07/01/2017 Breakfast


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07/01/2017

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Winter pressure on Accident and Emergency, nothing new. But the Red

:02:09.:02:14.

Cross says it amounts to a crisis. The charity claims social care cuts

:02:15.:02:18.

means patients are sent home without the right support so they end up

:02:19.:02:23.

back in A Red Cross volunteer support NHS staff and say they have

:02:24.:02:27.

seen patients at home without clothes, some who don't receive the

:02:28.:02:31.

care they need to get washed, even some who have fallen and not been

:02:32.:02:36.

found for days. A staff recognise the problems as well. I think the

:02:37.:02:42.

pressures on the NHS and day care is intense at the moment, but what is a

:02:43.:02:47.

concern as the patients who have been managed within four hours, and

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then the delays for admission into the hospital bed base, which

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unfortunately are very significant. Our staff are working under some

:02:56.:02:59.

pretty intolerable conditions at times trying to manage. And

:03:00.:03:03.

sometimes they just can't manage. Figures from NHS England show that

:03:04.:03:07.

overflowing A departments have to close their doors to new patients

:03:08.:03:13.

more than 140 times over the last month. Compare that with the same

:03:14.:03:17.

month in 2015, it is up more than 60%. The suspicion is it is a

:03:18.:03:22.

combination of the cuts we have seen in social care in community services

:03:23.:03:26.

run by the NHS and very heavy pressure in general practice. So is

:03:27.:03:31.

the strain on the NHS costing lives? The death of two patients on

:03:32.:03:34.

emergency trolleys at Worcestershire Royal Hospital are being

:03:35.:03:39.

investigated. One of them had waited 35 hours per bed. The Department of

:03:40.:03:43.

Health says it is providing billions more every year to ease pressure.

:03:44.:03:47.

NHS England says plans are in place to deal with the extra demand. The

:03:48.:03:59.

beds are actually not quite as full as they were this time last year but

:04:00.:04:03.

everyone in the Health Service knows things could get worse before they

:04:04.:04:05.

get better. We will have more on this story

:04:06.:04:05.

later in the programme. We will be speaking

:04:06.:04:08.

to Dr Mark Holland from the Society Police in Florida have been

:04:09.:04:11.

questioning a man after five people were killed and dozens injured

:04:12.:04:15.

in a shooting at Fort Lauderdale The suspect opened fire

:04:16.:04:18.

in the baggage claim area, after seemingly retrieving his

:04:19.:04:22.

weapon from his luggage. The FBI says it is pursuing

:04:23.:04:25.

all leads and hasn't ruled out President Obama said

:04:26.:04:28.

he was heartbroken for the families. Our correspondent Gary O'Donoghue

:04:29.:04:31.

reports from Fort Lauderdale. It is a familiar scene

:04:32.:04:33.

at airports the world over, but the baggage claim hall

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at the Fort Lauderdale Airport turned into a place of death

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and mayhem, as a lone gunman opened fire on those waiting

:04:40.:04:42.

to collect their luggage. Passengers scattered for cover,

:04:43.:04:48.

hitting the ground, and reports say

:04:49.:04:51.

the assailant had time to reload attempts were made to

:04:52.:04:53.

attend to the wounded. Once he was done with ammunition,

:04:54.:05:04.

he threw the gun down after one He basically through the gun

:05:05.:05:08.

onto the ground and laid on the ground face

:05:09.:05:13.

down, spreadeagled. The gunman has been named

:05:14.:05:14.

as 26-year-old Esteban Santiago. Reports say he was carrying

:05:15.:05:17.

a military ID and had a weapon in his checked baggage,

:05:18.:05:20.

which is legal in the United States. One family member said he had been

:05:21.:05:23.

receiving psychological treatment after leaving the National

:05:24.:05:26.

Guard last year. This cowardly, heinous act resulted

:05:27.:05:28.

in the deaths of five people. There were eight more people injured

:05:29.:05:34.

by way of gunshot that In his first reaction

:05:35.:05:37.

to the shooting, President Obama said he was heartbroken

:05:38.:05:47.

for the families. These kinds of tragedies have

:05:48.:05:49.

happened too often during the eight The FBI says it's ruling nothing

:05:50.:05:54.

out, including terrorism. But the agency has confirmed it had

:05:55.:06:09.

prior contact with Santiago in November when he was referred

:06:10.:06:11.

for a mental health assessment. The ease with which he was able

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to transport and use a weapon in an airport will raise serious

:06:16.:06:18.

concerns about public safety. We can join Gary outside

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Fort Lauderdale International Gary, this story has been

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developing overnight. Well, essentially you are allowed to

:06:24.:06:41.

carry a firearm in your checked baggage in the US. Now, there are

:06:42.:06:46.

some restrictions, some rules. You have to be carrying it to a state

:06:47.:06:50.

where you are allowed to possess a firearm. You have to put it in your

:06:51.:06:54.

checked baggage, as I say, you have to put it in a locked, hard sided

:06:55.:06:59.

container. The gun has to be unloaded. You can't have ammunition

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in it, but you can carry ammunition with you. So on the face of it he

:07:06.:07:09.

has done nothing wrong in terms of firearms laws. The crucial point

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here is that he was able to collect that baggage at the belt, he was

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able to go into a laboratory just near the baggage claim area,

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seemingly unpack that semiautomatic weapon, load it, go back in and open

:07:25.:07:28.

fire indiscriminately, and what's more he had time to reload and start

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all over again before he laid out on the floor and gave himself up. So

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aside from the motivations for what he did, there will be questions

:07:38.:07:42.

about whether or not security in that part of the airport at that end

:07:43.:07:47.

of the travel process is sufficient. For now, thank you very much indeed.

:07:48.:07:49.

US intelligence officials have released a report that claims

:07:50.:07:52.

Vladimir Putin personally ordered a cyber campaign to try and help

:07:53.:07:55.

Donald Trump win the presidential election.

:07:56.:07:57.

Last night, after being briefed on the findings, Mr Trump said that

:07:58.:08:00.

hacking had absolutely no impact on the election result,

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but promised to set up a team to stop such attacks in the future,

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The report from American intelligence claims

:08:07.:08:18.

Russia's President, Vladimir Putin, personally ordered what it called

:08:19.:08:20.

an influence campaign to help Donald Trump's chances of winning

:08:21.:08:23.

The President-elect had earlier described the Russian hacking claims

:08:24.:08:36.

as a political witch-hunt by his opponents.

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At Trump Tower, he met America's top intelligence officials

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They say Russia's actions included hacking into the e-mail

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accounts of the Democratic National Committee and top Democrats,

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and using intermediaries such as WikiLeaks to

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Russia has previously denied this, and WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange

:08:53.:08:56.

has said before that Moscow is not the source.

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After the briefing, Mr Trump did not single out Russia.

:09:04.:09:07.

The incoming Vice President says the US

:09:08.:09:22.

The President-elect has made it very clear that we're going to take

:09:23.:09:39.

aggressive action in the early days of our new administration to combat

:09:40.:09:42.

cyber attacks and protect the security of the American people

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from this type of intrusion in the future.

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Donald Trump said he had tremendous respect for the work and service

:09:49.:09:51.

done by those in the US intelligence community.

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But, with two weeks to go until he moves into the White House,

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questions remain over how they will all work together

:09:58.:10:00.

The repair bill to fix the country's potholes could soon

:10:01.:10:05.

That is according to nearly 400 councils in England and Wales,

:10:06.:10:08.

who say the Government should increase fuel duty to pay

:10:09.:10:11.

The Government says it is already putting ?250 million

:10:12.:10:15.

But the Local Government Association says that is not enough,

:10:16.:10:19.

Councils six 2 million potholes every year. That is about 12,000 for

:10:20.:10:33.

every local authority in England and Wales. But it never seems to be

:10:34.:10:37.

enough. Now the council the repair bill could soon reach ?14 billion.

:10:38.:10:45.

Hard-pressed councils, who are mending, you know, pothole every

:10:46.:10:49.

five seconds in this country just cannot get to the core of the

:10:50.:10:54.

problem, which is actually many of our roads are just being patched

:10:55.:10:58.

now. They need to be fully repaired. The council say the government must

:10:59.:11:03.

do more to help. They suggest increasing fuel duty by a couple of

:11:04.:11:07.

pence a litre, a figure they say the public would support. It is not just

:11:08.:11:12.

the cost of repairing all these potholes that seems to be on the

:11:13.:11:15.

increase. Today's report also found that the time it is taking appears

:11:16.:11:20.

to be on the rise as well, going up from ten years in 2006 to 14 years

:11:21.:11:27.

today. Last year, the government announced a ?250 million pothole

:11:28.:11:30.

repair fund to help 100 councils fixed 4 million potholes. Today's

:11:31.:11:37.

report by local councils suggest that is not enough, and that the

:11:38.:11:40.

pothole problem is actually getting worse.

:11:41.:11:42.

For the first time, the NHS is providing disabled children

:11:43.:11:44.

with prosthetic limbs that are specially designed for sport.

:11:45.:11:47.

13-year-old Ben from Brighton was amongst the first to benefit,

:11:48.:11:50.

NHS England says it hopes the programme will allow several 100

:11:51.:11:54.

children a year to receive limbs, allowing them to participate

:11:55.:11:57.

We will be hearing from him later on in the programme.

:11:58.:12:21.

I want to go back to the story we mentioned earlier, the shooting at

:12:22.:12:30.

Fort Lauderdale, in Florida, which has drawn attention to possible

:12:31.:12:32.

weaknesses in US aviation security. Local authorities say the gunman

:12:33.:12:34.

opened fire in the baggage claim area yesterday, after retrieving

:12:35.:12:37.

a weapon from his checked luggage. Five people were killed

:12:38.:12:39.

in the attack and eight Joining us in the studio

:12:40.:12:42.

is the Independent's travel editor I think for a lot of people waking

:12:43.:12:50.

up this morning, they will be surprised to hear that it is

:12:51.:12:53.

perfectly OK to carry a gun in your luggage, but that is the case, isn't

:12:54.:12:58.

it? It is, not just in the US, worldwide. Certainly in the US it is

:12:59.:13:02.

easier. You turn up at check-in and say I have a firearm in my bag and

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they will make a note of that but there is no formalities. Elsewhere

:13:07.:13:10.

it is tricky. For instance British airways requires three days of

:13:11.:13:14.

advance notice and there are various rules about permits and so on. South

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Africa and Italy say you have to have your weapon and ammunition in

:13:20.:13:22.

separate tags. But generally it has done all over the world. What is

:13:23.:13:26.

different about Fort Lauderdale and Florida and the US is that you have

:13:27.:13:32.

a nation with liberal gun laws and culture of carrying firearms, which

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means that when tragedy like this happens there are, very sadly... It

:13:37.:13:41.

is very easy for somebody to be in that position, because probably on a

:13:42.:13:45.

typical flight you might have three or four people having weapons in

:13:46.:13:50.

their checked bags. But it does expose some really serious questions

:13:51.:13:54.

about aviation security. Again, not just in the US, but worldwide. You

:13:55.:14:00.

were speaking earlier to your correspondent, Gary O'Donoghue, he

:14:01.:14:03.

was standing right outside from what I could make out the terminal to

:14:04.:14:08.

baggage reclaim. You have a glass door and a road -- Terminal 2. There

:14:09.:14:13.

is nothing to stop people going into that area as they have done, for

:14:14.:14:17.

example, in Moscow. Aviation security professionals are saying

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they spend all this time and effort stopping people getting weapons on

:14:21.:14:28.

the aircraft, but that leaves the very high-profile aviation target,

:14:29.:14:31.

airports, very exposed because whether you are going through

:14:32.:14:34.

check-in, retrieving baggage or picking someone up at the airport,

:14:35.:14:38.

there are really no checks on who comes and goes. We saw President

:14:39.:14:44.

Obama in Gary's he's talking about another incident, and he has thought

:14:45.:14:48.

about trying to do more to control guns and has failed, by his own

:14:49.:14:52.

admission, to do much. Is there a move to try and change things within

:14:53.:14:56.

aviation, within the plant industry, or is that equally difficult to

:14:57.:15:00.

change? That I think is exactly right. There will be questions

:15:01.:15:04.

about, well, yes, you have obvious targets which are airports, with

:15:05.:15:09.

lots of people, you have a culture of not wanting any harm to come to

:15:10.:15:13.

people in those circumstances. There seems to be, from what we have heard

:15:14.:15:17.

so far, and issue involving someone with mental health problems in the

:15:18.:15:21.

country with very relaxed gun laws, that happens to have taken place in

:15:22.:15:26.

an airport, rather than specifically an aviation security issue. However

:15:27.:15:32.

it does, once again, as with Russell 's airport, as with Istanbul, remind

:15:33.:15:36.

us that there is all sorts of uneasy questions -- Brussels Airport. You

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can come and go wherever you like as long as you are not going through to

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the area where you bought the aircraft. Thank you.

:15:46.:15:52.

Quarter past six and you are watching Breakfast. Helen is the

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weather for us this morning. Is it murky? I am afraid it is a bit grey

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out there. It is not all doom and gloom but it may have impact on

:16:06.:16:11.

travelling. A thick mist and hill fog, mostly fog around the

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Manchester and Liverpool regions. We will keep a lot of leaden skies this

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week in Cronulla should be mostly dry and temperatures are

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considerably higher than this time yesterday, especially for England

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and Wales. But chilly in Ireland but largely forced free. Another spot of

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rain as well. The remnants of a weather front as we had south across

:16:35.:16:40.

the southern half of England. As I mentioned around the chest of

:16:41.:16:45.

playing it feels sick and that may be an issue for travellers. And

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across the English Channel, temperatures are said to be quite

:16:49.:16:53.

icy for some of the airports over here and for travellers as well. We

:16:54.:16:57.

got rid of the cold air is so it is milder across UK for the weekend.

:16:58.:17:02.

There will be some brightness, probably across the north-east of

:17:03.:17:06.

Scotland, eastern parts of north Island but on the whole it will be a

:17:07.:17:12.

great day. There could be drizzle lingering in the south-west but

:17:13.:17:16.

overnight high pressure will build and dry things up a little bit here.

:17:17.:17:20.

Again it should be largely forced free because we keep a blanket of

:17:21.:17:25.

cloud that stops temperature from falling. More misty, murky weather

:17:26.:17:32.

to contend with as the breeze picks up across the west of Scotland there

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is a chance to break the cloud or more. Eastern parts of Scotland and

:17:38.:17:40.

north-east England, slightly brighter day across the south-west.

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Still relatively mild with temperatures average. It will not

:17:45.:17:54.

feel warmer but nowhere near as cold as it is across eastern parts of

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Europe. -25 in Moscow! Of the most bitter weather of the season across

:18:02.:18:05.

central and eastern parts of Europe. How about next week? It is all

:18:06.:18:12.

change here in the UK. Weather fronts move through so a set of

:18:13.:18:16.

benign weather this weekend. It will be replaced by something more

:18:17.:18:17.

settled in next week. We'll be back with

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the headlines at 6.30. Time now to take a look at some

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of the week's big cinema releases - Hello, and a very warm

:18:23.:18:26.

welcome to the Film Review. To take us through this week's

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cinema releases is Antonia Quirtke. We are going to start with Silence,

:18:45.:18:50.

Martin Scorsese's new film, Liam Neeson, Andrew Garfield,

:18:51.:19:00.

Adam Driver, they are playing Jesuit Passengers, starring Chris Pratt,

:19:01.:19:04.

Jennifer Lawrence, about two passengers sleeping in suspended

:19:05.:19:13.

animation for 120 years on their way to a new colony on a far-away planet

:19:14.:19:16.

and they wake too early. And also, Assassin's Creed,

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Michael Fassbender's big movie, Let's kick off then with Silence,

:19:22.:19:23.

a great passion of Martin Scorsese, trying for years and

:19:24.:19:37.

years to get this made. First talk of it in 1990

:19:38.:19:47.

with Daniel Day Lewis, and Benicio Del Toro have

:19:48.:19:50.

been attached to it. He was famously brought

:19:51.:19:56.

up a devout Catholic, had a great and genuine

:19:57.:19:58.

interest in the priesthood, at one point he was going to join

:19:59.:20:01.

the priesthood, so Catholicism has Religion in his films,

:20:02.:20:04.

the Last Temptation of Christ and Kundun, but even

:20:05.:20:09.

something like Mean Streets, What is the religious

:20:10.:20:11.

Martin Scorsese like? This is a difficult film to watch,

:20:12.:20:17.

it is about the persecution and torture of priests

:20:18.:20:22.

and their flock. 161 minutes, incredibly long,

:20:23.:20:26.

and relentless, long conversations reflecting Martin Scorsese's

:20:27.:20:29.

own ambiguity towards his own faith. I know that it has been

:20:30.:20:34.

very highly praised, and not many people have gone to see

:20:35.:20:38.

it, but it has been critically I think that there is a pulse

:20:39.:20:42.

of confusion in it, I was not clear what Martin Scorsese

:20:43.:20:51.

was trying to say. The directors he admires,

:20:52.:20:53.

religious directors, Carl Dreier, Joe Navarre,

:20:54.:20:55.

Robert Bresson, there is a euphoria And yet, you can't help think,

:20:56.:20:58.

this was Scorsese's moment to join the ranks of those

:20:59.:21:12.

kind of directors. I'm not sure that he has done it,

:21:13.:21:14.

but I know that many people Let's take a little clip

:21:15.:21:18.

here, for a preview. We have fought to

:21:19.:21:21.

travel, for the Lord. If we do not do what they want,

:21:22.:21:34.

then there could be danger They could be put in prison,

:21:35.:21:41.

they could be taken away forever. As you were saying, a long watch,

:21:42.:21:46.

a pretty gruelling watch, Absolutely, Andrew Garfield,

:21:47.:22:14.

when he played Spider-Man, that role did that young actor no

:22:15.:22:23.

favours and here he is, he has a quality of deeply inherent

:22:24.:22:26.

youthfulness and vulnerability, anyone who saw him in

:22:27.:22:29.

Never Let Me Go will remember that, and also, a Japanese actor,

:22:30.:22:32.

Issey Ogato, he plays the Grand Inquisitor in this,

:22:33.:22:35.

and he is an incredible actor, ingenious casting

:22:36.:22:39.

for Martin Scorsese. And this is a comedic actor,

:22:40.:22:42.

but he playing someone who does the most terrible things,

:22:43.:22:45.

he's a comedic actor, he has wonderful kabuki gestures,

:22:46.:22:49.

and the performance Something pretty different,

:22:50.:22:55.

Passengers - Silence, gruelling, is Passengers

:22:56.:23:03.

something easier? A lot fluffier, a lot more fun,

:23:04.:23:05.

this is about two passengers in suspended animation,

:23:06.:23:11.

hibernation for 120 years on their way to a new colony

:23:12.:23:14.

on a new planet and for reasons we will not go into,

:23:15.:23:17.

spoiler alerts, they wake up early. Wonderful idea, so two strangers

:23:18.:23:21.

facing an eternity together, walking endless corridors,

:23:22.:23:24.

gigantic spaceship, and, breaking into the entertainment

:23:25.:23:29.

facilities, and with their little wristbands, one of the funniest

:23:30.:23:36.

things is the ways in which there is even if no-one else existing,

:23:37.:23:46.

you are still slaves, your life had been formalised

:23:47.:23:48.

before you left Earth. Also this lovely simmering

:23:49.:23:51.

sexual tension between It would have been all right

:23:52.:23:53.

to leave it at that, but there is this derring-do,

:23:54.:23:57.

in the third act, not entirely You can feel moments

:23:58.:24:00.

where it is reaching for some tougher kind of glory,

:24:01.:24:03.

think of something like Alien and wandering the corridors of that

:24:04.:24:05.

spaceship, intensely sinister and threatening place to be,

:24:06.:24:08.

but this place looks pretty nice. I would not mind

:24:09.:24:11.

moving there myself! There are moments when you are shown

:24:12.:24:13.

how jerry-built this craft is, hammering away against things,

:24:14.:24:19.

putting fuses together to get things to work, that ought to have been

:24:20.:24:24.

frightening and made me feel how vulnerable these people are and yet

:24:25.:24:27.

it does not quite do that. There is a wonderful cameo,

:24:28.:24:33.

Michael Sheen plays And you can see that he is

:24:34.:24:36.

struggling with the part, trying to bring more to it

:24:37.:24:42.

than is there on the page, unfortunately, it is not

:24:43.:24:46.

on the page but it is fun. Let's talk about Assassin's Creed,

:24:47.:24:50.

which video game players will be very familiar with,

:24:51.:24:53.

based on the video game. Now they are based on video games(!)

:24:54.:24:55.

this is catastrophic... Nine instalments in this video

:24:56.:25:05.

franchise, one of those movies that has been long in production,

:25:06.:25:08.

lots of re-shoots, rejigs, starring Michael Fassbender,

:25:09.:25:11.

Marion Cotillard, Jeremy Irons, To even begin to describe the plot,

:25:12.:25:15.

I am not sure there is any point! Assassins against Knights Templar,

:25:16.:25:24.

let's take a look. This is the actual one

:25:25.:25:28.

that your father used Your mother's death,

:25:29.:25:45.

not something a boy should ever be So, catastrophic, you said...

:25:46.:25:57.

charitably(!), I am surea lot of people will go

:25:58.:26:18.

to see it nonetheless. Unbelievably incoherent,

:26:19.:26:21.

extraordinary, it is... It opens with three

:26:22.:26:24.

flashbacks, three flashbacks! What a flashback does in a film,

:26:25.:26:27.

someone is standing there and saying, hang on a sec,

:26:28.:26:30.

let me fill you in, and then they do Feels like the movie never starts,

:26:31.:26:34.

then you are in there and you feel I went to the cinema to see this,

:26:35.:26:43.

two people were asleep at the end of the row that I was sitting

:26:44.:26:49.

on, that sums it up. Best movie out at the moment,

:26:50.:26:52.

in your opinion. A Monster Calls, now this

:26:53.:27:01.

is the most extraordinary sell, actually, it is a fantastical

:27:02.:27:06.

terminal illness melodrama Maybe it is not for children,

:27:07.:27:10.

it stars a 12-year-old boy. He's visited by a Yew Tree,

:27:11.:27:17.

over a few evenings, and it is played by Liam Neeson,

:27:18.:27:24.

it has a wonderful shape, Dickensian shape, visited three

:27:25.:27:31.

times to be shown things that may It is a flat-out classic,

:27:32.:27:34.

it has the emotional heft of the Railway Children,

:27:35.:27:38.

moments of Iron Man by Ted Hughes and Pan's Labyrinth,

:27:39.:27:42.

I think it is a masterpiece, go and see it and take

:27:43.:27:44.

all of the family. Featured quite a lot

:27:45.:27:48.

in the Golden Globes nominations. Hell or High Water,

:27:49.:27:57.

Ben Foster and Chris Pine, they play bank robber Brothers,

:27:58.:28:05.

and Jeff Bridges is the Texas Ranger who is tracking them down,

:28:06.:28:08.

which sounds terribly familiar, that kind of plot, and features

:28:09.:28:10.

a great deal in cinema. One of them is on a roll,

:28:11.:28:13.

the other brother is a little too wild, the Texas Ranger is always

:28:14.:28:17.

a step ahead of them. It feels like a movie

:28:18.:28:20.

of the mid-1970s or early 1980s, like Midnight Run, where you come

:28:21.:28:23.

away from it thinking, you will look through the TV

:28:24.:28:26.

listings and think, Hell or High Water is on tonight,

:28:27.:28:29.

unmissable, fantastic! It has slotted into that classic

:28:30.:28:31.

film territory already, Jeff Bridges has been

:28:32.:28:34.

nominated for a Golden Globes for his Best Supporting Actor

:28:35.:28:40.

and he does the most fantastic thing There is a death scene and just

:28:41.:28:43.

in a couple of seconds you see everything that Jeff Bridges

:28:44.:28:49.

can offer as an actor, the way that he absorbs the shock,

:28:50.:28:54.

it is a magical moment, That is it for this week, thank

:28:55.:28:58.

you so much for watching, goodbye. Hello, this is Breakfast,

:28:59.:29:17.

with Jon Kay and Rachel Burden. Coming up before 7:00am,

:29:18.:29:20.

Helen will have the weather for you. But first, at 6:30am,

:29:21.:29:23.

a summary of this morning's main The British Red Cross is warning

:29:24.:29:25.

of a humanitarian crisis in NHS hospitals in England,

:29:26.:29:33.

and is demanding the Government allocates more money

:29:34.:29:35.

to improve social care. Dozens of A departments

:29:36.:29:37.

were forced to divert ambulances to other hospitals last week,

:29:38.:29:39.

while one patient died after spending 35

:29:40.:29:41.

hours on a trolley. The Royal College of

:29:42.:29:43.

Emergency Medicine says the system is on its knees, but the Department

:29:44.:29:46.

of Health says it is investing more Police in Florida have been

:29:47.:29:50.

questioning a man after five people were killed and eight injured

:29:51.:30:04.

in a shooting at Fort Lauderdale The suspect opened fire

:30:05.:30:07.

in the baggage claim area after seemingly retrieving his

:30:08.:30:12.

weapon from his luggage. The FBI says it is pursuing

:30:13.:30:14.

all leads, and hasn't ruled out US intelligence officials have

:30:15.:30:17.

released a report that claims Vladimir Putin personally ordered

:30:18.:30:25.

a cyber-campaign to try and help Donald Trump win the

:30:26.:30:28.

presidential election. Last night, after being briefed

:30:29.:30:29.

on the findings, Mr Trump said that hacking had had absolutely no impact

:30:30.:30:32.

on the election outcome. His running mate, Mike Pence,

:30:33.:30:35.

says a team will be set up The President-elect has made it very

:30:36.:30:38.

clear that we're going to take aggressive action in the early days

:30:39.:30:47.

of our new administration to combat cyber attacks and protect

:30:48.:30:50.

the security of the American people from this type of

:30:51.:30:53.

intrusion in the future. For the first time, the NHS

:30:54.:31:03.

is providing disabled children with prosthetic limbs that

:31:04.:31:06.

are specially designed for sport. 13-year-old Ben from Brighton

:31:07.:31:08.

was amongst the first to benefit, NHS England says it hopes

:31:09.:31:11.

the programme will allow several 100 children a year to receive limbs,

:31:12.:31:15.

allowing them to participate A killer whale which was involved

:31:16.:31:18.

in the deaths of three people and featured in an influential

:31:19.:31:25.

documentary has died Tilikum featured in the film

:31:26.:31:27.

Blackfish', which led to a global campaign against the keeping

:31:28.:31:32.

of orcas in captivity. Sea World says staff are deeply

:31:33.:31:34.

saddened by the death of the whale, The doors of one of the country's

:31:35.:31:37.

biggest nightclubs reopened last night, ending months

:31:38.:31:50.

of enforced closure. Fabric in central London

:31:51.:31:52.

had its licence revoked in September, after Islington

:31:53.:31:54.

