19/03/2017 The Papers


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19/03/2017

A lively, informed and in-depth conversation about the Sunday papers.


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That's all of this board for now, now Maxine Mawhinney has a look at

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The Papers... -- that is all of the sport.

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Hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be

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With me are Martin Lipton, Deputy Head of Sport

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at the Sun and Rosamund Urwin from the London Evening Standard.

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Let's have a look at the Sunday papers.

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The Express features the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge

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who saw their visit to Paris overshadowed by the Orly airport

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attack: the Royals "continued defiantly with their programme,"

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The Sunday Times also pictures the Duchess of Cambridge,

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but its main story is that alleged rape victims will be spared

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cross-examination in court, under new reforms announced

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The Mail goes it alone with a controversial call

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from a retired doctor for women to be able to terminate a pregnancy

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The Telegraph says new evidence has emerged over claims that a pregnancy

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testing drug has been linked to birth defects

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And the Sunday Mirror has an exclusive interview

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with George Michael's personal medic - who says the star knew

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Let's dive straight in. Let's go to The Times newspaper first, this

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story about rape victims who can now give evidence on video tape, what do

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you think of this? This is overdue. Obviously, it can be incredibly

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painful to relive your attack in court. Liz Truss has given an

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exclusive interview to The Sunday Times and is bringing forward plans

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for us to have a recorded cross-examination for adult sexual

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offences and tried in Crown Court. We have taped evidence in child sex

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cases which is used already, it is being extended. It seems a really

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sensible measure, it is incredibly difficult for some people, and I

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think it does stop people coming forward, the idea that they have to

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get up in court and talk about what has happened to them. And in front

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of the person for whom they are alleged to be the victim? And

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effectively be grilled by a solicitor, a barrister. Martin, what

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do you think? I agree, absolutely. This is overdue by a number of

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years. The trauma of being raped, I cannot imagine. The horror of having

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to relive that, in front of a room full of strangers, in front of the

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person you believe perpetrated that act. With the understandably

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forensic and aggressive nature of a cross-examination. It's a horror I

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would not want to contemplate. Anything which would alleviate this

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distress in any way, a cross-examination would still take

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place but a more controlled one. An antiseptic way, in a small room in

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front of a camera. I think it is beneficial for everyone. It's

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interesting, the suggestion pilot schemes have been developed using

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the concept that there have been far more guilty pleas, early guilty

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pleas. Yes, one of the other lines is that because of the reduced

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pressure, I suppose, that evidence can be clearer... You are not going

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to stumble... If you are sat in that box with a judge and with

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cross-examination, with the jury and the press, whatever. You are going

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to be even more nervous than you would be in any event. Someone to

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look after the interests of the most important people in any crime, the

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victims. One thing mentioned here that Liz Truss found out, a case

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where a defendant faced his accuser wearing the same clothes in which he

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had allegedly committed the rape. On the next page, it talks about a case

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where somebody went on the stand and afterwards found the trauma so

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great, she killed herself. The cause is not clear but it is great trauma,

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and there are a number of cases where people suffered greatly after

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facing this in court. It is interesting, using the pilot from

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children, it's obviously been successful. In The Sunday Times,

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George Osborne, OK... Martin, let's begin with you.

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Scarpering second jobs for MPs? This could end the second jobs for MPs,

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I'm more interested in six jobs for MPs can he seems to be a very busy

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man! I didn't realise you could be a newspaper editor on a part-time

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basis, or a deputy editor on a part-time basis. It's a full-time

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job, I'm not sure I could be the MP for Wandsworth

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Wandsworth or wherever while putting a newspaper to get. I struggle

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enough! What would your Reading be, that he is more of a figurehead? I

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suspect so, he had a job in a few years ago working for The Times and

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the Telegraph. In a minor capacity. He has no knowledge of the newspaper

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industry, he doesn't know how to put a story together or develop

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headlines. What does he bring? That he's the former Chancellor of the

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Exchequer, and I had to say, in a pro-Labour but anti-Brexit city, he

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and it's one of those boxes given his position in the referendum. I

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think there will be a pact between him and the mess of the

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-- and the London mayor. It's a bit of revenge for him. He has the

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chance to slaughter Theresa May and those who feel have trashed his

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legacy. On a platform read by millions of people. It seems wrong

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to me that they can do this. It is not the first and there has been a

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political editor of the standard all other newspapers. The editor of the

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Telegraph was a cabinet minister but not simultaneously. He's going to be

