19/03/2017 Breakfast


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19/03/2017

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Hello this is Breakfast, with Tina Daheley and Jon Kay.

:00:00.:00:07.

Tributes are being paid to the musician Chuck Berry,

:00:08.:00:10.

The 90-year-old American singer and guitarist

:00:11.:00:20.

was widely credited as the founder of rock and roll.

:00:21.:00:38.

Meeting health care standards in England will be "mission

:00:39.:00:48.

impossible" according to the organisation representing

:00:49.:00:50.

Changes to car tax could leave drivers paying more according

:00:51.:00:53.

And in sport, Ireland break English hearts in Dublin

:00:54.:01:02.

to deny Eddie Jones's side a Six Nations Grand Slam

:01:03.:01:04.

We'll be onboard the converted bus that's offering help to the homeless

:01:05.:01:14.

- and how we could be seeing more of them.

:01:15.:01:17.

Good morning. A band of rain slices through Northern Ireland, southern

:01:18.:01:23.

Scotland, and the north of England. Paddy windy weather to the north.

:01:24.:01:26.

Call and showery. Or the details tell where you are come in about 15

:01:27.:01:29.

minutes. Tributes are being paid

:01:30.:01:37.

to Chuck Berry - the singer and guitarist who's

:01:38.:01:42.

died at the age of 90. Police say emergency services

:01:43.:01:45.

were called to the musician's home in Missouri yesterday,

:01:46.:01:47.

but were unable to revive him. A rock and roll pioneer,

:01:48.:01:50.

his hits such as Roll Over Beethoven and Johnny B Goode helped define

:01:51.:01:53.

the genre, and influenced a raft of artists from The Rolling

:01:54.:01:56.

Stones to The Beatles. Our Arts Correspondent David Sillito

:01:57.:01:59.

looks back at his life. Johnny B Goode, Sweet Little 16,

:02:00.:02:29.

Roll Over Beethoven... If anyone person could have claimed to have

:02:30.:02:32.

invented rock 'n' roll, it was Chuck Berry. This formula? Take rhythm and

:02:33.:02:39.

blues, mix with country, and adds electric guitar and sing about the

:02:40.:02:42.

things that temperatures care about. That is why I wrote about school.

:02:43.:02:46.

Half of young people go to school. At a wrote about life, clouds, and

:02:47.:02:55.

mostly most of the people, if not now, they will soon be in love. --

:02:56.:03:03.

cars. He was born in settlers, -- Satterley, misery. His hobby was

:03:04.:03:10.

guitar. It was Muddy Waters has suggested that he recorded a song at

:03:11.:03:15.

the legendary Hebig at chess Studios. -- St Louis, Missouri. --

:03:16.:03:27.

Chess Studios. After spending time in jail for having sex with a

:03:28.:03:32.

14-year-old girl, 80 came to find his sound was sweeping America. He

:03:33.:03:37.

was something of a loner, turning up and playing with whoever was around.

:03:38.:03:42.

Sometimes, he would not even hand out a set list. He knew everybody

:03:43.:03:47.

would do his songs. And he was not always easy to get along with, as he

:03:48.:03:52.

sang, Keith Richards, found out. -- as his fan. But, as Jon Z, if you

:03:53.:04:06.

want to dig of rock 'n' roll another game, you might call it Chuck Berry.

:04:07.:04:13.

-- as John Lennon said, if you want to give rock 'n' roll another name.

:04:14.:04:20.

In about half an hour we'll be speaking to Eric Burdon,

:04:21.:04:25.

lead singer with 60s rockers The Animals,

:04:26.:04:27.

who toured with Chuck Berry, and asking him what it was like to

:04:28.:04:31.

NHS services are facing a 'mission impossible' to meet the standards

:04:32.:04:35.

required by the Government - that's according to the organisation

:04:36.:04:38.

NHS Providers says the funding allocated for the next

:04:39.:04:42.

financial year is not enough to meet growing patient demand and will hit

:04:43.:04:46.

It says the warning is unprecedented.

:04:47.:04:49.

The budget earlier this month included new funding for social care

:04:50.:05:04.

and investment in and the units in England. NHS Providers says that may

:05:05.:05:09.

ease of the pressure on hospitals, but there will still be a yawning

:05:10.:05:13.

gap in the resources needed just to keep services ticking over. The

:05:14.:05:17.

organisation said it was unprecedented to warn even before

:05:18.:05:21.

the financial year began that he could not deliver the required

:05:22.:05:23.

standards of care. NHS Providers says there will be big increases in

:05:24.:05:29.

the number of people in England falling outside key kept their

:05:30.:05:35.

starts, with 1.4 million waiting in AME, and more than a thousand

:05:36.:05:40.

waiting for routine surgery. -- 100,000. This is the first time that

:05:41.:05:45.

trusts are saying that they cannot deliver targets and hit financial

:05:46.:05:50.

balance. -- A And that is before the year has even started. That is

:05:51.:05:53.

the first time that has actually happened, and I think that is

:05:54.:05:57.

worrying. The Department of Health said the comments failed to

:05:58.:06:00.

acknowledge that the NHS had a strong plan to improve performance,

:06:01.:06:04.

and that staff were working hard to treat thousands more people each

:06:05.:06:06.

year within the A target. French investigators

:06:07.:06:23.

are continuing their inquiry into an attack at an airport Paris

:06:24.:06:24.

yesterday, in which a man was shot dead by security forces after trying

:06:25.:06:28.

to seize a soldier's gun. According to officials

:06:29.:06:38.

Ziyed Ben Belgacem had said he was 'ready to die for Allah'

:06:39.:06:40.

and had tried to take the soldier's Earlier that day he had been

:06:41.:06:44.

involved in a shooting Flights to and from Orly airport

:06:45.:06:48.

were suspended for several hours North Korea's state media

:06:49.:06:52.

says its military has tested a new high-performance

:06:53.:06:55.

rocket engine. The announcement came

:06:56.:06:57.

as the US Secretary of State, Rex Tillerson, was meeting

:06:58.:06:59.

with his Chinese counterpart. Mr Tillerson told China's president

:07:00.:07:01.

Xi Jinping that President Trump looks forward to

:07:02.:07:04.

'enhancing understanding' between China and the US,

:07:05.:07:05.

as Our China Editor Carrie Gracie An upbeat meeting between the

:07:06.:07:11.

Chinese President and America's top lip. Just any anxieties about where

:07:12.:07:16.

US-China relations ahead. -- top diplomat. But even as the actors

:07:17.:07:21.

smile for the cameras, they were upstaged by another. North Korea

:07:22.:07:24.

announced the successful test of a highly thrust engine for long-range

:07:25.:07:30.

missiles. It is ready warned that its nuclear missiles also be able to

:07:31.:07:38.

US soil. Mr Rex Tillerson asked China to do more to persuade its

:07:39.:07:42.

ally to give up its arsenal. Only hours before he arrived, it is Boss

:07:43.:07:46.

tweeted a complaint that North Korea behaved badly, playing the US for

:07:47.:07:52.

years, with China doing little to help. But in Beijing, Mr Tillotson

:07:53.:08:01.

was diplomatic. We share a common view that tensions on the Peninsula

:08:02.:08:02.

are quite high rate now. -- Xi -- Tillerson. Things have written a

:08:03.:08:11.

dangerous level. We have committed ourselves to preventing any type of

:08:12.:08:16.

conflict from breaking out. -- have risen. Per the US Secretary of State

:08:17.:08:20.

is not the only one sending a message in north-east Asia. With

:08:21.:08:24.

today's rocket news, Kim Jong-un is turning his own message, one of

:08:25.:08:28.

defiance, not just see the United States, but also to North Korea's

:08:29.:08:40.

frustrated ally, China. -- not just to the United States.

:08:41.:08:41.

Liberal Democrat leader Tim Farron is to accuse the prime minister

:08:42.:08:44.

of following "aggressive, nationalistic" politics like those

:08:45.:08:46.

He's also expected to tell his party's conference later

:08:47.:08:50.

that they are the 'real opposition' to Theresa May's hard brexit plan.

:08:51.:08:54.

Our political correspondent Mark Lobel can tell us more.

:08:55.:08:56.

Mark we're expecting strong language from Tim Farron?

:08:57.:08:58.

Indeed we are. Strong words and colourful language. Tim Farron is

:08:59.:09:09.

keen to paint his party as the party of patriotism a bit later, defining

:09:10.:09:15.

it as much by what it is against, this nationalistic, protection is

:09:16.:09:19.

world order, as much as what it is for, giving British people the final

:09:20.:09:24.

say on a Brexit vote. And also, giving them, well wanting them, to

:09:25.:09:29.

have membership of the EU single market, and trying to do everything

:09:30.:09:33.

he can to avoid a hard Brexit. But he faces two key challenges in that

:09:34.:09:37.

regard. First of all, how is he going to do that? As you remember,

:09:38.:09:41.

the judges get Parliament the chance to change the rest of bill, but it

:09:42.:09:45.

has gone through without a scratch, so nothing to safeguard those

:09:46.:09:51.

aspirations has been put on the statute book. And we are a few days

:09:52.:09:58.

away from triggering Article 50 and second, he has had local electoral

:09:59.:10:02.

gains, but only has nine MPs, it still. So the moment, the Lib Dems

:10:03.:10:07.

bark remains quite different from its bite. Thank you very much that.

:10:08.:10:11.

And we'll be talking to the Liberal Democrat leader

:10:12.:10:17.

The rules on MPs taking other jobs are to be discussed

:10:18.:10:32.

by a parliamentary committee on Thursday.

:10:33.:10:34.

It's after the former Chancellor, George Osborne,

:10:35.:10:36.

was made the editor of the London Evening Standard.

:10:37.:10:38.

The MP for Tatton in Cheshire has already taken up business roles

:10:39.:10:42.

since leaving office - and has said he won't be standing

:10:43.:10:45.

Car buyers are being warned they'll be forced to pay much higher car tax

:10:46.:10:49.

The motoring organisation the RAC says the new rules will mean

:10:50.:10:53.

people buying new low emissions vehicles, which currently have no

:10:54.:10:56.

will pay at least

:10:57.:10:58.

The Government says the changes to will be fair

:10:59.:11:01.

to motorists and good for the environment.

:11:02.:11:03.

Our Business Correspondent Joe Lynam reports.

:11:04.:11:04.

Looking for a new clerk, car and think about doing your bit for the

:11:05.:11:10.

environment? That might become more expensive from April. The new excise

:11:11.:11:13.

duty rates come into force and low emission cars will be paying more

:11:14.:11:17.

than a do now. Most cars bought from the first of April will have a

:11:18.:11:21.

initial charge, and then ?140 after that every year. It means hybrid

:11:22.:11:25.

cars, which pay no tax up to now, will have to pay ?130 in road tax.

:11:26.:11:30.