Council found what it called The club was allowed to reopen

:31:55.:31:56.

after agreeing to a raised entry age I wonder if those people are home

:31:57.:32:19.

yet. Mike is here with the sport. A big weekend, FA Cup. One of those

:32:20.:32:28.

special weekends of the year. I love trying to pick whether big upsets

:32:29.:32:33.

are going to be. He and Arsenal, Bournemouth, Southampton and Crystal

:32:34.:32:39.

Palace will be travelling nervously. The potential for an upset, the

:32:40.:32:44.

lowest ranked team is Star Bridge, and they go to weaken today. Bobby

:32:45.:32:50.

Gould, who won the cup in 1988, his grandson is in goal today. All those

:32:51.:33:00.

coaches criss-crossing the country. A lot of players will be wondering

:33:01.:33:04.

if it is Baird Bay to be on the back page.

:33:05.:33:14.

FA Cup third round weekend got under way, with Manchester City the first

:33:15.:33:17.

side through to round four, thanks to a 5-0 thrashing handed out

:33:18.:33:21.

City were already out of sight by half-time,

:33:22.:33:24.

leading 3-0, thanks to an own goal, a Yaya Toure penalty,

:33:25.:33:27.

The gloss on an impressive night was added by John Stones.

:33:28.:33:31.

The England defender scored his first goal since a summer

:33:32.:33:34.

He needed goal-line technology to confirm that he had actually

:33:35.:33:37.

Hopefully it can help us to make our players are levers, that they are

:33:38.:33:47.

good enough to play every game, and try, in both our fans and the people

:33:48.:33:52.

in Manchester City. And they can believe that we are good. They know

:33:53.:33:56.

what happened in the past, but we are good guys. So they run a lot,

:33:57.:34:02.

fight a lot, playing good. But they have to believe.

:34:03.:34:17.

It will be a special FA Cup reunion today for one of the members

:34:18.:34:21.

of the treble-winning Manchester United team of 1999.

:34:22.:34:23.

Former Netherlands centre-half Jaap Stam is now the manager

:34:24.:34:25.

of championship side Reading, who go to Old Trafford hunting

:34:26.:34:28.

As a player, there is nothing better to play over there, in a stadium

:34:29.:34:36.

like that in front of so many fans. And we know as well, we have our own

:34:37.:34:40.

fans over there as well. Hopefully they are joining in and supporting

:34:41.:34:41.

us. Non-League Barrow are playing

:34:42.:34:42.

Rochdale and non-league Eastleigh travel to Championship

:34:43.:34:46.

side Brentford. Sir Andy Murray, will play world

:34:47.:34:47.

number two Novak Djokovic in the final of

:34:48.:35:06.

the Qatar Open today. Murray beat Czech Tomas Berdych

:35:07.:35:08.

in straight sets in their semi final, to reach his

:35:09.:35:11.

fourth final in Doha. The win was Murray's,

:35:12.:35:18.

28th in a row on the ATP Tour, and another title and victory

:35:19.:35:21.

over his main rival, would be the ideal preparation

:35:22.:35:25.

for the Australian Open. May be at the beginning of the year

:35:26.:35:36.

you are focusing a little bit more on yourself and how you are playing

:35:37.:35:40.

on how you want to play, moving into the Aussie Open, rather than just

:35:41.:35:41.

solely focusing on the outcome. Newcastle Falcons produced

:35:42.:35:47.

a stunning late comeback to beat Bath 24-22 in rugby

:35:48.:35:50.

union's Aviva Premiership. Bath led by 12 points halfway

:35:51.:35:54.

through the second half, but Ben Harris barged his way over

:35:55.:35:57.

to draw Newcastle level, Man of the match Joel Hodgson,

:35:58.:36:00.

kept his nerve to slot home the conversation, and send Bath

:36:01.:36:05.

to their third defeat in a row. Scarlets also came from behind,

:36:06.:36:08.

to beat Ulster 16-13, was on the receiving

:36:09.:36:14.

end of a high tackle, Elsewhere, Leinster beat Zebre,

:36:15.:36:22.

and Newport Gwent Dragons beat Tour de France champion Chris Froome

:36:23.:36:26.

says he turned down the chance, to use a Therapeutic

:36:27.:36:40.

Use Exemption in 2015 The exemption allows

:36:41.:36:42.

athletes to take medication would normally be banned, and

:36:43.:36:48.

although Froome had used them twice in the past, when given

:36:49.:36:51.

the option two years ago, They basically said that your

:36:52.:36:59.

condition is severe enough that you could use one, and I didn't feel as

:37:00.:37:05.

if having a TUE in the last week of the Tour de France was something

:37:06.:37:09.

that I was prepared to... It just didn't sit well morally with me, but

:37:10.:37:13.

that was something I was going to do.

:37:14.:37:21.

Earlier we saw how Sir Andy Murray got on.

:37:22.:37:23.

This afternoon Sir Mo Farah is in action at the Edinburgh Cross

:37:24.:37:27.

The four-time Olympic champion, who insists he's happy just to be

:37:28.:37:31.

called Mo, was surprisingly beaten into second place last year.

:37:32.:37:34.

He is using the event as part of his preparation,

:37:35.:37:37.

for the track World Championships, in London later this year,

:37:38.:37:40.

and admits he'll have his work cut out against some cross country

:37:41.:37:43.

It is going to be tough, they will try and put me down and beat me as

:37:44.:37:53.

quick as possible. I am not going to come out there and go I am not going

:37:54.:37:58.

to... I will fight for it, but it suits certain athletes better, and

:37:59.:38:02.

it is going to be tough. I think it might be.

:38:03.:38:03.

He was training with his beloved that Arsenal, giving Wenger a bit of

:38:04.:38:09.

a helping hand. There could be one less team,

:38:10.:38:16.

on the grid for the new Formula 1 season, after Manor Racing went

:38:17.:38:20.

into administration. Manor finished last

:38:21.:38:22.

in the championship last year, and have failed to find

:38:23.:38:24.

new investment needed to carry The team went into administration

:38:25.:38:27.

two years ago, when they were known as Marussia, with

:38:28.:38:32.

debts of ?35 million, Now as the big teams enter

:38:33.:38:34.

the FA Cup this weekend, I am sure we will see some

:38:35.:38:45.

silky skills on display, but none as spectacular as those

:38:46.:38:48.

performed by players in the sport It's been one of Asia's biggest

:38:49.:38:51.

sports for centuries and now it's It is Asia's best kept secret, the

:38:52.:39:04.

sport that has been part of the culture in countries like Malaysia

:39:05.:39:13.

since the 15th century. Combining football skills with the moves of

:39:14.:39:18.

kung fu. And now, sepak takraw is taking off in the UK as well. It is

:39:19.:39:28.

linking the martial art or the art of the body with this game, because

:39:29.:39:32.

you need to have the agility, flexibility and things like that.

:39:33.:39:36.

First of all, you are learning the basics of keeping up, really. And it

:39:37.:39:41.

can be fought, head... It does hurt, I can tell you that, a little bit,

:39:42.:39:47.

because... Look at that. That is beautiful skill. Let me show you,

:39:48.:39:51.

this ball is quite hard, it is plastic now. Slightly softer than

:39:52.:39:57.

the original ones, which were made of rattan, but it cause too many

:39:58.:40:03.

injuries. If you play football, death further you can play this game

:40:04.:40:07.

as well. So it is football meets volleyball and has now spread across

:40:08.:40:10.

the world. And who better to recruit for the new esteem forming this year

:40:11.:40:13.

than freestyle football world recordholder John Farnworth. Now,

:40:14.:40:24.

the size of the ball was a surprise. But he took it in his stride. It

:40:25.:40:47.

seems to me more power. Hey! In matches it is only three aside and

:40:48.:40:51.

you only have three touches per team before it has to go over the net. So

:40:52.:40:56.

there we are, we serve, the game is in play. Red shot. You do have set

:40:57.:41:01.

positions. The server, the feeder and the striker. An acrobatic smash

:41:02.:41:07.

at the net. And this can take some practice. Servers should know their

:41:08.:41:14.

place. The flexibility these guys possessed is incredible. They are

:41:15.:41:17.

getting their legs way above their head. It is like what Ibrahim of --

:41:18.:41:30.

Ibrahimovich does. If I can do it, so can you. And if we win the point,

:41:31.:41:35.

the celebration. It has got to be worth it for that.

:41:36.:41:38.

They also encourage you to count in Malaysian, so I used to do one, two,

:41:39.:41:46.

three in Malaysian. But I have forgotten it. You are surprisingly

:41:47.:41:51.

agile for a man of your experience. We will see you again later.

:41:52.:41:58.

From the damage they can cause to your car to the safety risk

:41:59.:42:01.

they pose to cyclists no-one likes a pothole and there are warnings

:42:02.:42:05.

this morning that the problem is getting worse.

:42:06.:42:07.

A survey of 400 councils in England and Wales estimates that the repair

:42:08.:42:10.

bill could reach ?14 billion by 2019.

:42:11.:42:12.

Peter Fleming is from the Local Government Association

:42:13.:42:14.

and joins us from our studio in Tunbridge Wells.

:42:15.:42:21.

Thank you for joining us on a Saturday morning. The figure for the

:42:22.:42:27.

cost of these repairs, ?14 billion is a huge amount. A couple of people

:42:28.:42:31.

have disputed it. How did you come up with a? It is ?12 billion at the

:42:32.:42:36.

moment and the rate of increase that we are seeing, it will easily top

:42:37.:42:41.

?14 billion by 2019. I think the issue is that this is about a

:42:42.:42:47.

backlog from many, many years of government underinvestment in what

:42:48.:42:51.

is known as local roads, which in fact a 97% of the road network in

:42:52.:42:58.

this country. So all the money goes on the major roads, the motorways

:42:59.:43:02.

and that kind of thing. So the government is in charge of what is

:43:03.:43:06.

known as National roads, that is 3% of the total road network. They

:43:07.:43:11.

spend about ?1.1 million per mile on keeping those up to scratch, and

:43:12.:43:15.

give councils ?27,000 a mile for everything else. You know that the

:43:16.:43:21.

big bugbear people have with this is that when potholes are... If you are

:43:22.:43:25.

lucky enough for them to be repaired, when they are filled it is

:43:26.:43:29.

quite often a bit of a hatchet job are not long-term repair so it

:43:30.:43:31.

doesn't solve the problem ultimately. Absolutely, and this is

:43:32.:43:35.

what we are saying. All the councils can do, and they are doing one

:43:36.:43:38.

pothole every 15 seconds in this country we are repairing, but we are

:43:39.:43:46.

just catching it up. We have been absolutely honest about that. That

:43:47.:43:49.

is all we can do. We need major investment in this country in the

:43:50.:43:52.

road structure, in infrastructure. And stopping this sort of patch and

:43:53.:43:56.

mend mentality, and giving us enough money to actually replace some of

:43:57.:43:59.

these local roads that desperately need proper money spent on them.

:44:00.:44:04.

What is causing the problems? Is it simply road use getting more

:44:05.:44:09.

expensive, more cars on the road, heavier cars? I think it is a

:44:10.:44:13.

mixture of lots of things. It is the historical backlog of government

:44:14.:44:16.

underfunding of the road network, coupled with increased traffic,

:44:17.:44:23.

weather, the fact that a patch the road is not as good as a new road,

:44:24.:44:27.

clearly the patch is a weak point in the road -- a patched road. We could

:44:28.:44:33.

save money in the long-term if money was spent on the local government

:44:34.:44:37.

network. It is very easy to blame on underfunding when this is a council

:44:38.:44:40.

responsibility and perhaps councils haven't been efficient enough in

:44:41.:44:44.

dealing with this in the past. As I said, we are repairing a pothole

:44:45.:44:49.

every 15 seconds. Councils are being innovative about the way they repair

:44:50.:44:52.

roads but frankly the government does fund road repairs. They are not

:44:53.:44:56.

finding it at the level that it needs to be. Councils have got

:44:57.:45:01.

competing necessities. They have seen their budgets reduced on

:45:02.:45:05.

average by about 40% over the last few years. You know, there are

:45:06.:45:09.

increasing costs in other areas, such as adult social care. So it is

:45:10.:45:14.

not a council issue. The government funds the road network, and we are

:45:15.:45:22.

saying if we use 2p out of the current fuel duty we could solve

:45:23.:45:26.

this problem. Thank you very much, Peter Fleming. It is one of those

:45:27.:45:31.

things which is deeply irritating to many motorists. Get in touch if you

:45:32.:45:34.

have been affected, if your vehicle has been damaged, if your bike has

:45:35.:45:38.

been damaged, if you have been injured as a result.

:45:39.:45:42.

You can tweet about the stories we show today using our hash tag or

:45:43.:45:54.

followers online. The potholes are weather-related. C what Helen has in

:45:55.:45:59.

store for us this weekend. I am worried you will not see any

:46:00.:46:05.

potholes this morning in some parts of the country. It is murky out

:46:06.:46:13.

there. Just a word of caution, really, for the Cheshire Plain. It

:46:14.:46:23.

is murky in many areas with a lot of cloud of Scotland and Northern

:46:24.:46:28.

Ireland but largely crossed free for the certainly so in the south where

:46:29.:46:33.

the temperature is about 15 degrees higher than this time yesterday. It

:46:34.:46:37.

does not necessarily feel that much warmer users will not have to scrape

:46:38.:46:42.

your cars this morning. A weak weather fronts a lot of misty cloud

:46:43.:46:47.

and it's fairly widespread light rain and drizzle. Damp and grey out

:46:48.:46:51.

their but gradually through the day that rain and drizzle will ease the

:46:52.:46:55.

way, lingering in the south-west. For the most part it is dry and best

:46:56.:47:00.

chance for bright weather will be the stump parts of Scotland

:47:01.:47:03.

north-east England. Leaden skies to much of the day at. Temperatures up

:47:04.:47:10.

on recent days that you can will fill chilly with a blanket cloud.

:47:11.:47:15.

That we could have the positive of arresting falling temperature so

:47:16.:47:18.

overnight it will be frost free except perhaps the blend of

:47:19.:47:22.

north-east Scotland. But will again be a really great one tomorrow

:47:23.:47:26.

morning for most of us. The improvement, I suppose, without our

:47:27.:47:29.

the front across the south-west there is a better chance of bright

:47:30.:47:34.

weather and there will be some breaks in the cloud here and there.

:47:35.:47:39.

Not ruling out but, unfortunately, not guaranteed. It looks cloudy for

:47:40.:47:44.

all of the FA Cup third round matches today and tomorrow. In fact

:47:45.:47:47.

there will be a be drizzle around today. Temperatures are just

:47:48.:47:50.

creeping above average for this time of year in early January. We are

:47:51.:47:55.

doing quite well because just across the Channel at the moment there is

:47:56.:47:58.

the potential for icy conditions in freezing rain across on the low

:47:59.:48:01.

country and look at these temperatures for tomorrow across the

:48:02.:48:06.

likes of Moscow. -20 five. Bitterly cold at the moment across that part

:48:07.:48:12.

of Europe. That air will stay stagnant next few days. As to the UK

:48:13.:48:18.

it is far more mobile into next week which means more wind and more rain.

:48:19.:48:24.

Look at those temperatures. -11! Take care, Helen.

:48:25.:48:27.

We're back with the headlines at seven o clock.

:48:28.:48:30.

First, let's get all the latest technology news with Spencer Kelly

:48:31.:48:57.

Right, let's get 2017 started in style, shall we?

:48:58.:49:00.

Lots of people queuing for photos of a sign.

:49:01.:49:12.

A motorcycle vest with built-in airbag?

:49:13.:49:17.

Every January, Las Vegas hosts the massive Consumer Electronics

:49:18.:49:26.

Show, and if you have a product to launch,

:49:27.:49:30.

And that's why I am being followed by a drone,

:49:31.:49:36.

specifically, the hover camera Passport drone.

:49:37.:49:38.

First one I have seen which follows you not by tracking a signal

:49:39.:49:42.

from your mobile phone, but instead by locking on to a face

:49:43.:49:45.

You can tell it which face to follow by tapping on it in the accompanying

:49:46.:49:52.

And the latest version will let you scan and upload your face

:49:53.:50:00.

to the drone so it can find and recognise you automatically.

:50:01.:50:06.

The theory is that you then don't need the phone at all.

:50:07.:50:09.

The drone knows and loves your face, just like a loyal puppy.

:50:10.:50:15.

And, with guarded blades and sensors underneath to help it steer clear

:50:16.:50:19.

of obstacles, it certainly seems safe and light enough to fly

:50:20.:50:22.

in amongst other people, or indeed to grab it out of the air

:50:23.:50:25.

Unbelievably, CES is now in its 50th year, and in that time it's got

:50:26.:50:35.

The show has spread beyond the walls of the Las Vegas Convention Centre

:50:36.:50:47.

to the surrounding hotels, and we have seen all sorts of ideas

:50:48.:50:51.

The event might have grown, but the technology,

:50:52.:50:59.

The TV screens have got so thin that they blend into the walls,

:51:00.:51:05.

so thin you can peel them on and off.

:51:06.:51:10.

And in amongst the major companies are a number of tiny companies.

:51:11.:51:15.

Marc has been checking some of them out.

:51:16.:51:24.

Most people understand that if I do this with my fingers it means

:51:25.:51:28.

However, if I am wearing this strap when I make that gesture my hand

:51:29.:51:34.

becomes part of the telephone itself and can send and receive calls.

:51:35.:51:37.

The strap has a little body conducting unit in here which sends

:51:38.:51:43.

vibrations down my hand and when I stick my finger

:51:44.:51:46.

in my ear, they become amplified sound.

:51:47.:51:51.

There is a microphone just in the strap there,

:51:52.:51:53.

The finished thing looks like a normal watch strap and can be

:51:54.:52:02.

Now, when you want to hang up, that's simplicity itself.

:52:03.:52:07.

All you've got to do is take your hand away

:52:08.:52:10.

Health is once again a big theme here at CES.

:52:11.:52:14.

And, whilst more people than ever are following gluten-free,

:52:15.:52:16.

dairy-free or other sorts of specialist diets,

:52:17.:52:24.

they don't necessarily need to be unless they've had

:52:25.:52:26.

And that's something that this device aims to overcome by helping

:52:27.:52:30.

people create the perfect diet for their own personal digestive

:52:31.:52:33.

Air connects via bluetooth, and its mission is to miniaturise

:52:34.:52:40.

a breath test that gastroenterologists have been

:52:41.:52:42.

It analyses reaction to various forms of carbohydrate,

:52:43.:52:48.

This is based on the idea that, if you consume a food that you can't

:52:49.:52:56.

break down, then it will ferment in the gut, and from that point

:52:57.:52:59.

chemicals will disperse into the bloodstream.

:53:00.:53:03.

That blood will be making its way into the lungs, and then

:53:04.:53:06.

when you breathe out you'll be able to analyse how well that food

:53:07.:53:09.

So, once it learns what works for you, it should be able to help

:53:10.:53:16.

you customise your diet as the finished app's food database

:53:17.:53:19.

indicates how likely you are to react to any given food.

:53:20.:53:24.

So, if you find the answer, all that's left to do is actually

:53:25.:53:27.

stick to the lifestyle and diet you need to.

:53:28.:53:31.

This year's big theme at CES was cars.

:53:32.:53:38.

And, as always, it's often the most outrageous concepts that grab

:53:39.:53:42.

Rinspeed has previously proposed a car with its own deployable drone.

:53:43.:53:50.

Well, now it's got one that has a space-age cockpit,

:53:51.:53:53.

with more glass than a greenhouse, which is quite fortunate because it

:53:54.:53:57.

Yes, that's a garden in the dashboard.

:53:58.:54:04.

Well, so you get a nice smell when you're driving,

:54:05.:54:07.

of course, and you can even take part of it

:54:08.:54:10.

Don't forget to switch the fan on, so you get that lovely whiff.

:54:11.:54:15.

Actually, a lot of the more serious car stuff is happening in small

:54:16.:54:19.

steps, incrementally, so it's harder to grab the headlines.

:54:20.:54:24.

That said, Marc Cieslak has just been for a couple

:54:25.:54:27.

There's a certain German car-maker that boasts of building

:54:28.:54:37.

But here at CES 2017, most of the motor manufacturers seem

:54:38.:54:42.

intent on building the ultimate self-driving machine.

:54:43.:54:49.

It isn't just motor manufacturers that are showing off

:54:50.:54:53.

They're doing it with the help of tech companies, as well.

:54:54.:54:59.

This vehicle is fitted with a system called BB8,

:55:00.:55:01.

which has been created by NVIDIA, a company most famous

:55:02.:55:05.

for manufacturing high-end graphics chips.

:55:06.:55:09.

Artificial intelligence software which learns helped by sensors have

:55:10.:55:11.

trained BB8 to be able to make driving decisions.

:55:12.:55:18.

Here, an obstacle has just appeared in the route

:55:19.:55:20.

that we were going to take to get to the other end of this track.

:55:21.:55:24.

The car has decided that they'd better not drive into that obstacle,

:55:25.:55:27.

Driving around a car park is one thing but how do these autonomous

:55:28.:55:32.

Electronic supplier Delphi has partnered with driver assistance

:55:33.:55:38.

and sensor outfit Mobileye and created a mini fleet

:55:39.:55:40.

of autonomous Audi SUVs which are driving around

:55:41.:55:45.

There are 24 different sensors spread out across the body of this

:55:46.:55:51.

car which allow it to drive autonomously and what I am struck

:55:52.:55:57.

by is that you don't notice any of them.

:55:58.:56:00.

You can't really see any of those sensory devices.

:56:01.:56:02.

This car is an indicator, if you like, of how autonomous

:56:03.:56:06.

vehicles will look in the future, which is pretty much like any car

:56:07.:56:09.

Those sensors include lidar, radar, and cameras all around the vehicle.

:56:10.:56:19.

Here, we can see what the car sees through them.

:56:20.:56:22.

Identifying other vehicles as well as pedestrians,

:56:23.:56:27.

and behaving accordingly, as it weaves its way through traffic.

:56:28.:56:30.

So, I'm a rear passenger in the back of this self-driving car.

:56:31.:56:33.

And so far zero dramas, apart from looking forward

:56:34.:56:36.

and noticing that the driver doesn't have his hands

:56:37.:56:38.

I could be forgiven for thinking that I am actually being driven

:56:39.:56:43.

The thing is, we've been driving around in prototype self-driving

:56:44.:56:48.

How long is it going to be before cars like this are available

:56:49.:56:55.

There is quite a wide consensus among the industry that 2021

:56:56.:56:59.

is the time where the technology will be ready, and after a number

:57:00.:57:04.

of years where society will start gaining confidence in this kind

:57:05.:57:08.

of technology, then society would be at the point where the driver can be

:57:09.:57:12.

With that 2021 goal in mind, Mobileye announced that,

:57:13.:57:17.

in partnership with BMW and Intel, it will be testing 40 autonomous

:57:18.:57:20.

vehicles on real American and European roads in the second

:57:21.:57:27.

Autonomous automobiles are most definitely on their way.

:57:28.:57:36.

Now, if you are someone who preferS the wind to be rushing

:57:37.:57:39.

through your hair, CES also offers plenty for riders

:57:40.:57:44.

This is surely the most fun you can have on a beach

:57:45.:57:55.

The Super 73 is an electric bike that can hold enough charge

:57:56.:58:01.

Its top speed is 27mph, which on Newport Beach is certainly

:58:02.:58:06.

Don't press on it just yet and you have the two

:58:07.:58:15.

The bike was funded via Kickstarter, where it raised almost $500,000,

:58:16.:58:28.

and now each bike is being carefully crafted here in Orange County

:58:29.:58:32.

We have every machine needed to create an entire bike.

:58:33.:58:36.

There's some days where we have got, you know, 30, 40 bikes being welded

:58:37.:58:40.

That's to ensure that everything is done properly,

:58:41.:58:44.

safely, and will hold up for a lifetime.

:58:45.:58:47.

The batteries in these things are getting more affordable,

:58:48.:58:51.

they're getting lighter, so it means at CES this year we're

:58:52.:58:54.

seeing a host of interesting ways to help us get around.

:58:55.:58:57.

Chinese company LeEco unveiled these bikes.

:58:58.:59:04.

They're powered by normal pedals, but they have the Android mobile

:59:05.:59:07.

operating system built in so you can track your progress.

:59:08.:59:10.

And then there is things like the Movpack.

:59:11.:59:12.

This is a regular backpack, that with one movement you can turn

:59:13.:59:16.

it into an electric skateboard, that's actually easier to ride

:59:17.:59:22.

But it's perhaps more futuristic ideas like this one from Honda that

:59:23.:59:27.

This concept car is more about having something that

:59:28.:59:34.

you don't necessarily own, but you kind of just call it up

:59:35.:59:37.

whenever you need a vehicle to pop to the shops or do some

:59:38.:59:41.

It will drive itself to you, pick you up, and when you are done

:59:42.:59:45.

with it you can just let it go itself.

:59:46.:59:50.

And we will have to stop the CES coverage right there,

:59:51.:59:53.

because this is the short cut of Click.

:59:54.:59:55.

In the meantime, you can follow us on Twitter.

:59:56.:00:02.

Thank you very much for watching, and we will see you soon.

:00:03.:00:29.

Hello, this is Breakfast, with Rachel Burden and Jon Kay.

:00:30.:00:32.

The British Red Cross warns of a humanitarian crisis in NHS

:00:33.:00:34.

The charity says the Government needs to provide more money

:00:35.:00:40.

It is after dozens of A departments were forced to divert

:00:41.:00:44.

Good morning, it is Saturday 7 January.

:00:45.:01:03.

Also ahead: An American army veteran has been arrested after five people

:01:04.:01:06.

were shot dead at Fort Lauderdale airport in Florida.

:01:07.:01:14.

Donald Trump promises to look at ways of combating future cyber

:01:15.:01:17.

attacks on US elections, after a briefing from intelligence

:01:18.:01:19.

A bump in the road - councils predict a huge rise

:01:20.:01:23.

in the repair bill for potholes in England and Wales.

:01:24.:01:26.

We will meet the schoolboy putting his new running blade

:01:27.:01:28.

into action, as children in England are given sporting prosthetics

:01:29.:01:31.

In sport, it is a stroll for City in the FA Cup,

:01:32.:01:36.

as Manchester City put five past West Ham United to go

:01:37.:01:39.

Good morning. It is grey and murky out there, with some fog around,

:01:40.:01:58.

especially over the hills. But in contrast to yesterday, nowhere near

:01:59.:02:02.

as cold. I will have all the details for the weekend in around 15

:02:03.:02:04.

minutes. Join me if you can. First, our main story:

:02:05.:02:06.

