15/03/2017 Breakfast


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15/03/2017

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Hello, this is Breakfast, with Dan Walker and Louise Minchin.

:00:00.:00:07.

16 million people face starvation in East Africa,

:00:08.:00:09.

as a major fundraising campaign is launched to help them.

:00:10.:00:16.

Drought and conflict are being blamed for the crisis,

:00:17.:00:18.

which is being called the worst famine in a generation.

:00:19.:00:38.

Good morning, it is Wednesday 15 March.

:00:39.:00:39.

Also this morning: Levels of identity fraud in the UK

:00:40.:00:42.

New figures show people under 30 are a growing target.

:00:43.:00:55.

Snowstorm Stella brings large parts of the eastern United States

:00:56.:00:57.

Up to 50 million people could be affected.

:00:58.:01:00.

Driverless vehicles are set to take to our roads,

:01:01.:01:03.

but a report out today warns we are not ready

:01:04.:01:05.

In sport: Leicester defy logic once again.

:01:06.:01:10.

They knock out Sevilla, and qualify for the quarter-finals

:01:11.:01:13.

Also this morning: After millions of views online, the BBC interviewee

:01:14.:01:18.

whose children stole the show talks about his family's sudden

:01:19.:01:20.

Certainly never had anything like this in our life before.

:01:21.:01:31.

You know, got to the point when we had to put turn off the phones, and

:01:32.:01:37.

Facebook and Twitter and that sort of stuff.

:01:38.:01:38.

Good morning, from a cloudy and chilly St James's Park in London.

:01:39.:01:49.

That is a very similar condition to what we are experiencing across the

:01:50.:01:53.

UK at the moment. It is cloudy, some of us murky, with some drizzle in

:01:54.:01:57.

the north-west. But the sun will come out, particularly across

:01:58.:02:00.

eastern parts of Wales and the Midlands, highs of 16 or maybe 17

:02:01.:02:04.

today. I will have more in 15 minutes.

:02:05.:02:07.

First, our main story: A major appeal has been launched to help 16

:02:08.:02:11.

million people facing starvation, in what is being described

:02:12.:02:13.

as the worst famine in a generation in East Africa.

:02:14.:02:16.

The Disasters Emergency Committee, which is made up of 13 UK aid

:02:17.:02:19.

agencies, says drought and conflict are to blame for the crisis,

:02:20.:02:22.

which has left tens of thousands of children at risk

:02:23.:02:25.

The United Nations says the crisis in the four affected countries,

:02:26.:02:29.

Nigeria, South Sudan, Somalia and Yemen, is the worst

:02:30.:02:31.

Our diplomatic correspondent James Landale has more.

:02:32.:02:43.

The Disasters Emergency Committee says drought and conflict has left

:02:44.:02:48.

millions in East Africa in immediate need of food, water and medical

:02:49.:02:54.

treatment. Across South Sudan, Somalia, can you and Ethiopia, it

:02:55.:02:58.

says 60 million people don't know when they are next going to eat --

:02:59.:03:03.

Kenya. More than 800,000 children are severely malnourished, and some

:03:04.:03:07.

are even eating leaves. The 13 aid agencies that make up the Disasters

:03:08.:03:11.

Emergency Committee are already on the ground, delivering clean

:03:12.:03:16.

drinking water and treatment for malnutrition. But they are now

:03:17.:03:19.

appealing to the public for funds so that they can do even more to help

:03:20.:03:25.

these people. The government has already promised ?200 million in

:03:26.:03:28.

emergency aid for South Sudan and Somalia, and the International

:03:29.:03:33.

Development Secretary said her department would match the first ?5

:03:34.:03:37.

million donated by the public and the new appeal. She also urged other

:03:38.:03:42.

countries to follow reason's bleed, before the crisis became what she

:03:43.:03:46.

called a stain on our collective conscience. The world, she said,

:03:47.:03:48.

cannot afford to wait. We will be speaking

:03:49.:03:49.

to the chief executive of the Disasters Emergency Committee

:03:50.:03:51.

in around half an hour's time. Identity fraud is at an all-time

:03:52.:04:00.

high in the UK, with more young That is according to new data

:04:01.:04:04.

analysed by the fraud Identity fraud involves criminals

:04:05.:04:07.

using someone's personal information to obtain money,

:04:08.:04:10.

products or services. Our home affairs correspondent

:04:11.:04:12.

Danny Shaw reports. Stolen identity, civil servant Lou

:04:13.:04:27.

Croydon was the victim of one of Britain's fastest growing crimes.

:04:28.:04:34.

His name, address, date of birth and banking details were obtained by a

:04:35.:04:37.

thief who pinched post from his letterbox. Armed with the

:04:38.:04:41.

information, the fraudster applied for a bank card and then used to go

:04:42.:04:46.

on a spending spree. When you first find out that it has happened, it is

:04:47.:04:50.

quite shocking. And then you get very worried because you wonder what

:04:51.:04:53.

else they might have done without personal details. If it is only

:04:54.:04:57.

opening bank accounts that is one thing, but you wonder what else they

:04:58.:05:01.

have done with it. Have they signed up to websites, have they got

:05:02.:05:04.

passport applications? So it is a very troubling experience. According

:05:05.:05:06.

to the fraud prevention service Cifas there were almost 173,000

:05:07.:05:09.

cases of identity fraud last year, the highest total ever. The number

:05:10.:05:14.

of victims under the age of 21 increased by more than a third, with

:05:15.:05:17.

the Midlands and the north-east of England registering the highest

:05:18.:05:20.

identity fraud increases year on year. Cifas has produced a film

:05:21.:05:27.

warning people to be careful about how much information they reveal in

:05:28.:05:33.

public and online. Fraudsters are adept at exploiting information

:05:34.:05:37.

posted on social media sites. It advises people to use passwords,

:05:38.:05:41.

privacy settings and antivirus software on their computers, and to

:05:42.:05:43.

shred important paper documents. The Conservative MP Craig Mackinlay

:05:44.:05:48.

has been interviewed by police under caution over the expenses

:05:49.:05:51.

he claimed during his Mr MacKinlay beat the former

:05:52.:05:53.

Ukip leader Nigel Farage Several other Tory MPs

:05:54.:05:57.

are also being investigated. Our political correspondent

:05:58.:06:01.

Iain Watson is in Westminster. Well, I think it is certainly a

:06:02.:06:23.

matter of how serious the police are taking these allegations around

:06:24.:06:26.

election expenses, but they interviewed an MP under caution for

:06:27.:06:30.

up to six hours over the weekend. But I think it is also significant

:06:31.:06:34.

because ultimately if, and I do stress, if, there is any sign that

:06:35.:06:37.

MPs can be disqualified in the elections rerun, and Nigel Farage,

:06:38.:06:44.

the UKIP leader, was defeated by the Conservatives' Craig Mackinlay in

:06:45.:06:48.

Kent, he has a majority of just over 3000 so it is a tight seat in the

:06:49.:06:52.

former UKIP leader has expressed an interest in standing there again.

:06:53.:06:55.

Now, basically at the centre of this, we have seen Craig Mackinlay's

:06:56.:06:58.

election expenses, they are below the legal limit, but an

:06:59.:07:02.

investigation suggests a further ?18,000 was spent, and party

:07:03.:07:08.

officials went there to try and see off the threat from Nigel Farage,

:07:09.:07:12.

and the allegation, of course, is that this was some way of trying to

:07:13.:07:16.

get around the election rules, which of course is denied by the

:07:17.:07:19.

Conservatives. But the reason it is potentially a big story is Theresa

:07:20.:07:25.

May has a very narrow Commons majority and there are 17

:07:26.:07:28.

investigations going on around the country. In a leaked e-mail, another

:07:29.:07:32.

Conservative MP suggested that he and his colleagues have been cast

:07:33.:07:35.

adrift by party officials in London, who were more interested in covering

:07:36.:07:39.

their own backs. Obviously the Conservative Party have said they

:07:40.:07:42.

are clearly cooperating with investigations, but I think it is a

:07:43.:07:46.

measure of how seriously those MPs are taking those investigations that

:07:47.:07:49.

they are now expressing their frustration. They thought, allegedly

:07:50.:07:51.

privately, but now very much in public. No doubt we will keep a very

:07:52.:07:57.

close eye on that in this programme and throughout the week as well.

:07:58.:07:59.

A rare glimpse into President Trump's private finances has

:08:00.:08:01.

emerged, with the leak of his 2005 tax return.

:08:02.:08:04.

Mr Trump refused to make the documents public

:08:05.:08:06.

during his election campaign, but the US TV network MSNBC has now

:08:07.:08:09.

In terms of what's on here, let me give you the basics.

:08:10.:08:16.

Aside from the numbers being large, these pages are straightforward.

:08:17.:08:20.

He paid - it looks like $38 million in taxes.

:08:21.:08:25.

He took a big write-down of $103 million, more on that later.

:08:26.:08:31.

If you add up the lines for income, he made more than $150 million

:08:32.:08:35.

The release led to an angry response from the White House,

:08:36.:08:40.

which has said, "You know you are desperate for ratings

:08:41.:08:42.

when you are willing to violate the law to push a story about two

:08:43.:08:46.

pages of tax returns from over a decade ago."

:08:47.:08:52.

Large parts of the East Coast of the United States has been

:08:53.:08:55.

brought to a halt because of heavy blizzards caused by snowstorm

:08:56.:08:58.

Around 50 million people across the country have been warned

:08:59.:09:03.

to expect further severe weather, and the German Chancellor,

:09:04.:09:06.

Angela Merkel, has been forced to postpone her trip to Washington

:09:07.:09:09.

It is nicknamed the city that never sleeps.

:09:10.:09:31.

But even New York's most determined have struggled to carry

:09:32.:09:34.

There was little sign of large crowds of tourists in Times Square,

:09:35.:09:41.

Instead, many headed to Central Park.

:09:42.:09:44.

I've been around snow maybe once or twice in my life,

:09:45.:09:48.

We had a snowball fight, and it was pretty cold,

:09:49.:09:53.

so we might get some hot chocolate, now, honestly.

:09:54.:09:56.

New Yorkers might be used to heavy snowstorms,

:09:57.:09:58.

but authorities have warned them to stay indoors.

:09:59.:10:01.

Upstate, conditions were even more severe, with 20 inches falling

:10:02.:10:04.

Across the east coast, airport runways were covered

:10:05.:10:12.

in white, and the departure boards red, with thousands

:10:13.:10:15.

Much of the nation's capital was also paralysed,

:10:16.:10:18.

The city is famous for its cherry blossoms in spring, but this storm

:10:19.:10:24.

Further north, they were struggling to dig their way out in Chicago,

:10:25.:10:34.

and also in Boston, where the school buses had to make way

:10:35.:10:37.

Until now, much of America's north-east region had enjoyed

:10:38.:10:44.

but storm Stella has delivered a harsh reminder that winter

:10:45.:10:49.

It looks spectacular, but I understand of course causing issues

:10:50.:10:58.

as well. It is the news interview that

:10:59.:10:58.

everyone's been talking about. Last week, Professor Robert Kelly's

:10:59.:11:01.

family became an internet sensation when his children crashed his

:11:02.:11:04.

appearance on BBC News. Well, they agreed to come

:11:05.:11:06.

back on the BBC to talk Our correspondent

:11:07.:11:09.

Sangita Myska has more. Professor Robert Kelly,

:11:10.:11:13.

an expert on South Korea, offering expert analysis

:11:14.:11:16.

of global events. But it was the unexpected

:11:17.:11:21.

entrance of his daughter, Marion, who was to create

:11:22.:11:25.

a global event of its own. I think one of your

:11:26.:11:28.

children's just walked in. To avoid being upstaged,

:11:29.:11:30.

the Professor tried a gentle push. Only for Marion's brother

:11:31.:11:36.

to enter on wheels. Was he hoping that, just perhaps,

:11:37.:11:39.

no-one had noticed after all? A perfectly timed slam of the door

:11:40.:11:56.

ensured this video went viral. Professor Kelly and his family

:11:57.:12:01.

were invited back onto live BBC

:12:02.:12:04.

television, only for Marion to once So, in spite of it all,

:12:05.:12:06.

did they find it as funny as we did? And we've watched it

:12:07.:12:22.

multiple times, too, and our families have

:12:23.:12:29.

watched it as well. Everybody we know seems to think

:12:30.:12:32.

it's pretty hysterical. So yeah, we understand why

:12:33.:12:34.

people find it enjoyable, catching a regular family

:12:35.:12:37.

off-guard, so yes. Just a regular family,

:12:38.:12:39.

whose off-guard moments have become In the last half-hour, have you seen

:12:40.:12:52.

the video of the news conference in South Korea? Welcome to 2017, isn't

:12:53.:12:58.

it? Are brilliant, unscripted, wonderful video. And she was in a

:12:59.:13:08.

hippity hoppity mood. And in that interview she starts chewing a toy

:13:09.:13:12.

hammer halfway through and they have to remove her from the screen again.

:13:13.:13:20.

She is just brilliant. I did have to do a double check, but Kat was here

:13:21.:13:27.

yesterday. A memorable performance from me. And what about Leicester.

:13:28.:13:33.

Speaking of memorable performances, amazing stuff from Leicester. Here

:13:34.:13:38.

they are struggling in the Premier league after winning the title last

:13:39.:13:45.

season, and some kind of vestige of that logic defying season has

:13:46.:13:48.

obviously lingered. There is something left in Leicester which

:13:49.:13:51.

means they can produce performances like they did last night, to come

:13:52.:13:57.

back, defeat Sevilla and get to the quarterfinals of the Champions

:13:58.:14:00.

League. And the thing with Leicester is you can't say that they won't.

:14:01.:14:01.

Another chapter in the remarkable story of Leicester City unfolds,

:14:02.:14:04.

as they beat Sevilla to move into the quarter-finals

:14:05.:14:07.

It was another great evening in the Premier League champions'

:14:08.:14:11.

history, winning 2-0 on the night, 3-2 on aggregate,

:14:12.:14:13.

to take their place in Friday's quarter-final draw.

:14:14.:14:15.

Wes Morgan and Marc Albrighton the scorers.

:14:16.:14:18.

The Football Association have charged Manchester United

:14:19.:14:20.

with failing to control their players during Monday's FA Cup

:14:21.:14:23.

quarter-final at Chelsea, after Ander Herrera's red card.

:14:24.:14:25.

Nicky Henderson became the most successful trainer

:14:26.:14:33.

of the Champion Hurdle at Cheltenham.

:14:34.:14:34.

Jockey Noel Fehily was on board Buveur D'Air, winning by 4.5

:14:35.:14:37.

And Muirfield golf club will admit women as members for the first time,

:14:38.:14:49.

It means the R will reinstate Muirfield on the list

:14:50.:14:53.

They were taken off that list when members rejected female

:14:54.:14:57.

Added makes front page of the Financial Times today, too. We will

:14:58.:15:06.

look at the papers shortly. Carol is at St James's Park

:15:07.:15:10.

for us this morning. But before we hear about

:15:11.:15:13.

the weather, we've got Have a listen to actually Harriet,

:15:14.:15:16.

here. -- Ainsley. Carol received a TRIC award

:15:17.:15:27.

for Best Weather Presenter. We can see her here

:15:28.:15:31.

accepting her award. Every time she wins it, we are

:15:32.:15:40.

equally at excited. That is a triple hat-trick! Congratulations, Carol!

:15:41.:15:50.

It was an early start to you. Good morning to you all. What an honour

:15:51.:15:54.

and a pleasure it was. I can tell you that I did not expect to win it.

:15:55.:15:59.

So thank you very much for the TRIC Award. Look at the lovely spring

:16:00.:16:06.

blossom behind me here at St James's Park. It is Chile, though, and

:16:07.:16:09.

fairly cloudy. This will change as we go through the day to stop for

:16:10.:16:15.

many of us, it will brighten. It will be milder dry. -- chilly.

:16:16.:16:18.

Sergei take a look around the charts, what we have this morning is

:16:19.:16:26.

quite a cloudy start. You will find that it will brighten up around

:16:27.:16:32.

central and eastern areas. At the west, we are likely to hold onto

:16:33.:16:37.

some cloud and murkiness. Around the coastline is around Scotland in

:16:38.:16:40.

particular. They was this patchy light rain and some drizzle. And it

:16:41.:16:43.

will still be quite windy, especially across the Northern

:16:44.:16:47.

Isles. But nothing like we had yesterday afternoon. So this

:16:48.:16:50.

afternoon in Scotland, it will store the windy in the north. We are

:16:51.:16:54.

looking at patchy ) drizzle in the west. But the rest of Scotland,

:16:55.:16:59.

bright and sunny spells. Across northern England and the north-west,

:17:00.:17:03.

more cloud, but for Lincolnshire, Yorkshire, at some sunshine. The

:17:04.:17:06.

Midlands will seas on Cloudbreak yuppie sunshine. It is a clear

:17:07.:17:12.

bright skies. As we drift to the south-west committee will hold onto

:17:13.:17:15.

a bit more cloud as we go through day. Maybe some coastal mist. For

:17:16.:17:20.

Wales, too, you will see some murkiness around the coast.

:17:21.:17:24.

Especially the West Coast around Cardigan Bay. It is Wales will see

:17:25.:17:29.

some height averages of 16 or 17, just like the Midlands. In northern

:17:30.:17:33.

England, the influence of the weather front will make it cloudy,

:17:34.:17:37.

but there could be so bright spells. Heading through the evening in

:17:38.:17:42.

overnight, we will see more cloud building, and generally, it will be

:17:43.:17:46.

a cloudy night. A murky one. Still with some patchy rain in the

:17:47.:17:50.

north-west, and also some hellfire, sea fog, and some low level for

:17:51.:17:54.

coming in across the eastern side of the east in Channel and south-east

:17:55.:18:00.

generally. That will turn to ease away tomorrow and it will turn

:18:01.:18:07.

could. A weather front is coming south, taking rain with it. Behind

:18:08.:18:11.

it, literature will go down and we will see an extra sunshine and

:18:12.:18:14.

showers. Some of the showers will be wintry, especially in the hills.

:18:15.:18:19.

Ahead of that, we hold on to the brighter and milder conditions. On

:18:20.:18:23.

Friday, what we have been talking about is Storm stellar in the

:18:24.:18:29.

states. This is what is left of it coming our way. -- Radu. It splits

:18:30.:18:35.

into over the Atlantic, and then we have the rain moving south-west hill

:18:36.:18:39.

snow in Scotland. Not unusual at this stage. But that is all the snow

:18:40.:18:45.

we are expecting. The rate is not falling into cold air like it was in

:18:46.:18:49.

New York. We'll see the second batch coming through on night. That leads

:18:50.:18:51.

to an unsettled period. Thank you so much about, Carol. I

:18:52.:19:00.

love the jacket, the cherry blossoms, and they too are the Best

:19:01.:19:07.

Weather Presenter ever. Six on the trough, 19 total. Everybody else

:19:08.:19:14.

should ever give up. -- everybody else should just give up. We are

:19:15.:19:20.

even more excited that she is, I think. She expected. In a nice way.

:19:21.:19:26.

Because we all know that she is the best. She is the best. Let's look at

:19:27.:19:35.

the papers after the court heads. Here are the headlines this morning:

:19:36.:19:41.

-- quarter heads. UK aid agencies launch a fundraising

:19:42.:19:43.

appeal to help millions of people Identity fraud in the UK

:19:44.:19:47.

is at a record high, with more young people

:19:48.:19:50.

becoming victims. Lucky I didn't wind, because I could

:19:51.:19:58.

not control it. I am so excitable. Come down. You are over excitable,

:19:59.:20:09.

today. -- calm. Can you be over excitable? Identikit can. You can.

:20:10.:20:20.

-- ie do not think you can. The Getty papers, here we have the

:20:21.:20:24.

Cheltenham Festival. So lots on that in many papers, as well. The Daily

:20:25.:20:30.

Mail has quite a few stories about Prince William. He has been on a ski

:20:31.:20:35.

holiday. And they're talking about Facebook, Google, Twitter, and so

:20:36.:20:39.

on, being shamed for failing to tackle online hate, child abuse and

:20:40.:20:52.

more. As you said, on the Financial Times, there is the story about

:20:53.:20:58.

Muirhead allowing women members. They voted against that a while ago,

:20:59.:21:03.

but now they are back on the Open rota. And on the Times, they have

:21:04.:21:12.