And cars costing ?40,000 or more will face an additional premium will

:11:31.:11:35.

stop but luckily, new duties will have no effect on cars already on UK

:11:36.:11:41.

roads. It is confusing to customers, because there are so many different

:11:42.:11:46.

levels and tears. It is like the old system where the CO2 was the driving

:11:47.:11:50.

factor. -- tiers. Now we have a capital ?40,000, where above that

:11:51.:11:57.

there is ?110 added. That is only for five years. There is another ?10

:11:58.:12:04.

for hybrids. It is ridiculous. They were designed to do is to make stop

:12:05.:12:11.

tax revenues falling as cars emit less CO2. The unintended consequence

:12:12.:12:14.

is that motor is by cars that pollute more. -- that motorists by

:12:15.:12:20.

cars. -- buy. An incredible icicle measuring 30

:12:21.:12:25.

metres high has formed on a mountain People have been travelling for more

:12:26.:12:28.

than an hour on horseback to see the icicle,

:12:29.:12:32.

which is also 15 metres wide. That is very impressive. If the sun

:12:33.:12:39.

stays out like that, they better be quick, or it will melt! The time is

:12:40.:12:45.

6:12am. Let's take a look at

:12:46.:12:45.

this morning's papers. The Observer has a picture there are

:12:46.:12:53.

Chuck Berry. The rock 'n' roll pioneer, it says, his death was

:12:54.:12:56.

announced last night. And they have a political headline on the other

:12:57.:13:00.

side. They said that a cross-party alliance is forming between

:13:01.:13:02.

different political groups to fight Theresa May's plan for grammar

:13:03.:13:07.

schools, including, it says, some leading Conservatives. The front

:13:08.:13:12.

page of the Sunday express, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge... Defined

:13:13.:13:18.

as the headline. Royal stay calm amid gun terror and Paris. They were

:13:19.:13:22.

also in the French capital yesterday. That was when a man shot

:13:23.:13:26.

a policewoman in the head just miles from the couple. They carried on

:13:27.:13:29.

with our programme yesterday and watch the rugby in the afternoon in

:13:30.:13:34.

Paris. The Sunday Times have a picture of the Duchess of Cambridge,

:13:35.:13:37.

there, playing rugby, and head of the rugby, on the trip to Paris. In

:13:38.:13:43.

that story here that is a just a story that says that a new law is to

:13:44.:13:47.

be introduced which would mean that victims of rape would not have to

:13:48.:13:51.

give evidence in court. And it says they will also be a new law that

:13:52.:13:54.

would ban the grooming of children, a new Internet -based defence.

:13:55.:13:59.

Different measure the Daily Mail has the same picture. -- of fans. I

:14:00.:14:06.

don't know she is fashionable, but she certainly carrying it. Let

:14:07.:14:10.

mothers abort babies of the wrong sex. The headline he was about the

:14:11.:14:17.

leading at exactly that of the British Medical Association, who

:14:18.:14:20.

they say is backing the limitations of sex based on -- abortion based on

:14:21.:14:27.

sex alone. And the Daily Mirror has an exquisite about George Michael.

:14:28.:14:32.

They say they had an interview with a doctor that spoke to him in the

:14:33.:14:36.

week before his death, in which George Michael said he knew he was

:14:37.:14:37.

going to die soon. You're watching

:14:38.:14:40.

Breakfast from BBC News. Chuck Berry, credited by many

:14:41.:14:42.

as being the man who helped invent rock 'n' roll, has died

:14:43.:14:47.

at the age of 90. The group which represents NHS

:14:48.:14:49.

trusts in England has warned it will be impossible to meet

:14:50.:14:52.

the standards of care required All the Brexiteers, there are

:14:53.:15:09.

enough, you've won, but I've yet to hear a constructive plan for this

:15:10.:15:13.

Brexit. Can you give us a constructive plan? -- fair enough.

:15:14.:15:14.

As the Government prepares to trigger proceedings for Britain

:15:15.:15:18.

to leave the EU, Leave and Remain voters come face to face to talk

:15:19.:15:22.

Here's Ben with a look at this morning's weather.

:15:23.:15:33.

Thanks and good morning. I wouldn't exactly say he did but it is pretty

:15:34.:15:40.

mild for most of us this morning. Through the day a real variety of

:15:41.:15:44.

weather depending on where you are, for many it will stay mild, it will

:15:45.:15:48.

be windy but for somewhere going to see some rain, especially where

:15:49.:15:52.

you're close to this weather front. It slices through the middle of the

:15:53.:15:56.

country, Northern Ireland, southern Scotland, north-west England, and

:15:57.:15:59.

because this parental system has these bends on it it won't move

:16:00.:16:03.

through quickly, sitting in place for a good part of the day across

:16:04.:16:07.

Northern Ireland, south-west Scotland and north-west England and

:16:08.:16:10.

a lot of rain to come, big puddles and surface water and spray on the

:16:11.:16:14.

roads. North-east Scotland, brighter weather with showers and to the

:16:15.:16:18.

south of our rain band, a bit drizzly and murky for hills and

:16:19.:16:27.

coasts of Wales and the south-west, further east for the Midlands, East

:16:28.:16:30.

Anglia and the Saudis, largely dry. Windy here but mild, 11 to start in

:16:31.:16:34.

Oxford. Through the day remember our Bradley Wiggins the weather front

:16:35.:16:37.

not moving too quickly, the rain keeps going in Northern Ireland and

:16:38.:16:40.

gradually fizzling as it goes south to the Midlands and Wales. To the

:16:41.:16:46.

north of that, sunshine and showers heavy, to the south, largely cloudy

:16:47.:16:49.

but some brightness developing to the south-east. Premier League,

:16:50.:16:54.

Tottenham against Southampton, the skies might brighten, sunny spells,

:16:55.:17:00.

feeling mild, 14 or 15. Through this evening and tonight, our rain band

:17:01.:17:03.

goes south and gets stuck across southern England and south Wales and

:17:04.:17:07.

meanwhile a fresh clutch of showery rain moves to western Scotland and

:17:08.:17:11.

Northern Ireland, with its strong winds, gales for a time, turning

:17:12.:17:15.

colder towards the north-west with snow over the mountains of Scotland.

:17:16.:17:19.

Tomorrow, a complicated story but this weather front is the same one

:17:20.:17:24.

we have today. Today it is sitting up here, tomorrow it is down here in

:17:25.:17:28.

the south. A soggy morning across southern England and south Wales.

:17:29.:17:33.

Further north, heavy showers and strong winds across Scotland. Wintry

:17:34.:17:37.

showers here as well, some showers into Northern Ireland and

:17:38.:17:40.

particularly across north-western areas it will start to turn that bit

:17:41.:17:44.

colder. Those chilly conditions with heavy showers are going to spread

:17:45.:17:49.

south and east as we go to the middle of the week, John and Tina.

:17:50.:17:51.

Not looking forward to that! We'll be back with a summary

:17:52.:17:52.

of the news at 6:30am. Hello, and welcome to

:17:53.:17:55.

the Film Review on BBC News. To take us through this week's

:17:56.:18:13.

cinema releases is Mark Kermode. We have Get Out, a horror

:18:14.:18:20.

movie-cum-social thriller. We have The Salesman

:18:21.:18:25.

from Asghar Fahadi, I am fascinated to know

:18:26.:18:29.

what you thought Get Out, because even watching

:18:30.:18:41.

the trailer, I felt very tense. The trailer sells it

:18:42.:18:44.

as a horror movie, and it is. The director, Jordan Peele,

:18:45.:18:48.

described it as a social thriller, so essentially, it is a satire

:18:49.:18:51.

about post-racial America, Daniel Kaluuya is this

:18:52.:18:54.

keen-eyed photographer, Alison Williams is his preppy

:18:55.:18:59.

girlfriend, and they are going to her rich parents'

:19:00.:19:02.

house for the weekend, and he says, they do

:19:03.:19:05.

know I'm black, right? to know, they are incredibly liberal

:19:06.:19:09.

people. My father would have voted

:19:10.:19:13.

for Obama for a third time And when they arrive

:19:14.:19:15.

at the Mansion-like house, that is pretty much

:19:16.:19:19.

the first thing he says. "I would have voted

:19:20.:19:24.

for Obama for a third time." He's really sort of friendly

:19:25.:19:26.

and chummy in a way which is, How long has this been

:19:27.:19:30.

going on, this thing? Four months.

:19:31.:19:34.

Four months? Atta boy, better get

:19:35.:19:39.

used to saying that! Please.

:19:40.:19:48.

I'm so sorry. At first, everything seems

:19:49.:19:50.

bonhomie and charming, but there are signs that

:19:51.:20:04.

everything isn't quite right. The housemaid and groundskeeper

:20:05.:20:08.

smile in a way that The friends turn up and they are not

:20:09.:20:11.

just attentive, it's almost as if they are treating the guest

:20:12.:20:16.

as some kind of trophy. We then move into something that

:20:17.:20:20.

Ira Levin, the writer of Stepford Wives and Rosemary's

:20:21.:20:26.

Baby would have recognised. The really clever thing

:20:27.:20:29.

about the film is, it manages the shift between being just

:20:30.:20:31.

about credible and going into something rather different

:20:32.:20:33.

very, very gradually. At its at its best, I think,

:20:34.:20:35.

when all the horror remains hidden. The way to think of it is

:20:36.:20:39.

as something that starts out as a modern version

:20:40.:20:42.

of Guess Who's Coming To Dinner and then it drifts towards

:20:43.:20:45.

Red State or Greenroom, There is humour all the way through,

:20:46.:20:47.

and there are really dark The satire is really sort

:20:48.:20:52.

of piercing, and then when it needs to turn into something thrilling,

:20:53.:20:56.

shocking, it doesn't hold back. I thought it was a really

:20:57.:20:59.

effective piece of work. I saw it with a full screening room

:21:00.:21:04.

of people who were jumping, shrieking and laughing

:21:05.:21:07.

when they were meant to. It's a really, really smart social

:21:08.:21:10.

thriller/horror film. Weirdly, it is about the underlying

:21:11.:21:12.

racism of the liberal elite, It's not a film in which

:21:13.:21:21.

rednecks are the bad guys. The liberals, who appear to be

:21:22.:21:31.

incredibly egalitarian, but there is something really

:21:32.:21:33.

sinister beneath the surface. As you say, the trailer is a real

:21:34.:21:36.

teaser and will get a lot of people The Salesman, this won the best

:21:37.:21:43.

foreign-language Oscar. Asghar Fahadi, the director,

:21:44.:21:52.

wasn't at the Acadamy Awards, he was boycotting them as a result

:21:53.:21:55.

of Donald Trump's travel ban. This isn't quite on a par

:21:56.:21:58.

with The Salesman. I think this is still a very

:21:59.:22:02.

fine piece of work. Husband-and-wife, part-time actors,

:22:03.:22:05.

putting on the play She's attacked in their new

:22:06.:22:07.

apartment and his thoughts The real-life relationship

:22:08.:22:13.

spills onto the stage. Some people have complained

:22:14.:22:16.

the film is too schematic, that the bridge between the play

:22:17.:22:18.

and real life is too contrived. I thought it slipped from social

:22:19.:22:21.

observation into psychological I think it is a really humane work

:22:22.:22:29.

and you can absolutely believe in the characters

:22:30.:22:38.

and their situations. I think it's a film that

:22:39.:22:40.

blends the personal and the political

:22:41.:22:42.

rather beautifully. It's strangely mysterious

:22:43.:22:43.

and rather heartbreaking. Having heard a few lukewarm reviews,

:22:44.:22:45.