The British Red Cross is warning of a humanitarian crisis in NHS

:02:07.:02:10.

hospitals in England, and is demanding the Government

:02:11.:02:13.

allocates more money Dozens of A departments

:02:14.:02:15.

were forced to divert ambulances The Royal College of

:02:16.:02:18.

Emergency Medicine says the system is on its knees, but the Department

:02:19.:02:22.

of Health says it is investing more Winter pressure on accident

:02:23.:02:26.

and emergency, nothing new. But the Red Cross says it

:02:27.:02:33.

amounts to a crisis. The charity claims social care cuts

:02:34.:02:49.

mean patients are sent home without the right support,

:02:50.:02:52.

so they end up back in A Red Cross volunteers support NHS

:02:53.:02:55.

staff, and say they have seen patients sent home without clothes,

:02:56.:02:58.

some who don't receive the care they need to get washed,

:02:59.:03:01.

even some who have fallen and not A staff recognise

:03:02.:03:04.

the problems as well. I think the pressures on the NHS,

:03:05.:03:13.

and especially in emergency care, is particularly

:03:14.:03:16.

intense at the moment. But what is a concern

:03:17.:03:18.

is the patients who have been managed within four hours,

:03:19.:03:21.

and then the delays for admission into the hospital bed base,

:03:22.:03:23.

which unfortunately Our staff

:03:24.:03:25.

are working under some pretty intolerable conditions,

:03:26.:03:33.

at times, trying to manage. And sometimes they

:03:34.:03:35.

just can't manage. Figures from NHS England show that

:03:36.:03:37.

overflowing A departments had to close their doors to new patients

:03:38.:03:39.

more than 140 times over Compare that with the

:03:40.:03:43.

same month in 2015. The suspicion is it's a combination

:03:44.:03:46.

of the cuts that we've seen in social care, in community

:03:47.:03:57.

services run by the NHS, and very heavy pressure

:03:58.:03:59.

on general practice. So is the strain on

:04:00.:04:01.

the NHS costing lives? The deaths of two patients

:04:02.:04:04.

on emergency trolleys at Worcestershire Royal Hospital

:04:05.:04:06.

are being investigated. One of them had waited

:04:07.:04:08.

35 hours for a bed. The Department of Health says

:04:09.:04:10.

it is providing billions more every NHS England says plans are in place

:04:11.:04:13.

to deal with the extra demand. Beds are actually not quite as full

:04:14.:04:19.

as they were this time last year, but everyone in the Health Service

:04:20.:04:23.

knows things could get worse before We will have more on this story

:04:24.:04:27.

later in the programme. We will be speaking

:04:28.:04:34.

to Dr Mark Holland from the Society Police in Florida have been

:04:35.:04:37.

questioning a man after five people were killed and eight injured

:04:38.:04:41.

in a shooting at Fort Lauderdale The suspect opened fire

:04:42.:04:44.

in the baggage claim area after seemingly retrieving his

:04:45.:04:52.

weapon from his luggage. The FBI says it is pursuing

:04:53.:04:55.

all leads, and hasn't ruled out Our correspondent, Gary O'Donoghue,

:04:56.:04:58.

reports from Fort Lauderdale. It is a familiar scene

:04:59.:05:03.

at airports the world over, but the baggage claim hall

:05:04.:05:06.

at the Fort Lauderdale Airport turned into a place of death

:05:07.:05:10.

and mayhem, as a lone gunman opened fire on those waiting

:05:11.:05:14.

to collect their luggage. Passengers scattered for cover,

:05:15.:05:16.

hitting the ground, and reports say the assailant had time to reload

:05:17.:05:19.

before opening fire once again, as attempts were made

:05:20.:05:22.

to attend to the wounded. Once he was done with ammunition,

:05:23.:05:38.

he threw the gun down, and I was about ten

:05:39.:05:41.

feet away from him. He basically through the gun

:05:42.:05:43.

onto the ground and laid on the ground face

:05:44.:05:46.

down, spreadeagled. The gunman has been named

:05:47.:05:48.

as 26-year-old Esteban Santiago. Reports say he was carrying

:05:49.:05:50.

a military ID and had a weapon in his checked baggage,

:05:51.:05:53.

which is legal in the United States. One family member said he had been

:05:54.:05:56.

receiving psychological treatment after leaving the National

:05:57.:05:59.

Guard last year. This cowardly, heinous act resulted

:06:00.:06:03.

in the deaths of five people. There were eight more people

:06:04.:06:07.

injured by way of gunshot, that were transported

:06:08.:06:10.

to local hospitals. In his first reaction

:06:11.:06:12.

to the shooting, President Obama said he was heartbroken

:06:13.:06:15.

for the families. These kinds of tragedies have

:06:16.:06:19.

happened too often during the eight The FBI says it is ruling nothing

:06:20.:06:22.

out, including terrorism. But the agency has confirmed it had

:06:23.:06:29.

prior contact with Santiago in November, when he was referred

:06:30.:06:35.

for a mental health assessment. The ease with which he was able

:06:36.:06:38.

to transport and use a weapon in an airport will raise serious

:06:39.:06:42.

concerns about public safety. We can join Gary outside

:06:43.:06:48.

Fort Lauderdale International Gary, this story has been

:06:49.:06:50.

developing overnight. Lets pick up on the point you made

:06:51.:07:00.

at the end of your peace. Lots of people in the UK will be alarmed and

:07:01.:07:04.

astonished to hear that you can carry your weapon in baggage and

:07:05.:07:08.

just pick it up at reclaim in the States. How does it work? Well, it

:07:09.:07:18.

is legal to transport a firearm in your checked baggage here in the

:07:19.:07:21.

United States. There are restrictions. You have to declare it

:07:22.:07:25.

to the airline when you arrive. It has to be locked inside a hard case.

:07:26.:07:31.

It has to be unloaded. You can carry ammunition with it, and of course

:07:32.:07:35.

that means once you get to baggage claim at the other end you can get

:07:36.:07:40.

it. It seems what happened here is Santiago did go and get his

:07:41.:07:45.

semiautomatic out of his case, out of his bag, go back into the baggage

:07:46.:07:49.

hall and start shooting pretty indiscriminately. And I think it

:07:50.:07:53.

will raise questions even here. These shootings are not infrequent

:07:54.:07:58.

here as window in the United States, and there will be calls for gun

:07:59.:08:01.

control, and there will be pushed back from the gun lobby. That is a

:08:02.:08:06.

pretty familiar dance. But I think what people will wonder is, look, we

:08:07.:08:11.

put all this security in place when people are going into the airport.

:08:12.:08:14.

Should it be quite so easy for somebody to get it out of their bag

:08:15.:08:19.

at the other end and still be in the airport and be able to cause this

:08:20.:08:24.

much death and mayhem. Thank you very much indeed.

:08:25.:08:25.

US intelligence officials have released a report that claims

:08:26.:08:28.

Vladimir Putin personally ordered a cyber campaign to try and help

:08:29.:08:30.

Donald Trump win the presidential election.

:08:31.:08:32.

Last night, after being briefed on the findings, Mr Trump said that

:08:33.:08:35.

hacking had absolutely no impact on the election result,

:08:36.:08:38.

but promised to set up a team to stop future attacks,

:08:39.:08:41.

The report from American intelligence claims

:08:42.:08:52.

Russia's President, Vladimir Putin, personally ordered what it called

:08:53.:08:54.

an influence campaign to help Donald Trump's chances of winning

:08:55.:08:57.

The President-elect had earlier described the Russian hacking claims

:08:58.:09:05.

as a political witch-hunt by his opponents.

:09:06.:09:07.

At Trump Tower, he met America's top intelligence officials

:09:08.:09:10.

They say Russia's actions included hacking into the e-mail accounts

:09:11.:09:17.

of the Democratic National Committee and top Democrats, and using

:09:18.:09:20.

intermediaries such as WikiLeaks to release the information.

:09:21.:09:24.

Russia has previously denied this, and WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange

:09:25.:09:26.

has said before that Moscow is not the source.

:09:27.:09:33.

After the briefing, Mr Trump did not single out Russia.

:09:34.:09:35.

And the incoming vice president says the US

:09:36.:10:02.

The President-elect has made it very clear that we're going to take

:10:03.:10:06.

aggressive action in the early days of our new administration to combat

:10:07.:10:09.

cyber attacks and protect the security of the American people

:10:10.:10:12.

from this type of intrusion in the future.

:10:13.:10:19.

Donald Trump said he had tremendous respect for the work and service

:10:20.:10:23.

done by those in the US intelligence community.

:10:24.:10:25.

But, with two weeks to go until he moves into the White House,

:10:26.:10:28.

questions remain over how they will all work together to keep

:10:29.:10:31.

The repair bill to fix the country's potholes could soon

:10:32.:10:39.

That is according to councils in England and Wales,

:10:40.:10:45.

who say the Government should pay for the repairs from fuel duty.

:10:46.:10:49.

The Government says it us already putting ?250 million into fixing

:10:50.:10:52.

the problem, but the Local Government Association says

:10:53.:10:54.

that is not enough, as Duncan Kennedy reports.

:10:55.:10:59.

Councils fix 2 million potholes every year.

:11:00.:11:03.

That is about 12,000 for every local authority in England and Wales.

:11:04.:11:06.

Now, the councils claim the repair bill could soon reach ?14 billion.

:11:07.:11:17.

Hard-pressed councils, who are mending, you know,

:11:18.:11:24.

a pothole every five seconds in this country,

:11:25.:11:26.

just cannot get to the core of the problem, which is actually

:11:27.:11:30.

many of our roads are just being patched now.

:11:31.:11:32.

The councils say the Government must do more to help,

:11:33.:11:41.

and suggest increasing fuel duty by a couple of pence a litre,

:11:42.:11:44.

a figure they say the public would support.

:11:45.:11:46.

But it is not just the cost of repairing all these potholes that

:11:47.:11:50.

Today's report also found that the time it is taking appears

:11:51.:11:54.

to be on the rise as well, going up from ten years in 2006

:11:55.:11:58.

Last year, the Government announced a ?250 million pothole repair fund

:11:59.:12:02.

to help 100 councils fixed 4 million potholes.

:12:03.:12:10.

But today's report by local councils suggest that is not enough,

:12:11.:12:13.

and that the pothole problem is actually getting worse.

:12:14.:12:22.

Michelle Obama has delivered her final speech as First Lady

:12:23.:12:25.

of the United States, with an impassioned call on young

:12:26.:12:28.

people to have hope and fight for their rights.

:12:29.:12:30.

Speaking at a ceremony in the White House, she ended

:12:31.:12:33.

tearfully, saying the role of First Lady had been the greatest

:12:34.:12:36.

Empower yourselves with a good education, then get out there and

:12:37.:12:47.

use that education to build a country worthy of your boundless

:12:48.:12:51.

promise. Lead by example, with hope. Never fear. And know that I will be

:12:52.:12:58.

with you, rooting for you, and working to support you for the rest

:12:59.:13:04.

of my life. So I want to close today by simply saying thank you. Thank

:13:05.:13:07.

you for everything you do for our kids and for our country. Being your

:13:08.:13:12.

first lady has been the greatest honour of my life, and I hope I have

:13:13.:13:15.

made you proud. There was a lot of Facebook chatter

:13:16.:13:25.

a week ago saying that she was considering standing in some kind of

:13:26.:13:28.

political role. I think there would be huge support for her, but not

:13:29.:13:33.

straightaway. Definitely support from the lady behind you, gearing

:13:34.:13:35.

up! Patients sent home without clothes,

:13:36.:13:38.

others suffering falls and not being found for days,

:13:39.:13:40.

still more not washed because there is no carer

:13:41.:13:43.

there to help them. That is the damning

:13:44.:13:45.

indictment on the NHS from the British Red Cross,

:13:46.:13:47.

which has called the resulting strain on hospitals in England

:13:48.:13:50.

a humanitarian crisis. Let's speak now to Dr Mark Holland

:13:51.:13:52.

from the Society for Acute Medicine. Humanitarian crisis? It is a strong

:13:53.:14:16.

term. It is probably not 1 million miles away from the truth. I think

:14:17.:14:21.

we've been predicting that we would face a winter from hell. I think

:14:22.:14:25.

that time has arrived. I think we saw the last two Winters being very

:14:26.:14:31.

bad. We know that we have got record numbers of people in hospital beds

:14:32.:14:35.

who are fit to go home but there is no social care to get them out of

:14:36.:14:39.

hospital. Therefore when people arrive at hospital there is a bed

:14:40.:14:43.

available for them to go into. And we have seen over the last week or

:14:44.:14:47.

so that people who should be in a speciality bed are ending up in a

:14:48.:14:51.

non- speciality bed, or there are beds being created in the hospital,

:14:52.:14:56.

what we call contingency beds. And the people I speak to across the

:14:57.:15:00.

country, e-mails I have received this week and things I have been

:15:01.:15:04.

reading in the media make us conclude that probably the term

:15:05.:15:07.

humanitarian crisis has some validity to it. It is very strong

:15:08.:15:12.

words, as you say. There are obviously some hospitals which are

:15:13.:15:15.

getting it right, which are managing to link up with social services,

:15:16.:15:19.

which are getting people out of hospitals and into good care. Why is

:15:20.:15:23.

that not being practised everywhere? I think it is being practised

:15:24.:15:26.

everywhere but I think that the structures across the country are

:15:27.:15:33.

different so we know that there are some organisations where hospitals,

:15:34.:15:36.

acute care settings and social care are lined up in a proper, managerial

:15:37.:15:40.

structure. And that is the right thing to do. Why is that not

:15:41.:15:43.

happening everywhere? I don't know why it is not happening everywhere

:15:44.:15:46.

but it should be happening everywhere. Absolutely it should be

:15:47.:15:49.

happening everywhere and no one should deny that that is the case.

:15:50.:15:52.

The government says there is more money going on, the systems should

:15:53.:15:56.

be working. They deny it is a humanitarian crisis but they say we

:15:57.:15:59.

shouldn't be in a situation where there are these kinds of problems.

:16:00.:16:02.

The point we have reached at the moment over the Christmas and New

:16:03.:16:06.

Year period that they are describing as the humanitarian crisis is a

:16:07.:16:13.

build-up of what has been going on for a while. So as we went into this

:16:14.:16:20.

autumn it was 6000 people to the discharge, and although they say

:16:21.:16:23.

that there is more money going into the system, I think there is some

:16:24.:16:27.

debate about how those figures are actually quoted, and that quite

:16:28.:16:30.

often money is moved from one Budget to another Budget. So for example a

:16:31.:16:34.

couple of years ago we had the better care fund, where money was

:16:35.:16:38.

taken from the acute sector to give to the social care sector. And in

:16:39.:16:42.

different areas, so for example we are based here in the north-west, in

:16:43.:16:46.

Manchester, and actually you have got lots of people in this part of

:16:47.:16:50.

the world who have quite significant health issues of a day-to-day basis.

:16:51.:16:53.

So across the country, the actual distribution of health and

:16:54.:16:59.

healthiness isn't the same. And if you get to areas where you get more

:17:00.:17:03.

stress on the system, that is going to put more stress on particular

:17:04.:17:06.

areas at particular times of more stress.

:17:07.:17:11.

What about the role of families in all of this to support people

:17:12.:17:18.

leaving hospital? At the moment I look after and 89-year-old father

:17:19.:17:22.

who was in hospital for six weeks. To trigger social care was the

:17:23.:17:28.

devil's work. When you get your hands on social care and if you are

:17:29.:17:32.

paying for it yourself it can often not always be that affordable for

:17:33.:17:38.

people. I think families do play a part but apparently about half of

:17:39.:17:46.

the people who are nonprofessional carers have significant health

:17:47.:17:51.

problems of their own. Many people will think that yes, we get pinned

:17:52.:17:54.

points in the winter because the weather is bored and people fall in

:17:55.:17:58.

flippin' you get flu outbreaks in that kind of thing but it has not

:17:59.:18:02.

been particularly cold and there have been no major flu epidemics.

:18:03.:18:06.

Why this year? Why humanitarian crisis right now? Because we have

:18:07.:18:11.

struggled over the last couple of years and we have had a buildup in

:18:12.:18:15.

the number of people who are medically fit for discharge from

:18:16.:18:18.

hospital. We have many people are now acute hospices at the moment who

:18:19.:18:23.

do not need to be in those beds because they need social care. And

:18:24.:18:26.

you say this is overwhelmingly the reason that is going on? I think it

:18:27.:18:32.

is the big reason. It gives us a win to stress that we face every year

:18:33.:18:36.

and everyone in the NHS will get stressed every year. But this year

:18:37.:18:41.

it has come to a point where we have so few beds in the system to bring

:18:42.:18:45.

people into that it has gotten to a tipping point which we have

:18:46.:18:48.

predicted a long time. Thank you very much. We have had a few cold

:18:49.:18:56.

stunts but a lot of foggy weather as well. Quite murky out there and if

:18:57.:19:01.

you look quite carefully you can just about make out Helen against

:19:02.:19:05.

the light. Good morning. Good morning. Yes, this was sent in from

:19:06.:19:10.

a weather Watch are already out and about this morning. Thank you. Just

:19:11.:19:14.

to convey the fact that it is very murky out there. This is

:19:15.:19:18.

Staffordshire. We are concerned about the extent of the fog,

:19:19.:19:25.

particularly church, Lancashire. Down to 100 metres. A significant

:19:26.:19:29.

motorway network in that part of the country so it is likely to cause

:19:30.:19:33.

some issues and it could well have an impact on the airports as well.

:19:34.:19:37.

Further south, the remnants of a weather front or around. So it is

:19:38.:19:43.

damp and murky it is quite damp across southern parts of the country

:19:44.:19:47.

and that rain and drizzle will take awhile to die away. Possibly

:19:48.:19:50.

lingering for the day. Then we have met and mist across north-west of

:19:51.:19:54.

England. Further north still it is grey and cloudy. Slightly better

:19:55.:19:59.

chance at seeing a little bit of brightness coming through across the

:20:00.:20:04.

eastern side and north-eastern parts of England but on the whole we have

:20:05.:20:09.

a blanket cloud cover. It could be grey. In contrast to yesterday when

:20:10.:20:13.

temperatures reached about miners six, they are currently at eight or

:20:14.:20:18.

nine at the moment. The sunshine will not have much influence but

:20:19.:20:22.

eight or 10 degrees is up on what we have been seeing. A little bit above

:20:23.:20:27.

average. It will not feel that much warmer because of the cloud but not

:20:28.:20:31.

as bitter as it has been. As we go through the evening and overnight

:20:32.:20:35.

the benefit of the cloud is that the temperature will not fall. We should

:20:36.:20:40.

largely, largely beef frost free. It could be cold in the glance of

:20:41.:20:43.

Scotland but there is increasing weather front coming through here in

:20:44.:20:47.

the latter part of tomorrow. As the breeze strengthens although it would

:20:48.:20:51.

be misty murky to start the day I am hopeful that the increasing breeze

:20:52.:20:54.

that will help to break it up a little bit, particularly in the

:20:55.:20:58.

north of the country and allow some brightness to come through. Again,

:20:59.:21:01.

the second half of the weekend for most of us seems cloudy although I

:21:02.:21:05.

not like to rule out the odd limb of sunshine from time to time. Usable

:21:06.:21:09.

weather, dry and relatively mild compared to what we have had and

:21:10.:21:13.

compared with the rest of Europe where we have potential freezing

:21:14.:21:16.

rain through today across the low countries. That cold air vent

:21:17.:21:19.

tomorrow really stagnates. In fact it is that today is well but it is

:21:20.:21:22.

stagnating across central and eastern parts of Europe. As the cold

:21:23.:21:26.

area will stay across Eastern Europe. Wetter and windy weather

:21:27.:21:30.

heading our way into next week. That will clear the fog we but for the

:21:31.:21:34.

meantime, largely dry but murky. We hope we will see you through the

:21:35.:21:36.

morning despite the fog. Donald Trump says he's had

:21:37.:21:39.

a constructive meeting with American intelligence officials,

:21:40.:21:42.

who've released a report saying Russia was behind a series of cyber

:21:43.:21:43.

attacks designed to influence The President-elect insists

:21:44.:21:46.

the hacking played no part in his victory, but says he'll

:21:47.:21:50.

appoint a team to devise ways of combating any

:21:51.:21:54.

future interference. Let's remind ourselves what's been

:21:55.:21:58.

happening over the last 18 months. Back in September 2015,

:21:59.:22:01.

An FBI agent found a Russian-linked In July 2016, Wikileaks released

:22:02.:22:06.

private e-mails from Democratic officials just days before

:22:07.:22:18.

the National Convention. In October 2016, The FBI and the CIA

:22:19.:22:22.

announce they believe the Russian government was behind the hacking,

:22:23.:22:25.

and their aim was to interfere So what does Donald

:22:26.:22:32.

Trump think of it all? Well, he's made it clear he doesn't

:22:33.:22:37.

believe intelligence chiefs, tweeting only this week:

:22:38.:22:39.

The "Intelligence" briefing on so-called "Russian hacking"

:22:40.:22:41.

was delayed until Friday, perhaps more time

:22:42.:22:43.

needed to build a case. And less than 24-hours before that

:22:44.:22:46.

briefing one of his top intelligence advisers - former CIA

:22:47.:22:54.

director James Woolsey - They were able to come up with the

:22:55.:23:07.

identities of the intermediary is between the Russian government and

:23:08.:23:10.

the people who did some of the hacking. They did not have that

:23:11.:23:16.

before. And that, I think, was one thing that got the attention of a

:23:17.:23:18.

lot of people including me. Dr Leslie Vinjamuri from the US

:23:19.:23:19.

and the Americas Programme at Chatham House joins us now

:23:20.:23:22.

from our London newsroom. Thank you very much for your time.

:23:23.:23:29.

Let us look at the evidence here for Russian involvement in all of this.

:23:30.:23:34.

The CAI and the FBI, the National Security agency believes this was

:23:35.:23:37.

directed not just from Moscow but from Vladimir Putin himself. Looking

:23:38.:23:41.

across the report that we have all been able to see there is not much

:23:42.:23:47.

evidence of that. Well, remember that those are very considerable

:23:48.:23:49.

problems always her intelligence which is how much can you declassify

:23:50.:23:53.

and put into the public domain without putting at risk your sources

:23:54.:23:57.

and/or methods? And the report is very clear that, of course, the

:23:58.:24:02.

information that they are ultimately relying on for the high confidence

:24:03.:24:07.

they express cannot be declassify. The report is thorough, pointed and

:24:08.:24:11.

clear in its findings but you are correct, there is a lot of

:24:12.:24:15.

information that is simply not there because it cannot be declassified.

:24:16.:24:19.

Tell us more about the influence campaign they describe. They are

:24:20.:24:24.

various means that alleged to have been used by the Russians to

:24:25.:24:28.

influence on the outcome of the election. There are cyber attacks in

:24:29.:24:33.

which they successfully got into the probity malls and the e-mail is of

:24:34.:24:38.

many top party officials in the credit National committee as well as

:24:39.:24:42.

Hillary Clinton's campaign manager, John Podesta. And then there is what

:24:43.:24:46.

they refer to as an influence campaign which was aimed at putting

:24:47.:24:49.

the information, this information into the public domain to try and

:24:50.:24:55.

undermine the public's face in the electoral process. There were trolls

:24:56.:25:01.

who were targeting particular individuals who were seen as being

:25:02.:25:04.

putting information out against Russian interests. And so there was

:25:05.:25:09.

a very broad and sustained campaign over the course of many months to

:25:10.:25:13.

really shake the information that the public had access to, and the

:25:14.:25:18.

United States especially. We now know there was all sorts of fake and

:25:19.:25:23.

false news being bandied around on all sorts of social media outlets

:25:24.:25:27.

that were not necessarily connected to this particular Russian campaign

:25:28.:25:30.

is alleged by American security services but the critical question

:25:31.:25:34.

is did this impact on the outcome of the election? On added appeaser is

:25:35.:25:39.

no conclusion. Remember, the point of the report is not to contest the

:25:40.:25:44.

electoral results. The point is to say that there is confirmed evidence

:25:45.:25:47.

of a high level of confidence that the integrity of the electoral

:25:48.:25:53.

process has been hampered, that individuals, that the end of e-mail

:25:54.:25:57.

was hacked and that there was a clear violation of cyberspace. Cyber

:25:58.:26:03.

attacks are crucial and very secure, a very clear risk to any democracy

:26:04.:26:10.

when it comes to protecting the electoral process. Briefly, how does

:26:11.:26:14.

the President-elect deal with this now? You cannot seem to be at odds

:26:15.:26:19.

with the security services client he? And I think this is one of the

:26:20.:26:23.

concerns for the state of affairs and now which is that Donald Trump,

:26:24.:26:26.

even before he was briefed yesterday in late afternoon had really gone on

:26:27.:26:31.

the attack without seeing the intelligence. He has rejected the

:26:32.:26:35.

idea that he needs daily intelligence briefings as this

:26:36.:26:39.

information is come out when President Obama initially issued

:26:40.:26:44.

sanctions against Russia. His instinct has been to take it

:26:45.:26:47.

personally, to go on the attack against the intelligence community.

:26:48.:26:51.

This is deeply problematic, considering that this is a man who

:26:52.:26:55.

very soon will be president of the United States of America who will be

:26:56.:27:01.

in a position to rely on the intelligence agencies and a healthy

:27:02.:27:04.

degree of scepticism is wise but as was said in the committee hearings,

:27:05.:27:10.

disparagement is something altogether very different. This is,

:27:11.:27:14.

I think, a very useful way of characterising what the

:27:15.:27:16.

President-elect has been doing, which is to disparage the integrity

:27:17.:27:21.

and undermine the confidence, try to undermine the confidence in the

:27:22.:27:24.

intelligence agencies across the United States. Thank you very much.

:27:25.:27:29.

It is extraordinary when you read the report, it is like a work of

:27:30.:27:33.

fiction almost. And as soon as he stopped tweeting about that he

:27:34.:27:37.

started tweeting about the new series of the presence. In the

:27:38.:27:41.

ratings having dropped from when he did the show. -- new series of the

:27:42.:27:43.

apprentice. For the first time, the NHS

:27:44.:27:44.

is providing disabled children with prosthetic limbs, that

:27:45.:27:46.

are specially designed for sport. NHS England says it hopes to equip

:27:47.:27:50.

several 100 children a year with the limbs, to allow them

:27:51.:27:53.

to participate in more sport. Here's our Health

:27:54.:27:56.

correspondent Robert Pigott. How have you been doing since you

:27:57.:28:05.

had your leg? When Ben Moore made the decision at the age of ten to

:28:06.:28:08.

have the stunted right leg amputated, his dream of a future in

:28:09.:28:12.

sport seemed remote. Would you like to put it on for me? Three years on,

:28:13.:28:18.

he is one of the first children to receive a running blade on the NHS.

:28:19.:28:22.