Angelina Jolie, who was nervous before her first appearance as a

:21:13.:21:17.

visiting professor. And that is the front page of the Daily Telegraph,

:21:18.:21:21.

too, and they have a picture of the Cheltenham Festival that, which

:21:22.:21:24.

started yesterday. Who wants to go first? In the sun, lots of coverage

:21:25.:21:35.

of lesser's amazing when, but this is the best picture the papers at

:21:36.:21:40.

the moment, I think. Maradona Hand bawling in a 5-a-side match to

:21:41.:21:44.

promote the draw for the Fifa under 20 World Cup. Azarenka, there is the

:21:45.:21:50.

original picture. That was when he scored the goal to beat England in

:21:51.:21:54.

the 1986 World Cup in Mexico. Almost an exact replica of that again in

:21:55.:22:00.

this 5-a-side tournament. Just the other hand, isn't it? I am impressed

:22:01.:22:06.

he can do it with both. Very talented. So you know we have a

:22:07.:22:11.

figure four insulation that basically tells us how much the cost

:22:12.:22:15.

of living is going up by? What the office of national statistics do is

:22:16.:22:18.

work out what products are popular that we are buying. So the services

:22:19.:22:22.

and products. And every so often, they will work out and change these

:22:23.:22:28.

different products that are in their it is interesting to see what has

:22:29.:22:32.

made it in and out. Now included in this list of thing things -- things

:22:33.:22:43.

are soymilk. Things that are not included any more mental cigarettes,

:22:44.:22:48.

a single drainer sink, a jostling, and alcopops. So that is

:22:49.:22:54.

fascinating. It is an idea of how society changes. And the Daily

:22:55.:22:57.

Telegraph is picked up on jigsaw is not being in there any more.

:22:58.:23:03.

Apparently the over 50s are using them more than ever, so they have

:23:04.:23:11.

made it in as well. I like a jigsaw. There are other things that in there

:23:12.:23:18.

that we are not using any more, like the word whatshername. What do we

:23:19.:23:28.

use now? What is her name? You're watching BBC Breakfast.

:23:29.:23:36.

The aim of the medical profession is perhaps,

:23:37.:23:38.

above all, to help people get better and save lives.

:23:39.:23:41.

But when terminal illness makes that impossible,

:23:42.:23:43.

care turns to making a patient feel as comfortable as can be.

:23:44.:23:46.

A new film detailing the importance of the right approach during those

:23:47.:23:49.

final days is being used to help educate staff and better

:23:50.:23:52.

It's based on the experiences of one family.

:23:53.:23:55.

He was 49 years old. He was seemingly fit in well. Life was

:23:56.:24:02.

wonderful. We had been away on holiday, and they had a chest

:24:03.:24:05.

infection. They can make a couple weeks then suddenly Seth got some

:24:06.:24:09.

trouble breathing. It was May 2014, and Leslie's husband, Seth, was

:24:10.:24:13.

diagnosed with pragmatic cancer. He died 33 days after his diagnosis.

:24:14.:24:18.

Seth's dying wish was never fulfilled. He wanted to die at home.

:24:19.:24:28.

We felt like it was a daily intervention. It just felt like no

:24:29.:24:33.

one was really listening to us. Leslie put her frustrations and

:24:34.:24:37.

anger down in writing. Her and Seth's story has now been adapted

:24:38.:24:46.

into a short story, Homeward Bound. An intensive course of chemotherapy?

:24:47.:24:52.

Chemotherapy? Happily give you this news when you are on your own? You

:24:53.:24:59.

only go to die once. You wanted to be as good as it possibly can be. I

:25:00.:25:03.

wanted to show with some compassion and sensitivity that dilemma that

:25:04.:25:06.

all families find themselves in in that difficult time of life. The

:25:07.:25:11.

film is about to be screened here in London. The idea is that it is then

:25:12.:25:14.

used as an educational resource in hospices and across the NHS. Nobody

:25:15.:25:20.

told me what was going on. Nobody spoke to Seth. Nobody had a

:25:21.:25:26.

conversation with me about what I might need, what might help,

:25:27.:25:30.

nothing. What was your reaction to the film you saw it? It made me cry.

:25:31.:25:36.

We need to make sure we are doing it right. And we are getting better.

:25:37.:25:39.

Because we only have one chance. I thing sometimes people presumed that

:25:40.:25:43.

other people have the conversations. So other people think that they are

:25:44.:25:47.

sure that other people have spoken to the family or explain things to

:25:48.:25:51.

them. In 2009, the Department of Health funded the Dying Matters

:25:52.:25:56.

coalition, established across England and Wales to improve and of

:25:57.:26:00.

life care. Its mission is to help people talk more openly about death.

:26:01.:26:04.

But many accept that more can be done, and Homeward

:26:05.:26:08.

-- Seth's story can help. People understood what it meant to them.

:26:09.:26:16.

How those last few days were so important, and how would a little

:26:17.:26:20.

bit of thought, we may have been to do so in the differently. It is

:26:21.:26:23.

about learning from that. We only die once. It should be like a birth.

:26:24.:26:27.

Special and pressures. With good memories. Just to sustain those left

:26:28.:26:34.

behind. Seth asked me to show the story because he was a selfless man.

:26:35.:26:48.

That is a wonderful bit of television.

:26:49.:26:48.

That was Lesley Goodburn speaking to Tim Muffett.

:26:49.:26:51.

You're watching Breakfast. latest in half and now. Plenty on

:26:52.:30:15.

our website at the usual address. Now though it's back

:30:16.:30:17.

to Louise and Dan. Hello, this is Breakfast

:30:18.:30:19.

with Dan Walker and Louise Minchin. We will bring you all the latest

:30:20.:30:24.

news and sport in a moment. But also on Breakfast this morning:

:30:25.:30:29.

How one man's death became After 8:00am, we will speak

:30:30.:30:32.

to the police officer in charge of investigating the man

:30:33.:30:39.

on Saddleworth Moor. With a boom in under-25s taking

:30:40.:30:43.

to the seas, Steph will be looking into whether cruises

:30:44.:30:46.

are the new cool. And, as the Forces' Sweetheart

:30:47.:30:48.

prepares to release a new album to mark her 100th birthday,

:30:49.:30:57.

we will be joined by Dame Vera Lynn's daughter,

:30:58.:31:00.

to hear about the memories But now, a summary of this

:31:01.:31:03.

morning's main news: A major appeal has been launched

:31:04.:31:15.

to help 16 million people facing starvation, in what is being

:31:16.:31:19.

described as the worst famine The Disasters Emergency Committee,

:31:20.:31:21.

which is made up of 13 UK aid agencies, says drought and conflict

:31:22.:31:26.

are to blame for the crisis. Let's speak now to our Africa

:31:27.:31:36.

correspondent Emmanuel Igunza, who is in Ethiopia's

:31:37.:31:39.

capital, Addis Ababa. Good morning to you. Thank you so

:31:40.:31:49.

much for talking to us. Give us a sense of what is going on there and

:31:50.:32:02.

how much people need a. -- aid. Millions of people are facing

:32:03.:32:08.

starvation. In South Sudan the UN has declared them in there. 1

:32:09.:32:12.

million people are said to be in danger of starvation because of this

:32:13.:32:15.

conflict which has been raging on since 2013. And across in Somalia,

:32:16.:32:20.

an eminent famine. We are already hearing numbers about 100 have died

:32:21.:32:25.

just in March. The UN are saying much more needs to be done to help

:32:26.:32:29.

these people. Here in Ethiopia, also, millions of people, about 6

:32:30.:32:34.

million, are in urgent need of assistance. They are facing yet

:32:35.:32:37.

another drought after the El Nino phenomena affected most of the

:32:38.:32:41.

country. Farmers have lost all their livestock. Many people are in urgent

:32:42.:32:46.

need, and the UN says much needs to be done if these people are to be

:32:47.:32:51.

saved. Thank you very much for talking to us. And a little bit

:32:52.:32:56.

later we are expecting to speak to Disasters Emergency Committee chief

:32:57.:32:59.

executive, to find out what exactly can be done to help all those

:33:00.:33:00.

people. A rare glimpse into President

:33:01.:33:02.

Trump's private finances has emerged, with the leak

:33:03.:33:05.

of his 2005 tax return. Mr Trump refused to make

:33:06.:33:07.

the documents public during his election campaign,

:33:08.:33:09.

but the US TV network MSNBC has now In terms of what's on here,

:33:10.:33:13.

let me give you the basics. Aside from the numbers being large,

:33:14.:33:19.

these pages are straightforward. He paid - it looks like

:33:20.:33:22.

$38 million in taxes. He took a big write-down of $103

:33:23.:33:27.

million, more on that later. If you add up the lines for income,

:33:28.:33:30.

he made more than $150 million Which simply means congratulations

:33:31.:33:34.

or good luck, by the way. The release led to an angry response

:33:35.:33:50.

from the White House, Cases of identity fraud in the UK

:33:51.:33:53.

are at an all-time high, according to figures from the fraud

:33:54.:34:00.

prevention organisation Cifas. The crime involves stealing

:34:01.:34:02.

someone's personal information to obtain money,

:34:03.:34:04.

products or services. New data suggests young people

:34:05.:34:06.

are a growing target. A Conservative MP has been

:34:07.:34:18.

questioned for six hours by police about the money he claimed

:34:19.:34:21.

during his general election Craig MacKinlay beat the former

:34:22.:34:24.

Ukip leader Nigel Farage He submitted expenses for ?15,000,

:34:25.:34:31.

which is just under the legal limit. The people of the Netherlands

:34:32.:34:36.

are voting in the first of three crucial elections in Europe this

:34:37.:34:39.

year, which are being viewed as important tests of the popularity

:34:40.:34:42.

of nationalist parties. The anti-Islam, anti-EU,

:34:43.:34:45.

far-right leader Geert Wilders's party performed best in polls

:34:46.:34:47.

leading up to the vote, but his support seems

:34:48.:34:49.

to be slipping. The Dutch Prime Minister,

:34:50.:34:51.

Mark Rutte has said the election is an opportunity for voters to beat

:34:52.:34:54.

the wrong sort of populism. Large parts of the east coast

:34:55.:35:05.

of the United States has been brought to a halt because of heavy

:35:06.:35:09.

blizzards caused by storm Stella. Around 50 million people

:35:10.:35:12.

across the country have been warned to expect further severe weather,

:35:13.:35:15.

and the German Chancellor, Angela Merkel, has been forced

:35:16.:35:17.

to postpone her trip to Washington We have heard yesterday they are

:35:18.:35:32.

being told not to go anywhere, and we can see why. We will have the

:35:33.:35:39.

travel and weather. The weather from Carol and about ten minutes' time,

:35:40.:35:45.

and a crazy night for Leicester. A few weeks ago all the talk was about

:35:46.:35:52.

Ranieri struggling in the league, no chance in the Champions League and

:35:53.:35:55.

they can't stop winning. Have they got rid of Ranieri and is that what

:35:56.:36:01.

they needed to do to find their form and refresh themselves, or have they

:36:02.:36:06.

all downed tools to push Ranieri out the door? It depends on how cynical

:36:07.:36:10.

you are about the world of football. I will leave you to make your own

:36:11.:36:12.

mind up about that. Leicester City have joined Barcelona

:36:13.:36:13.

and Bayern Munich in the quarter finals of the Champions League,

:36:14.:36:16.

after beating Sevilla 2-0 on the night, going through 3-2

:36:17.:36:18.

on aggregate, on one of the greatest For Leicester city, the power of

:36:19.:36:32.

surprise is a renewable energy. It never seems to dream, regardless of

:36:33.:36:36.

how often they use it. Wes Morgan came out time and time again to

:36:37.:36:40.

score momentous goals. Less a captain in a field marshal,

:36:41.:36:43.

Leicester were heading through. It was happening again. But beware,

:36:44.:36:48.

this was Sevilla. Third in the lead, one goal would change at all. That

:36:49.:36:52.

is how narrow Leicester's lead was. You could forgive the nerves, these

:36:53.:36:56.

fans have seen their heroes become mortals. Losing the manager in the

:36:57.:37:00.

process. Recently something has stirred. Albrighton took aim then

:37:01.:37:04.

took off. Who could stay calm in this? Not Nasri. This was his last

:37:05.:37:12.

touch of the night, a red card, Sevilla down to ten. Pivotal,

:37:13.:37:18.

Schmeichel incredible. But with Leicester city perhaps we should

:37:19.:37:19.

expect that. We have to be delighted with the

:37:20.:37:28.

performance, and knocking Sevilla out tonight. Because their record in

:37:29.:37:32.

Europe is there for everyone to see. But we are in there on merit, make

:37:33.:37:36.

no mistake about that. And we might just be the surprise team, but we

:37:37.:37:41.

know that the quality of teams in that is getting down to the real

:37:42.:37:43.

serious business now. There is an enticing second-leg tie

:37:44.:37:44.

for Manchester City tonight. They scored three times in 11

:37:45.:37:46.

minutes, to beat Monaco 5-3, and manager Pep Guardiola says

:37:47.:37:49.

they will be on the hunt Take the ball and attack as much as

:37:50.:38:02.

possible, is the only way I know to beat this kind of team. So that's

:38:03.:38:07.

why, when one team scores 124 goals, if you are thinking about just

:38:08.:38:11.

defending 90 minutes because we won once, 5-3, you kill yourself.

:38:12.:38:14.

Some encouraging news for Tottenham fans this morning.

:38:15.:38:16.

Harry Kane has damaged ankle ligaments, but it is not as serious

:38:17.:38:19.

The England striker was injured early in the FA Cup quarter-final

:38:20.:38:24.

victory against Millwall on Sunday, but he could be fit for the Wembley

:38:25.:38:27.

semi-final against Chelsea next month.

:38:28.:38:28.

The Football Association have charged Manchester United

:38:29.:38:30.

with failing to control their players during Monday's FA Cup

:38:31.:38:33.

It follows the United players' reaction when Ander Herrera was sent

:38:34.:38:37.

Nicky Henderson has become the most successful trainer

:38:38.:38:51.

Jockey Noel Fehily was on board Buveur D'Air, winning by 4.5 lengths

:38:52.:38:55.

from My Tent Or Yours on the first day of the festival,

:38:56.:38:58.

The Sports Minister, Tracey Crouch, says the decision

:38:59.:39:06.

by Muirfield Golf Club to admit women as members for the first time

:39:07.:39:10.

The sport's governing body, the R, confirmed that Muirfield would now

:39:11.:39:14.

be eligible to host an Open Championship again,

:39:15.:39:16.

Over 80% of members voted in favour of the change.

:39:17.:39:26.

I love that, Tracey Crouch saying it has been a long time coming. It has

:39:27.:39:33.

been since the club was founded in 1744. That is a long time coming! It

:39:34.:39:40.

is a bit of an understatement. It is a great golf course, good to see it

:39:41.:39:42.

back in. 16 million people, including

:39:43.:39:44.

hundreds of thousands of children, are on the brink of

:39:45.:39:46.

starvation in East Africa. The 13 UK aid agencies which make up

:39:47.:39:49.

the Disasters Emergency Committee have launched an urgent appeal

:39:50.:39:55.

to help those caught up in what has been described as the worst famine

:39:56.:39:58.

in a generation in the region. Saleh Saeed is DEC's chief

:39:59.:40:01.

executive, and we can speak Thank you for talking to us about

:40:02.:40:14.

this this morning. Louise just mentioned that the worst famine we

:40:15.:40:17.

have seen for an awfully long time. Over the weekend the UN said it was

:40:18.:40:21.

the worst crisis in 60 years. Does that reflect what you are seeing on

:40:22.:40:26.

the ground in those countries? Yes, absolutely. It really is a race

:40:27.:40:31.

against time. As you have mentioned, 16 million people facing starvation,

:40:32.:40:36.

and sadly 800,000 people under the age of five will die of hunger if we

:40:37.:40:40.

don't reach them very quickly. East Africa has seen terrible conflict

:40:41.:40:44.

and also drought, it hasn't rained for over three years. And we are

:40:45.:40:50.

seeing children, women, elderly, all slowly dying a death. Of starvation,

:40:51.:40:56.

we would urge people to support the DEC, the Disasters Emergency

:40:57.:41:01.

Committee, which reunites the 13 leading aid organisations, such as

:41:02.:41:07.

Oxfam and the Red Cross. We are supplying water, food and nutrition

:41:08.:41:11.

to hungry babies in order to try and save and protect their lives. The

:41:12.:41:14.

countries we are particularly looking at here are South Sudan,

:41:15.:41:18.

Somalia, Kenya and Ethiopia. I don't want you to get too graphic about

:41:19.:41:22.

this because of the time of the morning, but what sorts of examples

:41:23.:41:26.

can you give us of things on the ground that are happening in those

:41:27.:41:30.

countries? Sure, well, we are hearing stories of people having to

:41:31.:41:33.

resort to eating leaves, because there is absolutely nothing to eat.

:41:34.:41:39.

And we have seen before the horrific images of children who are barely

:41:40.:41:43.

just skin and bones. This is the effect of famine, and that is why we

:41:44.:41:47.

need to respond quickly. There really isn't time to delay. We all

:41:48.:41:51.

have to respond urgently. We would ask people to go to our website, and

:41:52.:42:00.

only ?5 will provide one child with a miracle nut paste, which is very

:42:01.:42:04.

nutritious and will bring back one child from the brink of death. We

:42:05.:42:08.

ask people to please act and not delay, in any way they can. How much

:42:09.:42:12.

money will actually make a difference here? Some figures I have

:42:13.:42:16.

seen quoted are vast, into the billions and billions of pounds. I

:42:17.:42:20.

think it is important not to get lost in the figures. We are talking

:42:21.:42:23.

about lots of money, the UN has quoted ?3.5 billion needed before

:42:24.:42:29.

July in order to avert catastrophe, but really every small amount

:42:30.:42:33.

counts. As I have mentioned, ?25 will actually save the life of a

:42:34.:42:37.

child. So it is not really about raising billions and billions, it is

:42:38.:42:41.

about reaching as many people as quickly as possible. And that is why

:42:42.:42:45.

people need to act now and support the DEC. All the best with your

:42:46.:42:49.

campaign. Thank you for coming and talking to us this morning. We will

:42:50.:42:56.

have more on that later. Time for a look at this morning's weather.

:42:57.:42:59.

Carol is at St James is Park, where it could he really warm. -- St

:43:00.:43:05.

James's Park. Highs of 16 or 17 across parts of the Midlands and

:43:06.:43:09.

East Wales, but spring has sprung. Look at this. A beautiful cherry

:43:10.:43:13.

blossom, what a lovely scene. More cloud in the sky this morning and if

:43:14.:43:18.

you are hanging around it is a chilly start as well. St James, of

:43:19.:43:22.

course, St James's Park, is the oldest of the eight Royal Parks. The

:43:23.:43:26.

forecast for today is actually not too bad at all. It is going to be

:43:27.:43:30.

mostly dry, and it will be mild, as Lou Rutley said. This morning there

:43:31.:43:34.

is quite a lot of cloud around, and some murky conditions -- rightly

:43:35.:43:41.

said. Here we are looking at some drizzle, but through the day you

:43:42.:43:45.

will notice the cloud will start to break, especially in some central

:43:46.:43:48.

and eastern areas, and the sun will come out. It is not as windy day

:43:49.:43:53.

across Scotland as it was yesterday but it is still going to be windy,

:43:54.:43:56.

especially across the Northern Isles. There will be some patchy

:43:57.:43:59.

rain coming in across the north-west. As we push into northern

:44:00.:44:03.

England, it is the far north of northern England and the north-west

:44:04.:44:06.

seeing a bit more cloud. To the east, in the shelter of the

:44:07.:44:09.

Pennines, we should see some of that rake up through Yorkshire and

:44:10.:44:12.

Lincolnshire to give us some sunshine. For East Anglia, Essex and

:44:13.:44:15.

Kent, variable amounts of cloud, some bright spells and some

:44:16.:44:19.

sunshine. The Midlands will have sunshine, 16 or 17, maybe a little

:44:20.:44:23.

higher. Along the south Coast, brighter, sunny skies. We get to the

:44:24.:44:27.

south-west and here on the coast there is one or two showers in the

:44:28.:44:31.

afternoon. Not many but also a little bit of coastal murkiness. The

:44:32.:44:35.

