

:11:32.:11:34.

Yesterday the royal couple met French President Francois Hollande.

:11:35.:11:36.

The visit is part of the UK government's charm offensive

:11:37.:11:39.

in Europe ahead of the start of Brexit talks.

:11:40.:11:46.

Schools should teach children how to spot "fake news" and recognise

:11:47.:11:48.

lies on social media, according to a leading

:11:49.:11:50.

The director of the influential think-tank, the OECD,

:11:51.:11:53.

says pupils are becoming too dependent on the internet and need

:11:54.:11:56.

help distinguishing between true and false information online.

:11:57.:12:09.

Think of the countryside and many of us might have a vision

:12:10.:12:19.

of healthy living surrounded by beautiful scenery,

:12:20.:12:21.

but a new report says the image is blinding us to pockets of poor

:12:22.:12:24.

The study by the Local Government Association

:12:25.:12:27.

and Public Health England points to significant challenges

:12:28.:12:29.

to services as in remote areas as the population ages.

:12:30.:12:31.

Dr Peter Holden is a GP in Matlock, Derbyshire on the edge

:12:32.:12:34.

A beautiful part of the world. Yes. People have an image of what a

:12:35.:12:43.

lovely place to live and life couldn't be better? Very often it

:12:44.:12:47.

is, but we have real problems in rural areas. I think what this

:12:48.:12:51.

report shows and it has only been in the public domain a couple of hours

:12:52.:12:55.

and I have only see the executive summary, what we have always known

:12:56.:13:00.

that there are statistics and the problems we have got is the systems

:13:01.:13:06.

we use to measure hept, deprivation, those kinds of things miss things

:13:07.:13:10.

out. To give the best example, one of the examples of prosperity, if

:13:11.:13:14.

you like, do you own a car? Now, in London, you don't have to own a car.

:13:15.:13:19.

You have got seven different modes of public transport at the last

:13:20.:13:23.

count. In my neck of the woods families on modest incomes will keep

:13:24.:13:27.

cars together with duck tape and anything else and try and keep two

:13:28.:13:30.

on the road because without the car you can't do a job. There is no

:13:31.:13:35.

public transport, but it looks wealthy. I have a patch of my, the

:13:36.:13:42.

area where I practise, where we have the two areas of real noted

:13:43.:13:46.

deprivation in the Peak District, yet in the same patch are three of

:13:47.:13:52.

the Times 100 Rich List. I know rural areas aren't the same, but

:13:53.:13:56.

just an example of how far somebody would have to travel to see their

:13:57.:14:01.

GP? Increasingly further is the very short take home message. Currently,

:14:02.:14:07.

the average patient is around, I think, it's five or six kilometres,

:14:08.:14:11.

three or four miles to their doctor's. Not a walking distance.

:14:12.:14:16.

Many people living in cities take for granted. As the delivery of

:14:17.:14:21.

healthcare becomes more complex you can no do Dr Finlay out of the front

:14:22.:14:26.

room medicine, you have got to do it in specialised premises. The

:14:27.:14:29.

Government is wanting to squeeze efficiencies and practises are

:14:30.:14:32.

having to merge. Branch practises are closing so that figure is

:14:33.:14:37.

already out of date. And the figures for travel to hospitals, I think,

:14:38.:14:42.

45% of people in rural areas are more than, I think, it is eight or

:14:43.:14:45.

nine miles from a hospital. That's going to get bigger because we're

:14:46.:14:49.

closing community hospitals, right, left and centre. Nine will close in

:14:50.:14:54.

Derbyshire alone. How do you address the problem of accurately assessing

:14:55.:14:57.

of what life is really like for people? The truth is until now the

:14:58.:15:03.

measures that have been used have been the easy materialistic

:15:04.:15:06.

measures, do you own a car? You have to look at other things. People talk

:15:07.:15:11.

about broadband. One megabit per second, an utter luxury in some

:15:12.:15:14.

parts of where I live. It is the whole business of if we are going to

:15:15.:15:21.

populate this country reasonably evenly rather than concentrate

:15:22.:15:24.

everything in London and the South East, we've got to build the

:15:25.:15:27.

infrastructure. If you look at the statistics, it is not about

:15:28.:15:30.

population density because there are many parts of this country you would

:15:31.:15:34.

think, oh, that's a town. Yes, but it's an isolated town. It's 25, 30

:15:35.:15:39.

miles to the next town where there might be a hospital. There are huge

:15:40.:15:44.

swathes of ruralality and isolation where that population does not get

:15:45.:15:49.

the same service, but pays the same taxes as those in the connobations.

:15:50.:15:53.

We will leave it there. Thank you very much for your time. Dr Peter

:15:54.:15:55.

Holden. Here's Ben with a look

:15:56.:16:02.

at this morning's weather. How is it looking? For some of us,

:16:03.:16:11.

it is not looking too bad. We have managed to catch a sunrise in

:16:12.:16:15.

Aberdeenshire. It is eastern parts of the country that see the driest

:16:16.:16:18.

and at times the brightest weather. Further west, that was the scene

:16:19.:16:22.

earlier in West Wales. A lot of cloud around. Jnly most of us will

:16:23.:16:26.

be cloudy today. Mild, breezy and there will be some rain at times.

:16:27.:16:29.

Again, most of that will be in the west. It is because of this stripe

:16:30.:16:35.

of cloud. A real pipeline of moisture racing across the atlantic.

:16:36.:16:39.