As if he were changing issue, he can swap his false leg for the blade and

:28:23.:28:27.

feel a new freedom and energy. This spring is the bit that makes me go

:28:28.:28:32.

faster. I used to not be able to, like, be able to run as fast or able

:28:33.:28:38.

to kick a ball as well. But now I have a good amount of power in my

:28:39.:28:42.

leg and I have got the right size. So I can do loads of skills and hit

:28:43.:28:50.

a ball really well. The blade in the treatment cost around ?1000. But

:28:51.:28:55.

Clare Johnson, the expert in prosthetic limbs says the NHS will

:28:56.:28:58.

more than recoup the cost by keeping children active. We hope that will

:28:59.:29:03.

give them a level playing field so that he can compete with his peers

:29:04.:29:07.

and be able to participate in a lot more sport. It does help in the

:29:08.:29:11.

wider scheme of things and, hopefully, give a longer longevity

:29:12.:29:17.

to their lives by giving them the opportunity to do sport. Ben is

:29:18.:29:24.

among 2500 children in England limbs that are either absent or do not

:29:25.:29:29.

work properly. The NHS hopes to fit several 100 of them with a sport

:29:30.:29:32.

prosthetic every year. The scheme not only opens the way to sport for

:29:33.:29:37.

a group of disabled youngsters but comes with an added message. At a

:29:38.:29:41.

time when so many teenagers are couch potatoes, it makes an example

:29:42.:29:44.

of an extraordinary few who have overcome all the odds to carve a

:29:45.:29:50.

life in sport. A new blade for me can do a lot more than my prosthetic

:29:51.:29:57.

can do. Now I can run with more freedom. His mother says that

:29:58.:30:00.

running blade can change a disabled child's whole outlook on life. He

:30:01.:30:06.

seems more confident and more eager to get out and about. He is wanting

:30:07.:30:15.

to put it on and go out more and do more sport, do more activity. Now he

:30:16.:30:20.

has the blade, the sky is the limit. Ben says he is now training for the

:30:21.:30:26.

Paralympics. He is aiming for 2020 for the very least. 2020? Who knows.

:30:27.:30:34.

He will be there, surely. Bound to be. Coming up for the end of the

:30:35.:30:40.

programme. Two years ago he was running boot camps in his local

:30:41.:30:41.

park. Now Joe Wicks is a publishing

:30:42.:30:43.

and social media sensation. He'll be here to give us his recipe

:30:44.:30:45.

for success just before ten. Hello, this is Breakfast

:30:46.:30:49.

with Jon Kay and Rachel Burden. Coming up before 8:00am,

:30:50.:31:39.

Helen will have the weather. But first, at 7:30am,

:31:40.:31:42.

a summary of this morning's main The British Red Cross is warning

:31:43.:31:45.

of a humanitarian crisis in NHS hospitals in England,

:31:46.:31:49.

and is demanding the Government allocates more money

:31:50.:31:51.

to improve social care. Dozens of A departments

:31:52.:31:53.

were forced to divert ambulances to other hospitals last week,

:31:54.:31:56.

while one patient died after spending 35

:31:57.:31:58.

hours on a trolley. The Department of Health says

:31:59.:32:00.

it is investing more money But Dr Mark Holland from the Society

:32:01.:32:03.

for Acute Medicine says that it has And we have seen over the last week

:32:04.:32:25.

or so that people who should be in a speciality bed

:32:26.:32:34.

are ending up in a non-speciality bed, or there are beds being created

:32:35.:32:36.

in the hospital, And the people I speak

:32:37.:32:39.

to across the country, e-mails I have received this week

:32:40.:32:43.

and things I have been reading in the media make us conclude that

:32:44.:32:46.

probably the term humanitarian Police in Florida have been

:32:47.:32:49.

questioning a man after five people were killed and eight injured

:32:50.:32:54.

in a shooting at Fort Lauderdale The suspect opened fire

:32:55.:32:57.

in the baggage claim area after seemingly retrieving his

:32:58.:33:11.

weapon from his luggage. The FBI says it is pursuing

:33:12.:33:13.

all leads and hasn't ruled out US intelligence officials have

:33:14.:33:16.

released a report that claims Vladimir Putin personally ordered

:33:17.:33:20.

a cyber campaign to try and help Donald Trump win the

:33:21.:33:23.

presidential election. Last night, after being briefed

:33:24.:33:24.

on the findings, Mr Trump said that hacking had had absolutely no impact

:33:25.:33:28.

on the election outcome. His running mate, Mike Pence,

:33:29.:33:30.

says a team will be set up A killer whale which was involved

:33:31.:33:34.

in the deaths of three people and featured in an influential

:33:35.:33:38.

documentary has died Tilikum featured in the film

:33:39.:33:40.

Blackfish, which led to a global campaign against the keeping

:33:41.:33:45.

of orcas in captivity. Sea World says staff are deeply

:33:46.:33:47.

saddened by the death of the whale, which was thought

:33:48.:33:50.

to be 36 years old. Those are the main

:33:51.:33:55.

stories this morning. loads more to come. Thank you for

:33:56.:34:05.

joining us. It is time for the sport. A big weekend, and Mike is

:34:06.:34:12.

warming his hands. I am on the tea leaves, trying to predict where the

:34:13.:34:18.

FA Cup upsets are going to be. Some saying Preston and Bolton, some

:34:19.:34:22.

saying the north-west. It is a bag, what are you talking about? There is

:34:23.:34:29.

too much water in it. Somewhere there will be an upset. Some player

:34:30.:34:34.

will be making the back players tomorrow. Mystic mike. A new career.

:34:35.:34:48.

Sam Allardyce going back to his old club.

:34:49.:34:50.

FA Cup third round weekend got under way, with Manchester City the first

:34:51.:34:54.

side through to round four, thanks to a 5-0 thrashing handed out

:34:55.:34:57.

City were already out of sight by half-time,

:34:58.:35:00.

leading 3-0, thanks to an own goal, a Yaya Toure penalty,

:35:01.:35:03.

The gloss on an impressive night was added by John Stones.

:35:04.:35:08.

The England defender scored his first goal since a summer

:35:09.:35:10.

He needed goal-line technology to confirm that he had actually

:35:11.:35:14.

Hopefully it can help us to make our players believers,

:35:15.:35:18.

that they are good enough to play every game, and try,

:35:19.:35:21.

in both our fans and the people in Manchester City, and they can

:35:22.:35:24.

They know what happened in the past, but we are good guys.

:35:25.:35:29.

So they run a lot, fight a lot, playing good.

:35:30.:35:31.

It will be a special FA Cup reunion today for one of the members

:35:32.:35:47.

of the treble-winning Manchester United team of 1999.

:35:48.:35:49.

Former Netherlands centre-half Jaap Stam is now the manager

:35:50.:35:52.

of championship side Reading, who go to Old Trafford hunting

:35:53.:35:54.

As a player, there is nothing better than to play over there,

:35:55.:36:02.

in a stadium like that in front of so many fans.

:36:03.:36:05.

And we know, as well, we have our own fans over

:36:06.:36:08.

Hopefully they are joining in and supporting us.

:36:09.:36:15.

Non-League Barrow are playing Rochdale, and non-League Eastleigh

:36:16.:36:19.

travel to Championship side Brentford.

:36:20.:36:21.

Sir Andy Murray will play world number two Novak Djokovic

:36:22.:36:34.

in the final of the Qatar Open today.

:36:35.:36:36.

Murray beat Czech Tomas Berdych in straight sets in their semi-final,

:36:37.:36:39.

The win was Murray's 28th in a row on the ATP Tour,

:36:40.:36:44.

and another title and victory over his main rival would be

:36:45.:36:47.

the ideal preparation for the Australian Open.

:36:48.:36:49.

We played at the end of last year. The ultimate goal was to find a way

:36:50.:37:05.

to win the match. Maybe at the beginning of the year

:37:06.:37:06.

you are focusing a little bit more on yourself, and how

:37:07.:37:10.

you are playing, and how you want to play, moving

:37:11.:37:12.

into the Aussie Open, rather than just solely

:37:13.:37:15.

focusing on the outcome. Newcastle Falcons produced

:37:16.:37:21.

a stunning late comeback to beat Bath 24-22 in rugby

:37:22.:37:23.

union's Aviva Premiership. Bath led by 12 points halfway

:37:24.:37:25.

through the second half, but Ben Harris barged his way over

:37:26.:37:28.

to draw Newcastle level, Man of the match Joel Hodgson,

:37:29.:37:31.

kept his nerve to slot home the conversation and send Bath

:37:32.:37:36.

to their third defeat in a row. Scarlets also came from behind,

:37:37.:37:39.

to beat Ulster 16-13, Scarlets scrum-half Aled Davies

:37:40.:37:49.

was on the receiving end of a high tackle as he tried

:37:50.:37:56.

to cross the line. Elsewhere, Leinster beat Zebre,

:37:57.:37:58.

and Newport Gwent Dragons beat Earlier we saw how

:37:59.:38:01.

Sir Andy Murray got on. This afternoon, Sir Mo Farah

:38:02.:38:14.

is in action at the Edinburgh The four-time Olympic champion,

:38:15.:38:17.

who insists he is happy just to be called Mo, was surprisingly beaten

:38:18.:38:20.

into second place last year. He is using the event as part

:38:21.:38:23.

of his preparation for the track World Championships in London

:38:24.:38:27.

later this year, and admits he will have his work cut out

:38:28.:38:29.

against some cross-country Them guys will try and hunt me down

:38:30.:38:32.

and beat me as quick as possible. That is what makes cross-country

:38:33.:38:44.

exciting. I am not going to come

:38:45.:38:51.

out there and go, oh, I will fight for it,

:38:52.:38:56.

but it suits certain athletes Now, as the big teams enter

:38:57.:39:00.

the FA Cup this weekend, I am sure we will see some

:39:01.:39:12.

silky skills on display, but none as spectacular as those

:39:13.:39:15.

performed by players in the sport It has been one of Asia's biggest

:39:16.:39:19.

sports for centuries, It is Asia's best-kept secret,

:39:20.:39:22.

the sport that has been part of the culture in countries

:39:23.:39:30.

like Malaysia since the 15th century, combining football skills

:39:31.:39:32.

with the moves of kung fu. And now, sepak takraw is taking

:39:33.:39:35.

off in the UK as well. It is linking the martial art,

:39:36.:39:45.

or the art of the body, with this game, because you need

:39:46.:39:48.

to have the agility, First of all, you are learning

:39:49.:39:51.

the basics of kicking up, really. It does hurt, I can tell you that,

:39:52.:39:58.

a little bit, because... This ball is quite hard,

:39:59.:40:06.

it is plastic now. Slightly softer than the original

:40:07.:40:15.

ones, which were made of rattan, If you play football,

:40:16.:40:19.

therefore you can play this So it is football meets volleyball,

:40:20.:40:22.

and has now spread across the world. And who better to recruit

:40:23.:40:28.

for the newest team forming this year than freestyle football world

:40:29.:40:31.

recordholder John Farnworth. Now, the size of the

:40:32.:40:44.

ball was a surprise. In matches it is only three a side,

:40:45.:40:46.

and you only have three touches per team, before it has

:40:47.:41:10.

to go over the net. You do have set positions,

:41:11.:41:13.

the server, the feeder The flexibility these guys

:41:14.:41:20.

possess is incredible. They are getting their legs

:41:21.:41:37.

way above their head. It is like what Zlatan

:41:38.:41:40.

Ibrahimovic does. And if we win the point,

:41:41.:41:41.

the celebration. So three touches, and the way to do

:41:42.:42:08.

it is to count to three in Malay. I need to bring the ball in and show

:42:09.:42:14.

you how hard at how small it is. I think they have one of those at

:42:15.:42:18.

home, my husband used to live in Indonesia so we have one of those in

:42:19.:42:23.

the house. I think what we need is met. High kicks around the TV! With

:42:24.:42:27.

or without the ball is. Have the cold and dark January

:42:28.:42:31.

nights left you craving sunshine? If the answer is yes,

:42:32.:42:34.

you are not alone. Today is predicted to be

:42:35.:42:36.

the busiest day of the year It is being dubbed Sunshine

:42:37.:42:39.

Saturday, with over 27,000 of us But is it really

:42:40.:42:43.

the best day to book? The Independent's travel editor

:42:44.:42:55.

Simon Calder and Alistair Rowland from Co-operative

:42:56.:42:58.

Travel join us now. Good morning. Sunshine, it doesn't

:42:59.:43:10.

feel like Sunshine Sunday looking at the weather forecast but you are

:43:11.:43:14.

going to be busy. Yes, it is a perfect day. We like the fog, we

:43:15.:43:22.

don't like the snow. Today 1.5% of all transactions happen, so it is a

:43:23.:43:27.

great day for booking. Is it something as simple as the weather

:43:28.:43:31.

impact on sales, as people look at the window and think another grade

:43:32.:43:36.

a? I think it is an odd thing that largely the stock which is available

:43:37.:43:40.

has been on sale since last May. -- grey day. It is today people think

:43:41.:43:46.

about it more and today is the biggest single day. You notice the

:43:47.:43:52.

adverts on TV, and if we are booking or thinking of booking is this a

:43:53.:43:56.

good time to do it, to get deals, or are they cashing in on the fact that

:43:57.:44:00.

we are desperate to go somewhere? Well, a bit of both, really. It is a

:44:01.:44:05.

great day if you're selling holidays, and there are some good

:44:06.:44:11.

deals out there. The thing is, of course, that if you are constrained

:44:12.:44:14.

to travel during the school holidays, then price is basically

:44:15.:44:17.

doubled compared with term time. And if you know the resort you want to

:44:18.:44:22.

go to, the property you want to go to, you may well find that there is

:44:23.:44:26.

a really good deal out there. You have to make sure that you are

:44:27.:44:29.

counting all the extra costs, if they are charging you extra for

:44:30.:44:33.

baggage and so on, worked that out. But do be slightly sceptical. When

:44:34.:44:37.

they say free child places you might find they are only available at the

:44:38.:44:41.

very tail end of August or that the price has gone up. And talking about

:44:42.:44:46.

the discounts you will be offered, unlike a car or a camera you can't

:44:47.:44:50.

say that is how much the holiday should cost. Holidays are very fluid

:44:51.:44:55.

pricing so it can come up as well as down. If you are tempted by a low

:44:56.:44:59.

deposit, and with credit card bills coming in who wouldn't be, bear in

:45:00.:45:02.

mind that if you subsequently decide to cancel the trip holiday company

:45:03.:45:06.

will come after you for the full deposit so even if you don't get

:45:07.:45:09.

your holiday there will be asking you for more money. Have you got any

:45:10.:45:13.

idea of the average spend for a family on holiday these days? The

:45:14.:45:18.

average price for a holiday somewhere between ?450 and ?500 per

:45:19.:45:22.

person but that is spread across the year. It tends to be much higher in

:45:23.:45:25.

the school holidays and significantly lower in term time.

:45:26.:45:30.

People say the travel industry are so greedy, that is not the case.

:45:31.:45:34.

Most companies lose money during the term times and they only make it up

:45:35.:45:36.

during the school holidays. What you say to that? There will so

:45:37.:45:47.

people, millions of families who feel like they are being done over.

:45:48.:45:51.

Balking earlier is better than booking late. Particularly this year

:45:52.:45:57.

and last year. Western Mediterranean resorts are filling up. So to get

:45:58.:46:02.

the right room, the right hotel, you need to book early. I think

:46:03.:46:06.

particularly this year, the deals you can get with low deposits are

:46:07.:46:11.

really good for the consumer. People should take advantage while they

:46:12.:46:14.

have the opportunity. It will be more expensive later. You have a

:46:15.:46:19.

couple of places, a couple hot destinations this year? Spain is

:46:20.:46:25.

always doing well. So was Portugal. Greece is doing quite better as

:46:26.:46:30.

well. In the long haul, Cuba, Mexico, the Caribbean. Thank you

:46:31.:46:37.

very much. We will ask you some more questions a bit later so if you have

:46:38.:46:41.

any questions or want some advice then get in touch. We don't need to

:46:42.:46:48.

go anywhere, do it? No, not what we have beautiful weather like we have

:46:49.:46:49.

here. That was almost convincing Helen.

:46:50.:46:57.

Wonderful Weather Watcher picture. We just picked this one up. This is

:46:58.:47:04.

from Dudley and these are drizzled drops coming down captured in the

:47:05.:47:07.

camera. Although we look weather this weekend, the cloud is sick

:47:08.:47:13.

because it sunk down to give us for. A little damp in places. Obviously

:47:14.:47:17.

the fog is the main concern of you are travelling there could be

:47:18.:47:20.

disruption to airport travel as well. Freezing rain and icy

:47:21.:47:23.

conditions across the low countries so if you travel further afield

:47:24.:47:26.

check with your travel operator because it is quite nasty with icy

:47:27.:47:31.

conditions. Temperatures are considerably higher than they were

:47:32.:47:34.

this time yesterday by some 15 degrees in places. It does not

:47:35.:47:38.

necessarily feel that much warmer but you will not be scraping ice

:47:39.:47:44.

from cars. In the south was drizzly rain, remnants of a weather front

:47:45.:47:47.

elsewhere. Just the thickness of the cloud in the fog where you are. It

:47:48.:47:51.

is not foggy everywhere but it is great. There will be brightness

:47:52.:47:54.

eventually breaking through the rain and drivel from the -- drizzle could

:47:55.:48:04.

linger. Once the fog clears through the Vale of York we may see

:48:05.:48:08.

brightness east of the Pennines. Temperatures is eight to ten, well

:48:09.:48:12.

up on yesterday. He won't feel that much milder just because we have let

:48:13.:48:16.

in disguise for the most part. Through the evening and overnight

:48:17.:48:20.

that is to our benefit. It stops the temperature from falling so most

:48:21.:48:23.

places will be frost free overnight tonight. Again, really quite murky.

:48:24.:48:31.

We do not lose the cloud. Again we will end up with fog on Sunday

:48:32.:48:34.

morning. The second part of the weekend looks just as cloudy for

:48:35.:48:40.

most of us. There will be strengthening winds in Scotland

:48:41.:48:43.

later on and as a result of that weather front moving away from the

:48:44.:48:46.

south-west, marginally brighter and drier here as well and temperatures

:48:47.:48:50.

will still be above where they should be at this time of year. The

:48:51.:48:55.

cold has not gone far. Over in Europe there is bitter weather at

:48:56.:48:58.

the moment. Minus 20s across the western side of Russia. Do spare a

:48:59.:49:04.

thought for those sitting in those countries, it is bitterly cold. So

:49:05.:49:12.

for our ideal destination, we will not be going to Sarajevo. Not today.

:49:13.:49:17.

Unless you like the cold. Cuba is then. We will be back with the

:49:18.:49:23.

headlines at the top of the hour. First of all it is time for News

:49:24.:49:25.

watch. Hello and welcome to the first

:49:26.:49:28.

Newswatch of 2017 with me, Samira Ahmed, where we'll be

:49:29.:49:31.

rounding up some of the comments you've made about BBC News

:49:32.:49:34.

since we went off air before Coming up: Jill Saward died this

:49:35.:49:40.

week, but should the BBC News website have described her

:49:41.:49:44.

in its headline as a campaigner And the year of celebrity deaths

:49:45.:49:47.

ended with several more, Did the BBC lose perspective over

:49:48.:49:51.

the extent of its coverage? First, the New Year has brought no

:49:52.:50:03.

respite from the terrorist attacks that have become a regular

:50:04.:50:06.

feature of news broadcasts. On Sunday came the latest atrocity,

:50:07.:50:08.

targeting those enjoying a night out NEWS READER: Less than two

:50:09.:50:11.

hours into the New Year, a gunman opened fire outside,

:50:12.:50:18.

bullets ricocheting as he shot Another camera showed people

:50:19.:50:23.

cowering as the attacker struck, Inside, his killing spree continued,

:50:24.:50:28.

Turks and foreigners murdered, others jumping into the freezing

:50:29.:50:34.

Bosphorus to escape. 39 people have died in the attack

:50:35.:50:37.

and the coverage of it raised questions we have heard before

:50:38.:50:43.

from Newswatch viewers Now, how much TV news coverage did

:50:44.:50:46.

you want from the BBC over Some may have appreciated a break

:50:47.:51:09.

from what can be a fairly grim diet of stories, but with many normal

:51:10.:51:16.

bulletins dropped or shortened, others feel they were underserved,

:51:17.:51:18.

including on the BBC's One annual staple of news

:51:19.:51:24.

coverage which did appear Much of the focus was on sports

:51:25.:51:53.

stars, as described by Andy Swiss, and pop stars and actors,

:51:54.:51:59.

reported on by Lizo Mzimba. At the end of a glittering

:52:00.:52:05.

year for British sport, for five of its greatest stars

:52:06.:52:08.

the greatest of honours. Patricia Routledge

:52:09.:52:11.

has been made a dame. Kinks frontman Ray Davis said

:52:12.:52:17.

he felt humility and joy to become Victoria Beckham becomes

:52:18.:52:20.

an OBE for services Anthony Hainsworth took exception

:52:21.:52:26.

to the balance of the reporting, And celebrity culture

:52:27.:52:32.

was at the heart of another series of complaints on what's sadly become

:52:33.:53:05.

a very familiar theme in 2016. Here's the start of BBC One's late

:53:06.:53:08.

bulletin on Christmas Day. In the last hour the death has been

:53:09.:53:11.

announced of the singer George George Michael shot to fame

:53:12.:53:17.

in the 1980s as half of the band Wham and went on to have a hugely

:53:18.:53:24.

successful solo career. He sold more than 80

:53:25.:53:29.

million records worldwide. The whole news bulletin tonight,

:53:30.:53:32.

apart from four minutes, has been taken up with

:53:33.:53:38.

George Michael dying. It's time you reported

:53:39.:53:42.

the real news. George Michael's was of course not

:53:43.:53:49.

the only death to be reported on the BBC over the past couple

:53:50.:53:52.

of weeks, as other viewers pointed It's the 27th of December and today,

:53:53.:53:56.

the BBC News and Channel 130 An enormously long one

:53:57.:54:04.

for Carrie Fisher, there's still contributions

:54:05.:54:11.

on George Michael, the author Richard Adams and about

:54:12.:54:15.

the Royle Family actress Liz Smith. There's so many important things

:54:16.:54:25.

happening in this world. Good morning, every time I switch

:54:26.:54:29.

on the news to find out what's happening in the world,

:54:30.:54:36.

all I see is an endless film of yet another pop star who has taken

:54:37.:54:40.

himself to an early grave. Sad for friends and family but,

:54:41.:54:43.

please, could you please give Thursday saw the death

:54:44.:54:48.

of Jill Saward, a long-term campaigner for the rights

:54:49.:55:01.

of survivors and victims of sexual violence, having herself been

:55:02.:55:04.

raped at the age of 21. The news was widely and prominently

:55:05.:55:07.

reported at the BBC. With George Alagiah tweeting

:55:08.:55:10.

that he was proud that TV's six o'clock bulletin led

:55:11.:55:13.

on her life and influence. But when the story broke the BBC

:55:14.:55:15.

News alert and the website headlined its report

:55:16.:55:18.

of her death like this, Prompting many complaints, like this

:55:19.:55:23.

one from Becky Stevens, on Twitter. We put this to BBC News,

:55:24.:55:29.

and they referred to a 2004 BBC interview in which Jill Saward said

:55:30.:55:54.

that she had no complaint about being described as the Ealing

:55:55.:55:57.

vicarage rape victim, as it enabled her to challenge

:55:58.:56:01.

politicians and work for change. Well, another issue of language

:56:02.:56:05.

cropped up at the end of last year in relation to the death

:56:06.:56:34.

of another woman. Georgina Symonds was killed a year

:56:35.:56:37.

ago by Peter Morgan, who was sentenced four days before

:56:38.:56:40.

Christmas to life in prison This was the headline

:56:41.:56:43.

on the News at Six that night. Life for the property

:56:44.:56:48.

developer millionaire Once I'd sort of attempted

:56:49.:56:50.

to murder her, I'd be in a hell of a lot of trouble for that,

:56:51.:57:02.

and she could have still gone So no mention of Georgina Symonds'

:57:03.:57:05.

name there, but the one word was used there and online

:57:06.:57:11.

which worried a number of viewers. And RM Shreeve put

:57:12.:57:14.

it like this: In response,

:57:15.:57:37.

BBC News told us this: Well,

:57:38.:58:17.

it's clear that the language used in reporting a death and especially

:58:18.:58:18.

the shorthand of a headline can give great offence to an audience,

:58:19.:58:22.

and that especially Since we were last on air,

:58:23.:58:24.

we have had two examples of that. One following a story

:58:25.:58:29.

on Breakfast about a rowing trip across the Atlantic raising money

:58:30.:58:32.

for a crisis centre in memory of one We wish you all the best, stay safe,

:58:33.:58:35.

and hopefully we will pick up with you when you reach Antigua

:58:36.:58:41.

at the end of January, That's Sam, Toby, Rory and Harry,

:58:42.:58:44.

who are rowing the Atlantic to try

:58:45.:58:49.

and raise money for Harry's brother Rosalind Allen was watching that

:58:50.:58:51.

and e-mailed us with her response. A couple of days earlier,

:58:52.:59:22.

the phrase had also been used on the news ticker, scrolling

:59:23.:59:24.

across the bottom of the screen during an overnight bulletin

:59:25.:59:27.

and then, for this caller The ribbons running

:59:28.:59:30.

across the bottom has an item, news story, chief resigns after

:59:31.:59:38.

overworked employee commits suicide. 20 or so news items after that,

:59:39.:59:46.

the next statement standing alone reads "I tried to kill

:59:47.:59:53.

myself several times." In the early hours of the morning,

:59:54.:59:57.

when vulnerable people might be watching this, it reads "I tried

:59:58.:00:04.

to kill myself several times." I object strongly to

:00:05.:00:10.

this, this is obscene. Again, we asked BBC News

:00:11.:00:15.

for a statement on issues of language about suicide

:00:16.:00:17.

and they told us: Well,

:00:18.:00:31.

thank you for all of your As a new year gets

:00:32.:00:32.

under way on Newswatch, we would

:00:33.:00:36.

like you to tell us what topics which news figures we

:00:37.:00:38.

should be interviewing. You can give us your opinion on BBC

:00:39.:00:42.

News current affairs and you can be quoted, or even appear

:00:43.:00:46.

on the programme. You can find us on Twitter and do

:00:47.:00:48.

have a look at our website address. That's all from us, we will be back

:00:49.:00:54.

to hear what you thought of the BBC Hello, this is Breakfast,

:00:55.:00:59.

with Rachel Burden and Jon Kay. The British Red Cross warns

:01:00.:01:20.

of a humanitarian crisis The charity says the Government

:01:21.:01:23.

needs to provide more money It's after dozens of A departments

:01:24.:01:28.

were forced to divert Good morning,

:01:29.:01:31.

it's Saturday 7th January. Also ahead, an American army veteran

:01:32.:01:51.

has been arrested after five people were shot dead at Fort

:01:52.:01:56.