South and west coast seeing some patchy mist and fog. East Wales

:44:36.:44:39.

getting away with a fine day, highs of 16 or 17. For Northern Ireland,

:44:40.:44:44.

patchy rain first thing this morning but it will brighten up. We should

:44:45.:44:48.

see some sunshine go through the course of the afternoon, here and

:44:49.:44:51.

there. Through the evening and overnight we hang onto a lot of

:44:52.:44:56.

cloud and murkiness in the west, but at the same time we also have some

:44:57.:45:00.

sea fog, some hill fog, and some low cloud coming into the eastern side

:45:01.:45:04.

of the in the channel, and across parts of the south-east of England,

:45:05.:45:07.

eastern England and Central parts of England as well. Tomorrow that will

:45:08.:45:11.

clear, allowing much of England and Wales are dry and bright start to

:45:12.:45:15.

the day with some sunshine. We have a weather front coming in across

:45:16.:45:18.

Northern Ireland and Scotland, which will introduce some rain. That will

:45:19.:45:21.

get into northern England and north Wales by the time to get the

:45:22.:45:24.

mid-afternoon. Behind that we will see some sunshine and showers, some

:45:25.:45:28.

wintry in the hills, and the wind strengthening again across the far

:45:29.:45:31.

north of Scotland, but not as strong as they were yesterday. Then, as we

:45:32.:45:36.

head on into Friday, well, we do have some rain coming our way. Now,

:45:37.:45:39.

this is what is left of storm Stella, which has been affecting the

:45:40.:45:44.

North States of America. It has been modified by the Atlantic, splitting

:45:45.:45:49.

into Mac and it is not falling as cold air on our shores -- splitting

:45:50.:45:55.

in two. It will have down into the south-east, and the second batch

:45:56.:45:58.

comes in overnight, nothing like they have had in the United States.

:45:59.:46:05.

We will show you some more pictures from Storm Stella in America later

:46:06.:46:09.

on in the programme. Driverless vehicles are already

:46:10.:46:10.

on the road in America and Asia - and they're poised to take

:46:11.:46:14.

to the streets here too. But a new report from the Lord's

:46:15.:46:16.

Science and Technology Committee Good morning to you both. Lots of

:46:17.:46:30.

people analysing what this could mean for the UK rose. Good morning

:46:31.:46:31.

everybody. There is a lot of opportunity

:46:32.:46:33.

for Britain when it comes to driverless vehicles -

:46:34.:46:37.

but the House of Lords report has The report also suggested there is

:46:38.:46:54.

too much focus on the private driverless clouds and not enough on

:46:55.:46:59.

things such as the public transport commercial vehicle opportunities. --

:47:00.:47:11.

driverless cars. Can you just explain to me what we mean by

:47:12.:47:16.

driverless cars? This is next hour, isn't it? I think that is a valid

:47:17.:47:22.

point, that there are levels of automation already out there. We can

:47:23.:47:26.

buy vehicles right now that can park themselves. But within autonomy,

:47:27.:47:31.

there are different levels. So the ultimate aim is to have a vehicle

:47:32.:47:35.

that does not have the steering wheel, potentially, or does not have

:47:36.:47:39.

the need for you to be sitting on a driving. What we are looking to

:47:40.:47:43.

right now is where you can be in a situation where you are not fully

:47:44.:47:46.

driving, but ready to take control. It is about understanding the steps

:47:47.:47:50.

that are needed to get to all the points that you raise, to get to

:47:51.:47:53.

where we understand what is absolutely safe. And that goes back

:47:54.:47:57.

to testing. Think they came out in the report as well. The need for

:47:58.:48:01.

testing on real roads and in real environments to make sure that we

:48:02.:48:05.

fully understand this they take this it -- this fantastic technology and

:48:06.:48:09.

how will work in the real world. That is key. As we said at the

:48:10.:48:13.

beginning of this, this is something where the technologies are ready out

:48:14.:48:16.

there and happening in other countries. When are we likely to see

:48:17.:48:19.

it here, and in what form? Because it probably won't be a driverless

:48:20.:48:23.

cars at is the first thing we see, but it could be perhaps driverless

:48:24.:48:27.

lorries, and other vehicles. Tell us about that. The timeline is a big

:48:28.:48:30.

question. People say when and I think what we are seeing from the

:48:31.:48:37.

car industry is that 2020 one is where we will see some diplomas.

:48:38.:48:42.

That is not far away. That is just in our present time horizon. --

:48:43.:48:47.

2021. And that is or is getting closer. So it is really important

:48:48.:48:51.

that this report came out. -- we will see some deployments. There is

:48:52.:48:56.

a lot of testing under way at the moment. Atkins is doing plenty on

:48:57.:49:04.

this, as are other organisations, on how all these bits will work

:49:05.:49:08.

together, what is the value of it and so on. That is really important,

:49:09.:49:12.

as well. It is not just about technology, but about the

:49:13.:49:15.

individuals, and do they feel comfortable, and what do they want?

:49:16.:49:19.

And can we get to that magnificent safety case of reducing the 90% of

:49:20.:49:24.

accidents that are caused by human error and getting to a situation

:49:25.:49:27.

where we don't have that awful statistic. So if we get this test

:49:28.:49:34.

and we get to a point where we feel like it is safe, how will it be of

:49:35.:49:39.

limited? Will be guessed at to see a few of them on the roads? I think

:49:40.:49:43.

what you will get is a blend. One mean is that you will have different

:49:44.:49:47.

technologies are different levels of maturity. We need to make sure that

:49:48.:49:52.

we couple in what has been deployed. I think that private cars are going

:49:53.:49:57.

to have a level of autonomy. There will be different levels across

:49:58.:50:00.

different modes of transport. And a big it is important to take a step

:50:01.:50:04.

back a little bit and say that driverless cars it is one part of

:50:05.:50:07.

the jigsaw. And that jigsaw is basically about getting from A to B

:50:08.:50:17.

as it comfortable as possible. People consume transport over many

:50:18.:50:21.

modes. From our sites, and from the work that we do at Atkins, it is

:50:22.:50:29.

exciting. To be at the forefront of that gets us out of bed in the

:50:30.:50:32.

morning. Is that mixture of excitement. Yes. Fear but also

:50:33.:50:38.

having just in all of us. Thank you very much real-time. -- having trust

:50:39.:50:45.

in all of this. It's a grand historic mansion

:50:46.:50:48.

that was, quite literally, Yet, crumbling walls and falling

:50:49.:50:50.

ceilings meant Knole House in Kent was in desperate need

:50:51.:50:55.

of some serious TLC. So it became the focus

:50:56.:50:57.

of the biggest restoration project the National Trust

:50:58.:51:00.

has ever undertaken. Let's find out more

:51:01.:51:01.

from John Maguire who's Good morning to both of you. The dry

:51:02.:51:20.

ice machine has given this atmospheric look. The mist has

:51:21.:51:24.

descended on Knole House. There are a lot of gear here. We might show

:51:25.:51:28.

you some of those later on when the mist clears up. At the moment you

:51:29.:51:32.

can hardly see your hand from the face. You can imagine, can't you,

:51:33.:51:35.

Henry Mantell sitting here in planning the next in the Wolf Hall

:51:36.:51:40.

dairies. Because it has that real feeling, that real atmosphere about

:51:41.:51:44.

it. And inside, it is an incredible place. That as you said, it is a

:51:45.:51:48.

place that over the years has really struggled to maintain its present

:51:49.:51:53.

body. This is DIY SOS. With almost six entries of history,

:51:54.:52:04.

and Knole House is one of the Allders, grandest, and most

:52:05.:52:08.

important houses in the country. -- oldest. This was greeted in the 17th

:52:09.:52:14.

century by Thomas Atwood and decorated from classman. But it is

:52:15.:52:22.

showing its age. I think we have been overwhelmed by the scalable we

:52:23.:52:26.

have here. We have seven acres of route. They just keeping on top of

:52:27.:52:30.

the maintenance of the building is an enormous task. And because the

:52:31.:52:34.

building is sold, we got to a point where, actually, we needed to do

:52:35.:52:36.

something, and major intervention, like a project that we are working

:52:37.:52:41.

on now. Really just to secure the house's future. This is the biggest

:52:42.:52:46.

restoration in the National Trust's history, or conducted under the

:52:47.:52:50.

watchful gaze of the Sackville family. Powerful and interglacial in

:52:51.:52:55.

the 17th-century Royal court, their descendants live here to this day, a

:52:56.:52:59.

living link to the past. The industry here is staggering. So

:53:00.:53:05.

state-of-the-art conservation studio will, with painstaking patience,

:53:06.:53:08.

work to protect the building and its contents. This is the famous Knole

:53:09.:53:20.

Sofa. As with everything here it is incredibly dusty. One of our jobs

:53:21.:53:25.

will be to carefully and slowly remove the dust as if we can get the

:53:26.:53:31.

grey gone and the colour back. You overlap the previous bid to ensure

:53:32.:53:34.

there are no holes. And then you just keep the system going, really.

:53:35.:53:38.

The Conservatives employ the same skills and techniques that have

:53:39.:53:41.

embellished Knole for hundreds of years. I suppose the whole point of

:53:42.:53:47.

it was too short to shock your wealth, wasn't it? Exactly. --

:53:48.:53:57.

conservators. If it gets dirty, or less shiny than it should be, that

:53:58.:54:01.

was the stage where the owners would have chosen to reguild. Through the

:54:02.:54:09.

ages, dust, rain, and smoke have taken a toll. This x-ray shows

:54:10.:54:14.

damage caused by woodworm. The team has to preserve the ornate and in

:54:15.:54:23.

outlet -- elaborate of Knole House, not just to preserve the house, but

:54:24.:54:25.

also those who come here to visit. Despite the credible history of the

:54:26.:54:34.

place, there is plenty of me and technology being employed here. --

:54:35.:54:39.

modern technology. We were looking at a device that listens to woodworm

:54:40.:54:44.

inside furniture to get an idea of the type of decay that is ongoing.

:54:45.:54:51.

And talking to those conservators earlier, they were telling me the

:54:52.:54:56.

incredible length they go to. So there is furniture that looks as if

:54:57.:55:00.

it is to be re- upholstered, they will not. They will try to preserve

:55:01.:55:06.

it, can serve it, so if there is a frame that was posted, but at a

:55:07.:55:10.

paltry has disappeared, they will replace it with as close to original

:55:11.:55:14.

materials as possible. They will even use the exact same holes as the

:55:15.:55:19.

first pulse as would have used on that historic furniture so long ago.

:55:20.:55:23.

As I say, the conservation studio here at Knole House opens tomorrow.

:55:24.:55:29.

It is worth a look. It is absolutely fascinating. Painstaking work. Thank

:55:30.:55:33.

you very much for joining us Jon. You're watching practice on BBC

:55:34.:55:38.

News. That the psychopathic place to films and television. Talking about,

:55:39.:55:42.

still to come this morning, with swords, Saxons, and savages, after

:55:43.:55:51.

9am we will be joined by one of the stars of The Last Kingdom, as

:55:52.:55:53.

Hello, this is Breakfast, with Dan Walker and Louise Minchin.

:55:54.:59:49.

16 million people face starvation in East Africa,

:59:50.:59:52.

as a major fundraising campaign is launched to help them.

:59:53.:59:54.

Drought and conflict are being blamed for the crisis,

:59:55.:59:57.

which is being called the worst famine in a generation.

:59:58.:00:17.

Good morning, it is Wednesday 15 March.

:00:18.:00:18.

Also this morning: Levels of identity fraud in the UK

:00:19.:00:21.

New figures show people under 30 are a growing target.

:00:22.:00:31.

Almost two million of us took a cruise holiday last year,

:00:32.:00:34.

and the average age of passengers has been falling.

:00:35.:00:42.

This morning, I'm asking whether the industry can ever get

:00:43.:00:45.

In sport: The European fairytale continues for Leicester City.

:00:46.:00:48.

They knock out Sevilla, to qualify for the quarter-finals

:00:49.:00:51.

Also this morning: After millions of views online, the BBC interviewee

:00:52.:00:57.

whose children stole the show talks about his family's sudden

:00:58.:01:00.

Certainly never had anything like this in our life before.

:01:01.:01:11.

You know, it got to the point when we had to turn off

:01:12.:01:14.

the phones and Facebook and Twitter, and that sort of stuff.

:01:15.:01:19.

She is just a scene stealer, isn't she? And also unbeatable, Carol has

:01:20.:01:26.

the weather for us this morning. Good morning. It is beautiful in St

:01:27.:01:32.

James's Park, quite a bit of cloud around, it is trying to break with

:01:33.:01:36.

some blue sky is coming through and that is more or less forecast for

:01:37.:01:40.

most of us. A cloudy start the some of us, murky as well but it will

:01:41.:01:44.

brighten up with some sunshine, more especially in Central and eastern

:01:45.:01:47.

areas. I will have more in 15 minutes.

:01:48.:01:49.

First, our main story: A major appeal has been launched to help 16

:01:50.:01:53.

million people facing starvation, in what is being described

:01:54.:01:55.

as the worst famine in a generation in East Africa.

:01:56.:01:58.

The Disasters Emergency Committee, which is made up of 13 UK aid

:01:59.:02:01.

agencies, says drought and conflict are to blame for the crisis,

:02:02.:02:04.

which has left tens of thousands of children at risk

:02:05.:02:07.

The United Nations says the crisis in the four affected countries,

:02:08.:02:11.

Nigeria, South Sudan, Somalia and Yemen, is the worst

:02:12.:02:14.

Our diplomatic correspondent James Landale has more.

:02:15.:02:23.

The Disasters Emergency Committee says drought and conflict has left

:02:24.:02:26.

millions in East Africa in immediate need of food,

:02:27.:02:28.

Across South Sudan, Somalia, Kenya and Ethiopia, it says 60

:02:29.:02:39.

million people don't know when they are next going to eat.

:02:40.:02:42.

More than 800,000 children are severely malnourished,

:02:43.:02:44.

The 13 aid agencies that make up the Disasters Emergency Committee

:02:45.:02:50.

are already on the ground, delivering clean drinking water

:02:51.:02:53.

But they are now appealing to the public for funds,

:02:54.:03:00.

so they can do even more to help these people.

:03:01.:03:06.

It really is a race against time. As you have mentioned, 16 million

:03:07.:03:14.

people facing starvation and sadly 800,000 children under the age of

:03:15.:03:18.

five will die of hunger if we don't reach them very, very quickly. East

:03:19.:03:22.

Africa has seen terrible conflict, and also drought. It hasn't rained

:03:23.:03:26.

for over three years, and we are seeing children, women, elderly, all

:03:27.:03:28.

slowly dying. The Government has already promised

:03:29.:03:29.

?200 million in emergency aid for South Sudan and Somalia,

:03:30.:03:32.

and the International Development Secretary, Priti Patel,

:03:33.:03:35.

said her department would match the first ?5 million donated

:03:36.:03:37.

by the public in the new appeal. She also urged other countries

:03:38.:03:47.

to follow Britain's lead, before the crisis became

:03:48.:03:49.

what she called a stain The world, she said,

:03:50.:03:51.

cannot afford to wait. A rare glimpse into President

:03:52.:04:01.

Trump's private finances has emerged, with the leak

:04:02.:04:03.

of his 2005 tax return. Mr Trump refused to make

:04:04.:04:06.

the documents public during his election campaign,

:04:07.:04:08.

but the US TV network MSNBC has now It reveals that Mr Trump

:04:09.:04:11.

paid $38 million in tax, on an income of more

:04:12.:04:16.

than $150 million. In terms of what's on here,

:04:17.:04:22.

let me give you the basics. Aside from the numbers being large,

:04:23.:04:26.

these pages are straightforward. He paid - it looks like

:04:27.:04:29.

$38 million in taxes. He took a big write-down of $103

:04:30.:04:32.

million, more on that later. If you add up the lines for income,

:04:33.:04:39.

he made more than $150 million And that means congratulations, or

:04:40.:04:43.

good luck. The release led to an angry response

:04:44.:04:55.

from the White House, Identity fraud is at an all-time

:04:56.:04:58.

high in the UK, with more young That is according to new data

:04:59.:05:07.

analysed by the fraud Identity fraud involves criminals

:05:08.:05:17.

using someone's personal information to obtain money,

:05:18.:05:20.

products or services. Our home affairs correspondent

:05:21.:05:21.

Danny Shaw reports. Stolen identity - civil servant

:05:22.:05:25.

Luke Croydon was the victim of one His name, address, date of birth

:05:26.:05:28.

and banking details were obtained by a thief who pinched

:05:29.:05:34.

post from his letterbox. Armed with the information,

:05:35.:05:40.

the fraudster applied for a bank card, and then used it to go

:05:41.:05:43.

on a spending spree. When you first find out

:05:44.:05:50.

that it's happened, And then you get very worried,

:05:51.:05:52.

because you wonder what else they might have done

:05:53.:05:57.

with that personal detail. If it is only opening bank accounts,

:05:58.:06:00.

that is one thing, but you wonder Have they signed up to websites,

:06:01.:06:03.

have they got passport applications? So it is a very

:06:04.:06:08.

troubling experience. According to the fraud

:06:09.:06:10.

prevention service Cifas, there were almost 173,000 cases

:06:11.:06:12.

of identity fraud last year, The number of victims aged

:06:13.:06:15.

under-21 increased by more than a third, with the Midlands

:06:16.:06:23.

and the north-east of England registering the highest identity

:06:24.:06:25.

fraud increases, year-on-year. Cifas has produced a film warning

:06:26.:06:27.

people to be careful about how much information they reveal

:06:28.:06:31.

in public and online. Fraudsters are adept

:06:32.:06:35.

at exploiting information posted It advises people to use passwords,

:06:36.:06:37.

privacy settings and antivirus software on their computers,

:06:38.:06:42.

and to shred important paper A Conservative MP has been

:06:43.:06:44.

questioned for six hours by police about the money he claimed

:06:45.:06:52.

during his general election Craig Mackinlay beat the former

:06:53.:06:54.

Ukip leader Nigel Farage He submitted expenses for ?15,000,

:06:55.:06:58.

which is just under the legal limit. Large parts of the east coast

:06:59.:07:11.

of the United States has been brought to a halt because of heavy

:07:12.:07:15.

blizzards caused by storm Stella. Around 50 million people

:07:16.:07:18.

across the country have been warned to expect further severe weather,

:07:19.:07:21.

and the German Chancellor, Angela Merkel, has been forced

:07:22.:07:23.

to postpone her trip to Washington It is nicknamed the city

:07:24.:07:26.

that never sleeps. But even New York's most determined

:07:27.:07:34.

have struggled to carry There was little sign of large

:07:35.:07:37.

crowds of tourists in Times Square, Instead, many headed

:07:38.:07:45.

to Central Park. I've been around snow maybe once

:07:46.:07:48.

or twice in my life, We had a snowball fight,

:07:49.:07:53.

and it was pretty cold, so we might get some hot

:07:54.:07:59.

chocolate, now, honestly. New Yorkers might be used

:08:00.:08:01.

to heavy snowstorms, but authorities have warned

:08:02.:08:03.

them to stay indoors. Upstate, conditions were even more

:08:04.:08:06.

severe, with 20 inches falling Across the east coast,

:08:07.:08:08.

airport runways were covered in white, and the departure

:08:09.:08:13.

boards red, with thousands Much of the nation's

:08:14.:08:16.

capital was also paralysed, The city is famous for its cherry

:08:17.:08:25.

blossoms in spring, but this storm Further north, they were struggling

:08:26.:08:30.

to dig their way out in Chicago, and also in Boston, where the school

:08:31.:08:36.

buses had to make way Until now, much of America's

:08:37.:08:40.

north-east region had enjoyed an unusually mild start to 2017,

:08:41.:08:46.

but storm Stella has delivered a harsh reminder that

:08:47.:08:49.

winter is not over yet. The people of the Netherlands

:08:50.:08:52.

are voting in the first of three crucial elections in Europe this

:08:53.:09:00.

year, which are being viewed as important tests of the popularity

:09:01.:09:03.

of nationalist parties. The anti-Islam, anti-EU,

:09:04.:09:05.

far-right leader Geert Wilder's party performed best in polls

:09:06.:09:07.

leading up to the vote, but his support seems

:09:08.:09:10.

to be slipping. Our Europe correspondent

:09:11.:09:12.

Anna Holligan is in The Hague much of Europe will be keeping a

:09:13.:09:29.

close eye on what happens in the Netherlands. Yes, this is being seen

:09:30.:09:35.

as the first real test of the populace is' ability to challenge

:09:36.:09:38.

those establishment parties since Brexit and before the votes in front

:09:39.:09:46.

and Germany. We are here in The Hague, where Geert Wilders, leader

:09:47.:09:50.

of the freedom party, is expected to be casting his vote in 45 minutes'

:09:51.:09:54.

time. We have been covering this, but you might forget there are

:09:55.:09:59.

actually a record 28 parties competing in these elections. So

:10:00.:10:02.

many parties in this democracy, reports this paper. In the

:10:03.:10:08.

