Primal Scream: Screamadelica Classic Albums


Primal Scream: Screamadelica

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This programme contains some strong language.

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MUSIC: "Movin' On Up" by Primal Scream

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We wanted to make a classic, a great hit record, you know.

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Something that was, like, ecstatic.

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We created something which was conceived as completely new.

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A song could be, suddenly be anything,

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it didn't necessarily have to be verse, chorus, verse, chorus.

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MUSIC: "Loaded" by Primal Scream

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It was very optimistic, the times, I suppose. Anything was possible, really.

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Being a rock band that makes people dance is actually quite rare.

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I can't put my finger on why it works.

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I don't know why it's a great record and that's why it's a great record.

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I think it's a brave, exploratory record which, for all of that, sums up its time.

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The Stone Roses had peaked, the Happy Mondays had peaked, and these bands were imploding,

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so, Primal Scream kind of waded into this huge wave of expectation.

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It brought so many people together.

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I mean, it's a cliche, but it's true.

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MUSIC: "Come Together" by Primal Scream

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I always just totally believed in Bobby, ultimately.

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"You're going to be a pop star." And, you know, 1990, he was.

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# I was blind

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# Now I can see

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# You made a believer... #

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We wrote it as a ballad, it was a really slow ballad.

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And it was... It sounded absolute crap.

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It was piano and a vocal song, like a kinda...

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a gospel song. Um...

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And we were... We weren't really getting anywhere with it

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and Andrew came up with the...

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the Bo Diddley, Magic Bus guitar riff at the start.

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And that was the glue that held everything together.

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Picked up the guitar and went, "This is it, this is the intro,"

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and that then defined the groove of the record.

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It went from a crappy old ballad,

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that we couldn't work out to...

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probably our most successful song.

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Some claps.

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Some shaker.

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Then...listening? Then the congas.

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And we're motoring along now.

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I'm not the loudest singer in the world, you know,

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I have quite a soft voice,

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but we thought if we brought in a gospel choir,

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then it would enhance the choruses and make them sound even bigger, you know.

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It was just record production, really. And also we loved Phil Spector's productions.

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# My love shines on

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# My love shines on

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# My love shines on

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# My love shines on... #

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Jimmy Miller mixed it.

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Obviously he'd worked with the Stones and, you know, the Spencer Davis Group and all that,

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the records we really like and we just thought, "This is perfect for him."

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He was fast and he knew what...

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He knew what to do and he taught us a guitar should answer...

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singing, you shouldn't solo all the way down something,

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you should answer the vocal at all times.

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And it should be a, you know, call-and-response thing.

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You know, the voice goes you know,

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"My light shines on," and Throb goes, "Da, da, da da, da, da,"

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"My light shines on," "Da, da, da da, da, da."

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# My light shines on

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# My light shines on

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# My light shines on

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# My light shines on

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# Everybody sing it

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# Gettin' outta darkness My light shines on

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# Shines on

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# Gettin' outta darkness My light shines on

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# Light shines on

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# Gettin' outta darkness My light shines on

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# Light shines on

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# Gettin' outta darkness My light shines on

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# Light shines on. #

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CHEERING

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I knew this much, that we had the track to start the album with.

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When we, you know, when this was finished, when Jimmy mixed it,

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we knew we had a great start to the album, you know.

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My first memory of Robert Young is a little kid and he could,

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you know, he could play the start to this Clash song.

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I was really impressed.

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He was about 15 or something, and he lived right across the road from me.

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And he'd stick speakers out the window, and he'd,

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you know, like, let our street know

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that he's got the new Ramones single,

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or he's got the new Pistols single.

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Cos the other guy that could do the same thing,

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when I first met him, was Andrew Innes when he was 15.

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And he could play Never Mind The Bollocks,

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the first Clash album, the first three Jam albums, you know?

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Um, the Rich Kids, Generation X, you know?

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He could play all the punk stuff, plus The Beatles!

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And McGee lived, um, just down the road.

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I got into punk maybe about...

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maybe a month before Bobby. Whatever, I mean, who cares?

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It's not like... You don't get a badge for it.

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And, um... And he was the only other person in our area

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that got it as well, so we kind of were thrown together.

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I met him through Alan McGee,

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we'd sort of, you know, met through trying to form a band

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on the south side of Glasgow and he was one of Alan's friends

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so we just ended up sitting up, trying to play punk songs together,

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he was singing I was playing guitar. And Alan played bass as well.

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I think we were called Captain Scarlet and the Mysterons.

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I don't think we intended to be a band, it was a bit of fun.

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We never played a show, except in Andrew Innes's bedroom

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and me and Innes were drinking so...

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God, drinking at 16 what a great advert for the kids, that one(!)

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But, anyway, Andrew would be a bit...

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Andrew's younger than me by quite a long way. Andrew would be about 14,

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so Andrew and me used to drink four cans of Tennent's, each,

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and be smashed!

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But the one that was even more mental - and he was sober - was Gillespie, who was rolling around.

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Me, just rolling around the floor, screaming, pretending I had a mic.

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Me and Alan sort of went to London when we were 18, 19.