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your boss, Rosamund? Yes! What is your -- what has the reaction be? He

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came in on Friday to talk to the troops. And how did that go? It went

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well, there were not questions, there was not time. He wants to put

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out a paper that is good, he would not want to take on a job with all

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of the attention it has got... I'm sure he will find it easy and be an

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excellent work for her new boss, she will flourish as she always does! We

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are putting you in a difficult position but Martin, you are right,

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but questions about whether you can edit a paper... The chairman of

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public life, has shunned the light -- shone the light on whether MPs

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should have more than one job. Does it come down to salaries? Not

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so much salaries, but the divergence of interest. I think it's no fair

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thing that you have members of the House of Lords and the House of

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Commons who are professionals in other walks of life, professionals,

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doctors... But it is difficult to have a full-time job and still be a

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full-time member of a house of parliament. This story will run...

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It will run and run! We will ask you when you have had a flavour of it

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all! In The Observer, Nicola Sturgeon's

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warning to Theresa May, obstruct second referendum at your peril.

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Nicola Sturgeon is talking tough on this?

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Yes but it is interesting, it looks like she has been bounced into this

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position by Alex Salmond, who is more hawkish on the call for a

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second referendum. We have this pretty and pleasant spat between

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Nicola Sturgeon and Theresa May. -- and pleasant spat -- and pleasant. I

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do not think Scotland can win. Wherever the vote takes place, she

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has two resign, in the same way that Salmond does. If they vote for

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independence, it's unlikely, but who knows... We all called Brexit

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differently! She is suddenly in charge of a country where the

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economic arguments in favour of independence were based on an oil

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price of $130 per barrel, and there was a mythical huge sea of oil in

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the North Sea that everybody was keeping quiet about before the

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referendum because the British government did not want anyone in

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Scotland to know this thing that doesn't exist exists... It is

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bizarre. But this is about timing. And there is clearly a Nasa monitor

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-- animosity between the two. They are both important people. If I was

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Theresa May. I would want Scotland to go earlier. If there is any

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chance of the Scottish First Minister being a conservative, like

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Ruth Davidson, it would be if the SNP were to split in two, with

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recriminations and aggravations, a referendum bid again... Nobody will

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want to be the Prime Minister that sees the end of the union. You don't

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want that on your card. And you had to think about Northern Ireland now,

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that double whammy. And possibly Cornwall. But I agree, Nicola

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Sturgeon has the best of both worlds at the moment. When things go wrong,

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she can blame Westminster and kick a pasting there. When things go right,

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the SNP in power in Scotland, -- kick up a stink.

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They have a monopoly on seeds there. It is a difficult position for her.

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People think, we have had two major referendums, we do not want another.

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And in the last 24 hours, there was a poll, I know they change over time

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but they say that a majority of people are against another

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referendum in that time frame. You want to wait and see what comes from

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the EU. I know plenty of people in Scotland who voted to stay as part

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of red Britain. Now, because of Brexit -- as part of Great Britain

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but now because of our decision to leave the EU, they are rethinking

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it. What guarantee do we have that

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Scotland can stay in the U... And without the euro, what would their

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currency be? Would the Spanish government want to encourage a

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breakaway after those problems in Catalonia? These issues would become

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greater, the more there is a possibility... Any more comments on

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Gordon Brown's that way? You season self as a saviour of Britain, from

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the last independence, -- he sees himself.

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It is fair to say that he sees Scotland as the issue that he can

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bring back to the forefront... I thought he spoke really well on it

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and it was a fair point. The thing is, the concept of a third way, it

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goes back to when we had Clinton and Blair trying to triangulate in the

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same way. I do not think people want to hear about a third way but I

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understand the argument. Brown tries to field a middle

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ground. I think maybe they do, what we have seen with Brexit and the

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previous Scottish referendum is the binary question where we know that

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political events are complex. And we want to compromise. As we saw with

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Brexit, 48% of people said, hang on, we didn't vote for any of this! You

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are a typical Remainer! Let's stick with the breakfast... Brexit! It's a

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difficult word to say! A lot of us have done it, I hold my hand up!

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Hammond faces a mutiny from Brexit ministers? It's incredible, it

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seemed to weeks ago he could do no wrong but now it seems he can do no

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right. To watch the budget unravel so swiftly... We had the

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omnishambles before... It's an absolute disaster for him. He has

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been hung out to dry by Theresa May, quite clearly. Now you have the pro

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Brexit lobby pushing and demanding more money. The Treasury must have

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tens and millions of pounds of extra funding. It could undermined

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Britain's trading future, forging new links across the world...