Telegraph, they say the Labour Party must fight fear, this is a campaign

:10:09.:10:13.

which has been dominated by questions of immigration,

:10:14.:10:17.

integration, the Dutch identity. And then finally, the front page of this

:10:18.:10:23.

newspaper, go and vote it says, projecting six front pages they the

:10:24.:10:27.

six main party leaders. Even though Geert Wilders may not make up the

:10:28.:10:32.

government, other parties have said they refused to work with him

:10:33.:10:35.

because of his very extreme views. He has succeeded already in shaping

:10:36.:10:40.

the whole nature of this debate, to focus on those kinds of issues, of

:10:41.:10:45.

immigration, Islam, and the future of the EU. Thank you very much for

:10:46.:10:51.

that this morning. We will have plenty more on that over the course

:10:52.:10:55.

of the day. You can follow that on the BBC News Channel. You have

:10:56.:10:58.

probably seen this at some stage. It is the news interview that

:10:59.:11:00.

everyone has been talking about. Last week, Professor Robert Kelly's

:11:01.:11:03.

family became an internet sensation when his children crashed his

:11:04.:11:06.

appearance on BBC News. Well, they agreed to come

:11:07.:11:08.

back on the BBC to talk Our correspondent

:11:09.:11:11.

Sangita Myska has more. Professor Robert Kelly,

:11:12.:11:14.

an expert on South Korea, offering expert analysis

:11:15.:11:16.

of global events. But it was the unexpected

:11:17.:11:18.

entrance of his daughter, Marion, who was to create

:11:19.:11:22.

a global event of its own. I think one of your

:11:23.:11:28.

children's just walked in. To avoid being upstaged,

:11:29.:11:30.

the Professor tried a gentle push. Only for Marion's brother

:11:31.:11:33.

to enter on wheels. Was he hoping that, just perhaps,

:11:34.:11:38.

no-one had noticed after all? A perfectly timed slam of the door

:11:39.:11:52.

ensured this video went viral. Professor Kelly and his family

:11:53.:12:01.

were invited back onto live BBC television, only for Marion to once

:12:02.:12:04.

again steal the limelight. So, in spite of it all,

:12:05.:12:09.

did they find it as funny as we did? And we watched it multiple times,

:12:10.:12:22.

too, and our families have watched and everybody we know seems to think

:12:23.:12:31.

it's pretty hysterical. So yeah, we understand why

:12:32.:12:36.

people find it enjoyable, catching a regular family

:12:37.:12:38.

off-guard, and stuff, so yes. Just a regular family,

:12:39.:12:41.

whose off-guard moments have become So good, that video. And they are in

:12:42.:12:44.

high demand as well. This morning the family gave a press

:12:45.:12:56.

conference in South Korea, and Marion looked like

:12:57.:12:59.

she was right at home. This time with a lollipop in her

:13:00.:13:09.

mouth throughout the entire press conference.

:13:10.:13:10.

A Royal Marine who shot and killed an injured Taliban fighter

:13:11.:13:13.

in Afghanistan is expected to find out today whether his appeal

:13:14.:13:16.

against a murder conviction has been successful.

:13:17.:13:18.

Sergeant Alexander Blackman was serving in Helmand Province in 2011.

:13:19.:13:21.

The incident was filmed on a body camera.

:13:22.:13:29.

In November 2013, he was found guilty of murder, and later

:13:30.:13:32.

sentenced to life in prison, with a minimum of ten years.

:13:33.:13:35.

However, an appeal was granted after new psychiatric evidence found

:13:36.:13:40.

that, at the time of the killing, Sergeant Blackman was suffering

:13:41.:13:43.

from a mental illness triggered by his experience in Helmand.

:13:44.:13:52.

Today, five judges at the Court Martial Appeal Court

:13:53.:13:55.

in London will decide whether to overturn that

:13:56.:13:57.

We can speak now to military defence lawyer Bob Scott.

:13:58.:14:06.

Good morning to you. Thank you very much indeed for joining us. Good

:14:07.:14:14.

morning. Let's talk about this new psychiatric evidence. It had not

:14:15.:14:17.

been looked at in the original trial. Do you think that could be

:14:18.:14:21.

the key difference here? Yes, indeed. It could allow the defence

:14:22.:14:27.

to suggest that the defendant was not operating in his normal mind,

:14:28.:14:33.

because of the pressure of the activities at the time. OK, just

:14:34.:14:38.

tell us a little bit about the disorder itself. It is called

:14:39.:14:42.

adjustment disorder. What do you know about it and how might it make

:14:43.:14:46.

a difference? It may make a difference because it would suggest

:14:47.:14:49.

that he couldn't make normal, rational judgements, that normal

:14:50.:14:53.

people would expect someone to make. OK. So now, he is going to hear his

:14:54.:15:00.

appeal. How important is it that people are able to use and look at

:15:01.:15:04.

whether or not someone is suffering from a mental illness at the time of

:15:05.:15:09.

an incident? Well, it is very important, because it makes the

:15:10.:15:12.

difference between a conviction for murder, or indeed, a conviction for

:15:13.:15:17.

manslaughter, for which the sentence can be quite different. OK. And why

:15:18.:15:24.

would it not have been used in the first trial? Well, that principally

:15:25.:15:29.

is a decision for the prosecution, to decide whether or not to put

:15:30.:15:33.

manslaughter on the indictment as an alternative. But it could be raised,

:15:34.:15:39.

indeed, by the board, which in a court martial is the equivalent of a

:15:40.:15:44.

jury, who might decide that they are not content that a murder conviction

:15:45.:15:50.

is upheld. They might wish to convicted for manslaughter, and will

:15:51.:15:55.

ask the judge for directions in that case. And let's just talk in general

:15:56.:16:01.

terms, if we could, how common is it that mental health conditions are

:16:02.:16:04.

involved in similar cases with regard to service personnel? In

:16:05.:16:12.

relation to a variety of military cases, there is an upsurge, if you

:16:13.:16:22.

will, of cases of PTSD stemming from active service, which is used as a

:16:23.:16:29.

potential defence for a lot of military personnel facing various

:16:30.:16:35.

charges. That is to be expected. OK, you talk about this upsurge. Are the

:16:36.:16:40.

implications, whichever way it goes, this today, are the implications for

:16:41.:16:45.

future military cases? Well, each case is judged on its own merits,

:16:46.:16:54.

but clearly defence practitioners, and indeed prosecutors, will

:16:55.:16:57.

consider such matters, I would have thought, with a greater attention to

:16:58.:17:04.

detail, in terms of that possible defence. Thank you very much for

:17:05.:17:06.

talking to us here on Breakfast. It's 7:17 and you're watching

:17:07.:17:12.

Breakfast from BBC News. UK aid agencies launch

:17:13.:17:14.

a fundraising appeal, to help millions of people facing

:17:15.:17:17.

hunger in East Africa. Identity fraud in the UK hits

:17:18.:17:21.

a record high, with more young Here's Carol with a look

:17:22.:17:25.

at this morning's weather. Here is Ainsley Harriot. Carol once

:17:26.:17:55.

again won an award yesterday. Her ninth TRIC Award for Best Weather

:17:56.:17:59.

Presenter. She is one of six years in a row. We always known she is the

:18:00.:18:05.

best, but it is official again. Official nine times, now!

:18:06.:18:09.

Congratulations to you. We are excited for you. Thank you so much.

:18:10.:18:15.

And congratulations to you too. And everybody behind the scenes. Because

:18:16.:18:19.

of course, we are a huge team, and we also push each other and make

:18:20.:18:24.

each other as good as we are. So it is very much a joint award. And

:18:25.:18:28.

thank you to the TRIC Award is for that. Anyway, this morning suggest

:18:29.:18:36.

as part -- at St James's Park, it has been a cloudy start. But look at

:18:37.:18:40.

the cherry blossoms. And the ducks. St James's Park is the oldest of the

:18:41.:18:44.

eight Royal parks in the capital. The forecast for all of us today is

:18:45.:18:49.

generally a cloudy one. It is a murky stuff is on us, but it will

:18:50.:18:53.

brighten up. But the most, it will be dry and also mild. The highest

:18:54.:18:57.

averages today are likely to be across is Wales and the Midlands,

:18:58.:19:03.

reaching 16, 17, or higher. So today, generally, where we have all

:19:04.:19:07.

that cloud in the central and eastern parts of the country, you

:19:08.:19:10.

will start to notice wells developed. We'll start this is

:19:11.:19:16.

shunned coming through. -- stunt Bell sunshine coming through. The

:19:17.:19:20.

murky conditions will hold on across south-west England and Wales on the

:19:21.:19:25.

coast. Scotland, not as Windies yesterday, but later, the wind will

:19:26.:19:29.

pick up and we will start this season patchy rain north-west. As we

:19:30.:19:33.

move into north-west England and the far northern England, here, too, a

:19:34.:19:37.

cloudy start. But it through the Pennines in the east, down towards

:19:38.:19:40.

Kent, we are looking at some sunny spells. The Midlands will brighten

:19:41.:19:46.

up nicely with some sunshine. And high temperatures. As we get to the

:19:47.:19:49.

south-west, we are looking again at a fairly cloudy start, but some

:19:50.:19:53.

bright spells. One or two showers across the coast. Wales will hold

:19:54.:19:58.

onto is a murky conditions. A better cloud at times, too, that is Wales

:19:59.:20:01.

will have a different story. For them, sunshine and 16 or 17 degrees

:20:02.:20:06.

as a high. Patchy rain across Northern Ireland this morning, but

:20:07.:20:11.

it will brighten up and dry up. Some cloud around later. Through this

:20:12.:20:15.

evening at overnight, where we have clearer skies, you will tend to find

:20:16.:20:19.

the cloud will build. Still murky across the north and north-west. And

:20:20.:20:23.

then we have some sea fog, hill fog, and low fog across the English

:20:24.:20:30.

Channel and into the south-east, Midlands, and some parts of eastern

:20:31.:20:33.

England. That will tend to fade this morning. Then it will be a lovely

:20:34.:20:37.

bright start across much of England and Wales. Through Scotland and

:20:38.:20:40.

Northern Ireland, the weather front coming your way is producing

:20:41.:20:43.

southwards, taking its rain with it. Get into northern England and north

:20:44.:20:48.

Wales by mid-afternoon. Line-out, we see sunshine and showers. Wintry on

:20:49.:20:53.

the hills. Possibly sleet at lower levels. The wind will strengthen

:20:54.:20:56.

again across the Northern Isles. Not as much as yesterday. Until Friday,

:20:57.:21:01.

we have rain coming our way. This is what is left of Storm Stella. That

:21:02.:21:06.

has been affecting the naughty states of America. As that comes

:21:07.:21:10.

across the Atlantic in a jetstream, it will modify it, and will not fall

:21:11.:21:18.

into cold air like it did in the states. It will come to us as rain,

:21:19.:21:21.

coming in and pushing down to the south-east. A second oath that on

:21:22.:21:27.

Friday the same thing. That will lead to an unsettled weekend. That

:21:28.:21:28.

make a -- that will make a second. Let me tell you what is going on in

:21:29.:21:51.

the business world. Lots of results coming in this morning.

:21:52.:21:59.

EON, the owner of fast fashion chain Zara

:22:00.:22:02.

has results out, and they're pretty good again.

:22:03.:22:08.

Sales at Inditex jumped last year to ?20 billion globally,

:22:09.:22:11.

helped by new store openings in 56 countries and online growth.

:22:12.:22:14.

The fastest growing sector of the business, though,

:22:15.:22:16.

was the chain's homeware department, Zara Home.

:22:17.:22:18.

The firm says it is because of an increasing gust associated with

:22:19.:22:25.

delivering UK energy policy and other expenses. The firm says these

:22:26.:22:28.

are out of its control. We have also got results in from Zara. Their

:22:29.:22:35.

results are out and say they are pretty good again. Sales jumped last

:22:36.:22:41.

year to ?20 billion globally. This was helped by new store openings and

:22:42.:22:45.

56 countries and online growth as well. It is the fastest-growing

:22:46.:22:56.

sector of the business. Zara Home sought growth of 15%. Two different

:22:57.:23:05.

stories, one from Zara and one from EON. And jigsaws and so milk of

:23:06.:23:15.

being includes included in the --. -- gunners will look at 700 goods

:23:16.:23:19.

and services that we readily buy to try and work out the inflation

:23:20.:23:22.

figures. So falling out of the basket this time are alcopops,

:23:23.:23:29.

mental cigarettes, and non- smartphone mobiles. It is

:23:30.:23:32.

interesting to see what goes in and out of that basket. Jigsaws are in

:23:33.:23:36.

because the over 50s enjoy more jigsaws, now. Jese make staying in,

:23:37.:23:44.

drinking gin, and the jigsaws. Not drinking it with soy milk, though.

:23:45.:23:48.

They could go wrong. Good morning to you.

:23:49.:23:50.

How medical staff handle the last few days of a patient's life can

:23:51.:23:53.

A new film detailing the importance of the right approach

:23:54.:23:57.

during that time is being used to help educate staff and better

:23:58.:24:01.

It's based on the experiences of one family.

:24:02.:24:04.

Breakfast's Tim Muffett went to meet them.

:24:05.:24:07.

Seth was 49 years old - he was seemingly fit and well.

:24:08.:24:10.

We'd been away on holiday, and I'd had a chest infection.

:24:11.:24:16.

We came back make a couple weeks then suddenly Seth got

:24:17.:24:19.

We thought he had caught something from me.

:24:20.:24:28.

It was May 2014, and Leslie's husband, Seth, was diagnosed

:24:29.:24:31.

Seth's dying wish was never fulfilled.

:24:32.:24:35.

We felt like it was a constant kind of clinical intervention.

:24:36.:24:40.

Today, we need to look at the pulmonary embolism.

:24:41.:24:42.

Today, we need some intravenous antibiotics.

:24:43.:24:44.

It just felt like no one was really listening to us.

:24:45.:24:53.

Lesley put her frustrations and anger down in writing.

:24:54.:24:56.

Her and Seth's story has now been adapted into a short film,

:24:57.:24:59.

They said "We'll try you on intensive course

:25:00.:25:02.

How could they give you this news when you're on your own?

:25:03.:25:06.

It's got to be as good an experience as it possibly can be.

:25:07.:25:12.

And so I wanted to show with, you know, some compassion

:25:13.:25:16.

and sensitivity, that dilemma that all families find themselves

:25:17.:25:18.

The film's about to be screened here in London.

:25:19.:25:32.

The idea is that it is then used as an educational resource

:25:33.:25:35.

Nobody had a conversation with me, about what I might need,

:25:36.:25:43.

What was your reaction to this film you saw it?

:25:44.:25:52.

-- What was your reaction to this film when you saw it?

:25:53.:25:55.

We need to make sure we are doing this right,

:25:56.:25:59.

and we're doing this better, because we only have one chance

:26:00.:26:02.

I think sometimes people presume that other people have

:26:03.:26:07.

So that other people think that well, I'm sure other people have

:26:08.:26:11.

talked to the family, or explained things to them.

:26:12.:26:14.

In 2009, the Department of Health funded the Dying Matters coalition,

:26:15.:26:17.

established across England and Wales to improve and of life care.

:26:18.:26:20.

Its mission is to help people talk more openly about death.

:26:21.:26:23.

But many accept that more can be done, and Seth's story could help.

:26:24.:26:26.

People understanding what it meant to them.

:26:27.:26:30.

How those last few days made - were so important, and how,

:26:31.:26:33.

with a little bit of thought, we may have been to do something

:26:34.:26:37.

It should be like a birth - special and precious,

:26:38.:26:42.

with good memories, to sustain those left behind.

:26:43.:26:44.

Seth asked me to show the story because he was a very

:26:45.:26:48.

Actually, I'm doing that in partnership with Seth,

:26:49.:26:50.

so we're doing that together, even though Seth isn't here.

:26:51.:27:05.

I know lots of you are talking in sending messages to macro me. --

:27:06.:27:15.

Lesley, they are. Still to come, John Maguire

:27:16.:27:19.

is at Knole House in Kent, to find out about the largest ever

:27:20.:27:23.

restoration project undertaken It looks beautiful air. And on the

:27:24.:27:31.

misty moors this morning, Jon? Yes, it is misty. Where wedding through

:27:32.:27:35.

to burn off so we can show you the spectacular setting here. Some of

:27:36.:27:39.

the trees just appearing through the mist, they are. -- we are waiting.

:27:40.:27:45.

There has been a house here for about 600 years. It was famously

:27:46.:27:54.

haunted by Henry VIII. It was a palace for the Archbishop of

:27:55.:27:57.

Canterbury. The years have not been kind to the building. It has

:27:58.:28:02.

struggled, as have many of its contents. A massive conservation and

:28:03.:28:06.

preservation project has been taking place here. Also tomorrow, they are

:28:07.:28:10.

opening a state-of-the-art conservation studio, so people can

:28:11.:28:14.

see some of these skills that are used to protect this place. So will

:28:15.:28:16.

show you all those after the new Hello, this is Breakfast,

:28:17.:31:44.

with Dan Walker and Louise Minchin. A major appeal has been launched

:31:45.:31:52.

to help 16 million people facing starvation, in what is being

:31:53.:31:55.

described as the worst famine The Disasters Emergency Committee,

:31:56.:31:58.

which is made up of 13 UK aid agencies, says drought and conflict

:31:59.:32:03.

are to blame for the crisis, which has left tens of thousands

:32:04.:32:06.

of children at risk A rare glimpse into President

:32:07.:32:09.

Trump's private finances has emerged, with the leak

:32:10.:32:18.

of his 2005 tax return. Mr Trump refused to make

:32:19.:32:20.

the documents public during his election campaign,

:32:21.:32:23.

but the US TV network MSNBC has now published two pages which reveal

:32:24.:32:26.

he paid $38 million in tax, on an income of more

:32:27.:32:29.

than $150 million. The release led to an angry response

:32:30.:32:39.

from the White House, Cases of identity fraud in the UK

:32:40.:32:42.

are at an all-time high, according to figures from the fraud

:32:43.:32:53.

prevention organisation Cifas. The crime involves stealing

:32:54.:32:55.

someone's personal information to obtain money,

:32:56.:32:57.

products or services. New data suggests young people

:32:58.:32:59.

are a growing target. A Conservative MP has been

:33:00.:33:10.

questioned for six hours by police about the money he claimed

:33:11.:33:13.

during his general election Craig Mackinlay beat the former

:33:14.:33:16.

Ukip leader Nigel Farage He submitted expenses for ?15,000,

:33:17.:33:19.

which is just under the legal limit. The people of the Netherlands

:33:20.:33:28.

are voting in the first of three crucial elections in Europe this

:33:29.:33:31.

year, which are being viewed as important tests of the popularity

:33:32.:33:34.

of nationalist parties. The anti-Islam, anti-EU,

:33:35.:33:36.

far-right leader Geert Wilders's party performed best in polls

:33:37.:33:38.

leading up to the vote, but his support seems

:33:39.:33:41.

to be slipping. The Dutch Prime Minister,

:33:42.:33:43.

Mark Rutte, has said the election is an opportunity for voters to beat

:33:44.:33:46.

the wrong sort of populism. Large parts of the east coast

:33:47.:33:57.

of the United States has been brought to a halt because of heavy

:33:58.:34:00.

blizzards caused by storm Stella. Around 50 million people

:34:01.:34:03.

across the country have been warned to expect further severe weather,

:34:04.:34:06.

and the German Chancellor, Angela Merkel, has been forced

:34:07.:34:08.

to postpone her trip to Washington Was I booting you that? I am fine,

:34:09.:34:31.

you just stepped on my foot! Does not much space here. I know, it is

:34:32.:34:38.

fine! I didn't mean to extend sideways. Good morning. Talking

:34:39.:34:44.

about Leicester city, and that remarkable night. What a night. But

:34:45.:34:51.

at that picture. Kasper Schmeichel saving another penalty, and it is so

:34:52.:34:57.

funny how quickly the woes of the last few weeks can be forgotten,

:34:58.:35:01.

aiming for three back-to-back wins in the Premier league to lift them

:35:02.:35:04.

further from relegation zone. You will remember that just as Ranieri

:35:05.:35:12.

was fired the team dropped into the relegation zone of the Premier

:35:13.:35:15.

league. Now they are into the quarterfinals of the Champions

:35:16.:35:18.