It is in western areas, where you're most exposed to the pipeline of moss

:16:40.:16:45.

ture that you will see showers. In the east, shelter and dry weather

:16:46.:16:50.

and sunshine. Brightness across Eastern England, north-east Scotland

:16:51.:16:53.

getting away with bright weather and a few showers. Out west, more in the

:16:54.:16:58.

way of cloud and outbreaks of rain, but rain spreading into some areas

:16:59.:17:01.

through this afternoon. Particularly Northern Ireland, I think, turning

:17:02.:17:04.

wet here. Some of that rain into the south-west of Scotland, but up

:17:05.:17:07.

towards the north-east of Scotland, here more in the way of sunshine.

:17:08.:17:10.

The showers will continue, some of them wintry and it will be on the

:17:11.:17:14.

chilly side. Come further south into England and Wales, it is mild. We

:17:15.:17:18.

will see rain into north-west England, a good part of Wales

:17:19.:17:22.

trickling into the Midlands, through north-east England and East Anglia

:17:23.:17:24.

and into the South East, some breaks in the cloud. Some sunny spells.

:17:25.:17:28.

Could lift temperatures to 15 Celsius or 16 Celsius. So a big

:17:29.:17:35.

afternoon in the Six Nations. It looks cloudy at Dublin, Paris and

:17:36.:17:39.

Edinburgh. Can't rule out the odd spot of rain, but the emphasis will

:17:40.:17:44.

be on largely dry weather. If you're out and about this evening and

:17:45.:17:47.

tonight, Northern Ireland and Scotland will see outbreaks of rain.

:17:48.:17:52.

Some of that will be heavy. Further south, damp and drizzly weather

:17:53.:17:54.

towards the south-west. Generally a lot of dry weather here and it will

:17:55.:17:58.

be a mild night for the most part. Tomorrow, this band of rain moving

:17:59.:18:01.

its way through Northern Ireland, Southern Scotland, just easing its

:18:02.:18:04.

way into Northern England and North Wales. Eventually the Midlands,

:18:05.:18:10.

behind the rain band things right of brightening up for Northern Ireland.

:18:11.:18:15.

Sunshine and showers. To the south of the rain band, a cloudy day, but

:18:16.:18:19.

a mild one with temperatures of 15 Celsius in London. In a word,

:18:20.:18:24.

Charlie and Tina, this weekend would be described as mixed.

:18:25.:18:27.

Ben, thank you very much. The breaking news story at 9.18am. A

:18:28.:18:37.

hand has been killed, shot, at Orly Airport by a police officer. We

:18:38.:18:41.

understand the sequence of events happened at 8.30am our time in the

:18:42.:18:46.

UK. The man tried to seize the weapon of a soldier who was part of

:18:47.:18:50.

the force that are guarding Paris Orly Airport. And the man was shot

:18:51.:18:56.

dead. We know there is a major security operation underway there as

:18:57.:18:59.

we speak. You can see the airport has been evacuated. We know that air

:19:00.:19:05.

traffic has been suspended. This is at Paris Orly Airport. We know that

:19:06.:19:09.

passengers are not being allowed to get off the planes that have already

:19:10.:19:14.

landed there. Orly Airport is eight miles south of

:19:15.:19:18.

Paris. It is the capital's second largest airport. Police are warning

:19:19.:19:22.

people to stay away from the security cordon that's in place at

:19:23.:19:25.

the moment. People intending to travel to the airport have been

:19:26.:19:29.

advised to make alternative arrangements. Officials again saying

:19:30.:19:32.

the man approached a group of soldiers, patrolling the airport,

:19:33.:19:36.

made off with the gun into a shop at that point shots were fired and the

:19:37.:19:39.

man was killed. The French Interior Minister is said to be on his way to

:19:40.:19:45.

scene of the attack right now. Of course, Paris and the rest of France

:19:46.:19:50.

in major security phase anyway at the moment. Very high security

:19:51.:19:54.

operation underway at the moment throughout Paris, but that's the

:19:55.:19:57.

very latest we can tell you. A man has been shot dead at Paris Orly

:19:58.:20:01.

Airport. It is causing some confusion at the airport. Those are

:20:02.:20:06.

the live images. The airport has been evacuated and all air traffic

:20:07.:20:11.

suspended. We'll keep you up-to-date on the latest from Paris.

:20:12.:20:19.

The former Chancellor has been dubbed six jobs George

:20:20.:20:20.

following the announcement yesterday that he will be the new Editor

:20:21.:20:23.

He says he'll continue to be the MP for Tatton in Cheshire,

:20:24.:20:28.

But that's not the only thing that'll be taking up his time,

:20:29.:20:35.

Yes, he still has a role as a chairman of the Northern

:20:36.:20:42.

And is a fellow at the American think-tank the McCain Institute

:20:43.:20:48.

as well as a part-time advisor at the investment

:20:49.:20:50.

So how is he going to juggle his politics and the paper?

:20:51.:20:54.

We're joined now by Martin Bell, a former BBC journalist

:20:55.:20:57.

Good morning to you. Good morning. Unless he's Superman or super MP, it

:20:58.:21:07.

is hard to realistically imagine him being able to juggle six jobs. What

:21:08.:21:12.

do you make of it? I think I must have missed a trick during my four

:21:13.:21:15.

years as member of Parliament for To then. I probably worked harder that

:21:16.:21:21.

I have ever done anywhere in my life before and I did nothing but be the

:21:22.:21:27.

MP. Personally, I can't see how he can combine all the jobs and there

:21:28.:21:31.

is a strong case for calling a by-election and putting it to the

:21:32.:21:34.

people of Tatton so they can make their own judgement. You know the

:21:35.:21:40.

Tatton constituency well. Can you give us an insight into what

:21:41.:21:43.

constituents think about the news and whether it is do-able and

:21:44.:21:46.

acceptable? I think a lot of them are having doubts. I know the Tory

:21:47.:21:52.

high command so to speak the association has stuck by him, but

:21:53.:21:57.