Lauderdale Airport in Florida. Donald Trump promises to look

:01:57.:01:59.

at ways of combating cyber attacks on US elections after a briefing

:02:00.:02:02.

from intelligence chiefs. A bump in the road -

:02:03.:02:07.

councils predict a huge rise in the repair bill for potholes

:02:08.:02:09.

in England and Wales. In sport, it's a stroll for City

:02:10.:02:13.

in the FA Cup as Manchester City put

:02:14.:02:15.

five past West Ham United to go through to the

:02:16.:02:18.

fourth round. And in the next hour,

:02:19.:02:22.

we'll meet the schoolboy putting his new blade into action

:02:23.:02:25.

as children in England are given sporting prosthetics

:02:26.:02:27.

for the first time on the NHS. Is good morning. It is grey and

:02:28.:02:43.

murky out there, some fog around, especially over the hills, but in

:02:44.:02:47.

contrast to yesterday, nowhere near as cold. All the details for the

:02:48.:02:51.

weekend in around 15 minutes, join me if you can.

:02:52.:02:53.

The British Red Cross is warning of a humanitarian crisis

:02:54.:02:57.

in NHS hospitals in England and is demanding the Government

:02:58.:03:00.

allocates more money to improve social care.

:03:01.:03:02.

Dozens of A departments were forced to divert ambulances

:03:03.:03:05.

The Royal College of Emergency Medicine says the system

:03:06.:03:12.

is on its knees, but the Department of Health says

:03:13.:03:14.

it's investing more money to improve services.

:03:15.:03:16.

Winter pressure on accident and emergency - nothing new,

:03:17.:03:21.

but the Red Cross now says the strain on hospitals in England

:03:22.:03:25.

The charity claims social-care cuts mean patients are sent home

:03:26.:03:32.

without the right support, so then they end up back in A

:03:33.:03:37.

Red Cross volunteers support NHS staff and say they've seen patients

:03:38.:03:41.

sent home without clothes, some who don't receive the care

:03:42.:03:44.

they need to get washed, even some who've fallen and

:03:45.:03:47.

A staff recognise the problems too.

:03:48.:03:52.

I think the pressures on the NHS, and especially in emergency care,

:03:53.:03:55.

are particularly intense at the moment.

:03:56.:03:59.

But what is more concerning is the number of patients

:04:00.:04:02.

who are being managed within four hours, and then the delays

:04:03.:04:04.

to admission into the hospital bed base, which unfortunately are very,

:04:05.:04:07.

very significant, and our staff are working under some pretty

:04:08.:04:09.

intolerable conditions at times trying to manage.

:04:10.:04:17.

And sometimes they just can't manage.

:04:18.:04:20.

Figures from NHS England show that overflowing A department

:04:21.:04:22.

had to close their doors to new patients

:04:23.:04:25.

more than 140 times over the last month.

:04:26.:04:28.

Compare that with the same month in 2015 - it's up more than 60%.

:04:29.:04:34.

The suspicion is that it is a combination of the cuts

:04:35.:04:37.

in community services run by the NHS,

:04:38.:04:42.

and very heavy pressure in general practice.

:04:43.:04:45.

So is the strain on the NHS costing lives?

:04:46.:04:47.

The death of two patients on emergency trolleys

:04:48.:04:51.

at Worcestershire Royal Hospital are being investigated.

:04:52.:04:55.

One of them had waited 35 hours for a bed.

:04:56.:04:58.

The Department of Health says it's providing billions more

:04:59.:05:00.

NHS England says plans are in place to deal with the extra demand.

:05:01.:05:05.

Beds are actually not quite as full as they work this time last year,

:05:06.:05:09.

but everyone in the health service knows

:05:10.:05:11.

things could get worse before they get better.

:05:12.:05:12.

Earlier on Breakfast, Dr Mark Holland from the Society

:05:13.:05:18.

for Acute Medicine, said so far it had been a winter from hell.

:05:19.:05:26.

We've seen, over the last week or so, that people who should be in a

:05:27.:05:33.

specialty bed are ending up in a non-specialty bed, or there are beds

:05:34.:05:38.

being created when the hospital that we call contingency beds, and people

:05:39.:05:41.

that ice pick to across the country, e-mails that I have been receiving

:05:42.:05:45.

this week, things I have been reading in the immediate, make us

:05:46.:05:48.

conclude that the term humanitarian crisis has somebody to it.

:05:49.:05:54.

We will return to that story throughout the morning Breakfast.

:05:55.:05:57.

Police in Florida have been questioning a man after five people

:05:58.:05:59.

were killed and eight injured in a shooting

:06:00.:06:01.

The suspect opened fire in the baggage-claim area

:06:02.:06:06.

after seemingly retrieving his weapon from his luggage.

:06:07.:06:08.

and hasn't ruled out terrorism as a motive.

:06:09.:06:13.

Our correspondent Gary O'Donoghue reports from Fort Lauderdale.

:06:14.:06:17.

It's a familiar scene at airports the world over,

:06:18.:06:20.

but the baggage-claim hall at the Fort Lauderdale Airport

:06:21.:06:25.

turned into a place of death and mayhem, as a lone gunman

:06:26.:06:28.

opened fire on those waiting to collect their luggage.

:06:29.:06:33.

Passengers scattered for cover, hitting the ground, and reports say

:06:34.:06:35.

the assailant had time to reload before opening fire once again,

:06:36.:06:38.

as attempts were made to attend to the wounded.

:06:39.:06:44.

Once he was done with ammunition, he threw the gun down,

:06:45.:06:47.

and I was about ten feet away from him.

:06:48.:06:52.

He basically threw the gun onto the ground

:06:53.:06:54.

and laid on the ground face down, spreadeagled.

:06:55.:06:58.

The gunman has been named as 26-year-old Esteban Santiago.

:06:59.:07:02.

Reports say he was carrying a military ID and

:07:03.:07:04.

had a weapon in his checked baggage, which is legal in the United States.

:07:05.:07:07.

One family member said he had been receiving psychological treatment

:07:08.:07:14.

after leaving the National Guard last year.

:07:15.:07:19.

This cowardly, heinous act resulted in the deaths of five people.

:07:20.:07:23.

There were eight more people injured by way of gunshot

:07:24.:07:26.

that were transported to local hospitals.

:07:27.:07:29.

In his first reaction to the shooting,

:07:30.:07:31.

President Obama said he was heartbroken for the families.

:07:32.:07:35.

These kinds of tragedies have happened too often

:07:36.:07:39.

during the eight years that I've been President.

:07:40.:07:41.

The disruption at Fort Lauderdale went on long into the night, with

:07:42.:07:54.

some traveller stuck on the tarmac for more than eight hours.

:07:55.:07:58.

The FBI says it's ruling nothing out, including terrorism.

:07:59.:08:00.

But the agency has confirmed it had prior contact

:08:01.:08:03.

when he was referred for a mental-health assessment.

:08:04.:08:05.

The ease with which he was able to transport and use a weapon

:08:06.:08:09.

in an airport will raise serious concerns about public safety.

:08:10.:08:15.

Gary O'Donoghue, BBC News, Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

:08:16.:08:19.

US intelligence officials have released a report that claims

:08:20.:08:21.

Vladimir Putin personally ordered a cyber-campaign

:08:22.:08:24.

to try to help Donald Trump win the presidential election.

:08:25.:08:27.

Last night, after being briefed on the findings, Mr Trump said

:08:28.:08:30.

that hacking had absolutely no impact on the election result

:08:31.:08:33.

but promised to set up a team to stop future attacks,

:08:34.:08:35.

The report from American intelligence claims

:08:36.:08:44.

Russia's President, Vladimir Putin, personally ordered what it called

:08:45.:08:47.

an influence campaign to help Donald Trump's chances

:08:48.:08:49.

The President-elect had earlier described the Russian hacking claims

:08:50.:08:56.

as a political witch-hunt by his opponents.

:08:57.:08:59.

At Trump Tower, he met America's top intelligence officials

:09:00.:09:01.

They say Russia's actions included hacking into the e-mail accounts

:09:02.:09:09.

of the Democratic National Committee and top Democrats, and using

:09:10.:09:13.

intermediaries such as WikiLeaks to release the information.

:09:14.:09:16.

Russia has previously denied this, and WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange

:09:17.:09:20.

has said before that Moscow was not the source.

:09:21.:09:24.

After the briefing, Mr Trump did not single out Russia.

:09:25.:09:27.

says the US will strengthen cyber defences.

:09:28.:09:53.

The President-elect has made it very clear that we're going to take

:09:54.:09:57.

aggressive action in the early days of our new administration

:09:58.:09:59.

to combat cyber attacks and protect the security of the American people

:10:00.:10:07.

from this type of intrusion in the future.

:10:08.:10:11.

Donald Trump said he had tremendous respect for the work

:10:12.:10:14.

and service done by those in the US intelligence community.

:10:15.:10:18.

But with two weeks to go until he moves into the White House,

:10:19.:10:21.

questions remain over how they will all work together

:10:22.:10:23.

The repair bill to fix the country's potholes

:10:24.:10:31.

That's according to councils in England and Wales,

:10:32.:10:37.

who say the Government should pay for the repairs from fuel duty.

:10:38.:10:39.

The Government says it's already putting ?250 million

:10:40.:10:41.

into fixing the problem, but the Local Government Association

:10:42.:10:43.

says that's not enough, as Duncan Kennedy reports.

:10:44.:10:56.

We need a major investment in this country on the road is a structure,

:10:57.:11:02.

the infrastructure, and stopping this sort of patch and amend

:11:03.:11:06.

mentality, and giving us enough money to two action be replaced

:11:07.:11:09.

these local roads that desperately need proper money spent on them. --

:11:10.:11:13.

to actually replace. Michelle Obama has delivered

:11:14.:11:18.

her final speech as First Lady of the United States,

:11:19.:11:21.

with an impassioned call on young people to have hope,

:11:22.:11:23.

and fight for their rights. Speaking at a ceremony

:11:24.:11:25.

in the White House, she ended tearfully,

:11:26.:11:27.

saying the role of First Lady had the been the greatest

:11:28.:11:29.

honour of her life. Empower yourselves with a good

:11:30.:11:32.

education, then get out there and use that education

:11:33.:11:34.

to build a country worthy Lead by example -

:11:35.:11:36.

with hope, never fear. And know that I will be with you,

:11:37.:11:44.

rooting for you, and working to support you

:11:45.:11:47.

for the rest of my life. So I want to close today

:11:48.:11:51.

by simply saying thank you. Thank you for everything you do

:11:52.:11:55.

for our kids and for our country. Being your First Lady has been

:11:56.:11:59.

the greatest honour of my life, Michelle Obama on her final speech

:12:00.:12:02.

at the White House. The shooting at Fort Lauderdale

:12:03.:12:14.

Airport in Florida has drawn attention to possible weaknesses

:12:15.:12:17.

in US aviation security. Local authorities say the gunman

:12:18.:12:19.

opened fire in the baggage claim area yesterday,

:12:20.:12:21.

after retrieving a weapon Five people were

:12:22.:12:23.

killed in the attack, Joining us from our London

:12:24.:12:26.

newsroom is Philip Baum, editor of Aviation Security

:12:27.:12:29.

International. Thanks for your time this morning on

:12:30.:12:47.

Breakfast, a lot of people will be stunned to hear that if they have

:12:48.:12:50.

been to Florida, they have stepped off microplane, gone to pick up

:12:51.:12:54.

their bags off the plane, that among the bags they could be gallons,

:12:55.:13:00.

legally, it inside people's suitcases. -- guns. Explain how it

:13:01.:13:05.

works. First of all, we are talking about a country that allows people

:13:06.:13:09.

to carry firearms, albeit with permits, and as anywhere in the

:13:10.:13:14.

world, if you are allowed to carry a firearm, you are allowed to take it

:13:15.:13:18.

onto an aircraft, but you have to have the correct paperwork, check in

:13:19.:13:22.

the firearm, which must be unloaded, and then in a separate package,

:13:23.:13:27.

check in the ammunition for it. And of course there comes a point in

:13:28.:13:31.

time when the passenger is reunited with their checked luggage at the

:13:32.:13:37.

arrivals belt. I don't really think this is actually a problem with

:13:38.:13:42.

aviation security, it is actually a problem that could have happened

:13:43.:13:47.

anywhere in society. We have had 223 deaths this year in the United

:13:48.:13:50.

States already as a result of firearms incidents. This happened at

:13:51.:13:56.

an airport, and yes, of course, it is going to be of concern to

:13:57.:14:00.

passengers that are travelling, but you know, it really could have

:14:01.:14:04.

happened anywhere. But airports have been such a focus of security and

:14:05.:14:08.

threats in recent years, and airports go to such lengths to try

:14:09.:14:13.

to make sure that, as you enter them, you are separated from

:14:14.:14:16.

anything that could be a risk to people. It seems extremely ironic

:14:17.:14:20.

that when you arrive, you can be reunited with a weapon, and with

:14:21.:14:24.

ammunition, so easily apparently, and you are still within the

:14:25.:14:28.

confines of the place that is supposedly so safe. Absolutely, but

:14:29.:14:36.

as I say, Americans are entitled, if correctly licensed, to carry

:14:37.:14:39.

firearms, and therefore to take them with them. The objective of airport

:14:40.:14:43.

security is to separate the passenger from the firearm on board

:14:44.:14:47.

the aircraft so that they cannot use it to hijack the aircraft. This was

:14:48.:14:50.

a lesson the Israelis learned back in 1972, with a massacre, when three

:14:51.:14:56.

members of the Japanese red army were reunited with their baggage,

:14:57.:15:02.

opened it in what is now Tel Aviv airport and carried out a firearms

:15:03.:15:08.

attack, killing many people. This is a challenge that we face that we

:15:09.:15:12.

have to screen people, but you have to remember that 27 million people

:15:13.:15:17.

go through Fort Lauderdale every year, there are questions to be

:15:18.:15:20.

asked, one of the things I would be saying is, what was the behaviour

:15:21.:15:24.

like of the passenger when he checked in in Anchorage? We know he

:15:25.:15:29.

had mental health issues. What was his behaviour like in Minneapolis

:15:30.:15:33.

said Paul, when he was in transit? The check-in agents would have known

:15:34.:15:36.

that he was travelling with a firearm, and I think what we will

:15:37.:15:39.

find at the end of the day, the failure was to connect the dots, and

:15:40.:15:45.

that is what happens so often with airport security, one person knows,

:15:46.:15:49.

but does the information get fed down the line. This passenger had no

:15:50.:15:54.

mental health problems, had reported himself to authorities in Anchorage

:15:55.:15:58.

but was still allowed to have a permit, so it is not the fact that

:15:59.:16:03.

he was able to check-in a firearm, people do that on a routine basis,

:16:04.:16:08.

including in the UK, because people do go on hunting trips, shooting

:16:09.:16:13.

competitions, and there are often law enforcement personnel that carry

:16:14.:16:16.

firearms and have them separated on board the aircraft. It is a

:16:17.:16:20.

challenge that we face, but we have to remember that this was a tragic

:16:21.:16:26.

incident, but as I say, 223 deaths so far in 27 as a result of gun

:16:27.:16:32.

related crime, and I am afraid that, with the forthcoming Trump

:16:33.:16:35.

administrations starting in two weeks' time, I don't think we will

:16:36.:16:41.

see any greater controls on guns. For now, Philip Baum, thank you for

:16:42.:16:43.

your time and Breakfast. You're watching

:16:44.:16:47.

Breakfast from BBC News. The British Red Cross is calling

:16:48.:16:48.

for more money to be spent on social care,

:16:49.:16:52.

as it warns of a humanitarian crisis A US Army veteran is being

:16:53.:16:54.

questioned by police after five people were killed in

:16:55.:16:59.

a shooting at Fort Lauderdale She was an outsider to win,

:17:00.:17:01.

but Ray BLK is now following in the steps of Adele after topping

:17:02.:17:22.

the BBC's Sound of 2017 poll. She'll be joining us

:17:23.:17:25.

here before ten. When you look at the list of people

:17:26.:17:36.

who have won that award, it is quite something to live up to!

:17:37.:17:42.

She has got amazing music as well, looking forward to talking to her.

:17:43.:17:46.

It has been a misty and murky morning today, you can see from the

:17:47.:17:49.

pictures, Helen Willetts, things improving?

:17:50.:17:54.

Not really, I'm sorry to say, it will be a slow improvement, this was

:17:55.:18:00.

sent in from Staffordshire, but we have had numerous from that part of

:18:01.:18:04.

the world, quite foggy in parts of the Vale of York and around the

:18:05.:18:07.

seven as jury at the moment. This was just to show you some Cisak

:18:08.:18:17.

coming down in Dudley. -- the Severn estuary. Extra care will be needed,

:18:18.:18:25.

particularly on the motorway network, where we have that foggy

:18:26.:18:34.

around the Bristol area. -- fog. This rain in the South fairly widely

:18:35.:18:37.

light rain and drizzle across southern parts of the country,

:18:38.:18:41.

remnants of a weather front that will take much of the day to fizzle

:18:42.:18:44.

out. They could be a bit of brightness here and there, but don't

:18:45.:18:49.

hold out hope of much, it will for the majority of the UKBA -- the UK

:18:50.:19:00.

be a cloudy Saturday. The Vale of York may see some brightness later.

:19:01.:19:06.

What it is is nowhere near as cold as this time yesterday. These are

:19:07.:19:13.

the temperatures we saw yesterday, minus six in the south. That is

:19:14.:19:17.

because we had no cloud through the night. The cloud will be giving us

:19:18.:19:22.

grey conditions today, acting like a blanket tonight, stopping

:19:23.:19:25.

temperatures from falling, so it looks like it should be largely

:19:26.:19:29.

frost free, chilly in some of the Glens of Scotland. We have a weather

:19:30.:19:32.

front coming through the course of Sunday, strengthening the breeze,

:19:33.:19:36.

lifting the fog across the northern half of the country, bringing patchy

:19:37.:19:44.

rain and drizzle. For Sunday itself, largely dry, predominantly cloudy. A

:19:45.:19:46.

better chance of more brightness tomorrow, although for the FA Cup

:19:47.:19:50.

third round, today and tomorrow, it looks cloudy and grey. A little bit

:19:51.:19:55.

damp in southern areas today. Temperatures tomorrow as today, just

:19:56.:20:00.

nudging above average, a far cry from what is happening elsewhere

:20:01.:20:05.

across Europe. We had cold air yesterday and in previous days, that

:20:06.:20:08.

is now stuck across central and Eastern Europe, where temperatures

:20:09.:20:12.

are considerably lower. No sign of a change back to the cold weather in

:20:13.:20:15.

the UK, much more unsettled into next week.

:20:16.:20:20.

Look at all light blue, very cold in other parts of Europe!

:20:21.:20:26.

For the first time in the NHS is providing disabled children with

:20:27.:20:32.

prosthetic limbs that are designed for playing sport. NHS England hopes

:20:33.:20:35.

took up several hundred children a year with limbs to enable them to

:20:36.:20:39.

participate in more sport. Here is health correspondent Robert Pigott.

:20:40.:20:42.

Right, how have you been doing, then, since you had your blade?

:20:43.:20:45.

When Ben made the decision at the age of ten to have

:20:46.:20:48.

his dream of a future in sport seemed remote.

:20:49.:20:51.

Would you like to put it on for me and show me what you can do with it?

:20:52.:20:55.

Three years on, Ben is one of the first children

:20:56.:20:58.

to receive a running blade on the NHS.

:20:59.:21:00.

As if he were changing a shoe, he can swap is false leg

:21:01.:21:03.

for the blade and feel a new freedom and energy.

:21:04.:21:08.

The spring of it is the bit makes me go faster.

:21:09.:21:11.

I used to not be able to, like, be able to run as fast or able

:21:12.:21:14.

to kick a ball as well, but now I've got a good

:21:15.:21:17.

amount of power in my leg, and I've got the right size,

:21:18.:21:20.

so I can do loads of skills and hit a ball really well.

:21:21.:21:25.

The blade and the treatment costs around ?1000,

:21:26.:21:31.

but Claire Johnson, a health service expert in prosthetic limbs,

:21:32.:21:33.

says the NHS will more than recoup the cost by keeping children active.

:21:34.:21:37.

We're hoping that it will give them a level playing field,

:21:38.:21:40.

so that he can compete with his peers

:21:41.:21:42.

and be able to participate in a lot more sports.

:21:43.:21:49.

It does help in the wider scheme of things,

:21:50.:21:53.

and hopefully give a longer longevity to their lives

:21:54.:21:55.

by giving them the opportunity to do sport.

:21:56.:21:57.

Ben is among 2500 children in England with limbs

:21:58.:22:00.

that are either absent or which don't work properly.

:22:01.:22:04.

The NHS hopes to fit several hundred of them

:22:05.:22:07.

The scheme not only opens the way to sport for a group

:22:08.:22:13.

of disabled youngsters, but it comes with an added message.

:22:14.:22:21.

At a time when so many teenagers are couch potatoes,

:22:22.:22:24.

it makes an example of an extraordinary few

:22:25.:22:26.

who overcome all the odds to carve out a life in sport.

:22:27.:22:29.

The new blade, for me, can do a lot more than my prosthetic can do,

:22:30.:22:32.

Ben's mother Kathleen says running blades

:22:33.:22:42.

can change a disabled child's whole outlook on life.

:22:43.:22:44.

He seems more confident, and more eager to get out and about now.

:22:45.:22:47.

He's wanting to put it on and go out more,

:22:48.:22:49.

Now he has got the blade, the sky is the limit.

:22:50.:22:58.

Ben says he is now training for the Paralympics,

:22:59.:23:00.

and he's talking dates - 2024, at the very least.

:23:01.:23:04.

You're watching Breakfast from BBC News,

:23:05.:23:23.

time now for a look at the newspapers.

:23:24.:23:25.

The writer Paul Vallely is here to tell us what's caught his eye.

:23:26.:23:32.

Good morning to you, thanks for coming in, we have been talking

:23:33.:23:37.

about this hacking, the alleged hacking, claims of hacking in

:23:38.:23:41.

America, that is the first story you have spotted. The first thing was

:23:42.:23:45.

that cartoon, the genius cartoonist from the Times as a small pea in the

:23:46.:23:53.

brain of Donald Trump, and it is understandable why when you read the

:23:54.:23:55.

story. It tells you that the evidence that the various US

:23:56.:24:02.

intelligence agencies have given to Trump is very direct, it says that

:24:03.:24:08.

Putin himself ordered this campaign of hacking, not just something that

:24:09.:24:12.

has been done by freelance agents off their own bat. And the reason

:24:13.:24:19.

the pea brain struck me as being so apt is that he is consistently in

:24:20.:24:25.

denial at the facts of the story, constantly trying to divert them in

:24:26.:24:30.

different directions. Basically, he is fed up of the idea that people

:24:31.:24:34.

will think he is not a legitimate president, because it does not

:24:35.:24:37.

follow that the result was influenced. No, it is important to

:24:38.:24:43.

make that point, but extraordinary, because not just the actual hacking,

:24:44.:24:47.

this campaign of influence, as they described, using Charles on social

:24:48.:24:53.

media to try to influence public discourse. -- troubles. They set up

:24:54.:24:58.

a website, and when nobody read it, they leaked it to Julian Assange, a

:24:59.:25:03.

very strange micro alliance, Julian Assange and Donald Trump, talking

:25:04.:25:11.

about an odd couple! The detail as this is quite extraordinary, and yet

:25:12.:25:15.

Trump is trying to divert attention to how NBC got the details of this,

:25:16.:25:22.

as though that is the important issue. And what struck me most is

:25:23.:25:27.

that a poll shows that 20% of Trump supporters, only 20% believe it,

:25:28.:25:34.

whereas 87% of Clinton believe it. So the divisions in America are

:25:35.:25:39.

really deep and getting deeper. Be classified nature of a lot of the

:25:40.:25:42.

findings, it is hard for the rest of us to know what they are talking

:25:43.:25:47.

about. They give us a broadbrush report, but we do not know what they

:25:48.:25:50.

have found. The Daily Mail has been running a

:25:51.:25:54.

campaign about foreign aid and potential issues of funds from the

:25:55.:26:01.

UK. Yes, this is another example of dog whistle politics, it puts a lot

:26:02.:26:04.

of things together and makes you think that there is something was

:26:05.:26:09.

going on than there is. Obviously, aid needs scrutiny, because there

:26:10.:26:15.

are bad examples of misuse of aid, but this project that the Mail is

:26:16.:26:19.

going about, an Ethiopian equivalent of the Spice Girls getting British

:26:20.:26:26.

money, it is actually a project to empower. There is a lot of early

:26:27.:26:29.

marriage in Ethiopian air, which becomes a kind of child slavery, and

:26:30.:26:37.

educating girls out of that, educating society out of those

:26:38.:26:41.

assumptions, if you educate girls, you find HIV transmission rates go

:26:42.:26:45.

down, child mortality goes down, family income is raised. They are

:26:46.:26:52.

picking on the excrescence, which makes it look silly... But there are

:26:53.:26:59.

no doubt genuine areas of concern, and I think the Mail is tapping into

:27:00.:27:05.

a considerable public opinion issue here. The point that concerns me is

:27:06.:27:10.

that the areas which the Times highlighted, for instance, too much

:27:11.:27:12.

spending on Western consultants, some of the salaries of charity

:27:13.:27:20.

bosses being far too large - there are legitimate areas of concern, but

:27:21.:27:23.

there is a kind of dog whistle element to this story, which tends

:27:24.:27:29.

to make you think, oh, well, all aid is bad, so we should scrap it.

:27:30.:27:33.

Making out that huge amounts of money go in aid, where it is about

:27:34.:27:37.

7p out of every ?10 of national income. It is to help the world's

:27:38.:27:44.

most vulnerable people. We started talking about the incoming president

:27:45.:27:49.

elect, Trump and his family, let's look back, can we? This interesting

:27:50.:27:54.

piece in the Guardian looking back to the 1960s and the Kennedys. A new

:27:55.:27:58.

film coming out called Jackie, it really deconstructs the way that she

:27:59.:28:06.

made the start of the myth, the legend rather of Kennedy, and in an

:28:07.:28:14.

interview soon after his death, she gave a journalist the insights that

:28:15.:28:17.

Kennedy had loved the Broadway musical Camelot, and he had pleaded

:28:18.:28:26.

most nights. She concluded there will be great presidents again, but

:28:27.:28:29.

there will never be another Camelot. This film shows that she had a

:28:30.:28:35.

background in journalism, she had interviewed Richard Nixon, cover the

:28:36.:28:39.

coronation of Queen Elizabeth, she was a seasoned journalist, and it

:28:40.:28:42.

showed how clever she was in building the myth of her husband,

:28:43.:28:45.

which has been one of the great subjects of Hollywood.