League and the stands were rocking and singing and chanting. It was

:35:19.:35:26.

like last season all over again. It raises questions about where that

:35:27.:35:31.

effort was when Ranieri was there. Is a close the new manager is doing

:35:32.:35:36.

an amazing job or did the players want Ranieri out? It would be good

:35:37.:35:41.

to set them all down and say come on, guys, tell us the truth.

:35:42.:35:43.

Leicester City have joined Barcelona and Bayern Munich in the quarter

:35:44.:35:46.

finals of the Champions League, after beating Sevilla 2-0

:35:47.:35:48.

on the night, going through 3-2 on aggregate, on one of the greatest

:35:49.:35:52.

For Leicester city, the power of surprise is a renewable energy.

:35:53.:35:57.

It never seems to drain, regardless of how often they use it.

:35:58.:36:00.

Wes Morgan came out, time and time again,

:36:01.:36:02.

to score momentous goals, less a captain than a field marshal.

:36:03.:36:05.

But beware, this was Sevilla, third in the League.

:36:06.:36:11.

That is how narrow Leicester's lead was.

:36:12.:36:14.

These fans have seen their heroes become mortals, losing the manager

:36:15.:36:19.

Marc Albrighton took aim, then took off.

:36:20.:36:26.

This was his last touch of the night, a red card,

:36:27.:36:34.

But, with Leicester City, perhaps we should expect that.

:36:35.:36:49.

We have to be delighted with the performance,

:36:50.:36:51.

and knocking Sevilla out tonight, because their record in Europe

:36:52.:36:54.

But we are in there on merit, make no mistake about that.

:36:55.:36:59.

And we might just be the surprise team, but we know that the quality

:37:00.:37:03.

of teams in there is getting down to the real serious business now.

:37:04.:37:12.

There is an enticing second-leg tie for Manchester City tonight.

:37:13.:37:15.

They scored three times in 11 minutes, to beat Monaco 5-3,

:37:16.:37:18.

and manager Pep Guardiola says they will be on the hunt

:37:19.:37:21.

Take the ball, and attack as much as possible,

:37:22.:37:27.

is the only way I know to beat this kind of team.

:37:28.:37:31.

So that's why, when one team scores 124 goals,

:37:32.:37:33.

if you are thinking about just defending 90 minutes because we won

:37:34.:37:36.

Some encouraging news for Tottenham fans this morning.

:37:37.:37:44.

Harry Kane has damaged ankle ligaments, but it is not as serious

:37:45.:37:47.

The England striker was injured early in the FA Cup quarter-final

:37:48.:37:56.

victory against Millwall on Sunday, but he could be fit for the Wembley

:37:57.:38:00.

semi-final against Chelsea next month.

:38:01.:38:01.

The Football Association have charged Manchester United

:38:02.:38:03.

with failing to control their players, when Ander Herrera

:38:04.:38:06.

was sent off during Monday's FA Cup quarter-final at Chelsea.

:38:07.:38:08.

United didn't get back to Manchester until 4:00am after that match,

:38:09.:38:11.

because their plane never turned up at Heathrow,

:38:12.:38:14.

so they had to get on the team coach all the way home.

:38:15.:38:21.

The Sports Minister, Tracey Crouch, says the decision

:38:22.:38:23.

by Muirfield Golf Club to admit women as members for the first time

:38:24.:38:27.

The sport's governing body, the R, confirmed that Muirfield would now

:38:28.:38:32.

be eligible to host an Open Championship again,

:38:33.:38:34.

Over 80% of members voted in favour of the change.

:38:35.:38:43.

Again, a bit of a controversial vote. We were talking about whether

:38:44.:38:48.

the Leicester players downed tools or whether they were rejuvenated

:38:49.:38:53.

under Craig Shakespeare. It is a similar reaction to the Muirfield

:38:54.:39:02.

vote, whether they only voted to accept women so they could be back

:39:03.:39:04.

on the tour. When you write a will,

:39:05.:39:05.

you would expect your wishes But a judgement is expected today

:39:06.:39:08.

at the Supreme Court which experts say could make it easier

:39:09.:39:12.

for adult children to She left all her money

:39:13.:39:15.

to three animal charities, the RSPCA, RSPB and Blue Cross,

:39:16.:39:19.

but explicitly excluded After a long court battle,

:39:20.:39:22.

her daughter, Heather Ilott, successfully challenged

:39:23.:39:25.

the decision, and was awarded But the animal charities that had

:39:26.:39:27.

been due to inherit appealed to the Supreme Court,

:39:28.:39:32.

and that decision is due today. So what does this mean

:39:33.:39:34.

for the rest of us? Let's find out from Marilyn Stowe,

:39:35.:39:38.

who is an independent family lawyer. We are also joined by Don Day,

:39:39.:39:41.

who has chosen to leave his entire We will talk to you in a moment.

:39:42.:39:57.

Good morning to you both. Just explain to us this case. It has gone

:39:58.:40:01.

backwards and forwards in court and this is really taking it right down

:40:02.:40:06.

to the wire, now, isn't it? Ten years, it has been ongoing for ten

:40:07.:40:10.

years. And the inheritance provision for family and dependents act is the

:40:11.:40:15.

relevant law, so it is 40 years old, and this is the first time it has

:40:16.:40:19.

ever got to the Supreme Court. And what happens with that law is that

:40:20.:40:25.

where reasonable financial provision has not been made by a will or by

:40:26.:40:33.

intestacy, to a very small category of people, for example a spouse or

:40:34.:40:39.

partner or child, or somebody who is being maintained as a child, then

:40:40.:40:44.

they can apply to the court for reasonable financial provision. And

:40:45.:40:48.

what has happened with this daughter is, she is entitled to maintenance.

:40:49.:40:54.

And the Supreme Court are going to decide today what that maintenance

:40:55.:40:58.

level should be, how it should be assessed, and what the entitlement

:40:59.:41:05.

to the charity is. Because that is to the lady who died, Mrs Jackson,

:41:06.:41:10.

that is what she actually wanted to happen to her estate, and how the

:41:11.:41:14.

charities should be treated. And it is also going to look at this issue

:41:15.:41:18.

where they are estranged. Does estrangement impact? So there are

:41:19.:41:24.

all sorts of technical areas, but it is the first time it has got to the

:41:25.:41:29.

Supreme Court, so it is really very interesting, and I think a lot of

:41:30.:41:33.

lawyers will be able to give much more informed advice to a client who

:41:34.:41:37.

doesn't want to have a child inherit his or her estate. Let's find out

:41:38.:41:41.

about Don's circumstances. I am sure you be interested in hearing this as

:41:42.:41:46.

well. When did you decide to leave your estate to charity rather than

:41:47.:41:51.

the rest of your well, my wife had been in a care home with Alzheimer's

:41:52.:41:57.

for the last five years, before she died last year. And during one of

:41:58.:42:03.

her more lucid moments, we decided that, because of her mother's

:42:04.:42:09.

involvement with Alzheimer's some 25 years ago that we would like to make

:42:10.:42:14.

a nice gesture to the Alzheimer's Society for their help and

:42:15.:42:17.

assistance, and kindness that they had provided to me and my wife is a

:42:18.:42:22.

family. And we talked with the legacy provider at the Alzheimer

:42:23.:42:27.

Society, who was most helpful in providing all the necessary

:42:28.:42:33.

documentation that was necessary, for us to make sure that our wishes

:42:34.:42:38.

were carried out. This meant, really, that we had to do a signed

:42:39.:42:44.

affidavit about our wishes, as well as our will. I had to go to the

:42:45.:42:49.

doctor and have a certificate from him to say that in fact, while I was

:42:50.:42:54.

making this, I was of sound mind, which I hope I was, and sometimes

:42:55.:42:59.

you doubt whether the professionals are right under these circumstances!

:43:00.:43:03.

But anyway, we did that, and everything seemed to be now geared

:43:04.:43:11.

up for my estate to go to the Alzheimer 's, which I am sure will

:43:12.:43:17.

be of some benefit for them in their research towards conquering or

:43:18.:43:22.

helping to conquer this very dreadful, and indeed, debasing

:43:23.:43:27.

disease that we are having to live with these days. And I will come

:43:28.:43:32.

back to Marilyn about what Don said, and you have clearly gone out of

:43:33.:43:36.

your way to make sure that you will can't be changed, haven't you? I

:43:37.:43:42.

have indeed, yes. I have taken a lot of advice, because I was aware that

:43:43.:43:47.

these things could be challenged, and that there could be deeds of

:43:48.:43:51.

variation, and so on and so forth, and I hope I have covered all the

:43:52.:43:55.

little bits and pieces that were necessary. OK. Marilyn, very

:43:56.:44:02.

interesting to hear that, because presumably, will it all depends what

:44:03.:44:06.

happens in this case? So many people will be writing wills thinking that

:44:07.:44:09.

is what is going to happen, won't they? Not every application is bound

:44:10.:44:14.

to succeed. There was a lady who made an application under the

:44:15.:44:19.

inheritance act last year, as an adult child, and the court found

:44:20.:44:23.

that she didn't need reasonable financial provision, because she

:44:24.:44:26.

already was provided for. So it is not bound to succeed. But what I

:44:27.:44:31.

think should help here is how the court will treat charities. If you

:44:32.:44:37.

want to leave money to a charity, a charity doesn't have needs, and the

:44:38.:44:42.

court, when it makes its decision, has to consider the needs of all the

:44:43.:44:46.

beneficiaries. So how will they treat the charity, how will they

:44:47.:44:50.

treat the person who is coming before it say I am entitled to

:44:51.:44:53.

reasonable financial provision? You can't oust the law, you can do your

:44:54.:44:59.

best, but you can't oust it and you can't prevent that application being

:45:00.:45:04.

made. But what will happen today is clearer guidance, I think, as to how

:45:05.:45:09.

things will go forward from there. Thank you very much indeed for your

:45:10.:45:12.

time. And thanks for all your comments on this as well. We will

:45:13.:45:16.

get them all together and maybe read some of them a little bit later on.

:45:17.:45:20.

There are so many people getting in contact who have either made a will,

:45:21.:45:25.

are thinking about making a will, and how this might affect them as

:45:26.:45:27.

well. It's time to take

:45:28.:45:31.

a look at the weather. Carol's enjoying the sunshine at

:45:32.:45:33.

St James's park for us this morning. Good morning. There is an sunshine

:45:34.:45:40.

here in London this morning after a cloudy start. I am in St James's

:45:41.:45:44.

Park in London. It is the oldest of the eight Royal parks in the

:45:45.:45:48.

capital. And it started life as a watery march and meadow. And then

:45:49.:45:53.

Henry VIII, King Henry VIII, acquired it. He built St James's

:45:54.:46:00.

Palace in it. That is in that direction. But I want to show you

:46:01.:46:03.

this direction. Isn't this stunning? A beautiful cherry blossom. Sun

:46:04.:46:07.

coming out and some nice blue skies. The forecast for the UK as a whole

:46:08.:46:12.

is a rather good one. Mostly dry, if you like it like that. If you don't,

:46:13.:46:18.

rain coming soon. Also mild. We start of this morning was a murky

:46:19.:46:22.

conditions, particularly south of the M4 corridor in towards the

:46:23.:46:27.

south-west. As we go through the day, the cloud will break and there

:46:28.:46:31.

will be some sunshine, especially in central and eastern parts of the UK.

:46:32.:46:34.

In the west, more cloud. Some coastal fog as an patchy light rain

:46:35.:46:38.

and drizzle in the north-west of Scotland. In Scotland, not as windy

:46:39.:46:41.

as yesterday. The wind will strengthen during the day. Gigli in

:46:42.:46:46.

the far north. Away from the patchy rain in the west, we are looking at

:46:47.:46:51.

a largely dry day with bright or sunny skies. -- especially in the

:46:52.:46:57.

far north. Any finals of England and west, windy. Each of the Pennines,

:46:58.:47:06.

some sunshine. The Midlands, a lovely afternoon for them. The

:47:07.:47:11.

temperatures up to 16 or 17 degrees. South coast, some sunshine.

:47:12.:47:14.

South-west, a little more cloud. Still some brown spells. Murky

:47:15.:47:20.

conditions for the coast, with the jail. South-west Wales on the coast

:47:21.:47:24.

will hang on to is a murky conditions. Quite a lot of cloud

:47:25.:47:29.

across Wales. Temperatures are 16 or 17 and the sun. The Northern

:47:30.:47:32.

Ireland, cloudy with some bright spells developing through the

:47:33.:47:36.

afternoon. Through the evening and overnight period, it will be still

:47:37.:47:40.

fairly cloudy in the northern west. Clear skies by day. The cloud will

:47:41.:47:45.

feel in and it will be murky to that side of the English Channel. Hill

:47:46.:47:52.

fog, low-level fog, so that Italy to be aware of tomorrow morning. But

:47:53.:47:56.

that will tend to clear. Tomorrow for England and Wales, a fine start,

:47:57.:47:59.

with some sunshine. At a weather front coming in across Northern

:48:00.:48:03.

Ireland Scotland will sink south, taking rain weathered into northern

:48:04.:48:07.

England, north Wales, by the afternoon. Find it, so shattered

:48:08.:48:11.

showers in the hills, but possibly sleet at low levels. The wind will

:48:12.:48:14.

strengthen again across the far north of Scotland into the Northern

:48:15.:48:18.

Ireland. Heading into Friday, we are going to see the remnants of Storm

:48:19.:48:23.

Stella. But of course, that storm will be hugely modified by the

:48:24.:48:27.

Atlantic ocean. As it comes our way, it is not falling on cold services

:48:28.:48:34.

or cold air. -- surfaces. We will have another dose of this overnight

:48:35.:48:40.

on Friday. -- of the rain. So before everybody in the forecast for the

:48:41.:48:42.

next few Cruise holidays - bingo and bowls

:48:43.:48:47.

and just for the old? Or a fantastic way to see

:48:48.:48:58.

the world, whatever your age? Steph is taking a look

:48:59.:49:01.

at the industry this morning to find out why it's trying to get more

:49:02.:49:04.

young people on board. The average age of people on cruises

:49:05.:49:11.

is falling. Some might be shocked about. Good morning everyone. It is

:49:12.:49:14.

one of the most popular ways to get away for Brits. 1.9 billion of us

:49:15.:49:18.

took a cruising holiday last year. That is according to official

:49:19.:49:21.

figures out this morning. The average age of passengers on board

:49:22.:49:24.

is 55, which is a figure that has been falling. The industry was to

:49:25.:49:28.

change its image and get more young people on board. So what are they

:49:29.:49:41.

doing? I am joined now by Giles Hawke from the Cosmos Cruise

:49:42.:49:45.

company. Talk is right. Do you think the cruise industry has a poorer

:49:46.:49:53.

images? -- image. Do people just think it is boring and predictable?

:49:54.:49:58.

I think it is an image problem that is more historic than current. The

:49:59.:50:05.

old image of the overfed, newlywed, and nearly damp. That is changing

:50:06.:50:09.

and rapidly. The introduction of a lot of new ships over the last 15 or

:50:10.:50:13.

20 years, and the development of what you can do on a cruise ship has

:50:14.:50:19.

made a big difference. I think cruise lines working with famous

:50:20.:50:23.

brands and celebrities to make it more attractive to a wider audience

:50:24.:50:28.

is helping. Due to make you think that is why the average age is

:50:29.:50:36.

falling? Yes. I think there is a wider choice. Cruising is no longer

:50:37.:50:42.

all about very fancy entertainment Web people are in feathers and

:50:43.:50:46.

tiaras. It is not all about black ties and fancy frocks. That still

:50:47.:50:50.

exist, and some of it, but it is actually democratising cruises. On

:50:51.:50:57.

that point of affordability, you actually hear people say that if

:50:58.:51:01.

they wind the lottery, there will go on a Caribbean cruise or something.

:51:02.:51:04.

It seems more aspirational than a realistic annual holiday. Tell us

:51:05.:51:08.

about the coast will stop it is probably cheaper to go on a cruise

:51:09.:51:12.

now than 20 years ago. There is more available. There is then 50% growth

:51:13.:51:19.

in the past few years. Over the next ten years, we will see an increase

:51:20.:51:26.

of 30% again. There will be more ships available and beds available.

:51:27.:51:30.

For a family of four, you could sell at UK on a week's cruise to the west

:51:31.:51:36.

Mediterranean, and Bolelli do that front ?2000. When you think of

:51:37.:51:40.

everything included, the value for muggy is absolutely phenomenal. In

:51:41.:51:44.

terms of the future, where do you see growth coming from. You would

:51:45.:51:48.

like to get more young people on board and change the image, how will

:51:49.:51:53.

you do that? A whole range of things. Rizzo, a river cruising --

:51:54.:52:02.

river cruising is increasing. They are putting bikes on board to get

:52:03.:52:09.

people involved onshore excursions. You can go around a river ride in a

:52:10.:52:13.

Norwegian fjords. You can go hiking Nick in Alaska. A lot of it is about

:52:14.:52:20.

making what you can do the ship more attractive. On board, there are

:52:21.:52:34.

cruise to work with celebrity chefs. The third offering is changing. On

:52:35.:52:37.

board, you have things like iceskating ranks, climbing walls,

:52:38.:52:44.

slow brightness, cookery schools, famous DJs. So this is changing

:52:45.:52:51.

drastically. They give are talking to us about that. And thank you to

:52:52.:52:55.

every music and pictures. Very jealous. People are visiting them

:52:56.:53:01.

through. People got to amazing places. I have never been on a

:53:02.:53:08.

cruise. Have you? Not yet. I was on a container ship for ten years. That

:53:09.:53:12.

is not really a cruise. No entertainment. That is another

:53:13.:53:18.

story. Right now, we have to go to a grand historic mansion that was

:53:19.:53:23.

literally fit for a king. But it had crumbling walls, ceilings falling

:53:24.:53:30.

in, and Knole House needs some TLC. It has become the biggest task the

:53:31.:53:37.

National Trust is undertaken. It looks rather spooky there.

:53:38.:53:43.

Yes. It is the location where Henry VIII came to hunt deer. This is the

:53:44.:54:01.

building. He sees this in the reformation from the Archbishop of

:54:02.:54:04.

Canterbury. There are hundreds of years of history within these walls,

:54:05.:54:09.

behind these walls, surrounding this estate. And the challenge, really,

:54:10.:54:14.

is trying to, if you like, roll back the years, or Stoccos years taking

:54:15.:54:18.

their toll on his magnificent historic building and the treasures

:54:19.:54:28.

it contains. -- ought to stop the years taking their toll. We took a

:54:29.:54:29.

look around inside. -- or to stop the years

:54:30.:54:33.

taking their toll. With almost six centuries

:54:34.:54:38.

of history, Knole House is one of the oldest, grandest,

:54:39.:54:40.

and most important houses This is the great staircase

:54:41.:54:42.

at Knole, created by Thomas Attwood in the 17th-century and decorated

:54:43.:54:46.

by craftsmen from the King's Works. I think we have been overwhelmed

:54:47.:54:49.

by the scale of what we have here. Just keeping on top

:54:50.:54:54.

of the maintenance of that is And because the building is old,

:54:55.:54:59.

we got to a point where, actually, we needed to do something,

:55:00.:55:03.

a major intervention, like a project that we are working

:55:04.:55:05.

on now, really to secure This is the biggest restoration

:55:06.:55:08.

in the National Trust's history, all conducted under the watchful

:55:09.:55:17.

gaze of the Sackville family, powerful and influential

:55:18.:55:20.

in the 17th-century Royal Court, their descendants live here to this

:55:21.:55:22.

day, a living link to the past. The inventory here is staggering,

:55:23.:55:25.

so state-of-the-art conservation studio will, with painstaking

:55:26.:55:27.

patience, work to protect This is the famous Knole Sofa,

:55:28.:55:30.

made anywhere between 1625 and 1660. As with everything here

:55:31.:55:34.

it is incredibly dusty. One of our jobs will be to carefully

:55:35.:55:36.

and slowly remove the dust as if we can get the grey gone

:55:37.:55:40.

and the colour back. You overlap the previous bit to make

:55:41.:55:57.

sure there are no little holes. And then you just keep

:55:58.:56:00.

the system going, really. The conservators employ the same

:56:01.:56:05.

skills and techniques that have embellished Knole

:56:06.:56:08.

for hundreds of years. I suppose the whole point

:56:09.:56:13.

of it was too short to show That is why so often in the past

:56:14.:56:16.

reguilding was done. Because if it gets dirty,

:56:17.:56:23.

or less shiny than it should be, that was the stage where the owners

:56:24.:56:26.

would have chosen to reguild. Through the ages, dust, rain,

:56:27.:56:33.

and smoke have taken a toll. This x-ray shows damage

:56:34.:56:36.

caused by woodworm. The team has to preserve the ornate

:56:37.:56:38.

and the elaborate of Knole House's past, whilst ensuring

:56:39.:56:41.

the safety of the present, not just to preserve the house,

:56:42.:56:44.

but also those who come We will be live there a little

:56:45.:57:11.

later. It looks stunning. So misty and mysterious. Time to get the

:57:12.:57:17.

news, travel, and whether we you are.