I was very, very impressed by it. That is in a league of its own

:22:46.:22:48.

and it's not as good as that, It is a smart, intelligent,

:22:49.:22:59.

melancholic, insightful drama about people you can

:23:00.:23:05.

really believe in. You mentioned good

:23:06.:23:09.

performances in that. That seems to be the overriding

:23:10.:23:12.

theme of your third film Kristin Stewart is absolutely

:23:13.:23:15.

brilliant in Olivier Assayas's film. It juxtaposes the spiritual

:23:16.:23:19.

and material world. It is literally a search

:23:20.:23:24.

for the afterlife and a search She is a personal shopper

:23:25.:23:27.

for a rich celebrity, so she spends her life

:23:28.:23:33.

going round choosing her wardrobe. However, she is also bereaved,

:23:34.:23:36.

having lost a brother, and she's trying to make

:23:37.:23:38.

contact with her brother Whoever died first would

:23:39.:23:41.

send the other a sign. You could call it that,

:23:42.:24:04.

you could call it a million things. At the beginning, it looks

:24:05.:24:15.

like being a really creepy ghost story, has her walking around

:24:16.:24:32.

the house, attempting Then, she starts getting text

:24:33.:24:34.

messages, and it's almost like her phone is working

:24:35.:24:39.

as a Ouija board. She doesn't know whether the text

:24:40.:24:42.

messages are coming from her brother, another spirit,

:24:43.:24:44.

a real-life stalker, or whether as the film suggests,

:24:45.:24:46.

they are coming from herself, The texts are asking,

:24:47.:24:49.

what are you afraid The phone almost

:24:50.:24:54.

becomes a confidante. As the film slips between the

:24:55.:24:58.

genres, as far as the supernatural stuff is concerned, it starts to be

:24:59.:25:02.

less sure-footed and drifts into territory that

:25:03.:25:05.

could be rather foolish. The reason that holds it together

:25:06.:25:10.

is because of her performance. She is in almost every shot,

:25:11.:25:13.

and it's a really sort She is brilliant, someone

:25:14.:25:16.

who is trying out different identities in the way she tries

:25:17.:25:21.

out different clothes. Somebody caught between this

:25:22.:25:24.

world and the next. For all the flaws of the film,

:25:25.:25:26.

and there are many, she is so good that she just carries it through,

:25:27.:25:32.

and I was mesmerised by her. As I said, I have been a huge fan

:25:33.:25:35.

of hers for a while. I loved the Twilight movies,

:25:36.:25:39.

but in this, she is really fine This is a properly

:25:40.:25:42.

brilliant performance. The film is fine, interesting

:25:43.:25:45.

and adventurous, but it is flawed, but I would rather something aimed

:25:46.:25:52.

high and fell slightly short of the mark than just

:25:53.:25:54.

settled for something. This isn't something that

:25:55.:26:02.

you've seen every day. We always like to talk

:26:03.:26:04.

about film of the week. You and I could still be

:26:05.:26:07.

talking about Moonlight, and it's still on, because it won

:26:08.:26:10.

the best picture Oscar. We should perhaps pick

:26:11.:26:14.

out something else. There is another choice,

:26:15.:26:19.

this anime called A Silent Voice released hot on the

:26:20.:26:22.

heels of Your Name. It is a schoolyard drama dealing

:26:23.:26:25.

with serious subjects, bullying, isolation,

:26:26.:26:28.

loneliness, self harm, suicidal thoughts, disability,

:26:29.:26:30.

in a way that is uplifting. A beautiful score, the animation

:26:31.:26:32.

is really well done, and it is one of those films

:26:33.:26:39.

that is all about learning to look the world in the eye,

:26:40.:26:43.

about learning to apologise It is a film with a lot

:26:44.:26:46.

of crying in it, and I don't I thought it was very

:26:47.:26:54.

touching, very impressive, DVD of the week is, and anyone

:26:55.:26:57.

who follows me on Twitter knows that Very stylish but hugely anti-women,

:26:58.:27:08.

and a difficult watch as a woman, I have to say, I don't think it is,

:27:09.:27:16.

but I understand that point of view. There is an LA art dealer

:27:17.:27:27.

who receives a manuscript from her ex-husband,

:27:28.:27:31.

which is a violent story which seems to have parallels with their life

:27:32.:27:33.

together, and the way in which one reads that story within a story,

:27:34.:27:37.

the fiction within a fiction, I know that a lot of people

:27:38.:27:40.

really don't like it, and I utterly respect

:27:41.:27:45.

that they don't. I have to say that I don't think

:27:46.:27:48.

that it is offensive in the way that some people do, but it is worth

:27:49.:27:52.

flagging up the fact that there are some people who have

:27:53.:27:55.

seen it and thought, this is just a film

:27:56.:27:58.

that is revelling in this violence. In its defence, on the violence

:27:59.:28:01.

issue, there is very little I mean, I think that one

:28:02.:28:04.

of the reasons it is powerful is because its ideas are powerful,

:28:05.:28:08.

and unpleasantly powerful. You're right, you don't

:28:09.:28:11.

actually see that much. But it's so powerfully conveyed that

:28:12.:28:13.

it's deeply unsettling. And that may account for the fact

:28:14.:28:15.

that it is only a 15 as well. It would be less unsettling

:28:16.:28:20.

if it was not as well made It is a 15 because there is very

:28:21.:28:23.

little actually displayed, but you think it is worse

:28:24.:28:29.

because it is tense. I absolutely understand your

:28:30.:28:32.

reservations, I just That's the DVD for this week -

:28:33.:28:35.

Nocturnal Animals made by Tom Ford. Before we go, you will find

:28:36.:28:47.

all our film news and reviews And all our previous

:28:48.:28:50.

programmes are there, Hello this is Breakfast,

:28:51.:28:55.

with Tina Daheley and Jon Kay. Coming up before 7am,

:28:56.:30:19.

Ben will have the weather for you. But first at 6:30, a summary of this

:30:20.:30:25.

morning's main news. And our top story is that tributes

:30:26.:30:31.

have been paid to the rock and roll Chuck Berry, who's

:30:32.:30:35.

died at the age of 90. Hello this is Breakfast,

:30:36.:30:40.

with Tina Daheley and Jon Kay. Coming up before 7am,

:30:41.:30:43.

Ben will have the weather for you. But first at 6:30, a summary of this

:30:44.:30:46.

morning's main news. And our top story is that tributes

:30:47.:30:49.

have been paid to the rock and roll Chuck Berry, who's

:30:50.:30:53.

died at the age of 90. The musician passed away yesterday

:30:54.:30:57.

at his home in Missouri. His hits include Roll Over

:30:58.:30:59.

Beethoven and Johnny B. Goode - and he's credited

:31:00.:31:02.

with influencing artists from the Beatles to

:31:03.:31:04.

the Rolling Stones. Bruce Springsteen has called him

:31:05.:31:06.

"a giant for the ages". Mick Jagger says he "blew

:31:07.:31:09.

life" into his dreams. Here, NHS services are facing

:31:10.:31:11.

a 'mission impossible' to meet required by the Government -

:31:12.:31:14.

that's according to the organisation NHS Providers says

:31:15.:31:17.

the funding allocated for the new financial year won't be

:31:18.:31:20.

enough to meet the growth in patient demand and hit targets such

:31:21.:31:24.

as A waiting times. The Department of Health say

:31:25.:31:26.

the NHS has as strong plan North Korea's state media

:31:27.:31:29.

says its military has tested a new high-performance

:31:30.:31:32.

rocket engine. The announcement came

:31:33.:31:34.

as the US Secretary of State, Rex Tillerson, was meeting

:31:35.:31:36.

with his Chinese counterpart, in the final leg

:31:37.:31:38.

of his East Asia tour. Mr Tillerson told China's president

:31:39.:31:41.

Xi Jinping that President Trump looks forward to 'enhancing

:31:42.:31:44.

understanding' between the US The Liberal Democrat leader

:31:45.:31:46.

Tim Farron will liken Theresa May's politics to those of Donald Trump

:31:47.:32:07.

and Vladamir Putin in He's expected to describe

:32:08.:32:10.

the Prime Minister as part of a new world order of 'aggressive,

:32:11.:32:14.

nationalistic' politics. And to say the Liberal Democrats

:32:15.:32:16.

are the 'real opposition' to the Government's

:32:17.:32:19.

hard Brexit plans. The rules on MPs taking other

:32:20.:32:20.

jobs are to be discussed by a parliamentary

:32:21.:32:23.

committee on Thursday. It's after the former

:32:24.:32:25.

Chancellor, George Osborne, was made the editor

:32:26.:32:27.

of the London Evening Standard. The MP for Tatton in Cheshire has

:32:28.:32:29.

already taken up business roles since leaving office -

:32:30.:32:32.

and has said he won't be standing Car buyers are being warned they'll

:32:33.:32:36.

be forced to pay much higher car tax The motoring organisation the RAC

:32:37.:32:40.

says the new rules will mean people buying new low emissions

:32:41.:32:44.

vehicles, which currently have no car tax, will pay at least

:32:45.:32:47.

?130 pounds a year. The Government says the changes

:32:48.:32:50.

to will be fair to motorists The time is 6:32am. Let's go to the

:32:51.:33:05.

sport. And not the day that Ingrid expected yesterday, in the rugby? I

:33:06.:33:11.

don't know about whether they expected it, but it was not what

:33:12.:33:15.

they hoped for. It was or is there to be difficult. They didn't win it

:33:16.:33:19.

and missed out on the Grand Slam, 19 wins in a row. That would have been

:33:20.:33:23.

great for them. That I think they were not too concerned, because

:33:24.:33:27.

lifting the trophy, that is what it was about. They still win the Six

:33:28.:33:32.

Nations title. Good morning. We went good enough, that is the simple

:33:33.:33:38.

assessment from England's head coach, Eddie Jones.

:33:39.:33:45.

England suffered 13-9 defeat to Ireland

:33:46.:33:46.

ended their unbeaten run and stopped them winning back to back Grand

:33:47.:33:50.

They did still pick up the overall title -

:33:51.:33:52.