Tatton does have a long history of being able to discard MPs even Tory

:21:58.:22:03.

MPs. There was a guy who was let go in 1983 because he didn't support

:22:04.:22:09.

the Falklands War and there was an MP called Neil Hamilton, it is not a

:22:10.:22:13.

run of the mill constituency. This has been done before. Boris

:22:14.:22:19.

Johnson edited The Spectator and he was a columnist for The Telegraph

:22:20.:22:24.

while MP for Henley. You were in journalism and moved into politics,

:22:25.:22:28.

didn't you? What's the difference? Well, I did one job and then the

:22:29.:22:34.

other. I didn't try to do both. Boris is a different category, The

:22:35.:22:38.

Spectator is weekly and the Standard is every day. There have been

:22:39.:22:44.

prominent editors who have also been MPs, Bill Eves was one, but he was

:22:45.:22:48.

in Government first and then he edited The Telegraph. I think that

:22:49.:22:53.

multitasking on this scale has never been heard of before and there is a

:22:54.:22:57.

strong case for putting it to the people. What about journalists point

:22:58.:23:02.

of view? 30 people applied for this role and the one person without any

:23:03.:23:09.

journalism experience got it? Well, he is he has a little bit of

:23:10.:23:13.

journalist, he worked for Peterborough, he wanted to get on

:23:14.:23:17.

the Times, but I mean... He didn't crucially. We should say, he didn't

:23:18.:23:23.

get on. No, I mean he is a clever chap. He is the most ambitious man

:23:24.:23:31.

I've ever met, but I can't see how it's possible to combine all these

:23:32.:23:35.

very demanding jobs. OK, thank you very much, indeed. We have to leave

:23:36.:23:37.

it there. It's time for look

:23:38.:23:42.

at the newspapers. Financial analyst from Deloitte,

:23:43.:23:43.

Margaret Doyle is here. First, what's your reaction

:23:44.:23:45.

to George Osborne's appointment? You have a life in newspaper

:23:46.:23:52.

journalism. On the face of it, George Osborne, former chancellor,

:23:53.:23:56.

current MP, as an editor, if you were a journalist on a publication,

:23:57.:24:00.

the London Evening Standard, what are you thinking? Well, look, I

:24:01.:24:04.

think that there are some things that are very good about this

:24:05.:24:09.

appointment which is that he is a big character. He is a big

:24:10.:24:14.

intellect. He is a man with wide interests, not just in politics, but

:24:15.:24:17.

also he is very interested in America. He is interested in the

:24:18.:24:22.

arts. He is a lover of the theatre. A Conservative MP? He is also an MP.

:24:23.:24:27.

Funnily enough, it may cause, it may well be that there are those in

:24:28.:24:32.

Parliament who have more questions about that than those who are fellow

:24:33.:24:39.

journalists, but certainly he will increase the profile of the

:24:40.:24:41.

newspaper for sure. We have seen from the reaction even on social

:24:42.:24:47.

media yesterday that journalists feel it is undermining their jobs

:24:48.:24:55.

and if you are an MP, you get paid ?76,000, he says I can edit in the

:24:56.:24:59.

morning and deal with Parliamentary issues in the afternoons? There will

:25:00.:25:02.

be plenty of people who will be asking the questions and

:25:03.:25:05.

scrutinising how he does both jobs. He has been defended today in the

:25:06.:25:11.

Time by his friend Matthew Paris who used to be an MP. He says at the

:25:12.:25:16.

defends Osborne, but his main point is, he's sad about this because he

:25:17.:25:20.

says I like Osborne and I want him to remain in the bullring of

:25:21.:25:24.

politics and his concern is by taking up this role that George

:25:25.:25:28.

Osborne is effectively signalling that the bullring of ideas as it

:25:29.:25:33.

were has moved from the Palace of Westminster to elsewhere. In other

:25:34.:25:37.

words that there is more influence to be had outside the Palace of

:25:38.:25:41.

Westminster than within. Interesting, isn't it, about

:25:42.:25:45.

characters, in this case politicians who like the spotlight and some

:25:46.:25:48.

would say George Osborne wanted another place to be and to be seen

:25:49.:25:51.

and to be heard. Here is another one... Tony Blair. Yes, again, this

:25:52.:25:56.

is a man who says he doesn't want to return to frontline politics and

:25:57.:26:01.

doesn't want to form a new political party like the new political

:26:02.:26:05.

movement in France. But what he does say is he wants his institute for

:26:06.:26:13.

global change to fight populism. Yes, there are people who say that

:26:14.:26:17.

the world is shifting. There is a rise of populism and we're worried

:26:18.:26:21.

about it and Tony Blair wants to do something about it. Can we go in on

:26:22.:26:27.

that picture, Margaret? What does that pose say to you? The look in

:26:28.:26:33.

the eye? It is like the thinker, isn't it? I am a serious

:26:34.:26:39.

intellectual... Take me seriously. He has got a globe in the

:26:40.:26:44.

background. Yes. OK. Talking about populism. How I left my London

:26:45.:26:57.

tribe? This is a article called David Goodhart, he was the founding

:26:58.:27:03.

editor of Prospect magazine. And so he was very much a liberal. That's

:27:04.:27:08.

how he started as a young man, but he has moved to the right and in

:27:09.:27:12.

particular, he has opposed immigration. So again, that's a

:27:13.:27:17.

highly contentious subject, immigration and most people who are

:27:18.:27:21.

left leaning and liberal, most people in London, for example, which

:27:22.:27:25.

is a city of very high immigration are in favour of immigration and he

:27:26.:27:29.