:57:18.:00:37.

For now though it's back to Louise and Dan.

:00:38.:00:39.

Hello, this is Breakfast with Dan Walker and Louise Minchin.

:00:40.:00:59.

16 million people face starvation in East Africa as a major

:01:00.:01:02.

fund-raising campaign is launched to help them.

:01:03.:01:04.

Drought and conflict are being blamed for the crisis

:01:05.:01:06.

which is being called the worst famine in a generation.

:01:07.:01:13.

Good morning. It's Wednesday, 15th March.

:01:14.:01:15.

Identity fraud in the UK reaches record levels -

:01:16.:01:21.

new figures show people under 30 are a growing target.

:01:22.:01:29.

The global mystery of the body on the moor -

:01:30.:01:35.

we meet the detective who successfully linked

:01:36.:01:37.

an unidentified man found near Manchester to a former Tube

:01:38.:01:39.

driver living thousands of miles away.

:01:40.:01:42.

Good morning. E.ON reported record losses after over valuing its fossil

:01:43.:01:51.

fuels division which was spun off last year. I'll have the details

:01:52.:01:53.

shortly. In sport, Leicester

:01:54.:01:55.

defy logic once again. They knock out Sevilla and qualify

:01:56.:01:57.

for the quarter-finals After millions of views online,

:01:58.:01:59.

the BBC interviewee whose children stole the show,

:02:00.:02:03.

talks about his family's Certainly never had anything

:02:04.:02:05.

like this in our life before. You know, it got to the point

:02:06.:02:16.

when we had to turn off the phones and Facebook and Twitter,

:02:17.:02:19.

and that sort of stuff. Good morning. From St James' Park in

:02:20.:02:31.

London where the sun has come out. For most of us, it is a cloudy start

:02:32.:02:35.

and murky conditions, but it will brighten up with sunshine. The winds

:02:36.:02:39.

strengthening once again across the far north of Scotland, but I'll have

:02:40.:02:41.

more details in 15 minutes. A major appeal has been launched

:02:42.:02:46.

to help sixteen million people facing starvation in what's

:02:47.:02:52.

being described as "the worst famine The Disasters Emergency Committee,

:02:53.:02:55.

which is made up of 13 UK aid agencies, says drought and conflict

:02:56.:03:00.

are to blame for the crisis which has left tens of thousands

:03:01.:03:03.

of children at risk Our Diplomatic Correspondent

:03:04.:03:06.

James Landale has more. The Disasters Emergency Committee

:03:07.:03:11.

says drought and conflict has left millions in East Africa

:03:12.:03:15.

in immediate need of food, Across South Sudan, Somalia,

:03:16.:03:17.

Kenya and Ethiopia, it says 16 million people don't know

:03:18.:03:22.

when they are next going to eat. More than 800,000 children

:03:23.:03:27.

are severely malnourished, The 13 aid agencies that make up

:03:28.:03:32.

the Disasters Emergency Committee are already on the ground,

:03:33.:03:40.

delivering clean drinking water But they are now appealing

:03:41.:03:42.

to the public for funds, so they can do even more

:03:43.:03:47.

to help these people. As you have mentioned,

:03:48.:03:52.

16 million people facing starvation. And sadly, 800,000 children under

:03:53.:03:59.

the age of five will die of hunger if we don't reach them

:04:00.:04:02.

very, very quickly. East Africa has seen terrible

:04:03.:04:05.

conflict, and also drought. It hasn't rained for over three

:04:06.:04:09.

years, and we are seeing children, The Government has already promised

:04:10.:04:12.

?200 million in emergency aid for South Sudan and Somalia,

:04:13.:04:21.

and the International Development Secretary, Priti Patel,

:04:22.:04:24.

said her department would match the first ?5 million donated

:04:25.:04:26.

by the public in the new appeal. She also urged other countries

:04:27.:04:32.

to follow Britain's lead, before the crisis became

:04:33.:04:34.

what she called a stain The world, she said,

:04:35.:04:38.

cannot afford to wait. A rare glimpse into President

:04:39.:04:52.

Trump's private finances has emerged with the leak

:04:53.:04:54.

of his 2005 tax return. Mr Trump refused to make

:04:55.:04:56.

the documents public But the US TV network MSNBC has now

:04:57.:04:58.

published two pages, which reveal he paid $38 million

:04:59.:05:03.

in tax on an income of more In terms of what's on here. Aside

:05:04.:05:18.

from the numbers being large, these pages are straightforward. He paid

:05:19.:05:27.

$38 million in taxes. He took a big write down of $103 million. More on

:05:28.:05:32.

that later. If you add up the lines for income he made more than $150

:05:33.:05:35.

million in that year. The release led to an angry response

:05:36.:05:41.

from the the White House, which has said, "You know

:05:42.:05:43.

you are desperate for ratings when you are willing to violate

:05:44.:05:46.

the law to push a story about two pages of tax returns

:05:47.:05:49.

from over a decade ago." Identity fraud is at an all-time

:05:50.:05:57.

high in the UK with more young That's according to new data

:05:58.:06:00.

analysed by the fraud Identity fraud involves criminals

:06:01.:06:03.

using someone's personal information to obtain money,

:06:04.:06:06.

products or services. New data suggest data suggests that

:06:07.:06:13.

young people are a target. A group of men, who were filmed

:06:14.:06:19.

posing for a Mannequin Challenge, are being sought in connection

:06:20.:06:22.

with two robberies in Salford. The video, which was found

:06:23.:06:24.

on a phone in a car driven by one of the suspects,

:06:25.:06:27.

was filmed shortly after The footage was discovered in a Ford

:06:28.:06:41.

Focus used to leave the scene on 14th November.

:06:42.:06:45.

The Conservative MP, Craig MacKinlay, has been

:06:46.:06:47.

interviewed by police under caution over the expenses he claimed during

:06:48.:06:50.

Mr MacKinlay beat the former Ukip leader, Nigel Farage,

:06:51.:06:54.

Several other Tory MPs are also being investigated.

:06:55.:06:57.

Our Political Correspondent, Iain Watson, is in Westminster.

:06:58.:07:01.

This is a really significant story, isn't it, Iain? The fact that an MP

:07:02.:07:11.

has been interviewed under caution shows how serious the police are

:07:12.:07:14.

taking their investigations into election expenses, but it is serious

:07:15.:07:20.

for another reason, if there is any wrongdoing that MPs can be

:07:21.:07:23.

disqualified and another election held in their seat. Craig McKinlay

:07:24.:07:29.

beat Nigel Farage narrowly in the Kent seat of Thanet seat, if that

:07:30.:07:36.

election is re-run, Nigel Farage indicated he might be willing to

:07:37.:07:41.

stand. We have seen Craig McKinlay's expenses and they are below the

:07:42.:07:48.

limit. A Channel 4 investigation suggests that money was spent on

:07:49.:07:53.

hotel bills. The allegation was that was a way of trying to get around

:07:54.:07:58.

the rules. Separately another Conservative MP has been expressing

:07:59.:08:01.

his frustration, e-mails which have been leaked. He suggests people at

:08:02.:08:08.

the head office of the Conservative Party has been casting he and other

:08:09.:08:13.

colleagues adrift during police investigations into 17 other

:08:14.:08:16.

potential cases. I think it shows just how serious this is because

:08:17.:08:21.

just remember Theresa May's working majority in Parliament is 17. So,

:08:22.:08:25.

the outcome of these investigations I think will be hugely important to

:08:26.:08:29.

her and of course, to the MPs concerned. Thank you very much.

:08:30.:08:35.

The people of the Netherlands are voting in the first of three

:08:36.:08:38.

crucial elections in Europe this year, which are being viewed

:08:39.:08:40.

as important tests of the popularity of nationalist parties.

:08:41.:08:43.

The anti-Islam, anti-EU, far-right leader Geert Wilder's

:08:44.:08:46.

party performed best in polls leading up to the vote, but his

:08:47.:08:49.

The Dutch Prime Minister, Mark Rutte, has said the election

:08:50.:08:56.

is an opportunity for voters to "beat the wrong

:08:57.:08:59.

Large parts of the East Coast of the United States have been

:09:00.:09:14.

brought to a halt because of heavy blizzards caused

:09:15.:09:17.

Around 50 million people across the country have been warned

:09:18.:09:20.

The German Chancellor Angela Merkel has been forced

:09:21.:09:23.

to postpone her trip to Washington to meet President Trump.

:09:24.:09:30.

Let's tell you about an incredible police investigation.

:09:31.:09:35.

It started in December 2015 with the discovery of a man's body

:09:36.:09:38.

on Saddleworth Moor, close to Manchester and turned

:09:39.:09:40.

into a mystery that sparked the interest of the world.

:09:41.:09:43.

Found with just a small bottle containing traces of poison,

:09:44.:09:45.

It took detectives over a year just to find out who he was.

:09:46.:09:52.

We'll speak to the officer behind the investigation in a moment.

:09:53.:09:55.

But following this week's inquest into the man's death,

:09:56.:09:57.

the story has been made into a documentary.

:09:58.:09:59.

Hi, police emergency. I've just found a dead body and it's just

:10:00.:10:23.

lying on the side of a path. It is a mountain track. It is like a Land

:10:24.:10:26.

Rover type track. Any idea how old he is? 50 to 60.

:10:27.:10:37.

700 feet above sea level, on an exposed edge of the Pennines lies

:10:38.:10:44.

Dove's Stone. It was a cold winter morning. Quite a fast wind. Driving

:10:45.:10:52.

rain. We were called out to reports of a male that had been found

:10:53.:10:56.

unconscious, possible cardiac arrest.

:10:57.:11:01.

The man is lying dead on the top of Saddleworth Moor. Bizarrely he's

:11:02.:11:04.

dressed for the high street rather than the hills.

:11:05.:11:08.

We're joined now by Detective Sergeant John Coleman

:11:09.:11:10.

from Greater Manchester Police and Sarah Hey who is the director

:11:11.:11:13.

of the documentary Mystery of the Man on the Moor.

:11:14.:11:15.

Thank you for coming on. Mystery is the right word. It really is. I know

:11:16.:11:21.

it is a long story and there is so many details, John, but from the

:11:22.:11:25.

moment you got that first call, can you tell us how the initial

:11:26.:11:29.

investigation started? Well, we received a phone call to the

:11:30.:11:32.

emergency services from a member of the public who was out cycling. The

:11:33.:11:39.

call was received at 10.47... Police time! We know you're always

:11:40.:11:45.

accurate! The gentleman had been found on a remote track between

:11:46.:11:53.

Dove's Stone Reservoir and another reservoir. It was an amazing set of

:11:54.:11:57.

circumstances. We've turned up and we've got a gentleman found

:11:58.:12:01.

deceased, lying on his back in this area and we thought it was an every

:12:02.:12:05.

day, unfortunately, death is part of our every day life. Possibly had a

:12:06.:12:12.

heart attack while walking. A heart attack, stroke, some kind of natural

:12:13.:12:16.

episode. You think to yourself, we'll get the identification

:12:17.:12:25.

quickly, he will have documentation, credit card, no phone, nothing which

:12:26.:12:29.

could assist us. Nothing apart from a bottle of pills? Yes. He had a

:12:30.:12:41.

bottle. It was labelled in English, but also had Urdu writing which was

:12:42.:12:45.

our first link to Pakistan however things developed quickly. He was in

:12:46.:12:50.

possession of ?130 in cash and the serial numbers of the notes were non

:12:51.:12:55.

sequential so we couldn't trace the cash. He had three train tickets

:12:56.:13:00.

from Ealing in West London. He travelled the previous day. Now, the

:13:01.:13:05.

tickets are coded so we know that the tickets were paid for with cash.

:13:06.:13:09.

So you couldn't trace a credit card either? But still you think to

:13:10.:13:16.

yourself OK, we'll search the missing phone database, we'll have a

:13:17.:13:21.

loved one, nothing. The car park, there was a number of cars in the

:13:22.:13:26.

car park, checked the cars, no. Not connected. So we decided to look at

:13:27.:13:34.

a media strategy. We see CCTV footage of him at the station where

:13:35.:13:40.

he bought the ticket? This is the male we know to be David Litton. He

:13:41.:13:49.

arrived at Piccadilly at 12.07 on the 11th of December 2015 and he

:13:50.:13:53.

walked around the station for a period of 53 minutes. So much

:13:54.:13:58.

detail. He walked into various shops. We know he purchased a

:13:59.:14:03.

sandwich. I know what sandwich it was. It was an egg sandwich. You had

:14:04.:14:08.

so much detail, but it look you how long to find his identity? His

:14:09.:14:16.

identity was a year to the day. Wow. Which we actually got this is

:14:17.:14:20.

definitely the man. This is the sort of story you followed through in the

:14:21.:14:23.

documentary of the police trying to find out this man. That's right.

:14:24.:14:28.

We've, 10% of the investigation, there was so many details of how

:14:29.:14:32.

police find out who he was and where he was from and his family and how

:14:33.:14:35.

he made the journey and why he made the journey? It is really difficult.

:14:36.:14:41.

You can't fit all of that into the film, it's impossible, you're

:14:42.:14:44.

looking at 12 months investigation to put into parts one and two and

:14:45.:14:47.

try and follow on from that, afterwards into part three and four

:14:48.:14:50.

to understand once you know the name of the man, you need to know who he

:14:51.:14:54.

actually is and that is also as intriguing as discovering who he was

:14:55.:15:00.

in the first place. First, you had a photo, a drawing, didn't you and

:15:01.:15:04.

then the CCTV, you put out a big media campaign, but the family

:15:05.:15:08.

didn't see it. This is David's brother who was tracked down by you

:15:09.:15:11.

and explained how much contact he had with his brother.

:15:12.:15:17.

I had assumed David was living probably in California. I had had

:15:18.:15:24.

some letters from David. He used to write to me to my core three times a

:15:25.:15:30.

year. For some reason the postmark was always California. Why I have no

:15:31.:15:38.

idea, if you are living in Pakistan. He told nobody where he went.

:15:39.:15:45.

Obviously a very private man. Very difficult for police officers to get

:15:46.:15:49.

to the bottom of where he was from. The Pakistan connection was to do

:15:50.:15:53.

with a hip replacement. That is how you found out. Yes. There was a

:15:54.:15:59.

postmortem. We identified he had a hip replacement, a titanium plate

:16:00.:16:07.

connected to his left femur. He had a fracture of the leg. We thought,

:16:08.:16:13.

we are moving forward, this is the break we are looking for. Let's get

:16:14.:16:19.

the plates. We will take that back to a hospital, get the date, deeds

:16:20.:16:24.

to the gentleman. No. There was a company name on the date -- plate.

:16:25.:16:30.

The company was in Pakistan and they had no licence for the UK. He

:16:31.:16:35.

definitely had to have had it in Pakistan. The company produced 500

:16:36.:16:42.

plates a year between 2001 and 2015. To only 15 hospitals. He is one of

:16:43.:16:49.

7000 people at this stage. That is narrowed down from one in a billion.

:16:50.:16:55.

Bring it down slowly. Still huge parts of the investigation and

:16:56.:16:59.

mystery about the whole thing. Definitely. You do not know why he

:17:00.:17:05.

came to Saddleworth. What brought him here in the first place? Why

:17:06.:17:12.

would he travel all that way from Pakistan to London and from London

:17:13.:17:16.

to Saddleworth? It is something I do not know whether you will ever get

:17:17.:17:23.

to the bottom. Thank you for that. It is so interesting here you

:17:24.:17:27.

talking about the details. I like to know the end of stories. And why.

:17:28.:17:35.

Does that play on your mind? I work with quite a dedicated team on this.

:17:36.:17:40.

It has been quite personal. Most of our investigations it is an

:17:41.:17:44.

investigation but this turned personal. We all have family

:17:45.:17:48.

members. If one of my sons or daughters were missing I would want

:17:49.:17:52.

to know where years and the personal information. We tried to put as much

:17:53.:17:59.

information forward as possible. We have put media strategies out there.

:18:00.:18:08.

I suppose it is the detail. The stuff goes round and round your

:18:09.:18:13.

head. Why 53 minutes that the state bill-mac station? Was he looking for

:18:14.:18:23.

somebody? Why settle Saddleworth? If you are from Manchester you will no

:18:24.:18:27.

be area he was then was where the taxes are, but it was funny that

:18:28.:18:33.

day. He remains there for a minute or so and then comes back into the

:18:34.:18:37.

station and walks around as if he is trying to tease us. Then, possibly

:18:38.:18:44.

significantly, he speaks to the inquiry counter clerk at the station

:18:45.:18:51.

and he is therefore four minutes. That is a long time in Piccadilly

:18:52.:18:56.

station which is so busy. What was he asking for and where was he

:18:57.:19:02.

asking to be directed to? If anybody knows the answers, you would like to

:19:03.:19:04.

know. If only. Fascinating story. Mystery of the Man on the Moor

:19:05.:19:17.

is on Channel 4 tonight at 10pm. Carol is at St James' Park

:19:18.:19:26.

for us this morning. It is beautiful here this morning.

:19:27.:19:35.

Since James' Park is the oldest of the historical parks in London.

:19:36.:19:41.

Lovely cherry blossom. It started off very cloudy but the sun is

:19:42.:19:50.

starting to come through. We have some murky conditions towards the

:19:51.:19:55.

south west. Today is my old. The highest temperatures will be across

:19:56.:20:00.

east Wales and the Midlands. It is mostly dry. This morning we will see

:20:01.:20:09.

the murk left. The cloudy skies will be across central and eastern parts

:20:10.:20:12.

of the UK with some sunshine. We have the weather fronts producing

:20:13.:20:18.

cloud in the west and the murky conditions around Wales in

:20:19.:20:21.

south-west England. Into the afternoon we will have patchy rain

:20:22.:20:26.

and drizzle across the north-west and that will be the case across

:20:27.:20:30.

Scotland. The wind is starting to strengthen but not like yesterday.

:20:31.:20:35.

Foremost there will be dry in bright with some sunshine. The far north of

:20:36.:20:45.

England C in workload. The sunshine will extend across most of eastern

:20:46.:20:49.

England with cloudy now and again. The beautiful afternoon in the

:20:50.:20:54.

Midlands, 16 or 17 degrees. Funny along the south coast until the

:20:55.:20:58.

south-west when we hang on more murk. Inland brighter spells with

:20:59.:21:06.

the occasional shower. Wales is also quite murky today. The east of Wales

:21:07.:21:12.

we are looking at sunshine and 16 or 17. Northern Ireland patchy rain

:21:13.:21:16.

should fizzle out and it will brighten up. This evening and

:21:17.:21:19.

overnight we hang on to light rain and drizzle across the north-west

:21:20.:21:23.

and in the south-east particularly the eastern half of the English

:21:24.:21:28.

Channel we will see some see fog, inland hail fog and low-level fog.

:21:29.:21:37.

Not a particularly cold start to the data model. The fog will clear

:21:38.:21:41.

leaving England and Wales with a fine and dry start of the day was

:21:42.:21:47.

some sunshine. A cold front coming in across Scotland and Northern

:21:48.:21:50.

Ireland. The rain will sink southwards into North Wales and

:21:51.:21:54.

Northern Ireland by mid-afternoon. We will see a return to sunshine and

:21:55.:21:58.

showers. Some wintry especially in the hills. A little bit of sleet at

:21:59.:22:03.

lower levels. The wind will strengthen across the Northern

:22:04.:22:07.

Isles. For Friday we are going to have the remnants of Storm Stella.

:22:08.:22:14.

Crossing the Atlantic and being modified. Cold conditions, called

:22:15.:22:21.

air in America, not doing that prevails, it will produce some rain.

:22:22.:22:25.