They're right here as champions, but now England and to be record

:33:53.:33:58.

breakers. They were chasing history, rather than a trophy. Ireland,

:33:59.:34:03.

however, had other ideas. The mood in Dublin was one of the fires. At

:34:04.:34:07.

the end of a disappointing campaign, the hosts had a point to prove,

:34:08.:34:13.

especially here, and a city still celebrating St Patrick's Day. In a

:34:14.:34:17.

day of shattering intensity, the tone was set early on. The hopes for

:34:18.:34:22.

endless grand slams has been dashed before. England was three down at

:34:23.:34:29.

half-time, and lucky not to be behind. All of England's points came

:34:30.:34:36.

from Farrell. The deficit was cut to four soon after the restart. But the

:34:37.:34:39.

Irish continue to pose the greater that. Jarryd Hayne broke through,

:34:40.:34:46.

and then Johnny Sexton capped an amazing performance with his kick.

:34:47.:34:50.

England, as so often in this campaign, turned to their bench for

:34:51.:34:54.

inspiration. But this time, it was lacking. The visitors were never

:34:55.:34:57.

really threatening. Last year, Ireland and New Zealand's 18 match

:34:58.:35:03.

Queen St, now they denied another default greatness. England were

:35:04.:35:07.

champions, but they must now reflect on a first defeat in the Eddie Jones

:35:08.:35:12.

zero. This was like a World Cup final. We got beaten 13- nine. See

:35:13.:35:18.

come away with the silver. It does not taste good. It makes you want to

:35:19.:35:22.

get the goal. It was more about Currys and class. There wasn't too

:35:23.:35:26.

much that we can put together, but I thought in the first 20 minutes,

:35:27.:35:30.

that is where we confidence in the game. A note of mixed emotions,

:35:31.:35:34.

then, for England, and it will hurt, but could be the making of them.

:35:35.:35:36.

Wales head coach Rob Howley questioned the integrity of France's

:35:37.:35:39.

victory in an extraordinary encounter that saw an incredible 20

:35:40.:35:42.

over from close range and the subsequent conversion

:35:43.:35:47.

Howley insists the French were wrongly able to bring back

:35:48.:35:54.

on a 'specialist scrummager' by claiming he was earlier removed

:35:55.:36:01.

for a 'head injury assessment', as Wales finished fifth

:36:02.:36:03.

It is that the process and how they came back on. I think if you look at

:36:04.:36:14.

the footage and how that happened, I think there is good enough evidence

:36:15.:36:20.

that we have questioned that. And if he does have HIA, that is fine. But

:36:21.:36:27.

the processor how he gets back onto the field and how they make that

:36:28.:36:31.

change, I think we have two question the integrity of the sport at the

:36:32.:36:33.

moment. Scotland won a third Six Nations

:36:34.:36:33.

match in the same campaign, for the first time in over a decade

:36:34.:36:36.

to send departing coach Vern Cotter They beat Italy 29-0

:36:37.:36:40.

at Murrayfield. Arsene Wenger has made a decision

:36:41.:36:44.

regarding his future and says he will announce his

:36:45.:36:47.

plans "very soon". It points towards his 20-year tenure

:36:48.:36:49.

as Arsenal manager coming to an end. It's been prompted by a 3-1 defeat

:36:50.:36:52.

at West Bromwich Albion, a fourth loss in their last

:36:53.:36:55.

five league games. On paper, on Twitter, on the air, in

:36:56.:37:07.

the air. A debate which grows with every Arsenal defeat. Should Arsene

:37:08.:37:12.

Wenger stay or go? He has the answer, he just won't tell us, yet.

:37:13.:37:18.

You know what I will do my future, so you will soon know. We have had a

:37:19.:37:26.

unique patch that we have not had in 20 years. We are losing game after

:37:27.:37:30.

game will stop the meat, that is more important than our future. --

:37:31.:37:37.

we are losing game after game. And for me, that is. Craig Dawson scored

:37:38.:37:46.

West Brom's opening goal. There are questions about Alexis Sanchez, too.

:37:47.:37:51.

This is a deadly goal of the season. His immediate future might be in the

:37:52.:37:55.

physio room. This tackle ended his match. Arsenal were not the same

:37:56.:38:00.

without him. West Brom played on frailties others had found. Dawson

:38:01.:38:07.

got the third. Still, no Markham. And now we wait for Arsene Wenger's

:38:08.:38:11.

answer. In happier times for Arsenal this season, they beat Chelsea 3-0.

:38:12.:38:17.

This helps transform into a winning machine. They squeezed ahead against

:38:18.:38:26.

Stoke. There were snuffed out three minutes from time by the man who had

:38:27.:38:30.

conceded that spot kick, Gary Cahill, with the Golden Princess I13

:38:31.:38:35.

points clear. Catching Chelsea looks most improbable.

:38:36.:38:38.

Jamie Vardy scored only his second away goal this season as he helped

:38:39.:38:41.

Leicester claim their first win on the road in the league this

:38:42.:38:45.

They beat West Ham 3-2 at the London Stadium.

:38:46.:38:47.

It's now four wins out of four for Craig Shakespeare

:38:48.:38:50.

since he replaced manager Claudio Ranieri, easing

:38:51.:38:52.

We started off really well, but the goals got in front, but it was

:38:53.:39:05.

definitely back to us, second half. Really pleased to get the result, at

:39:06.:39:10.

the end of the day. You think your players felt it a little bit arty or

:39:11.:39:14.

explodes in Europe? Possibly. But West Ham also deserve credit. They

:39:15.:39:20.

threw everything at us. The balls were reining in our box, and of

:39:21.:39:24.

course there was an importance as it needed to be made again. -- there

:39:25.:39:32.

were important saves. -- that needed to be made.

:39:33.:39:34.

Romelu Lukaku ended a week in which he turned down a lucrative

:39:35.:39:37.

new contract offer with two injury time goals as Everton beat 10-man

:39:38.:39:41.

The win moves them level on points with fifth-placed Arsenal.

:39:42.:39:44.

Troy Deeney scored an own goal as Watford lost 1-0

:39:45.:39:49.

Bournemouth moved nine points clear of the bottom three and added

:39:50.:39:54.

to Swansea's relegation worries with a 2-0 victory

:39:55.:39:56.

Celtic will have to wait a little bit longer to be crowned

:39:57.:40:00.

as the Scottish Premiership Champions.

:40:01.:40:02.

That's because Aberdeen beat Hearts 2-0.

:40:03.:40:03.

Shay Logan opened the scoring after 20 minutes.

:40:04.:40:05.

They stay second, but just 22 points behind Celtic

:40:06.:40:08.

Inverness are off the bottom after 1-1 draw aginst

:40:09.:40:14.

St Johnstone won 2-1 at Motherwell and Hamilton are now bottom

:40:15.:40:24.

Team Sky have something to celebrate after all the recent negative

:40:25.:40:28.

publicity surrounding the British-based cycling team.

:40:29.:40:32.

Their rider Michal Kwiatkowski held off world road race champion

:40:33.:40:37.

Milan-San Remo one day race in Italy.

:40:38.:40:44.

And finally - Andy Murray has pulled out of the Miami Open

:40:45.:40:49.

The world number one has said sorry to his fans that he'll miss

:40:50.:40:54.

one of his favourite events on the American hard-court circuit.

:40:55.:40:57.

He says he is now going to focus on getting fit for the start

:40:58.:41:01.

The first big tournament is the Monte Carlo Masters

:41:02.:41:04.

Good luck to Andy Murray, getting fed. Wish him a speedy recovery. You

:41:05.:41:17.

know, the Wimbledon bandwagon is starting to begin as the weather

:41:18.:41:19.

improves. It is 6:41. That's how the Rolling Stones have

:41:20.:41:30.

described Chuck Berry - The man behind hit songs

:41:31.:41:34.

like Johnny B Goode and Roll Over Beethoven influenced a string

:41:35.:41:47.

of artists over the decades, with Bruce Springsteen,

:41:48.:41:50.

Ringo Starr and Rod Stewart amongst those paying tribute to Chuck Berry,

:41:51.:41:52.

after the news broke that he'd Joining us now from California

:41:53.:41:56.

is Eric Burdon, the lead singer of the 1960s group The Animals,

:41:57.:42:00.

who toured with Chuck Berry. Thank you for joining us. A very sad

:42:01.:42:08.

time to you. When you look back at a man you knew and worked with and

:42:09.:42:12.

performed with, what are the things you are thinking right now about

:42:13.:42:15.

Chuck Berry? What you remember most clearly? I was first exposed to

:42:16.:42:23.

Chuck Berry in a movie called Jazz on a Summer's Day. I was an art

:42:24.:42:27.

student at the time. When Chuck Berry came on screen, all of the

:42:28.:42:32.

jazz heads in the audience got up and left, leaving myself and another

:42:33.:42:39.

member of my band, and that was the beginning of an absolute love affair

:42:40.:42:50.

with this guy. It wasn't until 1964 that his first single was released

:42:51.:42:53.

in Britain, and from that point on, we lived from one release of his

:42:54.:43:00.

singles to the next, learning the lyrics, trying to learn the sound,

:43:01.:43:07.

the Americanisms in the language, and translate the music, and

:43:08.:43:13.

eventually play at ourselves, and become sort of interpreters of his

:43:14.:43:21.

music. We can hit from what you are saying of the influence he had a

:43:22.:43:28.

new. How influential was he in music in general? We have heard a long

:43:29.:43:32.

list of stars paying tribute today. But how important was the? Most

:43:33.:43:41.

important. -- was he. There were several lawsuits along the way with

:43:42.:43:46.

people mimicking his music without permission. And so he had to take

:43:47.:43:56.

action against them. In other words, everybody and anybody who was in the

:43:57.:44:03.

world of rock, rhythm and blues, had to interpret Chuck Berry's music.

:44:04.:44:11.

You mentioned lawsuits, they are. He, in his private life? He spent

:44:12.:44:17.

several stints in prison, as well. Quite a tumultuous life. It was a

:44:18.:44:25.

tumultuous and controversial life. I think you are talking more about his

:44:26.:44:30.

musical achievement? Yes, I am. But then again, one has to remember that

:44:31.:44:34.

it is not easy being black in America. So you can kind of forgive

:44:35.:44:44.

the stints in prison as just being part of the American experience.

:44:45.:44:51.

And... Sorry, there is a slight delay. I apologise. But what was he

:44:52.:44:56.

like to tour with? The time you spent with him on that into it to it

:44:57.:45:04.

-- intends to experience. He was very kind to me. A lot of people are

:45:05.:45:09.

different opinions on him, but he was kind to me. He took me to lunch

:45:10.:45:15.

if you times. He gave me fair warning about how tough it could be.

:45:16.:45:21.