:28:46.:28:50.

Issuing public opinion, as Russia apparently has been, in a very

:28:51.:28:54.

different way! Thank you very much. We will see you again in an hour's

:28:55.:28:56.

time. Coming up before the end

:28:57.:29:00.

of the programme, two years ago he was running

:29:01.:29:02.

bootcamps in his local park, now Joe Wicks is a publishing

:29:03.:29:05.

and social-media sensation. He'll be here to give us his recipe

:29:06.:29:07.

for success just before ten. Wait until you hear what he is! --

:29:08.:29:10.

eats. Hello, this is Breakfast

:29:11.:30:00.

with Jon Kay and Rachel Burden. Coming up before nine,

:30:01.:30:04.

Helen will have the weather. Mike will have all of the FA cup

:30:05.:30:10.

sport. But first, a summary

:30:11.:30:14.

of this morning's main news. The British Red Cross is warning

:30:15.:30:17.

of a humanitarian crisis in NHS hospitals in England,

:30:18.:30:21.

and is demanding the government allocates more money

:30:22.:30:23.

to improve social care. Dozens of A departments

:30:24.:30:26.

were forced to divert ambulances to other hospitals last week,

:30:27.:30:29.

while one patient died after The Department of Health says it's

:30:30.:30:33.

investing more money But Dr Mark Holland,

:30:34.:30:38.

from the Society for Acute Medicine, said it had so far been

:30:39.:30:43.

a "winter from hell". We have seen over the last week or

:30:44.:30:57.

so that people who should be in a specialty bed are ending up in a

:30:58.:31:01.

non-speciality bed, or are beds being created, contingency beds.

:31:02.:31:07.

People I speak to across the country, e-mails I have been

:31:08.:31:10.

receiving and things I have been reading in the media, make us

:31:11.:31:14.

conclude that the term humanitarian crisis has some validity.

:31:15.:31:19.

Police in Florida have been questioning a man,

:31:20.:31:20.

after five people were killed and eight injured in a shooting

:31:21.:31:23.

The suspect opened fire in the baggage claim area,

:31:24.:31:26.

after seemingly retrieving his weapon from his luggage.

:31:27.:31:28.

The FBI says it's pursuing all leads and hasn't ruled out

:31:29.:31:31.

US intelligence officials have released a report that claims

:31:32.:31:37.

Vladimir Putin personally ordered a cyber campaign to try

:31:38.:31:40.

and help Donald Trump win the presidential election.

:31:41.:31:44.

Last night, after being briefed on the findings, Mr Trump,

:31:45.:31:50.

said that hacking had had absolutely no impact on the election outcome.

:31:51.:31:53.

His running mate, Mike Pence, says a team will be set up

:31:54.:31:56.

The President-elect has made it very clear that we're going to take

:31:57.:32:04.

aggressive action in the early days of our new administration to combat

:32:05.:32:07.

cyber attacks and protect the security of the American people

:32:08.:32:12.

from this type of intrusion in the future.

:32:13.:32:22.

The repair bill to fix the country's potholes could reach 20 million

:32:23.:32:34.

pounds. The government says it has already set aside a ?250 million

:32:35.:32:40.

fund to tackle the problem, but the Local Government Association says

:32:41.:32:41.

more needs to be done. A killer whale which was involved

:32:42.:32:45.

in the deaths of three people and featured in an influential

:32:46.:32:48.

documentary, has died Tilikum featured in the film

:32:49.:32:50.

Blackfish, which led to a global campaign against the keeping

:32:51.:32:54.

of orcas in captivity. Sea World says staff are "deeply

:32:55.:32:56.

saddened" by the death of the whale, which was thought

:32:57.:32:59.

to be 36 years old. Those are the main

:33:00.:33:03.

stories this morning. FA Cup day-to-day. Third round.

:33:04.:33:19.

Absolutely. Started last night. Pep Guardiola's first-ever taste of the

:33:20.:33:24.

FA Cup with Manchester City. A goal fest for City at West Ham.

:33:25.:33:27.

FA Cup third round weekend got underway last night,

:33:28.:33:29.

with Manchester City the first side through to round four,

:33:30.:33:32.

thanks to a 5-0 thrashing handed out to West Ham.

:33:33.:33:34.

City were already out of sight by half time -

:33:35.:33:36.

leading 3-0 thanks to an own goal, a Yaya Toure penalty,

:33:37.:33:39.

The gloss on an impressive night was added by John Stones.

:33:40.:33:43.

The England defender scored his first goal

:33:44.:33:45.

He needed goal-line technology to confirm that he'd

:33:46.:33:48.

Hopefully it can help us to make our players believers,

:33:49.:33:55.

that they are good enough to play every game, and try,

:33:56.:33:59.

in both our fans and the people in Manchester City, and they can

:34:00.:34:03.

They know what happened in the past, but we are good guys.

:34:04.:34:10.

So they run a lot, fight a lot, playing good.

:34:11.:34:12.

It will be a special FA Cup reunion, today, for one of the members

:34:13.:34:19.

of the treble-winning Manchester United team of 1999.

:34:20.:34:23.

Former Netherlands centre half Yaap Stam is now the manager

:34:24.:34:26.

of Championship side Reading, who go to Old Trafford hunting

:34:27.:34:30.

As a player, there is nothing better than to play over there,

:34:31.:34:37.

in a stadium like that in front of so many fans.

:34:38.:34:40.

And we know, as well, we have our own fans over

:34:41.:34:43.

Hopefully they are joining in and supporting us.

:34:44.:34:49.

Dan Walker and the Football Focus team are on the road at one

:34:50.:34:57.

of the non-league sides left in the cup.

:34:58.:35:00.

Before he left, Dan left us a little message.

:35:01.:35:07.

Hello Breakfast friends. I cannot be with you today because we are out

:35:08.:35:14.

and about. Football Focus is on the road for the third round of the FA

:35:15.:35:17.

Cup. We hear from all five non-league teams and we will be live

:35:18.:35:23.

at Barrow, who take on Rochdale. Mark Clemmit has been to Stourbridge

:35:24.:35:29.

to speak to Bobby Gould's grandson as they prepare to take on Wycombe

:35:30.:35:33.

Wanderers. Eastleigh manager Martin Allen will speak to us ahead of his

:35:34.:35:41.

return to Brentford. Trevor Nsekhe -- traversing clear is out and

:35:42.:35:45.

about. And we will be at Sutton, too. What more could you possibly

:35:46.:35:51.

want on the third round weekend at the FA Cup? We are live from midday

:35:52.:35:56.

BBC One. Look forward to it. Thank you.

:35:57.:35:58.

Sir Andy Murray will play world number two

:35:59.:35:59.

Novak Djokovic in the final of the Qatar Open today.

:36:00.:36:02.

Murray beat Czech Tomas Berdych in straight sets in their semi

:36:03.:36:04.

final, to reach his fourth final in Doha.

:36:05.:36:08.

The win was Murray's 28th in a row on the ATP Tour,

:36:09.:36:11.

and another title and victory over his main rival would be

:36:12.:36:14.

the ideal preparation for the Australian Open,

:36:15.:36:15.

We played at the end of last year. The ultimate goal was to find a way

:36:16.:36:31.

to win the match. Maybe at the beginning of the year

:36:32.:36:33.

you are focusing a little bit more on yourself, and how

:36:34.:36:36.

you are playing, and how you want to play, moving

:36:37.:36:38.

into the Aussie Open, rather than just solely

:36:39.:36:40.

focusing on the outcome. Newcastle Falcons produced

:36:41.:36:44.

a stunning late comeback to beat Bath 24-22 in rugby union's Aviva

:36:45.:36:47.

Premiership. Bath led by 12 points half way

:36:48.:36:51.

through the second half, but Ben Harris barged his way over

:36:52.:36:55.

to draw Newcastle level less Man of the match Joel Hodgson

:36:56.:36:59.

kept his nerve to slot home the conversion,

:37:00.:37:05.

and send Bath to their Scarlets also came from behind

:37:06.:37:07.

to beat Ulster 16-13, The winning score was a penalty try

:37:08.:37:15.

- Scarlets scrum half Aled Davies was on the receiving end of a high

:37:16.:37:22.

tackle, as he tried Elsewhere, Leinster beat Zebre, and

:37:23.:37:25.

Newport Gwent Dragons beat Treviso. This afternoon, Sir

:37:26.:37:32.

Mo Farah is in action The four-time Olympic champion -

:37:33.:37:33.

who insists he's happy just to be called Mo -

:37:34.:37:37.

was surprisingly beaten He's using the event as part

:37:38.:37:39.

of his preparation for the track World Championships in London

:37:40.:37:44.

later this year, and admits he'll have his work cut out

:37:45.:37:46.

against some cross country They will try and put me down

:37:47.:37:49.

and beat me as quick as possible. That is what makes Cross-Country

:37:50.:38:11.

exciting. This is the event. I will fight for it. But it suits certain

:38:12.:38:16.

athletes better. It will be tough. Now as the big teams enter

:38:17.:38:21.

the FA Cup this weekend, I am sure we will see some silky

:38:22.:38:23.

skills on display - but none as spectacular as those

:38:24.:38:26.

performed by players in the sport It's been one of Asia's biggest

:38:27.:38:29.

sports for centuries. It does hurt to head that.

:38:30.:38:54.

It's heavy, yeah! Outshot! Go easy! Close range. You don't want it on

:38:55.:39:05.

your head. I'm used to it now. Let's see how it is properly played.

:39:06.:39:08.

It is Asia's best-kept secret, the sport that has been part

:39:09.:39:11.

of the culture in countries like Malaysia since the 15th

:39:12.:39:18.

century, combining football skills with the moves of kung fu.

:39:19.:39:23.

And now, sepak takraw is taking off in the UK as well.

:39:24.:39:30.

It is linking the martial art, or the art of the body,

:39:31.:39:34.

with this game, because you need to have the agility,

:39:35.:39:36.

First of all, you are learning the basics of kicking up, really.

:39:37.:39:44.

It does hurt, I can tell you that, a little bit, because...

:39:45.:39:49.

Slightly softer than the original ones, which were made of rattan,

:39:50.:39:58.

If you play football, therefore you can play this

:39:59.:40:08.

So it is football meets volleyball, and has now spread across the world.

:40:09.:40:13.

And who better to recruit for the newest team forming this

:40:14.:40:16.

year, than freestyle football world recordholder John Farnworth.

:40:17.:40:28.

Now, the size of the ball was a surprise.

:40:29.:40:31.

In matches it is only three a side, and you only have three touches

:40:32.:40:54.

per team, before it has to go over the net.

:40:55.:40:58.

You do have set positions - the server, the feeder

:40:59.:41:10.

The flexibility these guys possess is incredible.

:41:11.:41:21.

They are getting their legs way above their head.

:41:22.:41:23.

It is like what Zlatan Ibrahimovic does.

:41:24.:41:33.

And if we win the point, the celebration.

:41:34.:41:39.

John, there is potential for you. You did a header. They are trying to

:41:40.:41:54.

form a national league in the UK. Open to get a British team together

:41:55.:41:57.

by the summer to take on the likes of Switzerland, Belgium and France,

:41:58.:42:02.

who lead the European Challenge Tour. You start off practising

:42:03.:42:12.

keepy-uppy? Yes. I am impressed by your high kicks. I was OK at

:42:13.:42:17.

serving. When it came to the complicated net stuff, I left that

:42:18.:42:22.

to John. It would be great to see a British team on the world stage.

:42:23.:42:27.

That is enough heading! Concentrate on my foot skills.

:42:28.:42:34.

We are doing foot skills later with Joe Wicks. We have had lots of texts

:42:35.:42:44.

and e-mails and Facebook messages on potholes this morning. ?14 billion

:42:45.:42:51.

funding issue on that. That is how much they say it will cost to repair

:42:52.:42:54.

all of the potholes in England by 2020. Masses of correspondence.

:42:55.:43:01.

Tammy says the front wheel of bicycle went down a pothole. It

:43:02.:43:05.

stopped and she didn't. One ambulance, a hospital visit and a

:43:06.:43:10.

week off work. Even though the pothole was filled, she is still

:43:11.:43:13.

nervous about that section of the road. In fact, cycling has never

:43:14.:43:17.

been the same for. Lots of cyclists involved. Gary, back in 2015, he hit

:43:18.:43:26.

a pothole in the rain. It was full of water. He went over the

:43:27.:43:30.

handlebars. We had eight months of work. Still having treatment. Lots

:43:31.:43:32.

of you with similar stories. Police say that 35 children have

:43:33.:43:35.

come forward to them, fearing they have been groomed online

:43:36.:43:39.

following the publication of a film about the life of murdered

:43:40.:43:43.

schoolgirl Kayleigh Haywood. The 15-year-old had chatted with

:43:44.:43:46.

a man on Facebook for two weeks, The five-minute video,

:43:47.:43:49.

made by Leicestershire police, was shown to 35,000 school pupils

:43:50.:43:55.

in September and made We'll speak to the force's

:43:56.:43:59.

Chief Constable in just a moment, but first let's take

:44:00.:44:06.

a look at the film. I'll ride to stay at Katie's

:44:07.:44:40.

tomorrow? Yeah, all right. Mum and dad wouldn't understand. They don't

:44:41.:44:41.

know he is different. Chief Constable Simon Cole joins us

:44:42.:44:43.

from our Leicester studio. It's a very powerful film. It's a

:44:44.:44:52.

very unsettling film to watch. The first thing we should point out is

:44:53.:44:56.

this was done with the cooperation and approval of Caley's family?

:44:57.:45:03.

Yeah, absolutely. Caley's family have been integral. They wanted as

:45:04.:45:08.

we wanted that there was a legacy which would mean some good came out

:45:09.:45:12.

of something so tragic. They have been hugely supportive. The film was

:45:13.:45:17.

not an easy watch because it is not an easy topic. She went, 15 days

:45:18.:45:24.

from meeting someone online, to tragically being murdered. Along the

:45:25.:45:29.

way there are 2643 messages exchanged. It is a pretty sobering

:45:30.:45:33.

watch. I would suggest to viewers that they watch it and certainly I

:45:34.:45:38.

have watched it as a police officer and as a parent. Online there are

:45:39.:45:43.

fantastic opportunities, lots that is good. But there are also some

:45:44.:45:46.

risks. That is what this film tries to demonstrate using a very sad

:45:47.:45:54.

case. It could have been anyone's child, Hani won -- anyone family?

:45:55.:46:02.

Yes, if you watch the film and we now believe more than 5.5 million

:46:03.:46:06.

people have watched it since it went online earlier this week. It is such

:46:07.:46:12.

an ordinary story. We have shown the film in supported viewings to 35,000

:46:13.:46:17.

school children all across Leicestershire and Rutland. 35 of

:46:18.:46:22.

them have come forward and said something similar had happened to

:46:23.:46:27.

them, which has led us to investigations and safeguarding

:46:28.:46:32.

work. This is going on. There is much that is good online. I hope the

:46:33.:46:38.

film makes people aware of the risks. The man who contacted

:46:39.:46:42.

Kayleigh Haywood and the means he went and read it, would that be

:46:43.:46:46.

quite typical of the techniques that anyone grooming a child would use?

:46:47.:46:52.

Yes, I think it would. The texts in the film are real texts. He is now

:46:53.:46:58.

doing 12 years in prison. It became apparent that he was also in contact

:46:59.:47:03.

with other young people in a similar way and he was representing himself

:47:04.:47:06.

as something that he wasn't and someone he wasn't. His next door

:47:07.:47:12.

neighbour and friend was the person that killed Kaylee Haywood and he is

:47:13.:47:18.

doing 35 years. It is pretty typical. That is why it is being

:47:19.:47:22.

shown in the way it is shown, using some of the real words we use. When

:47:23.:47:28.

you take it from here when people come forward? We have been working

:47:29.:47:35.

with other partner agencies across Leicestershire and Rutland. The most

:47:36.:47:39.

important thing is to safeguard the young person. The next stage is

:47:40.:47:43.

often an investigation. There have been investigations that have

:47:44.:47:48.

followed on from the 35 disclosures. And the film is about trying to

:47:49.:47:52.

create a legacy of prevention so that people behave differently,

:47:53.:47:55.

people perhaps think about who they are talking to online. People

:47:56.:47:59.

realise they don't always know who they are talking to. If they then

:48:00.:48:04.

finish up meeting people they have met online, that they do that in a

:48:05.:48:07.

way that is safe and they can be saved. I think a lot of parents will

:48:08.:48:15.

be interested in looking this up and putting it into any search engine.

:48:16.:48:20.

What sort of age range are we talking about? What age range is

:48:21.:48:23.

appropriate for a? We have shown that in supervised showings from 11

:48:24.:48:31.

years -- for children from 11 years and upwards. It is not an easy

:48:32.:48:40.

watch. As you watch it you sort of find yourself trying back into your

:48:41.:48:45.

seat thinking, goodness me. But we have watched it in a supervised way,

:48:46.:48:50.

children of 11 and upwards, because those are the kind of children that

:48:51.:48:54.

are active online, which is mostly good, but they need to be aware of

:48:55.:48:58.

the risks. Watch it with your children and talk to them about it

:48:59.:49:03.

is the general message? Yeah, absolutely. Thank you very much

:49:04.:49:05.

indeed. Chief Constable Simon Cole. Details of organisations

:49:06.:49:11.

offering information and support are available

:49:12.:49:12.

at bbc.co.uk/actionline, or you can call for free any

:49:13.:49:15.

time, to hear recorded It is pretty mild this morning. It

:49:16.:49:42.

is also misty and murky. There is the evidence.

:49:43.:49:48.

It is. It is not going anywhere quickly, this fog. It is a cloud

:49:49.:49:54.

layer. It has hit the surface in some areas because we have no wind.

:49:55.:50:01.

There is the risk of further travel disruption this morning and into the

:50:02.:50:07.

afternoon. This is Staffordshire. The fog is the main concern. It is

:50:08.:50:14.

particularly thick through northern England, the Vale of York, Cheshire

:50:15.:50:19.

and Manchester. In Bristol, visibility is down to 100 metres.

:50:20.:50:23.

That will affect airports. We have got the drizzly rain across the

:50:24.:50:27.

South. That will be slow to clear. It is cloudy, it is grey and the

:50:28.:50:33.

cloud is thick enough to give us drizzle. In the Southend West, that

:50:34.:50:40.

will be reluctant clear. Few glimmers of sunshine. I wouldn't

:50:41.:50:47.

like to promise them in any particularly lengthy spells, but

:50:48.:50:51.

possibly in north-eastern Scotland and eastern Northern Ireland faring

:50:52.:50:56.

better. It will ease up a little bit this evening and overnight in the

:50:57.:51:03.

North. But the cloud... Generally mild, the temps -- temperatures. It

:51:04.:51:10.

will be a murky morning tomorrow. Misty and foggy weather once again.

:51:11.:51:15.

The fog taking time to clear. In the south, a mostly dry and cloudy day.

:51:16.:51:19.

Slightly brighter without the weather front. In the south and

:51:20.:51:24.

north, possibly brighter spells. If you are heading to the FA Cup today

:51:25.:51:29.

and tomorrow, it is basically leaden skies. Relatively mild. -6

:51:30.:51:37.

yesterday, this morning, six, tomorrow, eight to ten. The breeze

:51:38.:51:44.

strengthening tomorrow. It is significantly warmer than eastern

:51:45.:51:47.

parts of Europe. At the moment across parts of Belgium and Holland,

:51:48.:51:53.

parts of France, we have freezing rain, icy conditions. Into next

:51:54.:51:59.

week, all change. We get rid of the high-pressure. We have low pressure.

:52:00.:52:05.

So bands of rain and breeze picking up as well.

:52:06.:52:09.

That clears the fog at least. Thank you.

:52:10.:52:17.

This week HSBC launched adverts for its new voice recognition

:52:18.:52:19.

security system for customers of its telephone banking service.

:52:20.:52:28.

It's just one of several initiatives to get rid of passwords.

:52:29.:52:31.

Typically it is estimated we each have more than 20 online

:52:32.:52:33.

accounts which need one - and most of us struggle

:52:34.:52:36.

to remember them, or don't keep them very secure.

:52:37.:52:40.

Goodness knows, keeping one password for all 20 is the worst thing you

:52:41.:52:45.

can do. You have to keep changing them.

:52:46.:52:46.

Paul Lewis of Radio 4's Money Box programme has been looking

:52:47.:52:49.

at password security, and joins us now

:52:50.:52:50.

It is complicated, isn't it? There are so many demands on our password

:52:51.:53:02.

security. It is. You have to keep changing them. The advice is not to

:53:03.:53:07.

use one over several sites. You mentioned HSBC. They are trailing

:53:08.:53:15.

this. Voice recognition will replace passwords. MasterCard are trying out

:53:16.:53:22.

taking a selfie of yourself when you log on. See if that works. With the

:53:23.:53:28.

iPhone you can use your thumb print. Passwords are here to stay for a

:53:29.:53:31.

long time and managing them is difficult. HSBC talking about voice

:53:32.:53:37.

recognition over the phone. That doesn't mean the end of passwords?

:53:38.:53:44.

Not at all. Not for now, certainly. The advice is, and I have been

:53:45.:53:47.

talking to experts, people still use passwords like one, two, three,

:53:48.:53:59.

four, five, six. Perhaps stick a punctuation mark in the middle. That

:54:00.:54:08.

is virtually on trackable. You can use password managers. These are

:54:09.:54:12.

sites on the web that you can join and you just have one very secure

:54:13.:54:16.

password which, of course, you have to remember. They then manage your

:54:17.:54:20.

passwords and make them very difficult or impossible to crack.

:54:21.:54:24.

You have to pick the right firm. You have to trust them with their --

:54:25.:54:29.

your password. The real problem is not just us. It is the firms. If

:54:30.:54:34.

someone has a password breach and your passwords are stolen, thieves

:54:35.:54:39.

can crack those passwords. If you use them on different sites, once

:54:40.:54:45.

they have got one password, they have got access to everything. So

:54:46.:54:50.

you have to have a lot of secure passwords to keep yourself safe. It

:54:51.:54:54.

is a problem. But we have to deal with it. It isn't like locking the

:54:55.:54:57.

front door and the windows when you get out. And having to change your

:54:58.:55:02.

keys every couple of weeks! That is a very good example. With password

:55:03.:55:11.

management tools, you just have to remember one. You don't write it

:55:12.:55:15.

down. You have to remember it. Then you have two ask yourself, what is

:55:16.:55:19.

my password?! There will be more on that

:55:20.:55:22.

story on Money Box at When you've pushed yourself

:55:23.:55:25.

to the edge to conquer Mount Everest, abandoning your climb

:55:26.:55:28.

just 500 metres from the top is not But that's what our next heroic

:55:29.:55:31.

guest did to help a fellow Former British serviceman

:55:32.:55:37.

Leslie Binns turned around to save a woman who'd collapsed

:55:38.:55:43.

while on her trek. But, he's attempting

:55:44.:55:48.

to scale the world's highest mountain again soon,

:55:49.:55:52.

and joins us now in the studio, Good morning. I think you have the

:55:53.:56:08.

wrong guest. You are tired Landman! I love that this man and God, he

:56:09.:56:12.

doesn't necessarily look like a mountain air. I think the

:56:13.:56:18.

mountaineers that man behind us. That's the one. Do you have any

:56:19.:56:26.

heroic stories to tell us? I have but none involving Mount Everest. We

:56:27.:56:31.

will talk to Leslie Binns later. Todd, we definitely want to talk to

:56:32.:56:34.

you about what is going on in America, Donald Trump and Vladimir

:56:35.:56:40.

Putin, who has been accused of engineering the cyber attack on the

:56:41.:56:41.

United States. Coming up before the end

:56:42.:56:45.

of the programme: She was an outsider to win,

:56:46.:56:56.

but Ray BLK is now following in the steps of Adele

:56:57.:56:59.

after topping the BBC's She'll be joining us

:57:00.:57:02.

here before ten. Stay with us -

:57:03.:57:16.

the headlines are next. Hello, this is Breakfast,

:57:17.:58:36.

with Rachel Burden and Jon Kay. The British Red Cross warns

:58:37.:58:38.

of a humanitarian crisis in NHS The charity says the Government

:58:39.:58:41.

needs to provide more It's after dozens of A departments

:58:42.:58:44.

were forced to divert Good morning,

:58:45.:58:48.

it's Saturday 7th January. Also ahead, an American army veteran

:58:49.:59:07.

has been arrested at Fort Lauderdale Airport

:59:08.:59:09.

in Florida. Donald Trump promises to look

:59:10.:59:14.

at ways of combating cyber attacks on US elections after a briefing

:59:15.:59:18.

from intelligence chiefs. A bump in the road -

:59:19.:59:24.

councils predict a huge rise in the repair bill for potholes

:59:25.:59:29.

in England and Wales. In sport, it's a stroll for City

:59:30.:59:32.

in the FA Cup as Manchester City put five past West Ham United to go

:59:33.:59:35.

through to the fourth round. the top of the Christmas

:59:36.:59:42.

bestseller lists. We'll be joined by a

:59:43.:59:47.

star of social media. The body coach Joe Wicks will be

:59:48.:59:49.

with us on the sofa. And Helen has the weather.

:59:50.:00:04.

Good morning, grey and murky, fog and especially over the hills, but

:00:05.:00:07.

in contrast to yesterday, nowhere near as cold, all the details for

:00:08.:00:12.

the weekend in around 15 minutes, join me if you can.

:00:13.:00:16.

The British Red Cross is warning of a humanitarian crisis

:00:17.:00:21.

in NHS hospitals in England and is demanding the Government

:00:22.:00:23.

allocates more money to improve social care.

:00:24.:00:25.

Dozens of A departments were forced to divert ambulances

:00:26.:00:27.

The Royal College of Emergency Medicine

:00:28.:00:35.

says the system is on its knees, but the Department of Health says

:00:36.:00:38.

it's investing more money to improve services.

:00:39.:00:39.

Winter pressure on accident and emergency - nothing new,

:00:40.:00:43.

but the Red Cross now says the strain on hospitals in England

:00:44.:00:47.

The charity claims social-care cuts mean patients are sent home

:00:48.:00:54.

without the right support, so then they end up back in A

:00:55.:00:58.

Red Cross volunteers support NHS staff and say they've seen patients

:00:59.:01:01.

sent home without clothes, some who don't receive the care

:01:02.:01:04.

even some who've fallen and not been found for days.

:01:05.:01:12.

A staff recognise the problems too.

:01:13.:01:16.

I think the pressures on the NHS, and especially in emergency care,

:01:17.:01:19.

are particularly intense at the moment.

:01:20.:01:21.