says actually, he sees it from the other side. He sees it from the

:27:30.:27:34.

point of view of people who aren't necessarily so well educated, who

:27:35.:27:39.

don't necessarily move to live in a big city and feel threatened by

:27:40.:27:42.

immigration, but what he is saying in the article he feels like he has

:27:43.:27:46.

left his tribe and he talked about being at a party where someone

:27:47.:27:49.

slammed down his drink and marched out when he said that he sympathized

:27:50.:27:55.

with Nigel Farage. One thought, this is from, this is on the Times about

:27:56.:28:00.

house prices, something that affects everyone. It is the affordability

:28:01.:28:06.

issue? Yes, it is saying house prices are unaffordable. This is

:28:07.:28:10.

across England and Wales. So they have risen to 8-and-a-half times

:28:11.:28:17.

average incomes and in some parts of the country, in London, they are

:28:18.:28:22.

particularly unaffordable in Kensington and Chelsea, 38 times the

:28:23.:28:25.

average income, clearly you don't have a lot of people on average

:28:26.:28:29.

income living in Kensington and Chelsea. It is a challenge for

:28:30.:28:33.

London and its status as a global city and a challenge for the whole

:28:34.:28:36.

country. Margaret, thank you very much. Nice to see you.

:28:37.:28:40.

We're on BBC One until 10am this morning when Matt Tebbutt takes over

:28:41.:28:44.

Good morning guys. Our special guest today needs a lot of energy because

:28:45.:28:54.

she is about to do a 24 hour dancea-thon for Comic Relief. It is

:28:55.:28:58.

Sara Cox. That's madness. It is madness. You are here to face your

:28:59.:29:02.

food heaven or food hell. What's heaven? Clams. OK. What about hell?

:29:03.:29:10.

Anything with coffee in it. OK. Clams and coffee? Coffee desserts.

:29:11.:29:15.

I'll let you know what we've got later onment we have got two great

:29:16.:29:23.

chefs. Phil, what's on the menu? Broccoli and duck and bread couples.

:29:24.:29:32.

Very nice. I'm doing halibut. Some roasted tomatoes. You'll like it.

:29:33.:29:36.

You'll like it. That's almost threatening!

:29:37.:29:44.

You will like it! You'll dance for it later! Dance for

:29:45.:29:49.

the clams. We will see you at 10am. Thank you very much.

:29:50.:29:59.

We will be back with a summary of the news at 9.30am. Stay with us.

:30:00.:30:34.

Hello, this is Breakfast, with Charlie Stayt and Tina Daheley.

:30:35.:30:39.

We'll just remind you of a story that's just breaking this morning -

:30:40.:30:43.

A man has been shot dead at one of the main airports in Paris,

:30:44.:30:46.

A police operation is under way at the airport.

:30:47.:30:55.

All flights have been suspended and at the moment are being diverted to

:30:56.:31:10.

Charles de Gaulle. These are live pictures at the moment. Is a major

:31:11.:31:16.

security situation under way. We know that bomb disposal experts were

:31:17.:31:19.

combing the inside of the airport to see if any devices were attached. We

:31:20.:31:29.

also know that no planes landing at Orly airport. They have been

:31:30.:31:32.

diverted. We will bring you up-to-date on how that is impacting

:31:33.:31:36.

on flights elsewhere. We know passengers are being held in the

:31:37.:31:41.

planes while the security operation continues. Just to remind you what

:31:42.:31:45.

has happened. A man has been shot dead after trying to seize the

:31:46.:31:50.

weapon of a soldier. One of the soldiers guarding Paris Orly

:31:51.:31:55.

airport. It happened around an hour ago, and there has been an

:31:56.:32:00.

evacuation at the terminal and an ongoing security operation. We will

:32:01.:32:04.

speak to our correspondent in a few minutes. All flights have been

:32:05.:32:07.

diverted and people are being told to avoid the airport completely.

:32:08.:32:14.

Gordon Brown says Scotland should be handed a raft of new powers

:32:15.:32:17.

after Brexit to prevent the United Kingdom from splitting.

:32:18.:32:19.

The former Prime Minister will use a speech today to put

:32:20.:32:22.

forward his "third option" for Scotland's future.

:32:23.:32:23.

The Scottish Labour leader, Kezia Dugdale, says the issue

:32:24.:32:25.

of federalism is relevant to all parts of the UK.

:32:26.:32:28.

What can we do with those powers coming back from Brussels to create

:32:29.:32:34.

the type of Scotland we want to see? But I should also say, this is not

:32:35.:32:37.

just about Scotland. A federal solution would mean a whole change

:32:38.:32:43.

to the United Kingdom about who has power, how it is exercised and with

:32:44.:32:46.

its its. We have figures like Carwyn Jones and Wales calling for a

:32:47.:32:51.

similar thing, and the London Mayor arguing for more powers in London. I

:32:52.:32:56.

think this is an exciting time to be talking about the whole future of

:32:57.:32:57.

the United Kingdom. The first British soldiers have

:32:58.:33:04.

arrived in Estonia as part of the largest deployment of British

:33:05.:33:06.

troops to Europe since Over the next few weeks a total

:33:07.:33:09.

of 800 British soldiers and hundreds of military vehicles will be sent

:33:10.:33:13.

to the Baltic state in an attempt The American surveillance agency,

:33:14.:33:16.

the NSA, has rejected suggestions that British agents spied

:33:17.:33:19.

on Donald Trump, at the request On Wednesday, a White House

:33:20.:33:22.

spokesman discussed an allegation that GCHQ was asked to tap

:33:23.:33:25.