-- to lunch at a futile. And to be careful with my money. But my

:45:22.:45:31.

fondest memory of Chuck was at the Hammersmith Odeon when the audience

:45:32.:45:34.

were going crazy for him to return to the stage. And he was locked in

:45:35.:45:40.

his dressing room and Peter Grant and Don Arden were on their knees

:45:41.:45:47.

passing money under the door to Chuck Berry, who was on the other

:45:48.:45:52.

side, counting it, saying no, it is still another $500 before I come

:45:53.:45:56.

out. Meanwhile, the audience were destroying the theatre. And that was

:45:57.:46:05.

just Chuck Berry in a nutshell. He was really a tough businessman. He

:46:06.:46:09.

really took care of business, and took care of himself. And I am glad

:46:10.:46:16.

that in a way, when his time came to pass on, he had done it with money

:46:17.:46:24.

in his bank and a lot of love all over the world from millions of

:46:25.:46:31.

people. Thank you for joining us from California to remember Chuck

:46:32.:46:32.

Berry. You're watching

:46:33.:46:37.

Breakfast from BBC News. Let's find out what's happening

:46:38.:46:45.

outside with Ben. Good morning. A mixed bag across the

:46:46.:46:53.

country. Cloudy and mild probably covers it for most of us and it will

:46:54.:46:58.

be quite windy for some as well, some will have rain and for some

:46:59.:47:02.

many will have lots of rain, courtesy of a weather front, here it

:47:03.:47:06.

is. Instead of moving through quickly, because of all the bends on

:47:07.:47:12.

the weather front, it will stay in the same place for a good part of

:47:13.:47:16.

the day, so the rain will keep coming for Northern Ireland,

:47:17.:47:18.

south-west Scotland and north-west England, expect puddles, surface

:47:19.:47:23.

water and spray. In northern and north-eastern Scotland, sunshine to

:47:24.:47:27.

start the day, a few showers and it will be to but further south into

:47:28.:47:31.

Wales and the south-west, a mild start, misty and murky and windy

:47:32.:47:35.

here. Come further east to the Midlands, East Anglia and the

:47:36.:47:39.

south-east, here largely dry and great to start, 12 in London.

:47:40.:47:43.

Through the day we continue to see our band of rain edging slowly

:47:44.:47:47.

south, fizzling away a bit as it goes. To the south of it, we keep

:47:48.:47:52.

the cloud and strong winds, still drizzly rain for western coasts and

:47:53.:47:56.

hills. To the north, especially Scotland, we see some sunshine and

:47:57.:48:00.

showers, particularly heavy showers later on in the Northern Isles. For

:48:01.:48:05.

Dundee against Celtic, it says dry and cloudy on the graphics but I

:48:06.:48:10.

suspect there could be a few showers but equally some brighter spells in

:48:11.:48:14.

between. Through the evening and overnight, our weather front

:48:15.:48:17.

continues to sink erratically south and gets stuck in southern England

:48:18.:48:21.

and south Wales. Meanwhile, strong winds into western Scotland and

:48:22.:48:25.

Northern Ireland, gales late into the night with a clutch of showers

:48:26.:48:30.

and cold air working in. Into tomorrow, our weather front again,

:48:31.:48:34.

the same weather front wriggling around but this time in southern

:48:35.:48:37.

England, south Wales and the Midlands, a soggy Monday morning.

:48:38.:48:41.

Heavy showers in Scotland, these will be wintry but not exclusively

:48:42.:48:46.

over high ground, some showers into Northern Ireland and northern

:48:47.:48:49.

England and here we will seek sunshine between the showers. Is

:48:50.:48:53.

still a blustery wind for many and pretty cool in the north-west and as

:48:54.:48:58.

we go through this week the cooler air will go south-eastwards across

:48:59.:49:02.

the whole of the country. -- still a blustery wind. Thanks very much,

:49:03.:49:04.

Ben. As the date for triggering Brexit

:49:05.:49:05.

approaches, people up and down the country are asking what it

:49:06.:49:08.

will mean for the economy, jobs and the communities

:49:09.:49:11.

in which they live. So what happened when 50 people,

:49:12.:49:13.

25 Leave voters and 25 Remainers, came face to face

:49:14.:49:16.

to talk about the issues? BBC Radio 5 Live's Tony Livesey

:49:17.:49:19.

hosted a special debate to find out. 50 people from all walks of life.

:49:20.:49:34.

We've brought them here together to discuss one thing. Whether you like

:49:35.:49:39.

it or not, the economy's doing great and you lot lost! We can cope

:49:40.:49:45.

without Europe! We're not frightened, I'm sorry. All the

:49:46.:49:51.

Brexiteers, you've won, fine, but I get to hear a constructive plan for

:49:52.:49:56.

Brexit, can you give us a constructive plan? We will ask

:49:57.:50:00.

questions about their families, their jobs and communities. I want

:50:01.:50:04.

you to step forward and talk to me if you think that Brexit will hurt

:50:05.:50:09.

or help my family. I have two sons and they're not able to get jobs

:50:10.:50:13.

while they're at university because we've been told that they have to

:50:14.:50:16.

employ people from other countries first before people from our

:50:17.:50:21.

country. So I feel that leaving will give us the opportunity to get back

:50:22.:50:25.

to being British, give the British people back their jobs. One of my

:50:26.:50:31.

husbands' grandchildren is a student. And I think it will limit

:50:32.:50:37.

this opportunities regarding going abroad, going on a placement abroad

:50:38.:50:42.

or having the opportunity to work abroad. Step forward if you think

:50:43.:50:45.

Brexit will make Britain a more tolerant country. I think we are a

:50:46.:50:53.

country that has been borne out of diversity.

:50:54.:50:55.

I don't think that will change, I don't think this was about racism,

:50:56.:51:00.

Brexit was about taking control of our borders. A few weeks ago with

:51:01.:51:04.

the whole Brexit thing there was a 10-year-old boy and another teenage

:51:05.:51:08.

boy, a Muslim woman walked past and they said, you dirty Muslim. What is

:51:09.:51:15.

your point about racism? It has nothing to do with racism, Brexit

:51:16.:51:21.

isn't to do with racism. Some people didn't feel they could speak up

:51:22.:51:25.

before but isn't it better we hear those people and people do something

:51:26.:51:29.

about it? Have you been racially abused since Brexit? I haven't. A

:51:30.:51:34.

lot of people who have come out of the woodwork and wouldn't have said

:51:35.:51:37.

anything before are now saying things and that is really bad.

:51:38.:51:42.

Step forward if you changed your mind since referendum.

:51:43.:51:47.

Out of 50 people we have one. I was a reluctant Remainer but I now fully

:51:48.:51:52.

support Brexit. The Leave group has to be held to account but not held

:51:53.:51:57.

to ransom and people need to get behind the country and the

:51:58.:52:00.

government to make sure we do make the best of it. Here we have someone

:52:01.:52:04.

who has changed their mind since we last asked people if people had

:52:05.:52:07.

changed their mind. We'd need to work together to get people... It's

:52:08.:52:16.

not what the majority wanted so I'm not going to stand here and try and

:52:17.:52:20.

stop people from what the majority voted. Guys, thank you very much for

:52:21.:52:25.

coming. Give yourself a round of applause. You've been brilliant.

:52:26.:52:26.

Thank you. You can hear that debate in full

:52:27.:52:27.

on BBC Radio 5 Live's Stephen Nolan I feel like we should be standing up

:52:28.:52:39.

after that, we should do the rest of the programme on our feet! Well, you

:52:40.:52:40.

can! When the night shelter for homeless

:52:41.:52:41.

people on the Isle of Wight closed last year, one man who had

:52:42.:52:44.

experience of living on the streets decided

:52:45.:52:47.

to do something about it. Charity worker Kevin Newton

:52:48.:52:49.

raised thousands of pounds to convert a double decker

:52:50.:52:51.

bus into a shelter and his idea has proved

:52:52.:52:55.

so successful, it's now being adopted in other

:52:56.:52:57.

parts of the UK. Jon Cuthill has been

:52:58.:53:00.

to find out more. Kevin Newton's a man with a plan.

:53:01.:53:14.

After raising ?15,000 he's converted a double-decker bus into a homeless

:53:15.:53:19.

shelter. As well as somewhere dry and save to sleep, it provides a

:53:20.:53:23.

permanent address, giving those on-board access to healthcare,

:53:24.:53:30.

benefits and other support. We've got 14 banks... We find when people

:53:31.:53:35.

come the first night, if they're not completely exhausted, they won't

:53:36.:53:38.

sleep very well anyhow, just for a couple of hours because that's what

:53:39.:53:42.

their body tells them to do. When you don't have a good night's sleep

:53:43.:53:46.

your mental health isn't good, you can't function and think properly so

:53:47.:53:50.

we see a massive difference. There wanting to do more productive

:53:51.:53:54.

things. Until three years ago Jonathan was a six test all

:53:55.:53:59.

agricultural scientist. Losing that job lead to depression, alcoholism

:54:00.:54:03.

and ultimately divorce and at Christmas he found himself homeless.

:54:04.:54:08.

You never know what's round the corner in life. I had a beautiful

:54:09.:54:14.

five bedroom home in Cowes overlooking the Solent, I had my own

:54:15.:54:20.

boat, beautiful wife, it's all gone. Depression turned into alcoholism

:54:21.:54:23.

and eventually the money and the health ran out, as it does with

:54:24.:54:27.

Apple. Had to find somewhere pretty quick to live. -- alcohol. The

:54:28.:54:34.

council suggested Kevin. The people here come from all different

:54:35.:54:39.

backgrounds. Until the bus came along Lisa had spent months sleeping

:54:40.:54:44.

in a field. I had a situation where a homeless guy who did literally

:54:45.:54:48.

pick on vulnerable women out there who he knew was homeless for his own

:54:49.:54:52.

game, he would know when they got paid, he would make himself

:54:53.:54:56.

indispensable to them by saying we need the company, because he was a

:54:57.:55:00.

big fella, quite intimidating. So it's those kind of threats and that

:55:01.:55:05.

worried. Being here is a safety net from all of that because you have

:55:06.:55:08.

the option of choosing this life or a better life for yourself. It's not

:55:09.:55:13.

easy but it is a step forward in the right direction definitely.

:55:14.:55:20.

Gary used to be on the bus, he's moved out, he now has this flat. You

:55:21.:55:26.

used to have nothing, just a tent? When they're ready Kevin gets those

:55:27.:55:31.

on-board into their own rented accommodation. He has now re- homed

:55:32.:55:35.

11 people in just four months and the idea is catching on. This bus

:55:36.:55:39.

should be ready in eight weeks and will be based in Dorset. I think

:55:40.:55:43.

everything Kevin has done has been inspiring and to see people's lives

:55:44.:55:48.

being changed and somebody doing something that was actually breaking

:55:49.:55:52.

the cycle of homelessness. We walked past people in the streets and we

:55:53.:55:56.

might give them a coffee or give them some change but we don't really

:55:57.:56:00.

know how we can make a difference to their lives. I don't think anybody

:56:01.:56:03.

without having their basic needs net of being warm, dry, sheltered and

:56:04.:56:07.

feeling safe and Fed can attempt to move with their life and those needs

:56:08.:56:13.

are met for them. For more buses are also being set up across England

:56:14.:56:17.

thanks to Kevin's success on the Isle of Wight. We have ended the

:56:18.:56:21.

need for anyone to sleep rough on the Isle of Wight and that would be

:56:22.:56:26.

my dream, to end the need for anyone to sleep rough in the UK. It

:56:27.:56:29.

certainly gets people off the streets, it makes them safe, it

:56:30.:56:33.

gives them a chance to get their life back together. Jon Cuthill, BBC

:56:34.:56:35.