But what is more concerning is the number of patients who

:01:22.:01:27.

have been managed within four hours, and then the delays to admission

:01:28.:01:30.

into the hospital bed base, which unfortunately are very,

:01:31.:01:32.

very significant, and our staff are working under some pretty

:01:33.:01:35.

intolerable conditions at times trying to manage.

:01:36.:01:37.

And sometimes they just can't manage.

:01:38.:01:43.

Figures from NHS England show that overflowing A departments

:01:44.:01:46.

had to close their doors to new patients

:01:47.:01:49.

more than 140 times over the last month.

:01:50.:01:50.

Compare that with the same month in 2015 - it's up more than 60%.

:01:51.:01:57.

The suspicion is that it's a combination of the cuts

:01:58.:01:59.

that we've seen in social care, in community services run

:02:00.:02:02.

by the NHS, and very heavy pressure in general practice.

:02:03.:02:06.

So is the strain on the NHS costing lives?

:02:07.:02:09.

The death of two patients on emergency trolleys

:02:10.:02:12.

at Worcestershire Royal Hospital are being investigated.

:02:13.:02:15.

One of them had waited 35 hours for a bed.

:02:16.:02:18.

The Department of Health says it's providing billions more

:02:19.:02:21.

NHS England says plans are in place to deal with the extra demand.

:02:22.:02:28.

Beds are actually not quite as full as they work this time last year,

:02:29.:02:31.

but everyone in the health service knows things could get worse

:02:32.:02:34.

Earlier on Breakfast, Dr Mark Holland from the Society

:02:35.:02:42.

for Acute Medicine said so far it had been a winter from hell.

:02:43.:02:46.

We've seen, over the last week or so, that people who should be

:02:47.:02:49.

in a specialty bed are ending up in a non-specialty bed,

:02:50.:02:53.

or there are beds being created within a hospital that we call

:02:54.:02:57.

contingency beds, and people that I speak to across the country,

:02:58.:03:00.

e-mails that I've been receiving this week, things I've been

:03:01.:03:03.

reading in the media, make us conclude

:03:04.:03:06.

that the term "humanitarian crisis" has something to it.

:03:07.:03:12.

Police in Florida have been questioning a man after five people

:03:13.:03:15.

were killed and eight injured in a shooting at Fort

:03:16.:03:17.

The suspect opened fire in the baggage-claim

:03:18.:03:20.

area after seemingly retrieving his weapon

:03:21.:03:21.

The FBI says it's pursuing all leads and hasn't ruled out

:03:22.:03:25.

Our correspondent Gary O'Donoghue reports from Fort Lauderdale.

:03:26.:03:35.

It's a familiar scene at airports the world over,

:03:36.:03:38.

but the baggage-claim hall at the Fort Lauderdale Airport

:03:39.:03:41.

turned into a place of death and mayhem, as a lone gunman

:03:42.:03:44.

opened fire on those waiting to collect their luggage.

:03:45.:03:49.

Passengers scattered for cover, hitting the ground, and reports say

:03:50.:03:52.

the assailant had time to reload before opening fire once again,

:03:53.:03:57.

as attempts were made to attend to the wounded.

:03:58.:04:02.

Once he was done with ammunition, he threw the gun down,

:04:03.:04:04.

and I was about ten feet away from him.

:04:05.:04:08.

He basically threw the gun on the ground

:04:09.:04:10.

and laid on the ground face down, spreadeagled.

:04:11.:04:13.

The gunman has been named as 26-year-old Esteban Santiago.

:04:14.:04:17.

Reports say he was carrying a military ID and

:04:18.:04:21.

had a weapon in his checked baggage, which is legal in the United States.

:04:22.:04:27.

One family member said he had been receiving psychological

:04:28.:04:29.

treatment after leaving the National Guard last year.

:04:30.:04:35.

This cowardly, heinous act resulted in the deaths of five people.

:04:36.:04:39.

There were eight more people injured by way of gunshot that

:04:40.:04:43.

In his first reaction to the shooting,

:04:44.:04:49.

President Obama said he was heartbroken for the families.

:04:50.:04:52.

These kinds of tragedies have happened too often

:04:53.:04:55.

during the eight years that I've been President.

:04:56.:04:57.

The disruption at Fort Lauderdale went on long into the night,

:04:58.:05:04.

with some travellers stuck on the tarmac

:05:05.:05:05.

The FBI says it's ruling nothing out, including terrorism.

:05:06.:05:11.

But the agency has confirmed it had prior contact

:05:12.:05:14.

when he was referred for a mental-health assessment.

:05:15.:05:20.

The ease with which he was able to transport and use a weapon

:05:21.:05:23.

in an airport will raise serious concerns about public safety.

:05:24.:05:28.

Gary O'Donoghue, BBC News, Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

:05:29.:05:33.

US intelligence officials have released a report that claims

:05:34.:05:37.

Vladimir Putin personally ordered a cyber-campaign

:05:38.:05:40.

to try to help Donald Trump win the presidential election.

:05:41.:05:44.

Last night, after being briefed on the findings, Mr Trump said that

:05:45.:05:47.

hacking had absolutely no impact on the election result

:05:48.:05:49.

but promised to set up a team to stop future attacks,

:05:50.:05:52.

The report from American intelligence claims

:05:53.:06:00.

Russia's President, Vladimir Putin, personally ordered what it called

:06:01.:06:04.

an influence campaign to help Donald Trump's chances of winning

:06:05.:06:07.

The President-elect had earlier described the Russian hacking claims

:06:08.:06:13.

as a political witch-hunt by his opponents.

:06:14.:06:17.

At Trump Tower, he met America's top intelligence officials

:06:18.:06:19.

They say Russia's actions included hacking into the e-mail accounts

:06:20.:06:27.

of the Democratic National Committee and top Democrats, and using

:06:28.:06:29.

intermediaries such as WikiLeaks to release the information.

:06:30.:06:33.

Russia has previously denied this, and WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange

:06:34.:06:37.

has said before that Moscow was not the source.

:06:38.:06:40.

After the briefing, Mr Trump did not single out Russia.

:06:41.:06:42.

And the incoming Vice President says the US

:06:43.:07:13.

The President-elect has made it very clear that we're going to take

:07:14.:07:17.

aggressive action in the early days of our new administration

:07:18.:07:19.

to combat cyber attacks and protect the security of the American people

:07:20.:07:22.

from this type of intrusion in the future.

:07:23.:07:26.

Donald Trump said he had tremendous respect for the work

:07:27.:07:29.

and service done by those in the US intelligence community.

:07:30.:07:35.

But with two weeks to go until he moves into the White House,

:07:36.:07:38.

questions remain over how they will all work together

:07:39.:07:41.

The repair bill to fix the country's pot holes

:07:42.:07:48.

That's according to nearly 400 councils in England and Wales

:07:49.:07:53.

who say the Government should pay for repairs from fuel duty.

:07:54.:07:57.

The Government says it's already set aside a ?250 million fund

:07:58.:08:00.

but the Local Government Association says more needs to be done.

:08:01.:08:08.

We need a major investment in this country on the road is a structure,

:08:09.:08:12.

the infrastructure, and stopping this sort of patch-and-mend

:08:13.:08:14.

mentality, and giving us enough money to actually replace these

:08:15.:08:16.

local roads that desperately need proper money spent on them.

:08:17.:08:30.

Michelle Obama has delivered her final speech as First Lady

:08:31.:08:32.

of the United States, with an impassioned call

:08:33.:08:34.

on young people to have hope, and fight for their rights.

:08:35.:08:37.

Speaking at a ceremony in the White House,

:08:38.:08:39.

she ended tearfully, saying the role of First Lady

:08:40.:08:41.

had been the greatest honour of her life.

:08:42.:08:44.

Empower yourselves with a good education,

:08:45.:08:47.

then get out there and use that education

:08:48.:08:49.

to build a country worthy of your boundless promise.

:08:50.:08:53.

Lead by example - with hope, never fear.

:08:54.:09:01.

And know that I will be with you, rooting for you,

:09:02.:09:03.

and working to support you for the rest of my life.

:09:04.:09:06.

So I want to close today by simply saying thank you.

:09:07.:09:08.

Thank you for everything you do for our kids and for our country.

:09:09.:09:13.

Being your First Lady has been the greatest honour of my life,

:09:14.:09:16.

Not a dry eye in the house! The end of an era. We can think about the

:09:17.:09:37.

White House in the future under Donald Trump.

:09:38.:09:40.

He says he's had a constructive meeting with

:09:41.:09:42.

American intelligence officials, who have released a report

:09:43.:09:44.

saying Russia was behind a series of cyber attacks

:09:45.:09:46.

designed to influence the recent election.

:09:47.:09:48.

The President-elect insists the hacking played no part

:09:49.:09:50.

in his victory but says he'll appoint a team to devise

:09:51.:09:53.

ways of combating any future interference.

:09:54.:09:56.

Let's remind ourselves what's been happening over the last 18 months.

:09:57.:09:59.

an FBI agent found a Russian-linked hacker in the Democrats network.

:10:00.:10:09.

In July 2016, WikiLeaks released private emails from Democratic

:10:10.:10:12.

officials just days before the National Convention.

:10:13.:10:18.

In October 2016, the FBI and the CIA announce they believe the Russian

:10:19.:10:21.

and their aim was to interfere with the US election process.

:10:22.:10:28.

So what does Donald Trump think of it all?

:10:29.:10:32.

Well, he's made it clear he doesn't believe intelligence chiefs,

:10:33.:10:34.

And less than 24-hours before that briefing,

:10:35.:10:52.

one of his top intelligence advisers,

:10:53.:10:54.

former CIA director James Woolsey, quit his team.

:10:55.:11:02.

They were able to come up with the identities of the intermediaries

:11:03.:11:08.

between the Russian government and the people who did some of the

:11:09.:11:11.

hacking, they didn't have that before. And that, I think, was one

:11:12.:11:17.

thing that got a lot of people's attention, including mine.

:11:18.:11:19.

Todd Landman, professor of political science

:11:20.:11:21.

at the University of Nottingham, is with us.

:11:22.:11:27.

We are climbing a mountain of political intrigue in the United

:11:28.:11:34.

States this morning! Do you buy this interpretation by American

:11:35.:11:37.

intelligence services that Russia was behind this, and more

:11:38.:11:40.

specifically Vladimir Putin directed it himself? I think it goes a bit

:11:41.:11:45.

beyond interpretation, you are looking at 17 intelligence agencies

:11:46.:11:48.

coming together in this joint report which communicates what is allowed

:11:49.:11:51.

to be communicated - there are methods and techniques which are

:11:52.:11:56.

classified. That is the difficulty, we don't see the hard evidence. A

:11:57.:12:01.

lot of people make hay out of that, but a couple of key things are very

:12:02.:12:07.

interesting. Trump is hanging on to the fact that it does not say that

:12:08.:12:11.

the counting of votes was not affected, he won fair and square. It

:12:12.:12:15.

is impossible to determine, however, the degree to which public opinion

:12:16.:12:19.

had changed because of that intervention. That is something to

:12:20.:12:24.

draw from this experience. We don't know what happened behind locked

:12:25.:12:27.

doors in this meeting, but what do you make of the way Trump and esteem

:12:28.:12:31.

have dealt with this after the meeting finished? Since the meeting,

:12:32.:12:38.

we have seen a bit of forward movement from the Trump team, they

:12:39.:12:41.

say a constructive meeting, that is a positive signal. It is odd for a

:12:42.:12:45.

president to go on the offensive against the team that will work with

:12:46.:12:49.

him. They need to work with them everyday, there are 800 military

:12:50.:12:52.

bases around the world, there are constant briefings about this, and

:12:53.:12:56.

he needs to be briefed every day, and to disparage that really doesn't

:12:57.:13:01.

show the maturity of office that American people deserve. What is the

:13:02.:13:06.

endgame for Vladimir Putin? If you can influence world politics from

:13:07.:13:14.

behind your desk, in ways that has already been proven in this case,

:13:15.:13:17.

then it is a win for him, and it goes back to that zero-sum world

:13:18.:13:20.

politics of the Cold War, that a win for the Soviet Union was a loss for

:13:21.:13:23.

the United States. But he wants to work closely with Trump, forge a

:13:24.:13:28.

working relationship with him. It is not about Trump, it is about Hillary

:13:29.:13:33.

Clinton, the liberal order, international institutions, and to

:13:34.:13:35.

be able to attack that in ways that he has done, among other ways, is a

:13:36.:13:41.

way of returning to that zero-sum thinking. We are seeing a new

:13:42.:13:45.

paradigm perhaps in world politics, in which popular strongmen are

:13:46.:13:53.

coming to the fore. How damaging is this for Trump as president? When

:13:54.:13:57.

he's seen on stage with Putin, there will be a recollection in people's

:13:58.:14:01.

minds, even if we move on from this - Izzy Dagg was because of him? He

:14:02.:14:05.

needs to tackle it quickly, saying that there will be eight task forces

:14:06.:14:14.

the right thing to do. -- there will be a task force. It could be like

:14:15.:14:18.

the Hillary Clinton e-mail scandal, it could linger for many years, and

:14:19.:14:22.

he wants to get rid of it now, make sure something is being seen to be

:14:23.:14:28.

done. What about the UK perspective on all of this? British intelligence

:14:29.:14:32.

services, I think, assisted American intelligence in some ways in all of

:14:33.:14:36.

this, but also the report made it clear that this isn't necessarily

:14:37.:14:40.

just going to affect America, that it is likely that the Kremlin,

:14:41.:14:44.

Moscow, will be trying to use this influential power in other

:14:45.:14:47.

countries, in other world events as well. All powerful governments do

:14:48.:14:52.

this, that is an important point. Government around the world are able

:14:53.:14:56.

to do this, and there is a tit-for-tat strategy going on in

:14:57.:14:59.

terms of cyber attacks, so it is not just a Russian problem - it is a way

:15:00.:15:04.

in which power is exercised around the world. Military power, soft

:15:05.:15:11.

power, intelligence power et cetera. We shouldn't kid ourselves that this

:15:12.:15:14.

is only a Russian problem. Thank you very much. Lovely to have you with

:15:15.:15:22.

us this morning. Properly this time, earlier we

:15:23.:15:25.

thought you were someone else, thank you for coming back! Helen Housby --

:15:26.:15:36.

as the weather, sunshine breaking through at last!

:15:37.:15:40.

I was fed up of showing you fog this morning, so I found a little bit of

:15:41.:15:47.

sunshine. If you are living up in Moray, you may see a bit of

:15:48.:15:52.

sunshine, I would not say the north-east of Scotland was one of

:15:53.:15:55.

the better parts to see brightness, because elsewhere it is difficult to

:15:56.:16:00.

see much at all. Visibility has not really improved since I have been in

:16:01.:16:04.

this morning, and they are unlikely to improve very quickly. The

:16:05.:16:07.

remnants of a weather front in the south is reducing visibility,

:16:08.:16:12.

Bristol is down to 50 metres, but that fog is around through

:16:13.:16:15.

Lancashire, Cheshire, the Vale of York, pretty mucky in those areas.

:16:16.:16:21.

And it is great elsewhere. Fog, for example, sitting on the Chilterns,

:16:22.:16:25.

fog further west, drizzle quite widely across the south-west. Wales,

:16:26.:16:34.

mostly dry, but rather murky, particularly over the hills, not a

:16:35.:16:38.

day to Godel walking. Northern Ireland has a lot of cloud, Scotland

:16:39.:16:45.

as well, but predominantly dry. -- to go hill walking. Through this

:16:46.:16:48.

evening and overnight, all that cloud stops the temperatures from

:16:49.:16:53.

falling, so relatively mild to start this morning, a relatively mild day

:16:54.:16:57.

compared to what we have had this week, staying largely frost free

:16:58.:17:01.

overnight, chilly in the north-east of Scotland. But again, the area

:17:02.:17:05.

where we see the best of the sunshine, and other mucky start for

:17:06.:17:10.

most of us, hopefully a little bit more breeze picking up in the north

:17:11.:17:14.

to make it clear more quickly. On balance, more brightness, as you can

:17:15.:17:18.

see for the FA Cup, mostly light cloud rather than grey. But

:17:19.:17:23.

effectively it is cloudy! It should be dry, temperatures getting 28-10

:17:24.:17:28.

degrees Celsius, just a smidgen above average. -- getting to 8-10.

:17:29.:17:35.

We currently have freezing rain across the low countries, cold air

:17:36.:17:39.

stagnant further east, the average for Moscow was minus nine, and we

:17:40.:17:43.

have snow across the Greek islands at the moment, so some really wintry

:17:44.:17:47.

weather not too far away from our shores. As for the new we cared,

:17:48.:17:51.

turning more unsettled, low pressure moves in, high pressure keeps us

:17:52.:18:02.

dry. -- as for the new week ahead. We will keep you posted on the wind

:18:03.:18:06.

up north, it is the lack of wind that is causing problems today with

:18:07.:18:07.

the fog this morning. Thank you very much, Helen, we will

:18:08.:18:12.

wait for the fog to blow away! When you've pushed yourself

:18:13.:18:18.

to the edge to conquer Mount Everest, abandoning your climb

:18:19.:18:21.

just 500 metres from the top But that's what our next heroic

:18:22.:18:24.

guest did to help a fellow Former British serviceman

:18:25.:18:28.

Leslie Binns turned around to save a woman who'd collapsed

:18:29.:18:31.

while on her trek. the world's highest mountain

:18:32.:18:37.

again soon, Thank you very much indeed for

:18:38.:18:48.

coming in! Shall we go back to the first time, you tell us what

:18:49.:18:55.

happened? I managed to get to 8000 metres, which is Camp 4, it is about

:18:56.:19:01.

eight o'clock at night, a lovely night, nice clear whether, and a few

:19:02.:19:08.

hours later we were coming to a balcony, about 8400 metres, and

:19:09.:19:12.

there was a commotion at the head, and the next thing we knew, someone

:19:13.:19:15.

was sliding down the mountain towards me. It was a split-second

:19:16.:19:21.

decision to stop this person, essentially I rugby tackled her to

:19:22.:19:26.

stop her. The next thing I know, she was suffering from frostbite, the

:19:27.:19:31.

gloves were off. And this is the lady that you saved. Sunita, she was

:19:32.:19:36.

out of oxygen, she was in a very bad way, I had to get off the mountain,

:19:37.:19:42.

I couldn't leave her there to die. A very brave decision, because at that

:19:43.:19:46.

stage you didn't know what kind of assistance she would need, the

:19:47.:19:48.

difficulties you would encounter, and you came across another

:19:49.:19:55.

gentleman in a very dire situation. Yeah, me and the Sherpa got it

:19:56.:20:01.

sorted as best we could, we had a spare bottle of oxygen, we got

:20:02.:20:05.

gloves back on, and as we were heading down the mountain, there was

:20:06.:20:09.

another guy trouble. We thought he was one of the rescue teams coming

:20:10.:20:13.

up, but when we got to him, we realised he was in a lot of trouble,

:20:14.:20:18.

so we decided to help him as well. And things just seem to get worse

:20:19.:20:24.

from then on, I slipped into a few crevasses, we uncoupled from our

:20:25.:20:30.

safety lines, getting down the mountain, we all ended up sliding

:20:31.:20:34.

down, I thought it was the end of May, sliding down this blue eyes,

:20:35.:20:38.

cannot stop yourself. I thought that was it, I was very angry with myself

:20:39.:20:42.

to get myself in that situation. -- blue ice. I was a bit of a startled

:20:43.:20:52.

rabbit in headlights, but I realised I had to help these people, I

:20:53.:20:56.

decided to help the strongest person out of the two, Sunita. The other

:20:57.:21:02.

guy was stuck in a crass, which properly saved his life... Well, he

:21:03.:21:06.

passed away, but I went to help Sunita, I thought he would be OK

:21:07.:21:11.

until the sun came up. I helped Sunita into a sleeping bag, we had a

:21:12.:21:18.

flask of tea, we put her hands in it to warm her hands, and she managed

:21:19.:21:21.

to get away with just losing her little finger on her hand. But like

:21:22.:21:27.

I say, sadly, the other guy, with thoughts summary would help him in

:21:28.:21:32.

daylight. The Sherpas try to bring him down the mountain, but he later

:21:33.:21:37.

died. A reminder of just how treacherous embarking on this kind

:21:38.:21:42.

of journey is. After that, then, you formed a friendship with Sunita,

:21:43.:21:47.

understandably! Yeah. Yes, she keeps in touch with me, mainly my

:21:48.:21:56.

girlfriend, we ask about each other's families. I remember

:21:57.:22:02.

chatting to her in the tent at comedy, drinking hot tea, she was

:22:03.:22:07.

telling me about her family. -- at Camp 4. Having gone through not just

:22:08.:22:14.

one incident but a number of incidents, which is so scary, so

:22:15.:22:18.

dangerous, a lot of people would say, I am never going to do that

:22:19.:22:22.

again - but you are going back. Yeah, if you want to achieve your

:22:23.:22:26.

dreams, there is an element of danger, it is relevant to what you

:22:27.:22:31.

want to do. What you have got to understand, it is a harsh

:22:32.:22:35.

environment, a harsh man done. It does take peoples lives, but to get

:22:36.:22:40.

that close to the summit and not to be able to finish it off, that will

:22:41.:22:46.

stay in the back of your mind. If we don't strike again, I have to give

:22:47.:22:54.

it a fair shot. Are you more nervous? I would not save more

:22:55.:22:57.

nervous, but I know what is coming this time. I know there will be a

:22:58.:23:03.

lot of heartache, where I have to push myself, get myself out of the

:23:04.:23:08.

sleeping bag in the morning, but I am excited, really excited to go

:23:09.:23:12.

back and have another go at this beautiful mountain. You experienced

:23:13.:23:16.

something like four separate explosions during active military

:23:17.:23:19.

service, did you lose your eyesight in one eye? Yes, one of the Afghan

:23:20.:23:29.

army soldiers I was patrolling with stepped on an IED, I got the blast

:23:30.:23:32.

down the left-hand side of my face and lost my sight in my left one. So

:23:33.:23:37.

more of a challenge than it would be for some people anyway, gosh, I

:23:38.:23:41.

admire you! How does your girlfriend feel about it? She is very

:23:42.:23:46.

supportive, 100% behind me. Obviously, this is all in the back

:23:47.:23:50.

of mind, that things can go wrong, but we put it to one side. As a

:23:51.:23:55.

family, we are focused on getting me to the summit. You have amazing

:23:56.:23:58.

mental strength. And physical strength! Good luck, and keep us

:23:59.:24:06.

posted, we will see you back here to hear about your successful bridging

:24:07.:24:09.

of the summit. Fantastic, thank you very much. -- reaching.

:24:10.:24:18.

You're watching Breakfast from BBC News,

:24:19.:24:20.

time now for a look at the newspapers.

:24:21.:24:21.

The writer Paul Vallely is here to tell us what's caught his eye.

:24:22.:24:25.

Welcome back, Paul, where are you going to start? The Daily Mail story

:24:26.:24:34.

about Jamie Oliver closing some of his restaurants, is chief executive

:24:35.:24:41.

said that it was due to post-Brexit pressures. -- his. Clearly, his

:24:42.:24:47.

customers do not agree, they have been saying it is high prices and

:24:48.:24:55.

poor food! Obviously, you get a few who are disappointed with

:24:56.:24:59.

everything, but it is quite striking that Brexit is being blamed. There

:25:00.:25:04.

is another story in the Times, a front page about a donor who has

:25:05.:25:11.

given ?1.2 million to the Tory party, saying he is going to stop

:25:12.:25:16.

supporting it if Britain leaves the EU single market. And the paper has

:25:17.:25:27.

a leader about Brexit, in which it kind of unpacks some of these

:25:28.:25:30.

intentions. How can you believe these different stories about

:25:31.:25:36.

Brexit? It is explaining that the chief economist of the Bank of

:25:37.:25:42.

England was talking about a Michael Fish moment, when they got it wrong,

:25:43.:25:47.

and they are saying the thing about Brexit is that we really don't know

:25:48.:25:51.

what is happening still, and it could all unpack in a way in which

:25:52.:25:56.

Jamie Oliver is using as an excuse at the moment. It is quite a good

:25:57.:26:02.

context setting leader, it is worth reading, the Times leader on that.

:26:03.:26:09.

Virtually every article has Brexit in there somewhat! We will be

:26:10.:26:14.

talking to Joe Wicks, this clean living, amazing athlete, lots of

:26:15.:26:17.

people following him, but you are talking about fat being back this

:26:18.:26:21.

morning. Yes, speaking as someone who was on a died before Christmas,

:26:22.:26:26.

lost a stone, put some of it back on, haven't had the dreaded way in

:26:27.:26:33.

yet! -- a diet. This adds to the confusion, written by the business

:26:34.:26:37.

editor of the Financial Times, she has been a Napier died which

:26:38.:26:40.

consists of red meat and double cream, knocking back on the sugar,

:26:41.:26:50.

dairy, alcohol. -- a peculiar diet. It is two pages long, and she says

:26:51.:26:54.

halfway through that there is a lot of confusion, and no wonder the

:26:55.:26:59.

British public is confused. The advice is so absolutely

:27:00.:27:02.

contradictory, someone on the diet with was told off for eating an

:27:03.:27:08.

apple, it is that bad. But what it all boils down to, it seems to me,

:27:09.:27:13.

is that every diet makes you conscious of what you are eating,

:27:14.:27:17.

and that makes you eat less, and that seems to be the truth behind

:27:18.:27:21.

all the diets. The faddish nature of them is what stops you succeeding

:27:22.:27:27.

very often. Every paper has an offer for some sort of diet or exercise

:27:28.:27:36.

programme. I want to talk you about how a nap keeps you young, anyone

:27:37.:27:41.

who works odd hours, learning to catnap is one of life's great

:27:42.:27:45.

skills, and it can do our brain some good according to the Express. It is

:27:46.:27:52.

also in the FT article, that sleep is good for losing weight, but this

:27:53.:27:57.

tested people's memory and ability to do maths and various things. It

:27:58.:28:02.

was in America, and it worked out that if you sleep for an hour every

:28:03.:28:08.

afternoon, your ability to do things improves enormously. If you sleep

:28:09.:28:11.

for less than an hour or more than an hour, it doesn't work quite so

:28:12.:28:15.

well. Some of it is pretty common sense. I mean, people have been

:28:16.:28:21.

having siestas in Europe for years, haven't they? What it says,

:28:22.:28:28.

basically, is that there is a restorative function that sleep

:28:29.:28:32.

brings, and your brain is kind of overtaxed, and you need to rest it.

:28:33.:28:37.

Shall we try no?! God I was thinking about just going

:28:38.:28:42.

home and climbing back in bed, actually!

:28:43.:28:45.