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Clearly there will be a demand to underpin the negotiations to ensure

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that there are no negative repercussions. If it goes wrong, the

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finger of blame will once again be pointed at the Chancellor of the

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Exchequer. Suddenly, he's in a more difficult position then he would

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have imagined. He was anti-exit, his position of Foreign Secretary was as

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a Remainer. There are recriminations where you can see it coming. Doc

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they do not think he is a true believer. Philip Hammond clearly

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remains... Given the fallout from the Brexit, including the national

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insurance contributions, how do you think he would be personally damaged

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by this? I think he and is may have fallen out substantially, he did not

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want to back down. -- Theresa May. He thought they should stick with

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it. Clearly, whilst it was a very unpopular move, especially with

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newspaper columnists, they might have thought of that! If there was

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an opposition worth the concept of opposition, he would be in a lot of

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trouble but he has got away with it, because of how useless Jeremy Corbyn

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and McDonald... I think his defence, Theresa May thinks he has an air of

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competence that is lacking. There is still an argument for national

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insurance. I did not agree but there was an argument for it being

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correct, you should look at realigning. But you don't ignore

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your own manifesto commitments. No, I agree. Do you think he feels, with

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what he sees... I think he will fill extremely let down. I think he feels

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sidelined. It would be interesting to see how he rebuilds his

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authority, it has been unquestionably damaged. And also his

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relationship with the Prime Minister. Again, it has been

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significantly weakened. He would rightly, I feel, and his advisor

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would feel he is not only been let down but stabbed in the back. He was

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hung out to dry. We have a couple of people not in favour of the Prime

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Minister, we are racking them up! In the Mail on Sunday, they've gone

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for this shock headline. Let mothers abort babies of "Wrong sex".

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A shocking call by doctors, ethics board is terminations based on

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gender alone. It is not the first time we have heard this. There is a

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possibility, if you have some sort of inherited genetic disease for it,

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but this is more widespread? This is choice. This is selective abortion,

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and in other parts of the world it is more common, like India and China

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particularly, in that part of the world. We are mostly talking about

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female foetuses. You do not have to be anti-choice to oppose sex

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selective abortion. It is much more nuanced than that. Personally, I

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have studied this in other countries and throughout the world. To me,

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this is not always a free choice. It is painted as a binary but the

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individual is not always making a free choice because some women are

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conversed into making these decisions because a son is desired.

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And when a woman makes any choice, even if she thinks it's free, we do

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not make it in a vacuum. There are societal pressures imposed on you,

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and those decision to reflect a society that does not value

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female... And the society could end up having unbalanced agendas. She is

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also calling for abortion at any time. -- genders. We have a limit to

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24 weeks at the moment. In other countries, it is lower. She is

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basically calling for it at any stage in pregnancy. Even those who

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believe in a woman's right to choose, I am strongly in that camp,

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would find it difficult to stomach. I think there comes a point where

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once the foetus is capable of life, then surely, that is beyond the

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stage where... Unless there are medical reasons where you have to do

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it for the safety of the mother... I think this will run a bed. It is

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such a controversial and divisive issue.

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Let's go back to the Telegraph. Rosemary, what's happening in

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Cornwall? It might seem unlikely that people in Cornwall are victims

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of ethnic pressure but the Council of Europe has condemned the

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government for neglecting the Cornish minority. The southernmost

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County, obviously, has suffered erosion of its language, there

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are... 500 speakers of Cornish, apparently. And landmarks have been

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Disneyfied, like Pentagon Castle. It was blowing a gale when I went there

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a few months ago. It was not like a fairy tale princess, it is a rugged

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bit of rock on a headland. You access it through narrow bridges. It

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is not Disneyfied! Calling on the BBC to broadcast more in Cornish.

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That is W1A territory. Parody in the BBC. Someone worse complaining in

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that about treatment of the Cornish by the BBC. We will see what they

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come up with next! Complaints from everybody now! Thank

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you very much indeed for joining us. Those are The Papers this morning.

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We do them every night, at 10:40pm he and BBC News. Goodbye for now.

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Hello there, mixed fortunes in the weather today.

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Some of us have rain, others stay dry. Some are stuck with cloud, but

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others see the sunshine. This is how the morning started

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across the Scottish Highlands with

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