Mr Trump's calls last year. Downing Street says it's been

:33:26.:33:28.

reassured by Washington What would be the advantage to

:33:29.:33:30.

the UK Government of doing something The cost would be immense

:33:31.:33:35.

in comparison to any value. So of course they

:33:36.:33:38.

wouldn't do anything. The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge

:33:39.:33:47.

will meet victims of the attack on the Bataclan concert hall

:33:48.:33:50.

in Paris today. Last night, the royal couple had

:33:51.:33:52.

dinner at the British embassy, where Prince William spoke

:33:53.:33:55.

of the enduring ties The visit is part of the British

:33:56.:33:57.

government's charm offensive in Europe ahead of the start

:33:58.:34:00.

of Brexit talks. Schools should teach children how

:34:01.:34:06.

to spot "fake news" and recognise lies on social media,

:34:07.:34:09.

according to a leading The director of the influential

:34:10.:34:11.

think tank, the OECD, says pupils are becoming too

:34:12.:34:14.

dependent on the internet and need help distinguishing between true

:34:15.:34:16.

and false information online. New research suggests the idyllic

:34:17.:34:28.

image some people have of the countryside is masking

:34:29.:34:30.

pockets of poverty, poor health and social isolation that can

:34:31.:34:33.

exist in rural areas. The report by Public Health England

:34:34.:34:35.

and the Local Government Association says official statistics are often

:34:36.:34:37.

skewed towards gathering information about people living

:34:38.:34:39.

in towns and cities. Those are the main

:34:40.:34:47.

stories this morning. The countdown is on. Line yes,

:34:48.:34:58.

England are choosing two things. The first team to wind back-to-back

:34:59.:35:03.

grand slams, the first since the 1990s. And this 19 consecutive wins

:35:04.:35:08.

in test rugby, which has never been done before. At the moment they hold

:35:09.:35:13.

it jointly with New Zealand, regarded as one of the greats of all

:35:14.:35:16.

time, so we're with this but the current England team?

:35:17.:35:24.

We need to see them play New Zealand. The possibility of

:35:25.:35:29.

November. The incentive is truly the for Ireland.

:35:30.:35:35.

We have been a party pooper as in 2001 and 2011. And with their tails

:35:36.:35:39.

up after Cheltenham, plenty chance for them to do today.

:35:40.:35:47.

So England's men are in Dublin, today chasing a world record,

:35:48.:35:49.

19th consecutive wins and a second grand slam

:35:50.:35:51.

We will have more on this in a few minutes,

:35:52.:35:55.

but England's women have already shown how to win

:35:56.:35:57.

A victory for either Ireland or England

:35:58.:36:00.

would have secured the title, but it was England who ran away

:36:01.:36:03.

with it, with 5 tries, sealing a 34-7 win.

:36:04.:36:05.

It's the first time they've won the competition since 2012.

:36:06.:36:07.

It was always going to be a delete off first-half. The first 60

:36:08.:36:13.

minutes, we said all along it was going to be a game that would go to

:36:14.:36:20.

the wire. We got away with the Irish goals -- from the Irish goals a

:36:21.:36:23.

little bit at the end, but we knew we had to weather the storm, and

:36:24.:36:27.

that depends at the end of the first half was immense for us.

:36:28.:36:31.

Ireland won bragging rights at the Cheltenham races,

:36:32.:36:33.

as Sizing John trained in County Kildaire won the Gold Cup.

:36:34.:36:36.

The 7-1 shot gave trainer Jessica Harrington victory,

:36:37.:36:38.

with her first entry in the famous race.

:36:39.:36:40.

The favourite, Djakadam, finished in fourth after hitting

:36:41.:36:42.

a fence and Sizing John powered clear to repeat his triumph

:36:43.:36:44.

Jockey Robbie Power, also rode the 2007 Grand National

:36:45.:36:51.

Unbelievable. I was 25 when I won the Grand National, I am 30 now. I

:36:52.:37:09.

appreciate this a lot more. It is a fantastic feeling. Going on the

:37:10.:37:14.

podium as a Gold cup winning jockey now sounds very sweet.

:37:15.:37:26.

We're just getting a long look at Robbie Power!

:37:27.:37:36.

Leicester City will face Atletico Madrid,

:37:37.:37:38.

in the quarterfinals of the Champions League.

:37:39.:37:39.

The English Champions are the only British side

:37:40.:37:41.

Atletico have been runners up in the Champions league twice,

:37:42.:37:45.

Meanwhile in the Europa League quarter finals, Manchester United,

:37:46.:37:48.

will meet the Belgian side Anderlecht.

:37:49.:37:49.

I think Robbie Power deserve that extra few moments!

:37:50.:37:51.

Chelsea can extend their lead at the top of the Premier League,

:37:52.:37:54.

to 13 points, if they beat Stoke City later.

:37:55.:37:56.

That's one of 7 matches taking place today, including an important match

:37:57.:37:59.

for Arsenal at West Brom this lunchtime, as they try

:38:00.:38:02.

They are currently five points off fourth place.

:38:03.:38:04.

In Scotland, if 2nd placed Aberdeen lose against Hearts this lunchtime,

:38:05.:38:11.

Celtic can claim the title tomorrow if they beat Dundee.

:38:12.:38:13.

There was a big surprise in the Championship last night

:38:14.:38:22.

as promotion chasing Huddersfield Town were beaten 4-0

:38:23.:38:24.

The result means Huddersfield remain six points behind the top two,

:38:25.:38:27.

and moves City out of the relegation places.

:38:28.:38:30.

In the night's other match Reading moved fourth,

:38:31.:38:32.

after beating sixth-placed Sheffield Wednesday.

:38:33.:38:39.