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I just didn't want a real job, so when I started running a club,

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I chucked in my British Rail job and I'd formed Creation in '83.

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This was the '80s, so, you know,

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there was things like Frankie Goes To Hollywood going on

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and, you know, a lot of kinda Howard Jones and kinda big, shiny, plastic, chart pop.

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So to be influenced by punk, you know, in the mid-'80s

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was kinda like a weird thing, really, you know, because it wasn't really

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a guaranteed way of having any kind of success, you know.

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I'd just finished touring with Nico,

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I was with Nico for about six or seven years before she died

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and, um there was an advertisement in the NME.

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I was looking for a drummer who was into, like,

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Johnny Thunders, The Heartbreakers, the MC5, you know, Stooges.

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"Beach Boys, New York Dolls," and I thought, "Oh, that's interesting,"

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applied for it and it was Primal Scream.

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I went down to audition and that's it. That's it, really.

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Well, I played in a band called Felt from Birmingham

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and we were on Creation Records, so that's when we first met.

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I remember thinking, "I wish he was in our band."

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And when I heard Felt were splitting up, I just rang him up,

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said, "Do you you want to come play with us?"

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I got involved with Primal Scream

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because I lived downstairs from Toby, the drummer, and they wanted

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some string arrangements doing for...Dead Skin, which is on the Primal Scream album,

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and he shouted down and said, "I've got you some work".

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We were still trying to find a voice and trying to find a way

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and find a language, you know, we were still kind of finding ourselves.

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We went into Bark Studios in Walthamstow

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and we just recorded an album we wanted to do which is, you know,

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a straightforward rock 'n' roll, New York Dolls-y, punky album

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that's what we were listening to, that's where we all come from.

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# Ivy, Ivy, you destroy me Ivy, Ivy, you destroy me

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# Ivy, Ivy, you destroy me Ivy, Ivy, you destroy me

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# Ivy, Ivy, you destroy me Ivy, Ivy, you destroy me

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# Ivy, Ivy, you destroy me. Ivy, Ivy, you destroy me, you do. #

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By the second album, they were in danger

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of being a bit of a joke, actually, Primal Scream.

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With the leathers and the long hair and the speedy attitude,

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they were completely out of step with the times.

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I was doing the press for the group at the time and it was hard, man.

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It was really difficult. In fact, I'll never forget, actually,

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Andrew Innes, things were so bad, he said to me,

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"Can you not even get us in, like, the guitar magazines?" You know?

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And I couldn't!

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And they just toured and toured and toured and toured

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and it was called the Throw Away the Atlas Tour.

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They were playing Aberystwyth one night, Norwich the next,

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anywhere they good secure a booking.

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It was only McGee who obviously knew something,

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or hoped something good would come of it.

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I wouldn't give in. I mean, even though all the media hated Primal Scream,

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I didn't give a shit. I was just going to win with Primal Scream.

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# I don't want nobody else

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# I just want you to myself

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# I betrayed you

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# I'm sorry I hurt you... #

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It was the first song that we'd wrote that I thought,

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and Andrew thought, and Robert thought,

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"This is a really good song, our songwriting's getting good."

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It is a good... I think it's a classic love song. It's a cheating song.

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# Don't you believe me?

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# Will you redeem me?

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# Don't you believe me, baby?

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# Stay with me, come on

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# Stay with me

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# Stay with me, come on. #

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Easily the biggest response, the most important response we had to that record

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was from a DJ, a guy called Andrew Weatherall.

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He gave me a copy and I think, you know, er,

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and I think I came back to him a couple of days later going,

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"This is amazing, I love this record." He's like, "Really?"

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"You are literally the only one,"

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you know, "You are the only one in the world that likes it."

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And he picked up on all the ballads,

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especially I'm Losing More Than I'll Ever Have.

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A catalyst for a lot of this thing happening

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and she doesn't get the credit that she's due is an NME journalist called Helen Mead.

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I still remember that phone call, vividly,

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and it went something like, "Alan McGee has told me he's sacking me

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"unless I get some press on this record and at the moment,

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"I have nothing. Please, there must be something you can do to help!"

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She came up with a good idea. She said, "Why don't we make this work for everybody?

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"You're looking for a live review for your group. Why don't we get Andrew to do it?" So off we went.

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Andy came down to Exeter,

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and we got on right away, you know, he kind of liked...

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He liked a lot of the music that we like.

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My first meeting with Bobby, I had exceedingly long hair at the time,

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shoulder-length, kind of corkscrew hair,

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and I was sat waiting for him to come in and he came in

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and he looked me up and down and went,

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"Cool hair, man. It looks like Marc Bolan's. Is it a perm?"

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"Thank you. Thank you. No, it's not a perm."

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He'd a great sense of humour, as well. He's a really funny guy.

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So, he reviewed us for the NME.

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Although this was Exeter on a wet Wednesday and we were in a cupboard and it wasn't very rock 'n' roll,

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they gave the most rock 'n' roll performance I've ever seen.

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You know, that's when I knew it was in their bones.

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He gave them this great review and they clicked. They clicked,

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over this love of music. It was that simple.