The rain will come in from the north-west and think southeastwards

:22:26.:22:27.

and overnight we will have coming our way. Something for everyone in

:22:28.:22:31.

this forecast. Steph's here with some more

:22:32.:22:41.

of today's business news. German energy giant EON has

:22:42.:22:49.

reported a record loss It's related to the costs the firm

:22:50.:22:56.

faced after massively overvaluing its fossil fuels

:22:57.:23:00.

division which was The energy supplier recently

:23:01.:23:02.

announced a 9% rise in household The firm is blaming increasing costs

:23:03.:23:09.

associated with delivering UK energy policy and other expenses outside

:23:10.:23:15.

of its control. The owner of fashion chain

:23:16.:23:21.

Zara has results out, Sales at Inditex jumped last year

:23:22.:23:23.

to ?20 billion globally, helped by new store openings in 56

:23:24.:23:30.

countries and online growth. The fastest growing sector

:23:31.:23:33.

of the business, though, was the chain's homeware department,

:23:34.:23:35.

Zara Home. Jigsaws, gin and soya

:23:36.:23:41.

milk are growing in popularity and have now been

:23:42.:23:48.

included in the annual shopping basket that statisticians use

:23:49.:23:51.

to work out how much the cost Economists look at 700 goods

:23:52.:23:54.

and services that we regularly buy to try and work

:23:55.:24:00.

out inflation figures. Things will go in and out of the

:24:01.:24:08.

basket. Falling out of the basket this time

:24:09.:24:14.

are alcopops, menthol cigarettes It is fascinating what goes in and

:24:15.:24:24.

out of the basket. So you melt is interesting. Gin and jigsaws. That

:24:25.:24:34.

sounds like a good night in. The Christmas party is going to be fun

:24:35.:24:36.

messy shot back -- fun this year! . Last week, Professor Robert Kelly's

:24:37.:24:50.

family became an internet sensation when his children

:24:51.:24:52.

crashed his appearance on BBC News. What will it mean

:24:53.:24:58.

for the wider region? I think one of your children

:24:59.:25:00.

has just walked in. Shifting sands in the

:25:01.:25:04.

region, do you think What is this going to

:25:05.:25:06.

mean for the region? South Korea's policy

:25:07.:25:25.

towards North Korea has been severely limited

:25:26.:25:35.

in the last six months Everything about that is so

:25:36.:25:47.

perfectly timed. Marion is the star of the show. She is the eldest

:25:48.:25:54.

daughter. The family braved the cameras again yesterday to talk to

:25:55.:25:58.

the BBC about how they are dealing with their more than 15 minutes of

:25:59.:26:07.

fame. It is pretty unreal. We did not expect attention like this. We

:26:08.:26:10.

have had nothing like this in our life before. I rushed down

:26:11.:26:21.

immediately. I could not see her on the TV. There was a 22nd delay. My

:26:22.:26:28.

wife did not realise the children were in here until she saw them on

:26:29.:26:33.

television 20 seconds after. That is why you came flying down the

:26:34.:26:44.

hallway. They are in high demand. They were giving a press conference

:26:45.:26:49.

in South Korea this morning. Marion is right at home in the spotlight.

:26:50.:26:54.

Trying to be contained with a lollipop. I love her energy.

:26:55.:27:01.

Whatever the day starts with, you should come in like Marion.

:27:02.:27:04.

Everything is going to feel better. Hello, this is Breakfast

:27:05.:30:30.

with Dan Walker and Louise Minchin. It is 8:30, it's Wednesday morning,

:30:31.:30:41.

let's bring you the day's main headlines.

:30:42.:30:43.

A major appeal has been launched to help 16 million people facing

:30:44.:30:46.

starvation in what's being described as "the worst famine

:30:47.:30:49.

The Disasters Emergency Committee, which is made up of 13 UK aid

:30:50.:30:53.

agencies, says drought and conflict are to blame for the crisis

:30:54.:30:55.

which has left tens of thousands of children at risk

:30:56.:30:58.

A rare glimpse into President Trump's private finances has

:30:59.:31:03.

emerged with the leak of his 2005 tax return.

:31:04.:31:05.

Mr Trump refused to make the documents public

:31:06.:31:09.

But the US TV network MSNBC has now published two pages,

:31:10.:31:15.

which reveal he paid $38 million in tax on an income

:31:16.:31:18.

The release led to an angry response from the the White House,

:31:19.:31:28.

"You know you are desperate for ratings when you are willing

:31:29.:31:31.

to violate the law to push a story about two pages of tax returns

:31:32.:31:35.

Cases of identity fraud in the UK are at an all-time high,

:31:36.:31:40.

according to figures from the fraud prevention organisation CI-FAS.

:31:41.:31:44.

The crime involves stealing someone's personal information

:31:45.:31:46.

to obtain money, products or services.

:31:47.:31:48.

New data suggests young people are a growing target.

:31:49.:31:54.

A group of men who were filmed posing for a M-mannequin challenge

:31:55.:31:57.

are being sought in connection with two robberies in Salford.

:31:58.:32:02.

The video was found on a phone in a car driven

:32:03.:32:08.

It was made shortly after one of the crimes took place.

:32:09.:32:12.

Officers said footage of the social media challenge was discovered

:32:13.:32:15.

on the mobile in a Ford Focus used to flee the scene

:32:16.:32:18.

A Conservative MP has been questioned for six hours by police

:32:19.:32:24.

about the money he claimed during his general election campaign.

:32:25.:32:27.

Craig MacKinlay beat the former UKIP leader Nigel Farage

:32:28.:32:31.

He submitted expenses for ?15,000, which is just under the legal limit.

:32:32.:32:46.

Would you like some clap news? I think so. What I like this clap

:32:47.:32:53.

news? You don't have a choice, I'm afraid.

:32:54.:32:55.

Now it turns out humans are not the only ones who want to show

:32:56.:32:59.

Scientists at Anglia Ruskin University have discovered

:33:00.:33:02.

the foolproof way male banana fiddler crabs attract a mate.

:33:03.:33:05.

First they try to catch the female's attention by waving their brightly

:33:06.:33:12.

Then they drum on the ground to draw attention to the size

:33:13.:33:16.

Males that drummed most rapidly had the most success

:33:17.:33:19.

Well, it's all about the drumming. The larger you bang on the thing,

:33:20.:33:35.

the better you are. I'm not sure we've had that kind of news on

:33:36.:33:40.

Breakfast before. Normally its panda news. Occasionally owl news.

:33:41.:33:47.

Coming up here on Breakfast this morning...

:33:48.:33:53.

# Will meet again, don't know where, don't know when...

:33:54.:33:58.

As the Forces' sweetheart prepares to release a new album

:33:59.:34:01.

to mark her 100th birthday, we'll be joined by Dame Vera Lynn's

:34:02.:34:04.

daughter to hear about the memories behind the music.

:34:05.:34:06.

New research suggests 80% of us would eat food that's

:34:07.:34:08.

We'll be finding out whether the so-called

:34:09.:34:11.

Only a fool breaks the five second rule!

:34:12.:34:22.

With swords, saxons and savages - after nine, one of the stars

:34:23.:34:25.

of The Last Kingdom will be here to look ahead

:34:26.:34:28.

Now, this is important. Do you think that's obvious enough? Sometimes our

:34:29.:34:40.

viewers get understandably annoyed. I'm going to say it, spoiler alert!

:34:41.:34:46.

Can we do that again quiz like it's like being on the starship

:34:47.:34:47.

enterprise! The popular BBC one

:34:48.:34:49.

thriller The Replacement If you don't want to know, please

:34:50.:34:57.

run out of the room if you don't want to hear anything about it. Some

:34:58.:35:01.

people are running out of the building! Arsenal manager has rest

:35:02.:35:06.

left the building. -- our floor manager has left the building.

:35:07.:35:09.

We had the writer of the series on Breakfast earlier this week,

:35:10.:35:12.

And it certainly divided opinion - this was some of the

:35:13.:35:16.

Sandra tweeted, "How did the police know Paula was guilty?

:35:17.:35:20.

Samia said, "The Replacement deserved a better ending,

:35:21.:35:26.

first two episodes were brilliant and the ending had too many

:35:27.:35:29.

Louise commented, "The Replacement finale didn't quite live

:35:30.:35:32.

up to expectations - plot holes and unsatisfying.

:35:33.:35:34.

"The replacement on BBC One is one of the best dramas

:35:35.:35:44.

Writer Joe Ahearne was also following the social media

:35:45.:35:48.

The climax seems to have divided opinion from what I can see.

:35:49.:35:54.

It's very hard to please all those people who, on the one hand,

:35:55.:35:57.

some people wanted it to be passive aggressive staring for three hours.

:35:58.:36:01.

Then there are other people who want something massive to happen.

:36:02.:36:04.

You know, people always talk about jumping the shark,

:36:05.:36:08.

and at the end of Jaws they do blow up the shark.

:36:09.:36:11.

I'm much more a fan of having something big happen at the end.

:36:12.:36:17.

I think it's divided us as well, hasn't it? I thought for two and a

:36:18.:36:23.

half hours it was brilliant, Bennett went crazy for the last 20 minutes

:36:24.:36:27.

when she all of a sudden became an electrical experts. -- then it went

:36:28.:36:34.

crazy for the last 20 minutes. I like endings that are ambiguous. I

:36:35.:36:38.

don't want to say too much. I feel partially robbed!

:36:39.:36:40.

If you want to make up your own mind, you can watch all three

:36:41.:36:43.

What do you mean it you don't want to say too much? I haven't seen it

:36:44.:36:57.

and I... Shh! We couldn't have put more spoiler alerts on it. Comeback

:36:58.:37:03.

in, the sports news is about to happen. If you haven't seen what

:37:04.:37:08.

happened at Leicester last night, please leave the room now. I think

:37:09.:37:11.

you would have been doing well to avoid the news on Leicester last

:37:12.:37:20.

night. Given their form in the league, Claudio Ranieri goes, all of

:37:21.:37:21.

a sudden they can't stop picking up. Leicester City have joined Barcelona

:37:22.:37:24.

and Bayern Munich in the quarter finals of the Champions League

:37:25.:37:26.

after beating Sevilla 2-0 on the night, going

:37:27.:37:28.

through 3-2 on aggregate, on one of the greatest

:37:29.:37:30.

nights in their history. For Leicester City the power

:37:31.:37:33.

of surprise is a renewable energy. It never seems to drain how

:37:34.:37:41.

ever often they use it. Time after time last season

:37:42.:37:43.

Wes Morgan arrived from the back Leicester captain more

:37:44.:37:46.

of a field marshal, Leicester But beware, this was Sevilla,

:37:47.:37:50.

third in the Spanish League. That is how narrow

:37:51.:37:55.

Leicester's lead was. You could forgive the nerves,

:37:56.:37:58.

these fans have seen their heroes become mortals, losing the manager

:37:59.:38:01.

in the process. But just recently

:38:02.:38:03.

something has stirred. Mark Albrighton took

:38:04.:38:06.

aim and then took off. This was his last

:38:07.:38:10.

touch of the night. But one goal away from extra time

:38:11.:38:17.

here was their chance. But with Leicester City perhaps

:38:18.:38:21.

we should expect that. There's an enticing second leg tie

:38:22.:38:35.

for Manchester City tonight. They scored 3 times in 11 minutes

:38:36.:38:38.

to beat Monaco 5-3 - and manager Pep Guardiola says

:38:39.:38:41.

they'll be on the hunt Take the ball and attack as much

:38:42.:38:43.

as possible is the only way I know So that is why when one team scores

:38:44.:38:48.

124 goals you are thinking about just defending 90 minutes

:38:49.:38:54.

because we won once 5-3, The sports minister Tracey Crouch

:38:55.:38:57.

says the decision by Muirfield golf club to admit women as members

:38:58.:39:04.

for the first time has The sports governing body, the R,

:39:05.:39:07.

confirmed that Muirfield would now be eligible to host

:39:08.:39:11.

an Open Championship again, Over 80% of members voted

:39:12.:39:14.

in favour of the change. Some people today on social media

:39:15.:39:31.

and in the papers are saying that the R should have waited to see if

:39:32.:39:35.

attitudes at Muirfield really do change before reinstating the golf

:39:36.:39:38.

club, to check if they're doing it for the right reasons and not just

:39:39.:39:42.

to have the Open back. You can't keep changing the goalposts. You

:39:43.:39:47.

can't tell them you're going to check up on them for what they've

:39:48.:39:51.

done. I do know what you mean. The question that being posed by a lot

:39:52.:39:56.

of people - is it a real commitment to promoting women's golf, or is it

:39:57.:40:01.

paid lip service so they can all get back to what was the status quo?

:40:02.:40:08.

It's a good question, and one that is being debated in the sports pages

:40:09.:40:09.

of the newspapers. It's 8:30, you're watching

:40:10.:40:14.

Breakfast. Her singing inspired British

:40:15.:40:17.

troops all over the world, and she earned her nickname

:40:18.:40:19.

the Forces' Sweetheart Nearly 80 years later,

:40:20.:40:21.

Dame Vera Lynn is still entertaining people with her beautiful voice,

:40:22.:40:25.

and to celebrate turning 100 next week has taken part

:40:26.:40:27.

in a one-off BBC documentary. We'll be speaking to someone

:40:28.:40:30.

who knows her better than anyone - Lets see a clip from a brand-new BBC

:40:31.:40:44.

documentary and hear from the huge impact she made all those years ago.

:40:45.:40:56.

# Thurlby bluebirds over. -- there will be bluebirds over

:40:57.:41:03.

# The white Cliffs of Dover. Singing to the troops, she had a

:41:04.:41:06.

warmth and something that was there but nobody else had.

:41:07.:41:20.

# Sailing, I am sailing... The fact that she was the girl next

:41:21.:41:26.

door. # We will meet again, don't know

:41:27.:41:32.

where... We all love to because of the fact

:41:33.:41:36.

that she was there building up the morale that we needed.

:41:37.:41:41.

The songs were always song. People remembered them.

:41:42.:41:46.

It was a sort of a love affair, I think.

:41:47.:41:49.

CHEERING Let's have a chat to Dame Vera's

:41:50.:41:54.

daughter, Virginia. Good morning. Lovely to see you. How

:41:55.:42:07.

is she? She's actually very well. At 101 has won's off days, but on the

:42:08.:42:12.

whole she's absolutely brilliant. She's been travelling the world.

:42:13.:42:16.

Many years. Throughout your childhood, did you know she was this

:42:17.:42:21.

famous star? Were you aware of that? It's a difficult question to answer.

:42:22.:42:26.

She's always been her, I've always been the daughter and I've grown up

:42:27.:42:29.

with it. I've taken it for granted, I suppose. When she did go away for

:42:30.:42:35.

a while, I'd go and stay with family. She always made sure she was

:42:36.:42:40.

home for birthdays, holidays, everything. She always made very

:42:41.:42:45.

sure that life continued as normal as possible. We've seen pictures of

:42:46.:42:51.

her, I think this is from Burma. She travelled the world, became the

:42:52.:42:56.

Forces' Sweetheart. How important was that? Very. To her, it was a day

:42:57.:43:04.

job. "What Can I do to help the war effort? " Asking where she can be

:43:05.:43:14.

most useful. She asked where she could be used, and they said she

:43:15.:43:18.

could go here, or here. She said, has anybody been to Burma? And they

:43:19.:43:23.

said, no, but we can't take you there, the Army will have to take

:43:24.:43:29.

over. That's exactly what happened. As a family you must be proud of the

:43:30.:43:33.

work she did and is still doing. Absolutely, yes. And being patron of

:43:34.:43:39.

quite a few charities. From our local hospice to our children's

:43:40.:43:45.

charity for children with cerebral palsy, and all these things are

:43:46.:43:49.

very, very important to her. Although she is mostly a figurehead

:43:50.:43:53.

now, she still very involved. She wants to know what's going on and

:43:54.:43:57.

what's happening with all the charities. Such a beautiful voice as

:43:58.:44:00.

well. Let's have a look at her talking about performing.

:44:01.:44:05.

Even though all the bombs were dropping during the war, my mother

:44:06.:44:11.

still did all the shows. One night, she had to stay over. They sat with

:44:12.:44:16.

their backs against one of the big walls because that was the safest

:44:17.:44:19.

place to be. Eventually she got fed up and decided to drive home. But

:44:20.:44:23.

she and other performers continued throughout the war. You never had

:44:24.:44:31.

singing lessons until you were older, and that didn't last long,

:44:32.:44:35.

did it? No, I never had singing lessons. I just went once. I thought

:44:36.:44:40.

I could extend my range. But when she heard me sing, she said, no, I

:44:41.:44:46.

can't train that voice, it's not a natural voice. So I said, thank you

:44:47.:44:50.

very much, madam, and I left! I wonder if she ever hurt me when I

:44:51.:45:03.

was on the radio after that. I expect she did. I am really pleased

:45:04.:45:11.

with the documentary. Only one scene. Five minutes later it was,

:45:12.:45:19.

thank you very much, goodbye. Did she loved the performing?

:45:20.:45:24.

Eventually, it was a bit do not put your daughter on the stage at the

:45:25.:45:29.

beginning. But afterwards she loved it. You can see the reaction from

:45:30.:45:33.

people which comes across on the documentary and you can see the

:45:34.:45:38.

reaction she has on people and how important she was to them. She is

:45:39.:45:43.

still a very important figure for so many people as well. Obviously you

:45:44.:45:46.

and the family know her better than anyone else. What have you got

:45:47.:45:52.

planned? How are you celebrating? We are not doing, it will be quicker.

:45:53.:45:58.

She does not do the TV any more, I do, I am second in line. We have got

:45:59.:46:04.

a big concert on Saturday at the Palladium with lots of wonderful

:46:05.:46:10.

stars. She was involved in the Palladium, as you know. Also the

:46:11.:46:13.

documentary at nine o'clock on BBC Two. There is a radio programme on

:46:14.:46:20.

BBC Radio on Sunday and a family party on Monday. You have got a

:46:21.:46:27.

family meal somewhere in that. Yes, everyone is coming to us, we are

:46:28.:46:32.

huge, so we cannot get everyone in. Do you think she might give a tune

:46:33.:46:40.

for everybody, she is releasing an album! They have digitalised and

:46:41.:46:46.

re-orchestrating some of her songs and she has got people doing duets

:46:47.:46:52.

with her, like Alfie bow. It is fantastic, it is wonderful what they

:46:53.:46:56.

have done. Her voice reaches all age groups anyway and we often get

:46:57.:47:03.

wonderful letters from 11-year-olds in America or Uzbekistan or all over

:47:04.:47:09.

that, it is wonderful. Which are very happy birthday from us. Thank

:47:10.:47:13.

Happy 100th Birthday, Dame Vera Lynn will be

:47:14.:47:16.

Part of a big weekend celebrations it looks like. Before we talk about

:47:17.:47:29.

the weather, we want to talk about great news. She has won another

:47:30.:47:38.

award. Carol Kirkwood! It was a trick award for best weather

:47:39.:47:42.

presenter. She was kissing you there. That is the ninth she has

:47:43.:47:48.

one, the sixth on the trot. We always knew she was the best weather

:47:49.:47:54.

presenter out there. Once again, it is official, congratulations.

:47:55.:48:00.

It was so lovely to win it, and thank you everybody for that honour

:48:01.:48:10.

as well. Do you want to see it? Look at that, put it on your massive

:48:11.:48:15.

mantelpiece, Carol. Have you got another mantelpiece?

:48:16.:48:22.

No, of course not. I am really grateful. It is a team effort, we

:48:23.:48:27.

all work together and it is an award for everyone. I am in Saint James

:48:28.:48:32.

Brno Park this morning. Look how gorgeous it is. It is lovely and

:48:33.:48:36.

springlike and it is starting to warm up after a chilly start. The

:48:37.:48:43.

cloud is now breaking and we are seeing some sunshine.

:48:44.:48:49.

It is a cloudy start, but for most of us it is a mild day and it will

:48:50.:48:57.

stay dry. This morning we have got murky conditions which will improve

:48:58.:49:03.

as we go through the morning. The cloud will continue to break and the

:49:04.:49:07.

lying's share of the sunshine will be in Central and eastern areas. Out

:49:08.:49:12.

to the west it will be cloudy at times. The wind will strengthen as

:49:13.:49:20.

we go through the course of the day. We are looking at patchy rain in the

:49:21.:49:25.

west of Scotland, but largely dry and bright. In the far north of

:49:26.:49:29.