Hull FC moved level on points with Castleford Tigers,

:38:40.:38:41.

at the top of Super League, after beating struggling

:38:42.:38:43.

Leeds Rhinos joined them on eight points,

:38:44.:38:46.

after they ran in six tries, in their 38-14 victory

:38:47.:38:49.

Now we have been inundated with fishy golf names this

:38:50.:39:11.

Because of what happened on a course in Florida

:39:12.:39:24.

Smylie Kaufman was leisurely strolling up

:39:25.:39:26.

to the green, unware of that alligator in the rough

:39:27.:39:28.

This osprey was diving down to catch a fish. So we have been asking for

:39:29.:39:33.

fishy names. The fish might just

:39:34.:39:39.

be a Dory Mackerel, Paul Plaicey. Cod-rig Herrington.

:39:40.:40:03.

Blubber Watson. The list goes on and on.

:40:04.:40:08.

So as we've been hearing it's a tense day for England

:40:09.:40:10.

Eddie Jones's side haven't lost since 2015, and indeed since he took

:40:11.:40:14.

over, but Ireland have a tradition of ambushing, the men

:40:15.:40:17.

The day after St Patrick's day, they'll be hoping

:40:18.:40:22.

rugby grounds. And they are dancing all-round Lansdowne Road. England

:40:23.:41:01.

not taking their place. What a flourish, what a performance.

:41:02.:41:02.

England have scored. He scores! It is going to be the

:41:03.:41:19.

dashing of England's Grand Slam hopes. Once you get success, you

:41:20.:41:26.

either become a great team or a failure. We're going to achieve

:41:27.:41:28.

greatness now the winning back-to-back grand slams. Certainly

:41:29.:41:34.

stirs the emotions. That kicks off at five

:41:35.:41:46.

o'clock this afternoon. What a build-up that was. Standing

:41:47.:41:59.

here, you get a sense of the occasion. And the players gearing up

:42:00.:42:02.

for the match. The sponsorship signs are being painted on the pitch. It

:42:03.:42:08.

is a fabulous stadium, and will be a fantastic occasion here later. And

:42:09.:42:14.

on Saint Patrick's weekend as well. Here is the trophy introduced in

:42:15.:42:20.

2000, when Italy joined the six Nations. England, as we know, have

:42:21.:42:23.

already secured this. They will be awarded this later, they have won

:42:24.:42:28.

the six Nations title last weekend with the victory against Scotland.

:42:29.:42:31.

But they will be desperately hoping to get their hands on this one, this

:42:32.:42:34.

is the triple Crown. It is handed out to the nation that has beaten

:42:35.:42:39.

all the other home nations, and of England managed to secure that with

:42:40.:42:44.

victory over Ireland, it is back-to-back grand slams for

:42:45.:42:46.

England, and no team has ever done that in the six Nations here. That

:42:47.:42:52.

would be quite something. A record ninth test victory in a row, and two

:42:53.:42:58.

grand slams. The only caveat is they have not played New Zealand in this,

:42:59.:43:02.

the world's number one team. This is the benchmark that all rugby teams

:43:03.:43:07.

are marked again. And until they face them, we will not really know

:43:08.:43:11.

how good the England team are. But they are on the cusp of something

:43:12.:43:15.

great. And as the old adage goes, you can only beat the teams in front

:43:16.:43:22.

of you. That is a very good point. Charlie and I were discussing where

:43:23.:43:25.

this would leave England. You're right they have not yet played New

:43:26.:43:29.

Zealand. I was at Cheltenham with thousands of fans convinced Ireland

:43:30.:43:36.

could spoil the party. What are your senses having been in Dublin last

:43:37.:43:43.

night? I think there is definitely a sense that they can do it, and it is

:43:44.:43:46.

no reason why not. It is worth noting that Ireland have a reference

:43:47.:43:51.

year at the Aviva Stadium. Under their head coach we have never been

:43:52.:43:55.

beaten at home, and it will be wanting to build on that. It is

:43:56.:43:59.

worth pointing out that that record that was previously held by New

:44:00.:44:02.

Zealand, the one that England have gone on to equal, who the team who

:44:03.:44:07.

upset that run? That was Ireland, and that will not be done on the

:44:08.:44:13.

team and England's Eddie Jones. Could he do it again? And if ever

:44:14.:44:17.

there was a reason to gear the motivation you need to try to beat

:44:18.:44:25.

England, a victory here over the old enemies at St Patrick's Day weekend,

:44:26.:44:31.

that is all the motivation needed. I cannot wait. Fantastic. And Scotland

:44:32.:44:38.

could have beer best ever six Nations achievement. I thought if

:44:39.:44:43.

England did it, that would put them up against Andy Murray becoming

:44:44.:44:52.

number one but... It is an incredible achievement. Thank you

:44:53.:44:56.

very much. You're watching

:44:57.:45:03.

Breakfast from BBC News. A man has been shot dead, and the

:45:04.:45:12.

police operation is underway at Orly airport.

:45:13.:45:16.

The former Prime Minister, Gordon Brown, will call for greater

:45:17.:45:19.

powers to be given to Scotland's government - as he warns

:45:20.:45:21.

Here's Ben with a look at this morning's weather.

:45:22.:45:27.