News. Good morning to you. Good morning.

:56:36.:56:44.

You were saying the people we just saw using the service are watching,

:56:45.:56:47.

we should say good morning. What inspired you to come up with the

:56:48.:56:53.

idea of using a double-decker bus as a homeless shelter? My first thought

:56:54.:56:56.

was to get eight foot by 6-foot sheds. Put a 6-foot bunk across,

:56:57.:57:05.

storage underneath, insulate it, but the council said that would need

:57:06.:57:08.

planning permission unless it had wheels and then we got a bus. You

:57:09.:57:14.

found the loophole? Yes. With a double-decker bus, it is now a

:57:15.:57:19.

mobile home rather than a double-decker bus. That means we can

:57:20.:57:24.

park it anywhere for up to 28 days. We were very lucky that the council

:57:25.:57:29.

used us as the night shelter, so they gave us a bit of land to put it

:57:30.:57:34.

on. Really good. It is stationary but it can move if it needs to? It

:57:35.:57:41.

is. We the first mobile hostel in the world. Because its mobile it is

:57:42.:57:45.

stationary at the moment but it can be to anywhere. Have you had any

:57:46.:57:50.

feedback from people living nearby who think they don't want a mobile

:57:51.:57:55.

hostel outside their homes or on their street? There's always people

:57:56.:58:01.

like that. If we had built a hostel there we would have had the same.

:58:02.:58:07.

There's not that many. The majority of people are behind us. Interesting

:58:08.:58:11.

to hear from some of the people we were talking about who use the

:58:12.:58:16.

service and what has happened to them, the stories of how their lives

:58:17.:58:19.

have disintegrated and they've ended up sleeping rough. You've had

:58:20.:58:23.

experience of homelessness yourself, can you tell us what happened? I was

:58:24.:58:29.

homeless for about a year on and off due to relationship break-ups, that

:58:30.:58:32.

was the big cause. Eventually found a way out of it myself. I was

:58:33.:58:41.

attacked while I was homeless. Someone, I don't remember much of

:58:42.:58:45.

it, but someone kicked my head like a football apparently and then left

:58:46.:58:51.

me for dead. They had other things to do... And I had greater things to

:58:52.:58:57.

do, it wasn't my time. How much of a good motivation is that to help

:58:58.:59:01.

others and get this bus in other places? When I was constructing the

:59:02.:59:07.

bus there were times I was completely exhausted and the thought

:59:08.:59:12.

of when my feet were cold just spurred me on. I didn't want anybody

:59:13.:59:16.

else... There's no reason for anybody to be on the streets. Can

:59:17.:59:21.

you tell us more about the bus, what are the rules for people wanting to

:59:22.:59:26.

use it? Very simple rules, no smoking, no drinking and no drugs on

:59:27.:59:31.

board the bus and no drugs and drinking around the site. If anybody

:59:32.:59:36.

breaks those rules then they don't get banned, they get asked to stay

:59:37.:59:41.

in a tent at the side to sleep over overnight and then tomorrow they

:59:42.:59:48.

start again. Interesting. Kevin, thank you, we will be talking about

:59:49.:59:52.

this later. You have expanded the scheme, which is great.

:59:53.:59:53.

Viewers in the South of England can see more on Inside Out tomorrow

:59:54.:59:57.

on the BBC iPlayer shortly afterwards.

:59:58.:00:02.

Hello this is Breakfast, with Tina Daheley and Jon Kay.

:00:03.:00:46.

Tributes are being paid to the musician Chuck Berry,

:00:47.:00:48.

The 90-year-old American singer and guitarist

:00:49.:00:55.

was widely credited as the founder of rock and roll.

:00:56.:01:12.

Meeting health care standards in England will be "mission

:01:13.:01:21.

impossible" according to the organisation representing

:01:22.:01:22.

Changes to car tax could leave drivers paying more according

:01:23.:01:27.

We'll ask the Liberal Democrat leader Tim Farron why he thinks

:01:28.:01:35.

the Prime Minister is pursuing an "aggressive nationalistic"

:01:36.:01:37.

In sport, Ireland break English hearts in Dublin

:01:38.:01:43.

to deny Eddie Jones's side a Six Nations Grand Slam

:01:44.:01:46.

Good morning. A band of rain slices through the north. To the south, it

:01:47.:02:05.

tidy and windy. To the north, windy and showery. I will have all the

:02:06.:02:07.

details and about 15 minutes. Tributes are being paid

:02:08.:02:14.

to Chuck Berry - the singer and guitarist who's

:02:15.:02:19.

died at the age of 90. Police say emergency services

:02:20.:02:21.

were called to the musician's home in Missouri yesterday,

:02:22.:02:24.

but were unable to revive him. A rock and roll pioneer,

:02:25.:02:26.

his hits such as Roll Over Beethoven and Johnny B Goode helped define

:02:27.:02:29.

the genre, and influenced a raft of artists from The Rolling

:02:30.:02:33.

Stones to The Beatles. Our Arts Correspondent David Sillito

:02:34.:02:35.

looks back at his life. # Deep down Louisiana

:02:36.:02:41.

close to New Orleans # Way back up in the woods

:02:42.:02:43.

among the evergreens # There stood a log cabin

:02:44.:02:46.

made of earth and wood # where lived a country boy

:02:47.:02:49.

named Johnny B Goode...# If any one person could claim

:02:50.:02:51.

to have invented rock'n'roll, # Maybellene, why

:02:52.:03:06.

can't you be true...# His formula - take rhythm and blues,

:03:07.:03:12.

mix it with country and add electric guitar and sing about the stuff that

:03:13.:03:16.

teenagers care about. Half of the young

:03:17.:03:19.

people go to school. Half of the people have cars,

:03:20.:03:23.

I wrote about cars and mostly all the people, if they are not now,

:03:24.:03:27.

they'll soon be in love. Charles Berry was born

:03:28.:03:34.

in St Louis, Missouri. As a teenager he spent time

:03:35.:03:36.

in prison for armed robbery, trained as a hairdresser

:03:37.:03:39.

and his hobby was guitar. It was Muddy Waters who suggested

:03:40.:03:42.

he record a song at the legendary Of course he was only one of many

:03:43.:03:46.

rock'n'roll pioneers. And another spell in prison,

:03:47.:03:49.

a conviction for immorality with a 14-year-old girl,

:03:50.:03:52.

halted his career. that his sound was sweeping

:03:53.:03:54.

America. He'd often turn up and play

:03:55.:04:09.

with whoever was around. Sometimes he wouldn't even

:04:10.:04:13.

hand out a set list, he knew everyone

:04:14.:04:16.

would know the songs. And he wasn't always

:04:17.:04:17.

easy to get on with, I've been living

:04:18.:04:20.

for 60 years with it! But is it going to be

:04:21.:04:30.

here after we're But it ain't you and me...

:04:31.:04:34.

Oh, I ain't dying. But, as John Lennon said,

:04:35.:04:38.

if you wanted to give rock'n'roll another name, you might

:04:39.:04:41.

call it Chuck Berry. Just after half past seven we'll be

:04:42.:04:57.

speaking to the musician and author Sid Griffin - a huge

:04:58.:05:00.

fan of Chuck Berry's, who can tell us about the influence

:05:01.:05:03.

he had on his life and music. NHS services are facing a 'mission

:05:04.:05:07.

impossible' to meet the standards required by the Government -

:05:08.:05:10.

that's according to the organisation NHS Providers says the funding

:05:11.:05:12.

allocated for the next financial year is not enough to meet

:05:13.:05:16.

growing patient demand and will hit It says the warning

:05:17.:05:20.

is unprecedented. The budget, earlier this month,

:05:21.:05:23.

included new funding for social care and investment in A

:05:24.:05:43.

units in England. NHS Providers says that may ease

:05:44.:05:45.

of the pressure on hospitals, but there will still be a yawning

:05:46.:05:48.

gap in the resources needed just The organisation said

:05:49.:05:51.

it was unprecedented to warn, even before the financial year

:05:52.:05:55.

began, that he could not deliver NHS Providers says there will be big

:05:56.:05:58.

increases in the number of people in England falling outside

:05:59.:06:03.

key care benchmarks, with 1.8 million waiting more

:06:04.:06:05.

than four hours in A, and more than a 100,000 waiting more

:06:06.:06:08.

than 18 weeks for routine surgery. This is the first time in recent NHS

:06:09.:06:11.

history that trusts are saying that they cannot deliver the key

:06:12.:06:15.

accident and emergency and elective surgery targets and hit

:06:16.:06:18.

financial balance. And that has happened before

:06:19.:06:19.

the year has even started. That is the first time ever

:06:20.:06:22.

that's actually happened, The Department of Health said

:06:23.:06:24.

the comments failed to acknowledge that the NHS had a strong plan

:06:25.:06:35.

to improve performance, and that staff were working hard

:06:36.:06:38.

to treat thousands more people each Flights to and from Orly airport

:06:39.:06:41.

in Paris have resumed after a man was shot dead by security forces

:06:42.:06:52.

after trying to seize According to officials

:06:53.:06:55.

Ziyed Ben Belgacem had said he was 'ready to die for Allah'

:06:56.:06:58.

and had tried to take the soldier's French prosecutors say he had been

:06:59.:07:02.

radicalised while in prison We are hearing that a wonder boy has

:07:03.:07:23.

died, and a girl of the same age are in a critical condition after police

:07:24.:07:27.

were called to an incident in north London. We are hearing of Azaz went

:07:28.:07:31.

to the area last night car and found the two children with serious

:07:32.:07:34.

injuries. They were taken to hospital, where the boy died. No

:07:35.:07:37.

arrests have been made, but enquiries are under way. -- the

:07:38.:07:51.

Finsbury Park area, last night. -- hearing that police went to be.

:07:52.:07:54.

North Korea's state media says its military has tested

:07:55.:07:57.

a new high-performance rocket engine.

:07:58.:07:58.

The announcement came as the US Secretary of State,

:07:59.:08:01.

Rex Tillerson, was meeting with his Chinese counterpart.

:08:02.:08:03.

Mr Tillerson told China's president Xi Jinping

:08:04.:08:05.

that President Trump looks forward

:08:06.:08:06.

between China and the US, as Our China Editor Carrie Gracie

:08:07.:08:10.

An upbeat meeting between the Chinese President and America's

:08:11.:08:13.

anxieties about where US-China relations ahead.