England and the North West of England it will be cloudy at times.

:49:30.:49:34.

On the other side of the Pennines we are looking at sunshine which

:49:35.:49:38.

extends down to east Anglia and Kent. From the Midlands to the Isle

:49:39.:49:43.

of White there is sunshine, highs up to 16 or 17. Into the south-west,

:49:44.:49:50.

although it will brighten up a bit, there will still be some coastal

:49:51.:49:54.

fog, possibly the odd shower here and there. South West Wales has some

:49:55.:50:01.

coastal fog. East Wales sees some sunshine with a high of 16 or 17,

:50:02.:50:07.

possibly more. For Northern Ireland after a damp start it will dry up,

:50:08.:50:14.

but we will have limited brightness. This evening and overnight we carry

:50:15.:50:17.

on with the patchy rain and drizzle in the West and we also have some

:50:18.:50:22.

sea fog coming in across the South East and we will also have some hill

:50:23.:50:28.

fog and low level fog as well. That will clear leaving England and Wales

:50:29.:50:33.

with a largely dry and bright start to the day. Scotland and Northern

:50:34.:50:37.

Ireland have a cold front coming in and that will move southwards,

:50:38.:50:42.

getting into northern England and Wales by the afternoon. Behind that

:50:43.:50:46.

there are cooler conditions, sunshine and showers, some of them

:50:47.:50:52.

will be wintry. On Friday we have got what is left of storm Stella

:50:53.:50:56.

coming our way, but hugely modified by the Atlantic Ocean. We are not

:50:57.:51:03.

looking at snow, but what will happen is the rain will come across

:51:04.:51:07.

from the north-west and south-west. We could see some snow in the

:51:08.:51:11.

mountains of Scotland but that is not unusual for this time of year.

:51:12.:51:19.

The second batch of rain will be coming our way on Friday.

:51:20.:51:24.

The blossom looks lovely. Long may it last. We are looking to the tenth

:51:25.:51:28.

award next year. That will be impressive. She wins

:51:29.:51:33.

Have you ever eaten food that has dropped on the floor?

:51:34.:51:42.

Yes. Do you applied the five second rule?

:51:43.:51:51.

I am not that fussy about five seconds.

:51:52.:51:51.

What about you? Yes. Apparently four in five of us have,

:51:52.:51:55.

and we've even come up The "five second rule" states

:51:56.:51:59.

that if you pick it up within five seconds,

:52:00.:52:03.

it's totally fine. We'll speak to a scientist who's

:52:04.:52:05.

been looking into this in a moment. But, first, this is what people

:52:06.:52:08.

in Salford had to say. I certainly wouldn't pick food up

:52:09.:52:10.

if I dropped it on the floor, because you don't know what's been

:52:11.:52:15.

there before you, do you? Perhaps if it was a child then I'd

:52:16.:52:17.

think twice about doing it. It's the first time

:52:18.:52:22.

I've heard about it. But I don't think I would

:52:23.:52:24.

touch anything that had At home I tend to be fine,

:52:25.:52:26.

so I would just pick it up at home. But maybe in certain situations,

:52:27.:52:32.

out and about, depending I'm a little bit more frugal

:52:33.:52:34.

with money, so I may possibly It's better to be safe

:52:35.:52:44.

than sorry, really. And you don't know who's walked

:52:45.:52:51.

on your floor, either. Even if people take their shoes off,

:52:52.:52:54.

it's still not very hygienic. If it is very important

:52:55.:52:58.

food that I really like, But maybe outside I would be

:52:59.:53:01.

a little bit conscious about that. Professor Anthony Hilton knows

:53:02.:53:20.

all about food and germs, Good morning. I applied the five

:53:21.:53:37.

second rule, sometimes I go over it. What are your thoughts? It is

:53:38.:53:41.

something that four out of five of us are doing according to a survey.

:53:42.:53:46.

What is the basis for that decision? We decided to look at the science

:53:47.:53:52.

behind it. We inoculated the floor of laminate floor, a tiled floor and

:53:53.:53:56.

carpet floor with tens of millions of bacteria and we dropped on their

:53:57.:54:02.

toast and biscuits. What we found is that a very low number of bacteria

:54:03.:54:08.

are picked up, only 25-50. Inadvertently people are OK, the

:54:09.:54:11.

risk is very low. Although they apply a time ruled it does not make

:54:12.:54:16.

any difference. It does not make any difference? OK. However, there is a

:54:17.:54:23.

time importance in things like soft food. If you drop something like

:54:24.:54:27.

sticky sweet is on there, the longer they are on the floor, the more

:54:28.:54:32.

bacteria they picked up. It could be down there for quite awhile and it

:54:33.:54:38.

be fine. It is good news for parents across the country because biscuits

:54:39.:54:42.

and toast get dropped all the time. You have an experiment here as well.

:54:43.:54:48.

It is an experiment where we are raising awareness of areas in the

:54:49.:54:54.

home where you can expose yourself to bacteria. People are worried

:54:55.:54:57.

about toast on the floor, but there are other things we should be

:54:58.:55:02.

worried about. One thing I worry about is chicken, which can have

:55:03.:55:07.

harmful germs, unless you cook it. Raw chicken has about 50-60% of

:55:08.:55:15.

bacteria on there. It is not a real chicken. As if I was chopping it up,

:55:16.:55:24.

I might inspect it. Your hands will have become contaminated. I would go

:55:25.:55:29.

straight to the sink and wash my hands.

:55:30.:55:34.

But you might come in and shake my hands! We have got contamination of

:55:35.:55:40.

your hands and cross contamination of your hands and we can demonstrate

:55:41.:55:45.

that. On the chicken we have an ultraviolet light. We can turn down

:55:46.:55:54.

the lights. You can see that the chicken is glowing and that is

:55:55.:55:58.

representative of the bacteria that might be on there. Hopefully on your

:55:59.:56:01.

hands you can see that your hands are contaminated. Get the lights

:56:02.:56:12.

back down. And there you can see it. And on your hands as well. You can

:56:13.:56:17.

see it on my hands as well and that was a five second handshake. The

:56:18.:56:23.

importance of what we are showing is the importance of hygiene and

:56:24.:56:28.

washing your hands and taking care of those activities that have the

:56:29.:56:34.

most impact. If I had not shake it your hand, I would be spreading this

:56:35.:56:41.

everywhere. That is the issue, spreading the

:56:42.:56:46.

bacteria? Exactly and we want to engage with the younger engineers

:56:47.:56:53.

and scientists who come to the Big Ban Fair. Immediately you have

:56:54.:56:59.

touched something like chicken that could be problematic with

:57:00.:57:05.

problematic organisms. Hand washing is the single most important thing

:57:06.:57:08.

we can do to keep ourselves safe after handling poultry and raw food

:57:09.:57:16.

and things like that. The research said 2% of people admit to eating

:57:17.:57:19.

something that has been dropped on the floor in a cinema. I would

:57:20.:57:24.

imagine somewhere like that... I can hear the groaning already. The work

:57:25.:57:31.

we did was looking primarily in the indoor, domestic environment, in

:57:32.:57:35.

your own home. Interestingly, half of the people we look that would

:57:36.:57:40.

pick up food in their own home, but only 20% would pick it up in someone

:57:41.:57:46.

else's home! It is only about one or 2% of people who would pick things

:57:47.:57:50.

up in the public and I would not advocate that at all. What about if

:57:51.:57:54.

you have animals at home? Would there be more germs around? In a

:57:55.:58:01.

home with pets, people who wear their outdoor shoes indoors, it all

:58:02.:58:07.

alters what we call the type of microbe in the environment. It is

:58:08.:58:14.

coming in from the outside on an animal's pause and muggy shoes. How

:58:15.:58:19.

much damage could that do to an individual child who is coming into

:58:20.:58:26.

contact with that contaminated food? We survey people's homes and whether

:58:27.:58:31.

they had pets for children and whether they wore their shoes inside

:58:32.:58:35.

or outside, and we never found anything that was problematic. There

:58:36.:58:40.

are lots of environmental organisms, but not ones that we associate with

:58:41.:58:44.

disease. In a risk weight dropping food in your own home it picks up so

:58:45.:58:49.

few bacteria that the risk is quite small. Would you ever eat a mint

:58:50.:58:56.

suite in a restaurant or take an nut from a bar? That is another survey

:58:57.:59:01.

all by itself, something I need to look into and come back to you on

:59:02.:59:06.

that. I have heard statistics about that!

:59:07.:59:12.

I want to go and wash my hands now. I will be carrying out more

:59:13.:59:17.

demonstrations like that one at the big bang fair in Birmingham.

:59:18.:59:23.

It's a grand historic mansion that was, quite

:59:24.:59:25.

Yet, crumbling walls and falling ceilings meant Knole House in Kent

:59:26.:59:29.

was in desperate need of some serious TLC.

:59:30.:59:31.

It became the focus of the biggest restoration

:59:32.:59:32.

project the National Trust has ever undertaken.

:59:33.:59:34.

Let's find out more from John Maguire, who's

:59:35.:59:37.

It really looks spectacular. Good morning, John? Good morning. There's

:59:38.:59:47.

a big difference you may have noticed. The mist has just lifted,

:59:48.:59:56.

which means you can just about see deer in the distance at the top of

:59:57.:00:00.

the hill. We believe there are about 350 here at Knole. That's the first

:00:01.:00:06.

time we've seen them this morning. So lots of Tudor Deer parks on the

:00:07.:00:12.

show for you this morning. This is the spectacular Knole House. More

:00:13.:00:17.

than 600 years old. Once seized by Henry VIII during the Reformation,

:00:18.:00:20.

although we don't believe he ever rested his head here. But he just

:00:21.:00:25.

liked to acquire palaces. An extraordinary place that is really

:00:26.:00:28.

showing its age. Let's show you inside.

:00:29.:00:32.

With almost six centuries of history, Knole House

:00:33.:00:41.

is one of the oldest, grandest and most important

:00:42.:00:44.

This is the Great Staircase at Knole, created at the beginning

:00:45.:00:48.

of the 17th century and decorated by craftsmen from the King's works.

:00:49.:00:51.

I think we'll be overwhelmed by the scale of what

:00:52.:00:57.

And just keeping on top of the maintenance of a building

:00:58.:01:07.

And because the building is so old, we've got to the point where,

:01:08.:01:12.

A major intervention, like a project that we're working on now,

:01:13.:01:16.

This is the biggest restoration in the National Trust's history,

:01:17.:01:19.

all conducted under the watchful gaze of the Sackville family.

:01:20.:01:22.

Powerful and influential in the 17th century Royal Court,

:01:23.:01:24.

their descendants live here to this day -

:01:25.:01:26.

So a state-of-the-art conservation studio will,

:01:27.:01:37.

with painstaking patients, work to protect the building

:01:38.:01:40.

This is the famous Knole sofa, made anywhere between 1625 and 1660.

:01:41.:01:49.

As like everything at Knole, it's incredibly dusty.

:01:50.:01:51.

One of our jobs would be to very carefully and slowly start to remove

:01:52.:01:57.

the dust, and see if we can get the grey gone and the colour back.

:01:58.:02:01.

We overlap the previous bit to make sure we haven't

:02:02.:02:04.

And then just keep the system going, really.

:02:05.:02:09.

The conservators employ the same skills and techniques that

:02:10.:02:11.

have embellished Knole for hundreds of years.

:02:12.:02:14.

I suppose the whole point of it was to show off

:02:15.:02:17.

And that's why, quite often in the past, reguilding is done.

:02:18.:02:24.

Because if old gets worn or dirty, or it doesn't look as shiny,

:02:25.:02:29.

that was the stage where owners would have chosen to reguild.

:02:30.:02:34.

Through the ages, dust, rain and wood smoke have

:02:35.:02:38.

This x-ray shows damage caused by woodwork.

:02:39.:02:49.

The team has to preserve the ornate and the elaborate of Knole's past,

:02:50.:02:56.

while ensuring the health and the safety requirements

:02:57.:02:58.

of the present - to protect not only the house itself,

:02:59.:03:00.

but also those who come here to visit.

:03:01.:03:05.

Here we are in the courtyard. That visitor centre that we were just

:03:06.:03:12.

showing you opens to the public tomorrow. So you get a chance to

:03:13.:03:16.

have a really good close-up look at the type of work that takes place

:03:17.:03:22.

here. The exterior itself is spectacular and wonderful, but I

:03:23.:03:25.

suppose a lot of the work goes on inside. It's interesting to hear

:03:26.:03:30.

about the size of the roof. It's had lots of water damage. All of those

:03:31.:03:35.

things that have occurred over the years. It's almost a case of trying

:03:36.:03:38.

to roll back the years. The damage that very much defined this place

:03:39.:03:48.

has also, to a certain extent, led to threatening its.

:03:49.:03:51.

It's been wonderful, and what painstaking work as well.

:03:52.:03:55.

Thank you very much indeed. I'm glad the mist finally cleared.

:03:56.:03:58.

In a moment we'll be looking ahead to the second

:03:59.:04:00.

season of the hit series, The Last Kingdom.

:04:01.:04:02.

But first a last brief look at the headlines

:04:03.:04:04.

Thanks for watching and have a lovely day.

:04:05.:05:48.

Hello, welcome back. It's five past nine.

:05:49.:05:52.

The BBC's epic swords and Saxons drama, The Last Kingdom,

:05:53.:05:54.

returns for a second season this week.

:05:55.:05:56.

Described as the real life Game of Thrones,

:05:57.:05:58.

it's set during the time of King Alfred the Great.

:05:59.:06:00.

And combines historical fact with fictional characters.

:06:01.:06:02.

The story is based on the best-selling noveIs

:06:03.:06:04.

He joins us on the sofa along with the show's

:06:05.:06:09.

He plays Uhtred. Going for the full Danish pronunciation!

:06:10.:06:22.

But before we speak to them, here's a clip to whet your appetite.

:06:23.:06:26.

, We will play you that in a little while. We have technical issues.

:06:27.:06:37.

Lots of people have watched it. For those who haven't, tell us what it's

:06:38.:06:41.

about. It's about the making of England. Brilliant. A good selling

:06:42.:06:46.

point. If you had been sitting here in Manchester in the year 880, you

:06:47.:06:51.

would know what I was talking about. 50 years later, there was a place

:06:52.:06:56.

called England. So how did that happen? That the big story in the

:06:57.:07:01.

background. In the foreground is his story, and he can tell you about

:07:02.:07:07.

that. Go on. The story is historical, but the fictional part

:07:08.:07:14.

is my character. His story is told through his eyes. He's Borre Saxon

:07:15.:07:18.

but is raised as a Dane because his parents are killed when he is a

:07:19.:07:22.

little boy. -- he is born as a Saxon. He has access to both worlds.

:07:23.:07:27.

He feels a strong allegiance to the north of theology, he needs the

:07:28.:07:34.

Saxons in order to get what he wants, which is his birthright, the

:07:35.:07:40.

fortress now known as Bamburgh Castle. He eventually becomes the

:07:41.:07:46.

leader of RFID's armies. We are going to show a bit from the second

:07:47.:07:49.

series now. -- the leader of Alfred's armies. This is this is

:07:50.:07:58.

when Uhtred is struggling to come to terms with the death of the woman he

:07:59.:08:00.

loves. What am I to do in Northumbria with

:08:01.:08:14.

an army of two? Prepare yourself. To do what? Kill him and the men who

:08:15.:08:21.

surround him? You can begin to carry yourself as a Lord. Or we could

:08:22.:08:26.

return to Winchester. No, we could not return to Winchester. Did she

:08:27.:08:28.

not say that your path went north? Thank you.

:08:29.:08:54.

That feels like a very significant moment.

:08:55.:08:58.

But I like about it is you what a lot of these fictional dramas and

:08:59.:09:01.

it's all place names and maps which you have two imagine in your own

:09:02.:09:05.

mind. But here you're talking about places like Winchester and it feels

:09:06.:09:10.

like real history. Winchester was the capital of Wessex, and at one

:09:11.:09:13.

time the capital of England. When you are talking about the making of

:09:14.:09:18.

England, it's probably not a popular thing to say, but it's a process

:09:19.:09:20.

that begins in the South in gradually spread northwards. Uhtred

:09:21.:09:25.

follows that course and eventually gets further and further north

:09:26.:09:29.

through the course of the series. I get pulled back south again, and

:09:30.:09:33.

against game. That's because women. What isn't? It's going to be great

:09:34.:09:39.

fun. Did you worry that people would get confused between fact and

:09:40.:09:43.

fiction? I don't worry. I think people know when they're seeing

:09:44.:09:47.

fiction. Like most historical novels, think about Gone With The

:09:48.:09:53.

Wind, the big story is the story of the war and the little story is

:09:54.:09:57.

scarlet. So the little story here is about Uhtred and his land. There was

:09:58.:10:06.

a Uhtred, and he was a Lord. He managed to hold onto his land in a

:10:07.:10:10.

Viking controlled kingdom. We don't know how that happened because we

:10:11.:10:14.

don't have the record, so that means I can make it up and then he can

:10:15.:10:18.

play it. Excellent. Does the history of that interest you at all, or is

:10:19.:10:22.

it strictly a part and a script for you? It interests me. You have to

:10:23.:10:30.

know about these things if you're going to play the character

:10:31.:10:34.

accurately. My mum used to be a history teacher and I hated it as a

:10:35.:10:38.

kid. But here you are! Tell us about the filming of it. I can't help

:10:39.:10:41.

watching these programmes and looking at those horses...

:10:42.:10:46.

Magnificent riding, by the way. Thank you very much. We had a great

:10:47.:10:52.

stunt coordinator. He is the real version of Robin Retford's horse

:10:53.:10:56.

whisperer. He is as patient with the active as he is with the horses. Do

:10:57.:11:01.

you do as many as your -- do you do much of your instance? As many as

:11:02.:11:07.

they let me. Currently, there are ten books. Yes, we're up to ten

:11:08.:11:10.

books and the second series takes us up to the fourth book. So

:11:11.:11:15.

potentially there's a lot more in there. Yes, there is! Look at that.

:11:16.:11:22.

Will you continue writing? Yes. Uhtred is pretty ancient by now. By

:11:23.:11:28.

the tenth book I fudge his age. People ask me how old he is and I

:11:29.:11:33.

say, I don't know. I do, but I'm not saying! I can take up smoking.

:11:34.:11:40.

Guarantee series three and four. It obviously it starts with your work

:11:41.:11:42.

but it's taken in different directions in some ways. Do you like

:11:43.:11:47.

that sort of process? Yes, you let it go. There is no point in trying

:11:48.:11:52.

to hold onto it. These are the people who made down to an abbey.

:11:53.:11:54.

They know what they're doing. People like Alexander know what they're

:11:55.:12:00.

doing and you got to let them bring their creativity to it because it

:12:01.:12:04.

added value. When I see it on television, it's sort of like it's

:12:05.:12:09.

as, not mine. And I mean that in the nicest possible way because they've

:12:10.:12:12.

taken, they've added to it, they make it look brilliant and

:12:13.:12:18.

beautiful. Well, some of them! It's theirs, and it's wonderful. I think

:12:19.:12:23.

it is a story but even though it is a large slice of history, it

:12:24.:12:26.

resonates now because it's about immigration. It's about us being a

:12:27.:12:32.

country of immigrants. Lorry country of immigrants. Even the Saxons were

:12:33.:12:36.

immigrants in their day, resented by the Britons. -- we are a country of

:12:37.:12:50.

immigrants. It's also about Creed, because as far as Alfred was

:12:51.:12:54.

concerned, and Alfred didn't live to see the creation of England,

:12:55.:12:58.

although it was his dream, as far as he was concerned, the pagan Vikings

:12:59.:13:03.

were the enemy. But the men and they converted to Christianity, they were

:13:04.:13:07.

OK and they could stay. -- but the moment they converted. Wherewith it

:13:08.:13:12.

filmed? In Budapest, mainly. Some parts in Wales because we needed

:13:13.:13:15.

some beaches. You can't beat a Welsh beach.

:13:16.:13:17.

The Last Kingdom is on BBC Two on Thursday at 9pm.

:13:18.:13:21.

That is it from us today. Tomorrow Charlie and Sally will be talking

:13:22.:13:28.

about locations. That's why I mentioned it, because

:13:29.:13:31.

we will leave you with this lovely shot of Knole House where we have

:13:32.:13:36.

been all morning. Use that for series five! It will be perfect.

:13:37.:13:38.

Have a lovely day, goodbye.

:13:39.:13:41.