A pretty mixed story this weekend. I have managed to find some brightness

:45:28.:45:35.

for you. That was the scene in Aberdeenshire. Many eastern areas of

:45:36.:45:41.

the country see in brightness today. Further west, a different story. A

:45:42.:45:44.

lot of cloud around as captured here. Through the rest of today it

:45:45.:45:49.

will be mild and breezy, with rain at times. Like the thickest of the

:45:50.:46:03.

cloud, overexposed areas. Much of the rain further east, where

:46:04.:46:30.

there is more Shelter. Some sunny spells good with temperatures to 15

:46:31.:46:32.

or 16 degrees towards the south-east. Out west, some misty,

:46:33.:46:34.

murky, drizzly conditions with outbreaks of rain. The rain is more

:46:35.:46:36.

persistent in Northern Ireland and south-west Scotland. Over the rest

:46:37.:46:38.

of Scotland, colder weather, with a mixture of sunshine and showers. The

:46:39.:46:40.

Midlands will see cloud and outbreaks of rain. Some spells of

:46:41.:46:49.

sunshine in the East, with the Pennines providing shelter. For much

:46:50.:46:52.

of Wales and the Saint West of England, murky and drizzly. Having

:46:53.:46:56.

said that, the emphasis will be on dry weather for the six Nations

:46:57.:47:00.

matches this afternoon. In Edinburgh we may see a bit of brightness at

:47:01.:47:05.

times. This evening and tonight we will see rain, heavy rain, through

:47:06.:47:09.

Northern Ireland, Scotland, and northern England. South of that,

:47:10.:47:13.

some dry weather, albeit slightly murky. It will be a mild night for

:47:14.:47:21.

most offers apart from the far north-east of Scotland. This rain

:47:22.:47:24.

will move slowly and erratically south and east over Northern

:47:25.:47:28.

Ireland, southern Scotland and northern England, sizzling away as

:47:29.:47:32.

it gets towards Wales. In the Midlands, brightening up towards the

:47:33.:47:38.

afternoon. Sunshine and showers. To the south, a windy day, cloudy, and

:47:39.:47:44.

for most of us it will be a mild a. That is all from me for today, I

:47:45.:47:52.

wish you all a good weekend. Words, windy, told. -- mild.

:47:53.:48:03.

A man's been shot dead at Orly airport in Paris,

:48:04.:48:06.

French authorities have also confirmed a police officer has been

:48:07.:48:11.

injured after a shooting on the other side of Paris.

:48:12.:48:12.

We can show you the live links now from the airport. This is Paris Orly

:48:13.:48:18.

airport, which we know has been evacuated. A major security

:48:19.:48:22.

operation. Just to remind you of the sequence of events. Believe a man

:48:23.:48:28.

has been shot dead by police officers after seizing a weapon. We

:48:29.:48:33.

understand he sees the weapon from a soldier guarding the site, and

:48:34.:48:38.

immediately afterwards, the airport itself has been evacuated. We can

:48:39.:48:45.

speak to a gentleman who is stuck in the airport. Thank you for your time

:48:46.:48:50.

this morning. Describe what has happened. Well, I got to the airport

:48:51.:48:58.

about an hour ago, with the bus from the centre of the city, we were

:48:59.:49:02.

supposed to get to the south terminal, but traffic had been

:49:03.:49:05.

completely stopped, so everyone is being diverted to either the Western

:49:06.:49:12.

airport or not to go to the airport in general. At the moment everything

:49:13.:49:18.

is blocked, everything is shut down, all the stores are closed. It is

:49:19.:49:24.

completely blocked off by police officers in riot gear, and the

:49:25.:49:28.

military is outside. People are arriving from the South terminal,

:49:29.:49:38.

where we have been told it is safe, but no one knows exactly what is

:49:39.:49:44.

going on, and when we will progress. What have you been told about the

:49:45.:49:49.

incident that sparked this shooting inside the terminal? Nothing at all.

:49:50.:49:57.

I have been speaking to the soldiers outside. The very friendly, calm and

:49:58.:50:01.

quiet. They have not told is anything apart from the airport

:50:02.:50:07.

being closed, and they have to be vigilant, and obviously keep your

:50:08.:50:12.

belongings to yourself. We know that Paris is on a state of high alert

:50:13.:50:17.

anyway. How people reacting to what is clearly a chaotic situation.

:50:18.:50:23.

Well, we have not been told very much out here, so people are still

:50:24.:50:27.

very calm and relaxed. People are confused about what is going on. I

:50:28.:50:32.

see a lot of people on their phones trying to get more information,

:50:33.:50:38.

trying to get calls and see everything as OK. But so far we're

:50:39.:50:41.

not getting much information from either the police or the airport. We

:50:42.:50:45.

wish you well with the rest of your journey. Someone caught in the West

:50:46.:50:56.

terminal of Paris Orly airport. Simon Calder joins us now. We have

:50:57.:51:01.

just heard from our eyewitness at the airport. It sounds like a

:51:02.:51:11.

confusing picture. It is a very, very confusing picture. But the

:51:12.:51:15.

people who run the airport has told everyone, do not travel here. The

:51:16.:51:19.

whole place is closed, you will not be flying anywhere. And that

:51:20.:51:23.

presumably applies for most of the rest of the day at least. Just to

:51:24.:51:30.

put it into perspective, Paris Orly is not as big as Paris Charles de

:51:31.:51:34.

Gaulle, but it is busier than Manchester, nearly as busy as

:51:35.:51:38.

Gatwick, and a day like today would normally handle about 85,000 people,

:51:39.:51:43.

but there is extra pressure because, would you believe, it is this

:51:44.:51:47.

weekend they are basically closing down much of the rail network from

:51:48.:51:58.

Gare de Lyon, and there is a big rugby match, so it is busier than

:51:59.:52:02.

normal. A lot of British flights affected. British Airways, flight

:52:03.:52:08.

was due to go an hour ago, but it is still on the ground with the

:52:09.:52:13.

passengers. And at Heathrow flights to Orly are showing is delayed. In

:52:14.:52:20.