:08:14.:08:15.

But even as these actors smile for the cameras,

:08:16.:08:18.

North Korea announced the successful test of a high-thrust engine

:08:19.:08:22.

It's already warned that its nuclear missiles will soon be able

:08:23.:08:26.

Mr Tillerson asked China to do more to persuade its ally to give

:08:27.:08:30.

Only hours before he arrived, his boss had tweeted a complaint

:08:31.:08:34.

that North Korea behaved "badly", "playing" the US for years,

:08:35.:08:37.

But in Beijing, Mr Tillerson was diplomatic.

:08:38.:08:40.

We share a common view and a sense that tensions on the Peninsula

:08:41.:08:52.

-- We share a common view and a sense that tensions

:08:53.:08:55.

And that things have reached a rather dangerous level.

:08:56.:09:11.

We have committed ourselves to prevent any type of conflict

:09:12.:09:14.

But the US Secretary of State is not the only one sending a message

:09:15.:09:20.

With today's rocket news, Kim Jong-un is sending his own

:09:21.:09:23.

message, one of defiance, not just to the the United States,

:09:24.:09:26.

but also to North Korea's frustrated ally, China.

:09:27.:09:28.

Here, the Liberal Democrat leader Tim Farron is expected to accuse

:09:29.:09:40.

the Prime Minister of following what he describes as aggressive,

:09:41.:09:43.

nationalistic politics like those of Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin.

:09:44.:09:45.

He's due to tell his party's conference later

:09:46.:09:47.

that they are the 'real opposition' to Theresa May's hard Brexit plan.

:09:48.:09:51.

Our Political Correspondent Mark Lobel can tell us more.

:09:52.:09:53.

Mark we're expecting strong language from Tim Farron?

:09:54.:10:03.

Strong words, but also colourful language. His go to paint his party

:10:04.:10:09.

as the party of patriotism. And he's going to define them as much by what

:10:10.:10:13.

they are against, this authoritarian, Protectionist world

:10:14.:10:17.

of Vladimir Putin and Donald Trump, and Theresa May, as he will put it.

:10:18.:10:21.

As much as what the party is for, and that is giving British people,

:10:22.:10:28.

he would like, the final say over a Brexit deal, trying to avoid what he

:10:29.:10:31.

calls a hard Brexit, and trying to sure that the UK stays in the EU

:10:32.:10:37.

single market. Two big challenges, though, for Tim Farron and his

:10:38.:10:40.

Liberal Democrats. The first is how he will do that. The judges give

:10:41.:10:44.

Parliament the chance to do that, but there was not a scratch on the

:10:45.:10:48.

government's Brexit bill, and we are expecting Article 50 to be triggered

:10:49.:11:01.

within days without any amendments through for the things that he is

:11:02.:11:05.

looking for. And the second thing is his power base. Yes, he has won some

:11:06.:11:08.

local elections, recently, and they now have nine MPs, but that is not

:11:09.:11:12.

enough. So the Lib Dems' Bach remains quite different from their

:11:13.:11:13.

bite. Thank you Mark. And we'll be talking to Tim Farron

:11:14.:11:14.

in just a few minutes time. The rules on MPs taking other

:11:15.:11:18.

jobs are to be discussed by a parliamentary

:11:19.:11:22.

committee on Thursday. It's after the former

:11:23.:11:24.

Chancellor, George Osborne, was made the editor

:11:25.:11:26.

of the London Evening Standard. The MP for Tatton in Cheshire has

:11:27.:11:28.

already taken up business roles since leaving office -

:11:29.:11:31.

and has said he won't be standing Car buyers are being warned they'll

:11:32.:11:34.

be forced to pay much higher car tax The motoring organisation the RAC

:11:35.:11:39.

says the new rules will mean people buying new low emissions

:11:40.:11:43.

vehicles, which currently have no car tax, will pay

:11:44.:11:50.

at least ?130 a year. The Government says

:11:51.:11:53.

the changes to will be fair to motorists and good

:11:54.:11:55.

for the environment. Our Business Correspondent

:11:56.:11:57.

Joe Lynam reports. Looking for a new car,

:11:58.:11:59.

and thinking about doing your bit Well, that might become a bit more

:12:00.:12:02.

expensive from April. That's because the new vehicle

:12:03.:12:06.

excise duty rates come into force, and low-emission cars will be paying

:12:07.:12:09.

more than they do now. Most cars bought from April 1

:12:10.:12:11.

will pay a initial charge, depending on their emmissions,

:12:12.:12:15.

and then ?140 after that every year. It means hybrid cars,

:12:16.:12:17.

which pay no tax up to now, And cars costing ?40,000 or more

:12:18.:12:20.

will face an additional premium. But luckily, new duties will have no

:12:21.:12:26.

effect on cars already on UK roads. It is confusing for customers,

:12:27.:12:35.

because there are so many different It's a little bit of

:12:36.:12:40.

the old system where the CO2 But now we have brought

:12:41.:12:44.

in a cap at ?40,000, where above that, there

:12:45.:12:52.

is an extra ?310 added, Hybrids get a concession of ?10,

:12:53.:12:55.

which is ridiculous, particularly when we are in a time

:12:56.:12:59.

we want to push clean vehicles. The new rules for vehicle excise

:13:00.:13:03.

duties were designed to prevent tax revenues falling as more and more

:13:04.:13:07.

cars emit less and less CO2. The unintended consequence could be

:13:08.:13:11.

that motorists buy cars It's 7:13, and those are the main

:13:12.:13:13.

stories this morning. The leader of the Liberal Democrats

:13:14.:13:31.

says his party's the only real opposition to Theresa May -

:13:32.:13:34.

despite only having nine MPs. In a speech at his party's

:13:35.:13:37.

conference today, Tim Farron's also expected to accuse the Prime

:13:38.:13:40.

Minister of the same "aggressive nationalistic" agenda

:13:41.:13:42.

as Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin. Good morning to you. Thank you for

:13:43.:13:50.

joining us. Strong language, going a bit far? No, I take the view, it

:13:51.:13:59.

seems to me that in world politics, now, you have an increasing divide

:14:00.:14:03.

between those who are open, tolerant, it united in their

:14:04.:14:07.

political approach, and those who are closed, nationalistic, and

:14:08.:14:12.

insular. In my speech, I will set out in the United Kingdom, the

:14:13.:14:16.

British conservative government, since the referendum, as lept into

:14:17.:14:22.

the other category. That is troubling. I will also point out

:14:23.:14:26.

that the Labour Party and have chosen and are frozen into being

:14:27.:14:30.

neither fish nor fowl on the most important issue to face this country

:14:31.:14:35.

in generations. What is our relationship with the rest of the

:14:36.:14:39.

confident that we are a part of? -- continent. If we find ourselves

:14:40.:14:51.

alone in that cover and you talk about the MPs that we have got and

:14:52.:14:54.

the ambition, I cannot affect, and other can you, the results of the

:14:55.:14:58.

last election. But I can affect the next one. I cannot give up and

:14:59.:15:05.

accept that there is to be a hard line, conservative government for

:15:06.:15:09.

the next 20 or 25 years. I had to roll my sleeves up and be the

:15:10.:15:12.

alternative to it. Because it is increasingly clear it will not be

:15:13.:15:17.

the Labour Party. The last latest poll was the referendum. When you go

:15:18.:15:21.

to roll your sleeves up and accept that that is a done deal and that is

:15:22.:15:25.

could it happen, and to stop calling free second one? Well, first of all,

:15:26.:15:31.

when you lose an election, and I have lost the odd one, you do two

:15:32.:15:35.

things: You accept the result, and you don't give up. That is the

:15:36.:15:39.

fundamentally producing. We don't give up. They also take the view

:15:40.:15:42.

that what the British people voted for in June was to depart from the

:15:43.:15:46.

European Union, and therefore the government has got a mandate to

:15:47.:15:50.

negotiate Brexit. But they do not have a mandate to deliver exit from

:15:51.:15:54.

this in the market. That was not at the ballot paper, nor were the other

:15:55.:15:59.

things that add up to a hard and extreme Brexit. This is what John

:16:00.:16:04.

Major accuses the government tried to deliver. Given that we will get

:16:05.:16:08.

to the end of this in two years time, say, this is uneven and he has

:16:09.:16:13.

voted for. It will be signed off by politicians or the people. The

:16:14.:16:16.

Liberal Democrats are the early people saying that it should be the

:16:17.:16:20.

people. It is ultimately democratic. You cannot start this process with

:16:21.:16:25.

democracy and end it with a stitch up in 2019. That would be

:16:26.:16:29.

outrageous. If there were be a rerun of the referendum, duty there should

:16:30.:16:33.

be another referendum for Scottish independence? I don't think we need

:16:34.:16:38.

another rerun of the EU referendum. The question that was asked last

:16:39.:16:42.

June should not be presented again. The question that neatly put to the

:16:43.:16:46.

British people is here is the deal, dear accepted, or do you want to

:16:47.:16:50.

stay? And that is the first referendum on the deal. So you asked

:16:51.:16:54.

me about Scotland. Here is the difference: Let's say something

:16:55.:16:58.

pleasant and supportive of Alex Attwood for the moment. Alexandre

:16:59.:17:03.

presented in the people a six 100 Place page document it in 2014

:17:04.:17:10.

setting out what leaving the UK would look like. This can people

:17:11.:17:15.

looked at it and that article of destination, and has rejected. Last

:17:16.:17:19.

June, there was no 600 page document telling the British people what

:17:20.:17:22.

leaving the European Union would look like. All we had was a lie on

:17:23.:17:27.

the side of a bus. That is hardly comparable. The Scottish people

:17:28.:17:30.

voted against departure and destination. But last June, or the

:17:31.:17:36.

British people devoted for was departure, not destination. I think

:17:37.:17:40.

they should be to vote on destination. With nine MPs some

:17:41.:17:47.

might say you have delusions of grandeur by calling yourself a real

:17:48.:17:54.

opposition to the government? There are few more self-aware politicians

:17:55.:17:57.

than me. I am fully aware of the result we got last time and what it

:17:58.:18:01.

meant from our party and our country the two years since, with a

:18:02.:18:05.

Conservative government getting away with all the stuff they have now on

:18:06.:18:11.

their own. But as I said earlier I can't help the result that has just

:18:12.:18:16.

gone. Sometimes you have to do what is necessary. The British people

:18:17.:18:21.

will labour over the next couple of decades at least at this rate with a

:18:22.:18:25.

Conservative government that will be increasingly hard line and

:18:26.:18:28.

nationalistic and populist and increasingly divisive. Increasingly

:18:29.:18:38.

concerned with the average lives of people. Now the Labour Party have

:18:39.:18:46.

shrivelled -- shuffled off, never mind the alternative government.

:18:47.:18:51.