Thank you so much for your time, sleep and dietary advice in the

:28:46.:28:46.

papers. All the best. We're on BBC One until ten

:28:47.:28:49.

o'clock this morning, when Donal Skehan takes over

:28:50.:28:52.

in the Saturday Kitchen. It is looking fantastic this

:28:53.:28:59.

morning, our special guest today has just dived into the studio, the

:29:00.:29:04.

amazing Tom Daley, you are facing food heaven or food hell. Food

:29:05.:29:09.

heaven is beef Wellington, very British. Great for the diet! And

:29:10.:29:15.

food hell? Anything like massive bony fish I am not a fan. We are

:29:16.:29:22.

also joined by two brilliant guests, Ching-He Huang, what is on the menu?

:29:23.:29:27.

I will be making chicken, it is an American dish, very popular,

:29:28.:29:31.

delicious. And making his debut on the show, Mark Greenaway, is

:29:32.:29:37.

cooking? A very simple brown sugar baked cheesecake with tomato

:29:38.:29:41.

caramel. We are all excited about the tomato caramelised smack and I

:29:42.:29:45.

am a fan of cheesecake, we are in a good place, see you at ten, guys. --

:29:46.:29:54.

tomato caramel! We will all be looking at what he is eating!

:29:55.:29:56.

Headlines and more food coming up. Hello, this is Breakfast

:29:57.:30:30.

with Jon Kay and Rachel Burden. Coming up before nine,

:30:31.:30:33.

Helen will have the weather. Mike will have all

:30:34.:30:37.

of the FA cup sport. But first, a summary

:30:38.:30:42.

of this morning's main news. The British Red Cross is warning

:30:43.:30:46.

of a humanitarian crisis in NHS hospitals in England,

:30:47.:30:49.

and is demanding the government allocates more money

:30:50.:30:52.

to improve social care. Dozens of A departments

:30:53.:30:55.

were forced to divert ambulances to other hospitals last week,

:30:56.:30:57.

while one patient died after The Department of Health says it's

:30:58.:31:01.

investing more money But Dr Mark Holland,

:31:02.:31:07.

from the Society for Acute Medicine, said it had so far been

:31:08.:31:12.

a "winter from hell". We have seen over the last week

:31:13.:31:16.

or so that people who should be in a specialty bed are ending up

:31:17.:31:20.

in a non-speciality bed, or are beds People I speak to across

:31:21.:31:28.

the country, e-mails I have been receiving and things I have been

:31:29.:31:32.

reading in the media, make us conclude that the term humanitarian

:31:33.:31:35.

crisis has some validity. Police in Florida have

:31:36.:31:42.

been questioning a man, after five people were killed

:31:43.:31:44.

and eight injured in a shooting The suspect opened fire

:31:45.:31:47.

in the baggage claim area, after seemingly retrieving his

:31:48.:31:52.

weapon from his luggage. The FBI says it's pursuing all leads

:31:53.:31:56.

and hasn't ruled out US intelligence officials have

:31:57.:31:58.

released a report that claims Vladimir Putin personally ordered

:31:59.:32:04.

a cyber campaign to try and help Donald Trump win

:32:05.:32:07.

the presidential election. Last night, after being briefed

:32:08.:32:10.

on the findings, Mr Trump said that hacking had had absolutely

:32:11.:32:12.

no impact on the election outcome. His running mate, Mike Pence,

:32:13.:32:15.

says a team will be set up The President-elect has made it very

:32:16.:32:20.

clear that we're going to take aggressive action in the early days

:32:21.:32:28.

of our new administration to combat cyber attacks and protect

:32:29.:32:31.

the security of the American people from this type of

:32:32.:32:40.

intrusion in the future. For the first time, the NHS

:32:41.:32:44.

is providing disabled children with prosthetic limbs,

:32:45.:32:46.

that are specially 13-year-old Ben from Brighton

:32:47.:32:49.

was amongst the first to benefit, NHS England says it hopes

:32:50.:32:53.

the programme will allow "several hundred" children a year to receive

:32:54.:32:58.

limbs, allowing them A killer whale which was involved

:32:59.:33:02.

in the deaths of three people and featured in an influential

:33:03.:33:07.

documentary, has died Tilikum featured in the film

:33:08.:33:09.

Blackfish, which led to a global campaign against the keeping

:33:10.:33:14.

of orcas in captivity. Sea World says staff are "deeply

:33:15.:33:19.

saddened" by the death of the whale, which was thought

:33:20.:33:22.

to be 36 years old. Those are the main

:33:23.:33:28.

stories this morning. The question is, tomorrow morning

:33:29.:33:37.

will be be talking about a giant-killing upset in the FA Cup?

:33:38.:33:42.

May be a Stourbridge player, Eastleigh, Lincoln? Manchester City

:33:43.:33:49.

have certainly made their mark. It was a first FA Cup paste work Pep

:33:50.:33:52.

Guardiola, their manager. He relished it. Interesting to see if

:33:53.:34:00.

this helps their league form. Before their FA Cup third round tie, if --

:34:01.:34:05.

Slaven Bilic suggested Manchester City was not a confident team and a

:34:06.:34:09.

more. But they responded in emphatic style.

:34:10.:34:12.

City were already out of sight by half time -

:34:13.:34:15.

leading 3-0 thanks to an own goal, a Yaya Toure penalty,

:34:16.:34:17.

The gloss on an impressive night was added by John Stones.

:34:18.:34:22.

The England defender scored his first goal

:34:23.:34:23.

He needed goal-line technology to confirm that he'd

:34:24.:34:27.

Hopefully it can help us to make our players believers,

:34:28.:34:34.

that they are good enough to play every game, and try,

:34:35.:34:39.

in both our fans and the people in Manchester City, and they can

:34:40.:34:42.

They know what happened in the past, but we are good guys.

:34:43.:34:51.

So they run a lot, fight a lot, playing good.

:34:52.:34:53.

We gave everything but as a team it wasn't good enough. It was nowhere

:34:54.:35:10.

near the performance we had here against Man United when we were much

:35:11.:35:18.

more compact. That is the disappointment.

:35:19.:35:21.

It will be a special FA Cup reunion, today, for one of the members

:35:22.:35:24.

of the treble-winning Manchester United team of 1999.

:35:25.:35:26.

Former Netherlands centre half Jaap Stam is now the manager

:35:27.:35:28.

of Championship side Reading, who go to Old Trafford hunting

:35:29.:35:31.

As a player, there is nothing better than to play over there,

:35:32.:35:37.

in a stadium like that in front of so many fans.

:35:38.:35:42.

And we know, as well, we have our own fans over

:35:43.:35:44.

Hopefully they are joining in and supporting us.

:35:45.:36:02.

The five lower league teams left have a fair chance of getting into

:36:03.:36:09.

the next round. The lowest ranked team Stourbridge Arab Wycombe

:36:10.:36:14.

Wanderers. Some potentially tricky away ties for Crystal Palace,

:36:15.:36:22.

Norwich and Arsenal. You have got one of the best teams in Europe

:36:23.:36:26.

coming. A manager who has graced the Premier League for 20 odd years. The

:36:27.:36:32.

original invincible is against the modern-day invincible. It is a

:36:33.:36:35.

fantastic occasion. It will be a sell-out. The third round of the FA

:36:36.:36:40.

Cup. There is always a shock. Hopefully that will be the case on

:36:41.:36:46.

Saturday night. He knows how to create an upset. Remember when is

:36:47.:36:50.

Leeds United team beat Manchester United a couple of years ago?

:36:51.:36:53.

Sir Andy Murray will play world number two

:36:54.:36:56.

Novak Djokovic in the final of the Qatar Open today.

:36:57.:36:58.

Murray beat Czech Tomas Berdych in straight sets in their semi

:36:59.:37:01.

final, to reach his fourth final in Doha.

:37:02.:37:03.

The win was Murray's 28th in a row on the ATP Tour,

:37:04.:37:05.

and another title and victory over his main rival would be

:37:06.:37:08.

the ideal preparation for the Australian Open,

:37:09.:37:10.

The ultimate goal was to find a way to win the match.

:37:11.:37:16.

Maybe at the beginning of the year you are focusing a little bit more

:37:17.:37:20.

on yourself, and how you are playing, and how

:37:21.:37:23.

you want to play, moving into the Aussie Open,

:37:24.:37:28.

rather than just solely focusing on the outcome.

:37:29.:37:34.

Newcastle Falcons produced a stunning late comeback to beat

:37:35.:37:37.

Bath 24-22 in rugby union's Aviva Premiership.

:37:38.:37:40.

Bath led by 12 points half way through the second half,

:37:41.:37:44.

but Ben Harris barged his way over to draw Newcastle level less

:37:45.:37:48.

Man of the match Joel Hodgson kept his nerve to slot

:37:49.:37:54.

home the conversion, and send Bath to their

:37:55.:37:57.

Scarlets also came from behind to beat Ulster 16-13,

:37:58.:38:04.

The winning score was a penalty try - Scarlets scrum half Aled Davies

:38:05.:38:11.

was on the receiving end of a high tackle, as he tried

:38:12.:38:14.

Elsewhere, Leinster beat Zebre, and Newport Gwent Dragons beat Treviso.

:38:15.:38:20.

This afternoon, Sir Mo Farah is in action

:38:21.:38:22.

The four-time Olympic champion - who insists he's happy

:38:23.:38:25.

just to be called Mo - was surprisingly beaten

:38:26.:38:30.

He's using the event as part of his preparation for the track

:38:31.:38:36.

World Championships in London later this year, and admits he'll

:38:37.:38:39.

have his work cut out against some cross country

:38:40.:38:41.

They will want to hunt me down and beat me as quick as possible.

:38:42.:38:53.

That is what makes Cross-Country exciting.

:38:54.:38:55.

But it suits certain athletes better.

:38:56.:39:04.

I used to love Cross-Country. I wasn't one of those who tried to

:39:05.:39:30.

escape. I was quite good. It is quite a tough event, especially when

:39:31.:39:34.

it is more the in the winter. It is a completely different skill to

:39:35.:39:37.

track running. It takes different muscles afterwards. Indeed. Good

:39:38.:39:47.

luck, Mo Farah. If there was an upset today, I think

:39:48.:39:50.

it could be one of the Premier League teams going to a Championship

:39:51.:39:54.

team. Maybe Crystal Palace at Norwich.

:39:55.:40:01.

Enjoy it. It is also a day that has been named

:40:02.:40:12.

Sunshine Saturday. Today is predicted to be

:40:13.:40:17.

the busiest day of the year It's being dubbed Sunshine Saturday,

:40:18.:40:19.

with tens of thousands But is it really

:40:20.:40:25.

the best day to book? The Independent's travel editor

:40:26.:40:28.

Simon Calder and Alistair Rowland from Co-operative

:40:29.:40:30.

Travel join us now. We were talking about this area. Is

:40:31.:40:40.

it really the best day to go for a bargain when thousands of other

:40:41.:40:42.

people are trying to book at the same time? Presumably travel agents

:40:43.:40:49.

are excited. Yes. If you know what you want to go and you want to

:40:50.:40:53.

commit to the best rooms and the best resort, now is the time to buy.

:40:54.:40:59.

Today is the biggest single booking day. 1.5% of all bookings in the

:41:00.:41:05.

entire year happened today. Are you saying categorically that he did not

:41:06.:41:11.

increase your prices today? No. There is a myth about wait until

:41:12.:41:15.

late to book. I think Simon advocated. Actually, booking early

:41:16.:41:23.

is best. The deals on now, low deposits, free kids, good rooms. You

:41:24.:41:27.

have all of these travel agents competing with each other today?

:41:28.:41:33.

Yes, it is a busy day for the travel industry and ourselves as well. If I

:41:34.:41:39.

may, it is a very good time to look at a holiday if you know exactly

:41:40.:41:44.

where you want to go. But don't just walk into the first travel agent or

:41:45.:41:48.

might go to the first online age into you see, shop around. It is a

:41:49.:41:53.

great year to be a holiday-maker because, for example, in the south

:41:54.:41:57.

of Britain you have holidays expanding at Birmingham, Stansted,

:41:58.:42:02.

and Thomas Cook and Monarch are fighting back. If you are in the

:42:03.:42:05.

north, you can take advantage of the fact the school holidays in Scotland

:42:06.:42:12.

are earlier than in England. Shop around. See who has got the best

:42:13.:42:17.

deal. Beware of going through an odd online travel agent you haven't

:42:18.:42:21.

heard of. Over places that have been recommended. Or talk to a human

:42:22.:42:27.

being. That is always a good idea. If you don't have to go in the

:42:28.:42:32.

school holidays, just relax. There is so much stuff around,

:42:33.:42:35.

particularly in the next couple of months. If somebody is prepared to

:42:36.:42:40.

think a bit differently, and go somewhere they haven't been before

:42:41.:42:43.

but do not want to spend lots of money, what is hot? What is hot in

:42:44.:42:50.

terms of where people are going is Spain. It had a record year last

:42:51.:42:54.

year and it will do again this year. Along with Portugal, Italy, Greece.

:42:55.:42:58.

If you want sure good value, it is the former Yugoslavia, particularly

:42:59.:43:05.

Macedonia in the far south. Romania and Bulgaria offering good deals.

:43:06.:43:08.

That will help you stretch your pound. This is the first summer when

:43:09.:43:12.

we will be feeling the pain of the drop in sterling. One viewer has a

:43:13.:43:20.

couple of weeks off in February. Last year they went to Barbados.

:43:21.:43:23.

This year they are tempted by Mexico. Which Terry would you

:43:24.:43:29.

recommend? If you can cope with the long flight, Mexico is terrific

:43:30.:43:37.

value. Can Kuhn. American standards, Caribbean field. Fantastic value for

:43:38.:43:42.

money. At the moment the average price is only ?4 higher than last

:43:43.:43:47.

year. Fuel is increasing. So airlines hedge their fuel. If you

:43:48.:43:51.

leave it late, that price is more likely to be offensive. Cuba is

:43:52.:43:58.

changing rapidly. Mexico will still be as lovely as ever in five years.

:43:59.:44:04.

Cuba will be very different. That is a possibility to do now as well.

:44:05.:44:09.

David from Shetland has booked his holidays for the summer and is

:44:10.:44:12.

thinking about next New Year. He is very organised. Have you got a tip?

:44:13.:44:19.

Only if you're planning to fly long haul to Australia, New Zealand, the

:44:20.:44:24.

Caribbean or South Africa, you probably should be booking right now

:44:25.:44:27.

because you will get the pick of the airline seats and the fares. You

:44:28.:44:32.

have got to get organised. Get those leave request in as well. Thank you

:44:33.:44:35.

very much indeed. See you in the summer. Helen is

:44:36.:44:40.

going to tell us what the weather is going to do today.

:44:41.:44:45.

The summer will hopefully have something warmer and less foggy then

:44:46.:44:49.

we are at the moment. It is quite great. It is not going anywhere.

:44:50.:44:54.

This is Hill fog that has just settled at low levels. It is giving

:44:55.:45:00.

some nasty conditions. This is Moray. We have found some sunshine

:45:01.:45:08.

in Wales. This was sent in from Carmarthenshire. A little bit of

:45:09.:45:11.

brightness. I have seen the latest satellite picture. It is not ready

:45:12.:45:16.

to show on air yet. A good deal of sunshine in the northern half of

:45:17.:45:19.

Scotland. A little bit in north-eastern England. For most, it

:45:20.:45:25.

is grave. Drizzly, dank weather as well as the fog in the South. It is

:45:26.:45:34.

not going anywhere quickly. It will probably become an issue for the

:45:35.:45:37.

South and west later. Visibility down to 50 to 100 metres. It is

:45:38.:45:43.

combined with that drizzle. Some of the worst affected areas for fog cup

:45:44.:45:47.

in the West Midlands, into the Cheshire plains and the Vale of

:45:48.:45:52.

York. It is not as foggy in Scotland and Northern Ireland but it is just

:45:53.:45:56.

as cloudy. Good spells of sunshine in northern Scotland. Hopefully a

:45:57.:46:01.

few more breaks in the cloud this afternoon. Overnight the Thai

:46:02.:46:05.

returns, as will be missed and fog. It allows us to have a relatively

:46:06.:46:12.

mild night. Temperatures do not fall away. Fog will be the concern

:46:13.:46:18.

tomorrow morning. Some thick patches. We won't have the weather

:46:19.:46:24.

front as close to the south-west. It should be drier in contrast. Rain in

:46:25.:46:28.

the north-west. It looks as if it should be a large the dry picture

:46:29.:46:33.

for the third round of the FA Cup. There will be subtle mild. -- it

:46:34.:46:43.

will be relatively mild in this country. Considerably warmer than

:46:44.:46:48.

parts of Europe. Freezing rain in the low countries. Snow in parts of

:46:49.:46:54.

Greece. Temperatures expected to get to -23 in Moscow tomorrow. Things

:46:55.:46:58.

will change. Low pressure moving into the north and west. This

:46:59.:47:05.

weather system will give some snow. Something a little chillier towards

:47:06.:47:08.

the end of the week. A little breeze. That is it from me this

:47:09.:47:12.

morning. See you tomorrow. Thank you very

:47:13.:47:16.

much. If you've been hunting online

:47:17.:47:17.

for recipes that won't mess up your new year resolutions,

:47:18.:47:19.

then you've probably came Over Christmas, he knocked

:47:20.:47:22.

Jamie Oliver off top of the best In fact, he's become the second

:47:23.:47:30.

biggest selling author of 2016. at some of his very popular

:47:31.:47:34.

social media videos. I'm Joe Wicks, the body coach. Get

:47:35.:47:58.

those knees up. Three, two, one. In the van! Cod fillets, covered in

:47:59.:48:08.

flour. Are you ready? Let's get going. Land softly.

:48:09.:48:30.

Chicken breast, mixed peppers, mushrooms... Stick the lid on.

:48:31.:48:42.

Joe Wicks, welcome back to Breakfast. How are you? I'm good.

:48:43.:48:49.

It's lovely seeing those areas. Do you enjoy watching yourself? No, I

:48:50.:48:56.

don't watch them that often. It has been a mad year. Started with you

:48:57.:49:01.

training in a park? Yes, I was training in a park and garden

:49:02.:49:07.

Instagram Schering recipe ideas. I never predicted it. I never planned

:49:08.:49:12.

on writing a book or having a TV show. It has just built momentum.

:49:13.:49:16.

That social media thing is the reason you are who and what you are

:49:17.:49:21.

now, that has made you? Without a doubt. I still think I would be

:49:22.:49:26.

doing boot camps in Richmond. It is something you can harness if you use

:49:27.:49:29.

it in the right way. I have been consistent with my content. Free

:49:30.:49:35.

videos. Facebook live workouts. It is great building a community.

:49:36.:49:40.

People can access your regime and don't necessarily have to pay for

:49:41.:49:46.

it? Yes, that is how it started. I really believe in giving out free

:49:47.:49:50.

content. I want people to still have an access to recipes and content.

:49:51.:49:58.

What is the basic idea of lean in 15? It is basically cooking healthy

:49:59.:50:04.

food at home that you can eat, burgers, pizza is... That is sweet

:50:05.:50:12.

potato fries. That is healthy home-made fish fingers covered in

:50:13.:50:19.

red crumbs and coconut oil. Healthy fish and chips. You don't need to

:50:20.:50:26.

cut calories and deprive yourself. Healthy fat as proteins and carbs at

:50:27.:50:30.

the right time, as long as you combine it with the exercise. I know

:50:31.:50:34.

you have had some grief this week. There has been criticism saying that

:50:35.:50:40.

some of the things you have been making has been expensive. What do

:50:41.:50:45.

you say? Unless you are shopping in Harrods and buying caviar, I don't

:50:46.:50:49.

know how they managed to say it cost ?600 a month. All of my social media

:50:50.:50:58.

followers are doing it for ?50 a week. It wasn't correct. Healthy

:50:59.:51:02.

food, you have got to fuel your body right. If you're cooking for the

:51:03.:51:07.

family and buying in bulk, you are better off financially than eating

:51:08.:51:11.

out every day. Overall, living on the lean in 15 lifestyle is better.

:51:12.:51:19.

It says here you are responsible for 25% spike in broccoli sales. Is that

:51:20.:51:25.

true? The grocer industry said that. I call them midget trees for fun.

:51:26.:51:31.

Everyone has started using them in their recipes. Kids are loving them.

:51:32.:51:36.

Apparently it has increased by 25%. I am not going to invest in midget

:51:37.:51:44.

trees! I'm not a shareholder! I do like broccoli. I like Brock -- raw

:51:45.:51:49.

broccoli and spinach. Broccoli in some soy sauce is nice. Do you ever

:51:50.:51:54.

have anything that is unhealthy? Do you ever stopped at a fast-food

:51:55.:52:00.

place have a burger and enjoy it? Last night, I'll be honest, I

:52:01.:52:08.

ordered room service. I had a burger and chips and a bottle of Coke, and

:52:09.:52:13.

a mass of the minibar. It is all about balance and moderation. I

:52:14.:52:20.

fancied a blow out. How long do you work out for in the morning? 15 to

:52:21.:52:25.

25 minutes of high intensity working out. I do the you Tube videos as

:52:26.:52:30.

well. I believe that anyone can be lean all year round as long as they

:52:31.:52:35.

fit into their lifestyle. You can do it at home, follow the workouts and

:52:36.:52:40.

the recipes and we will be lean and 15. People see the likes of you in

:52:41.:52:45.

magazines and they think, it is all or nothing. You are saying you can

:52:46.:52:52.

balance it? Yes, especially this time of the year. The worst thing

:52:53.:52:55.

anybody could do is start a low-calorie diet now. It is not

:52:56.:52:59.

sustainable. Work hard, train hard and you can enjoy some treats and

:53:00.:53:05.

stay lean and maintain your body all year round. Congratulations on all

:53:06.:53:10.

of your success. I hope it goes well for 2017. Thank you for having me.

:53:11.:53:16.

Some chocolates on the way out. I do love a chocolate!

:53:17.:53:22.

The BBC Music Sound Of list aims to predicts the most exciting

:53:23.:53:25.

new music for the year ahead, and with previous winners including

:53:26.:53:28.

Adele, Sam Smith and Ellie Goulding, it's got a pretty good track record.

:53:29.:53:31.

That a lot delivered to. -- that is a lot to live up two.

:53:32.:53:39.

Now soul singer Ray BLK has beaten off stiff competition to be

:53:40.:53:42.

It is the first time an unsigned artist has won the honour.

:53:43.:53:46.

We'll be speaking to Ray in just a moment.

:53:47.:53:48.

But first, let's have a look at her song, Chill Out.

:53:49.:53:58.

# I told you I was trouble when we first met.

:53:59.:54:08.

# I guess you never got the message. # I hate to be so God damn

:54:09.:54:12.

depressive. # Bert Wemp broken heart has turned

:54:13.:54:16.

me into a savage. -- but my broken heart.

:54:17.:54:23.

# I only want you when I'm lonely. # On a late-night, on Friday.

:54:24.:54:31.

# I'll only want you when I'm lonely, on a late-night, on Friday.

:54:32.:54:41.

Ray joins us now. Good morning. Great to have you with us. Talking

:54:42.:54:48.

about that particular song. The video is beautiful. How do you get

:54:49.:54:52.

it all together given that you don't have a record label? It was quite a

:54:53.:54:58.

task. I have a really great team together. My manager listened to my

:54:59.:55:04.

vision when I said to him that I wanted to go to Jamaica and film

:55:05.:55:09.

these goalie Queen's. The goalie Queen's are transgender men who live

:55:10.:55:15.

in the goalie, which is basically the sewers of Jamaica. They are

:55:16.:55:20.

ostracised from the community. They face daily abuse. I felt it was

:55:21.:55:23.

something people were not aware of. I wanted to include them in my

:55:24.:55:28.

video. This is some accolade you have been given. The sound of 2017

:55:29.:55:35.

by BBC music. An amazing achievement. Shall we just see the

:55:36.:55:39.

moment when you found out you worthy winner.

:55:40.:55:48.

Oh, my God! You are joking?! Oh my God! I genuinely can't believe it!

:55:49.:55:59.

You owe us 17 grand for the microphone that you broke at that

:56:00.:56:03.

point! You have been able to compute it now. I don't think so. It still

:56:04.:56:09.

doesn't feel real. It still hasn't sunk in. I found out a little while

:56:10.:56:15.

ago. I'm still in shock, really. Must be shocking when you look at

:56:16.:56:19.

the list of people that have won. Exactly. No pressure. Tell us a

:56:20.:56:25.

little bit about your musical journey. You have gone from gospel

:56:26.:56:30.

to grime, or that the double R sound. How did you get there? It

:56:31.:56:36.

started with gospel. I was raised in a church, joined a gospel choir,

:56:37.:56:40.

joint every choir I could. Then I found the music that I loved and

:56:41.:56:45.

fell in love with, bar hip hop. Slowly I cultivated my sound. All of

:56:46.:56:51.

my inspirations helped me do that. You were lucky in a way to be

:56:52.:56:55.

surrounded by talented friends. They have been successful in the music

:56:56.:57:00.

business? Absolutely. I was once in a band where I was about 13 to 16

:57:01.:57:05.

with Emenike, he lived around the corner. It was himself, his brother

:57:06.:57:12.

and a couple of other boys. He ended up working with all sorts? Yes, a

:57:13.:57:19.

megastar. Howdy this prize will help you, or assist you to do what you

:57:20.:57:27.

want to do? The danger is you get pigeonholed. How do you keep

:57:28.:57:31.

control? I think me being an unsigned artist is what helps me

:57:32.:57:35.

keep control. It means that everything I do can remain authentic

:57:36.:57:40.

and genuine and come spread from me rather than a label making sure that

:57:41.:57:44.

everything is in a particular way and telling me how to sound. You

:57:45.:57:49.

don't want to be signed? I don't know what I would want to do in the

:57:50.:57:54.

future. If it is the right deal for me, I may sign. There must be people

:57:55.:58:00.

already approaching you? I mean, yeah Mac! Have had few

:58:01.:58:05.

conversations. I am enjoying my freedom. Are you a control freak?

:58:06.:58:12.

Slightly! I am a bit of a control freak. I liked the fact that the

:58:13.:58:15.

people who support me know the music is coming straight from me and know

:58:16.:58:19.

that everything I put out is me. I think we have a stronger connection

:58:20.:58:23.

because of that. That is really important in the music business,

:58:24.:58:27.

particularly when you are young, to know you have -- to have the

:58:28.:58:31.

integrity to know what you want is pretty impressive.

:58:32.:58:35.

We were talking to Joe Wicks about social media. It helps you as well?

:58:36.:58:41.

Definitely. I feel like I am where I am because of social media and the

:58:42.:58:44.

Internet in general. I have been able to share so much with people

:58:45.:58:48.

who probably wouldn't have heard my music before. Thank you so much for

:58:49.:58:53.

coming in. Good luck and congratulations. Amazing talent.

:58:54.:58:58.

That is it from us today. Ben and Shannon are here tomorrow. Have a

:58:59.:59:05.

good. -- have a good day. Goodbye.

:59:06.:59:07.