Luton there are number of flights to Orly airport, and all we know at the

:52:21.:52:25.

moment is that planes going into Orly, particularly long haul

:52:26.:52:29.

flights, are being diverted to Charles de Gaulle, which is likely

:52:30.:52:35.

to have a knock-on effect because that is normally a very busy

:52:36.:52:39.

airport, and would be under extra pressure. If you're travelling

:52:40.:52:44.

through Paris today, be delayed for -- be prepared for delays and

:52:45.:52:47.

disruption. Thank you very much indeed. All the latest details, any

:52:48.:52:54.

developments on that, on the BBC News channel.

:52:55.:52:59.

They were the craze of the late 70s and 80s -

:53:00.:53:02.

At its peak, the company's five factories were producing 75,000

:53:03.:53:05.

But by the late 1990s, profits started to dwindle.

:53:06.:53:11.

Now two decades on, Peter's sons have rebuilt

:53:12.:53:13.

We'll speak to Mark and Paul in a moment.

:53:14.:53:16.

First, our reporter Seb Choudhury takes a look back at how steerable

:53:17.:53:19.

It took me a long time to work out a name for one of these. And facts

:53:20.:53:34.

about five years. And I came up with Peter Powell Stunter. This became a

:53:35.:53:48.

global sensation. I suppose it was a bit like a celebrity at that time.

:53:49.:53:53.

When it all took. He would come back from Tokyo, with the latest gadgets

:53:54.:53:59.

for us like remote control cars. But it was this that one toy of the year

:54:00.:54:08.

in 1986 -- 1996. Technology along with poor commercial decisions led

:54:09.:54:11.

to the dramatic closure of Peter's business. Me and Paul came one

:54:12.:54:18.

night, and they had been round the factories, and he had a big bonfire

:54:19.:54:25.

and burned everything to do with the kites. He said to me, whatever you

:54:26.:54:30.

do, do not start up but business again. But they did decide to follow

:54:31.:54:36.

in their father's kite making fit sets. For people who don't know, I

:54:37.:54:39.

was obviously far too young to remember, and you tell us how big a

:54:40.:54:49.

deal these kites wed in the 70s? Massive. My dad designed to line

:54:50.:54:57.

kite, and it swept the world overnight. When you say it swept the

:54:58.:55:01.

world, there were enormous celebrities who bought them, and

:55:02.:55:07.

said how fantastic they were. Give a list of those who knew it? Mohamud

:55:08.:55:15.

Ali. Dad went on the Barbara Walters show in America. He flew his kites

:55:16.:55:18.

of the back of President Kennedy's yachts. Chris Tarrant, Noel Edmonds,

:55:19.:55:27.

Chris Evans, who we gave some kites, but we have not heard back if he got

:55:28.:55:30.

them. Explain what happened next because you have an amazing product,

:55:31.:55:34.

which is brilliant, all these celebrity endorsements, so what went

:55:35.:55:37.

wrong, I suppose, is the question. He went too big, too quick. Dad had

:55:38.:55:45.

undesirable people working for him at the time, and they wanted to line

:55:46.:55:53.

their pockets rather than my dad's. To the extent he lost everything.

:55:54.:56:01.

And he set fire to the lot. Yes, and scrapbooks. He said to me, whatever

:56:02.:56:06.

you do, never, ever start-up that business again. So how did you get

:56:07.:56:12.

here now because if he forbid you from doing this? We went ahead and

:56:13.:56:23.

looked at a prototype. It was all done behind his back. We had to

:56:24.:56:30.

sneak into his house, take old kites, re-engineer everything

:56:31.:56:32.

backwards, and it has taken as over two and a half years of redesigning

:56:33.:56:36.

everything to get it back to what it was before. And you do not have his

:56:37.:56:40.

help. And we did not know whether he would disown us. The day my brother

:56:41.:56:50.

showed hen the kite, he shook the hand and said I'd better go and have

:56:51.:56:53.

a lie down. He was happy. There are so many stories attached to the

:56:54.:56:58.

invention. He had many boasts about it. We have a clip here of your

:56:59.:57:06.

great-grandmother. He said proudly that the kite could lift a certain

:57:07.:57:13.

weight off the ground. Yes, about eight stone, and my grandmother was

:57:14.:57:20.

staying over, and she had been used as a guinea pig -- she was used as a

:57:21.:57:23.

guinea pig. Yes, she was eight stone. Soaked up she went. How many

:57:24.:57:29.

of these do you need to get one of these up in the air? If the wind

:57:30.:57:38.

drops too much, I say eight or nine stone. A little more wind, granny.

:57:39.:57:49.

All right? Lovely! How's that? OK. Well done! You are away! How is that

:57:50.:58:01.

for a birthday present? You said you had not seen that before. Reassured

:58:02.:58:09.

as everything was OK. In hopes of. What I love is that she takes her

:58:10.:58:16.

handbag! -- I hope so. There was a sudden gust of wind, and the kite

:58:17.:58:29.

fell two -- when my dad tried it, the kite smashed to pieces and he

:58:30.:58:34.

fell to the ground, but the cameras were not rolling. And they asked if

:58:35.:58:39.

he could do it again! Is a market for these now when we have drones

:58:40.:58:46.

and advanced toys? I think it is just read because it is about

:58:47.:58:50.

getting the kids out. Beard stuck indoors on the computers. And the

:58:51.:58:58.

parents are remembering from the 70s. Thank you very much for joining

:58:59.:59:05.

us. Fascinating. Viewers in the West of England can see more in that --

:59:06.:59:16.

on inside out later. From all of us

:59:17.:59:29.

A thrilling Six Nations concludes across the BBC...

:59:30.:59:34.