Somebody else has to step in that space and the only party in that

:18:52.:18:55.

space are the Liberal Democrats so it is perhaps not surprising that

:18:56.:19:04.

our leadership has ruled that we had 32 gains in by-elections and it is

:19:05.:19:08.

no surprise that our poll rating has doubled. It is no surprise that in

:19:09.:19:11.

the last quarter for the first time in history we overtook the Labour

:19:12.:19:15.

Party in terms of donations. I look across the Atlantic and I am

:19:16.:19:21.

terrified by Trump but inspired by Justin Trudeau. I saw a labour

:19:22.:19:30.

opposition overtaken. Sometimes you look beyond what is possible and you

:19:31.:19:34.

do what is necessary. Tim Farron from the Lib Dems spring conference

:19:35.:19:36.

in York, thank you. Let's find out what's happening with

:19:37.:19:44.

the weather forecast. It is looking mixed this morning. A

:19:45.:19:51.

range of views we are waking up to. For many it looks like this. This is

:19:52.:19:55.

from north-east Wales. A very cloudy scene. This is the Scottish

:19:56.:20:00.

Highlands. Some blue skies to be had. Still some snow over the

:20:01.:20:05.

mountains. Cold air in place in the north. Mild to the south. Splitting

:20:06.:20:10.

the two in half is this wiggling weather front, which will continue

:20:11.:20:14.

to provide outbreaks of rain. Because of the wiggle along the

:20:15.:20:17.

front it won't move through quickly and will hang around for a good part

:20:18.:20:21.

of the day. Certainly in the morning in northern areas and that rain will

:20:22.:20:26.

really pile up and could give surface water and spray on the

:20:27.:20:29.

roads, even a little bit of localised flooding. Wales and the

:20:30.:20:35.

south-west, a little bit murky. Towards the south-east a lot of

:20:36.:20:40.

cloud, but largely dry. 12 degrees in London. A windy start. Through

:20:41.:20:45.

the day, the weather front isn't moving quickly, so the rain

:20:46.:20:48.

continues for Northern Ireland, north-west England this week away.

:20:49.:20:52.

To the north we already have bright skies in the northern half of

:20:53.:20:56.

Scotland. Also showers. These turning heavy in the Northern Isles.

:20:57.:21:00.

Mild to the south. Staying cloudy for most, but for the match in the

:21:01.:21:05.

Premier League this afternoon, we could see brighter spells. Generally

:21:06.:21:10.

in the south-east of England there the chance of some lifting

:21:11.:21:14.

temperatures to 15- 16 degrees. Tonight the band of rain sinks

:21:15.:21:19.

southwards and get stuck in southern England and south Wales. Strong

:21:20.:21:24.

winds later in western Scotland. Gales here and a fresh clutch of

:21:25.:21:29.

showers. Starting to turn quite chilly in the north-west at this

:21:30.:21:33.

stage. Tomorrow the weather front is still with us, making for a soggy

:21:34.:21:37.

Monday morning in southern England, south Wales, up into the Midlands as

:21:38.:21:41.

well. Heavy showers blowing in across Scotland, Northern Ireland

:21:42.:21:45.

and perhaps north-west England. Wintry showers are the high ground

:21:46.:21:48.

and perhaps even the lower levels. There will be some spells of

:21:49.:21:53.

sunshine. While it remains mild to the south-east, it will start to

:21:54.:21:57.

turn colder towards the north-west. Back to you. Thanks very much.

:21:58.:22:05.

Time for a look at this morning's newspapers.

:22:06.:22:11.

Professor of entrepreneurship, Vikas Shah, is here to tell us

:22:12.:22:14.

First, let's look at the front pages.

:22:15.:22:24.

The Sunday Times has a story from the Justice Department.

:22:25.:22:32.

It says in future victims of rain will not have to be digging evidence

:22:33.:22:40.

in court. The Sunday Telegraph has a headline, pregnancy drug linked to

:22:41.:22:46.

birth defects. They also have a picture of the Duchess on the second

:22:47.:22:52.

day of their visit to Paris yesterday, where she met survivors

:22:53.:22:56.

of the Bataclan theatre attack and in the afternoon they both attended

:22:57.:22:58.

the rugby. The Sunday express leads with the

:22:59.:23:02.

Royal visit to Paris, saying the couple remained defiant during that

:23:03.:23:08.

trip amid what it called the gun terror that was going on at the

:23:09.:23:12.

airport in Paris. On the Mail on Sunday they lead with

:23:13.:23:18.

this headline. They have an interview which you can read more

:23:19.:23:22.

about inside the paper. The Mirror have an exclusive, they

:23:23.:23:27.

say, on George Michael. They say they have an interview with the

:23:28.:23:30.

doctor who spoke to the pop star a few weeks before he died, in which

:23:31.:23:37.

this man says he -- George Michael new his death was imminent and he

:23:38.:23:39.

was deeply unwell. First of all, this is a story about

:23:40.:23:48.

international aid. The writer has been a critic of international aid

:23:49.:23:53.

and he is due to reaffirm the UK's commitment to spend about .7% of our

:23:54.:23:57.

national income on supporting international aid, some of it will

:23:58.:24:03.

now go to UK charities as well, which is good news. She is

:24:04.:24:07.

highlighting the fact that in a world with such poverty and misery

:24:08.:24:10.

and such grinding challenges for so many people, this is a really

:24:11.:24:16.

important thing for us to do. And it is great to see the confirmation of

:24:17.:24:20.

our support for those people in desperate need all over the world.

:24:21.:24:24.

It is interesting because she has been so critical of aid spending in

:24:25.:24:29.

the past. It seems like a bit of a U-turn, nine months into the job?

:24:30.:24:33.

Deciding aid is difficult because every country has commitments to

:24:34.:24:37.

help people in distress. And I think a lot of this has just been as a

:24:38.:24:42.

result of the fact that we have got many humanitarian disasters at the

:24:43.:24:45.

moment, including one of the worst famines in history. In east Africa.

:24:46.:24:51.

Yes. So these eight commitments are really important. -- aid. Not just

:24:52.:24:57.

because it is the right thing to do, but it has been proven to improve

:24:58.:25:01.

security for everyone, not just for the countries where it is given.

:25:02.:25:07.

Many out there think at a time when we are talking again about problems

:25:08.:25:10.

in NHS funding that we should be spending money on improving things

:25:11.:25:14.

here. One of the challenges of calls is that you can't ever look at these

:25:15.:25:19.

things in isolation. You can't say aid spending is at the cost of NHS

:25:20.:25:24.

spending, or NHS spending is at the cost of something else. These are

:25:25.:25:28.

complex systems and all of these issues are somewhat interrelated,

:25:29.:25:32.

which is sometimes difficult to grasp. It is really important we

:25:33.:25:36.

continue these commitments. There is a piece in the Sunday Telegraph. You

:25:37.:25:41.

are a professor of entrepreneurship, a great title! This is about

:25:42.:25:46.

takeovers in business. It is one of those articles that is really easy

:25:47.:25:51.

to skip past. Had it not been for one of my least favourite substances

:25:52.:25:57.

on the front. Other spreads are available! This is really important

:25:58.:26:04.

for UK businesses. The UK is one of the easiest places in the world to

:26:05.:26:07.

do company acquisitions. So theoretically under our law is a

:26:08.:26:12.

large company wants to buy another large company they can do it in 60

:26:13.:26:17.

days. Think about that. 60 days to do a multibillion pound deal. The

:26:18.:26:23.

problem is, because our rules are so easy, shareholders and stakeholders

:26:24.:26:26.

do not get a chance to really think about what is happening. People

:26:27.:26:33.

buying big businesses or hedge fund is all investors who are highly

:26:34.:26:40.

motivated by short-term profit... That's a big challenge for

:26:41.:26:43.

stakeholders to guarantee employment and all other aspects of security.

:26:44.:26:54.

How people use their mobile phones. Apparently calls are not in the top

:26:55.:27:00.

ten. Text in is the one, followed by e-mail, Facebook on camera,

:27:01.:27:04.

WhatsApp, banking and watching YouTube videos. Interesting that one

:27:05.:27:09.

of the other aspects they found was people using their mobile phones to

:27:10.:27:14.

keep warm! As a hand warmer or bed warmer. Not entirely sure, but there

:27:15.:27:21.

was that exploding battery problem for recent history which could

:27:22.:27:25.

explain that. We can't live without these devices now and most people I

:27:26.:27:28.

know would feel more lost without their phone than their wallet, which

:27:29.:27:33.

says a lot about how our society is going. Smartphones are getting

:27:34.:27:37.

lighter and smaller, more capable every year. Interesting that text is

:27:38.:27:43.

number one, whereas in the past if you wanted to speak to somebody you

:27:44.:27:47.

would pick up the phone. Now you send a text instead. I see that all

:27:48.:27:51.

the time. Even with my students, they are less likely to pick up the

:27:52.:27:57.

phone. They will always revert to text or e-mail. Lots of people don't

:27:58.:28:03.

even have their mobile phone on them, but they have it on silent

:28:04.:28:06.

because the ringing doesn't matter any more. This piece in the Mirror,

:28:07.:28:16.

about disabled parking spaces in hospitals of all places...

:28:17.:28:26.

Interesting challenge. The hospital and other healthcare providers,

:28:27.:28:28.

provision for disabilities is absolutely essential. Parking spot

:28:29.:28:36.

is one of those bargains that these trusts have to make. It also opens

:28:37.:28:42.

the debate around mental health because hospitals and other public

:28:43.:28:45.

spaces, how are they making provision for people with mental

:28:46.:28:49.

health? How can we really have a good debate about that? It is

:28:50.:28:53.

important these things are highlighted, at Winnie to have

:28:54.:28:56.

sensible debates over the fact that trust me to make money to do what

:28:57.:29:01.

they do. -- but we have to have. Thanks very much.

:29:02.:29:07.

The Andrew Marr Programme is on BBC One this morning

:29:08.:29:09.

Andrew, what have you got coming up?

:29:10.:29:12.

George Osborne and David Cameron, John Major, they are all weighing in

:29:13.:29:19.

one by one and I will be joined by Tony Blair, talking about the

:29:20.:29:23.

collapse of the centre ground and his ideas to revive the centre at

:29:24.:29:27.

this be a time in our politics. I've also got Ruth Davidson, talking

:29:28.:29:36.

about it new referendum. I've also got a little touch of Surrealism for

:29:37.:29:41.

which my show is well known. That will be played out at the end by no

:29:42.:29:44.

less than madness! Surreal indeed! Thanks very much.

:29:45.:29:45.

We're here on the BBC News Channel until 9am this morning.

:29:46.:29:48.

Still to come: It's a bus that's been converted into a homeless

:29:49.:29:52.

shelter, but it's providing much more than a bed for the night.

:29:53.:29:56.

But this is where we say goodbye to viewers on BBC One.

:29:57.:29:58.

MasterChef is back, to find the country's best home chef.

:29:59.:30:07.

The MasterChef kitchen is alive once more. Come on, let's go!

:30:08.:30:12.