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And the icing on the cake was, was that they gave him

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the opportunity to go into the studio for the first time.

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We approached him and says, "Look, would you remix I'm Losing More Than I'll Ever Have?"

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We thought, "Well, he can make a mix of this

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"cos it was done to a click track," cos, you know a lot of times then we hadn't done things to...

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to click tracks.

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The mix, I'm Losing More Than I'll Ever Have, which became known as Loaded,

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that was Innes and Weatherall.

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# I'm losing more than I'll ever have

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# I feel bad

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# Feel so bad, yeah... #

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He wasn't like a producer, or an engineer,

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and he was just like a guy who had ideas. It really appealed to our...

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punk-rock ethics.

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It's an experiment. Let's see what's happening.

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We've got this song, you're on the dance floor,

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or you're in control of the dance floor, in the right clubs

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so, although you may not know what you're doing technically,

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you know what you're doing structurally,

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arrangement-wise, and how it would work on a dance floor.

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I think he was getting 500 quid for doing it

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and he was, he was excited and he was more than a little bit scared.

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I was very nervous. I didn't know what you could and couldn't do,

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but I was full of what Orson Welles called the confidence of ignorance.

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Not that I'm likening the making of Loaded

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to the making of Citizen Kane, but when asked, "How did you do it,

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"how did you come up with something like that, you know, when you were like 23, 24?"

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He said, "It's the confidence of ignorance."

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And I was full of piss and vinegar and full of the confidence of ignorance.

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I don't know that I'm breaking rules cos I don't know what the rules are.

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When he first did it, he was kind of too polite with it and too...

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I mean, he'll tell you, he... he didn't want to ruin our song.

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Mr Innes came in, listened to it, visible disappointment, um, "OK,"

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and he was just like, "Nah, man, fucking destroy it," was his very words...

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You know, that was his... "Dinnae give a fuck."

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We put him on the spot, cos he'd never done it before

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and it took him six, seven attempts, you know,

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"There's a good bit there, a good bit there, a good bit there."

0:16:350:16:38

The bass on I'm Losing More Than I'll Ever Have,

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it starts off with...

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So, following the chords. But none of that's in Loaded.

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The end section of I'm Losing More Than I'll Ever Have

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is E-flat, D-flat, A-flat and E-flat.

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It just goes round on those three chords

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so this bit of I'm Losing More Than I'll Ever Have went...

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I thought, "Right, OK, it's gotta be a big, epic piece."

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# I don't wanna lose your love

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# I don't wanna lose your love

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# I don't wanna lose your love

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# I don't wanna lose your love... #

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I was...blown away by that mix, I was completely blown away.

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It was everything that I loved. It had dub, the space of dub,

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guitars like the blues, Elmore James, Rolling Stones, you know, uh,

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you know, strings and horns like Curtis Mayfield.

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Bob and Andrew sort of started getting into...

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..the dance thing, which I absolutely hated...at the time.

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And...I even threatened to leave the band, you know,

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cos I wanted the rock 'n' roll thing.

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You know, as Quincy Jones always said, it's...

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music doesn't change, it's the beat that changes through time, and every generation has its beat.

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And Andy brought the beat that was modern.

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And then Innes, Mr Innes came up with the idea of, "Let's mix the two together."

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You know it was new music, it was exciting.

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It was new sounds, it wasn't such a formulaic-ness to it, it could...

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A song could just be a horn riff, it could just be a vocal stutter,

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a song could be... suddenly be anything.

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One Manchester DJ, who shall remain nameless, said...

0:19:130:19:16

described it as nonsense,

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and he used the words, "Soft, Southern-drinking shandy shite"!

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Andrew was there the first night it was played,

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and I think it was Subterranea, over in west London,

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and I was still up at four in the morning, and he called me up,

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and he was like, "Bob, Bob, Weatherall played Loaded,"

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and he goes, "The whole club went absolutely crazy."

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Yeah, the reaction was insane, culminating in, about halfway through,

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the whole crowd doing that Sympathy For The Devil "woo-woo" thing over the top.

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When you heard your record getting played in these places and the girls liked it...and, you know,

0:19:520:19:58

"I like this. It's better than playing to 20 people in a club in Bolton, on a Tuesday night."

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Loaded came in to the Smash Hits office, where I was working,

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and we were all kind of blown away by it.

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It was like, "Whoa! It's Primal Scream?" "Well, it's a remix, but it is Primal Scream."

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It was this sort of thing.

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And every time I was putting calls though to,

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you know, magazines like Blitz or the Face, people would pick up

0:20:180:20:22

and I could hear Loaded being played in the background.

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Acid house had emerged in '88, and we'd heard about these people,

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these DJs at clubs like Shoom,

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who were playing all this mad Chicago music,

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but also playing records at the wrong speeds and stuff like that and I was like, "What the hell is this?"

0:20:320:20:38

So the dance music scene was kind of amazing at that time

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but the rock music scene was kind of crap.

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You had U2 in their cowboy boots and their cowboy hats

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and you had Jim Kerr cutting about with his leggings on and giving it all the, "Hey, hey, hey."

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So rock music was kind of a bit duff at that time.

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When Loaded was a hit, it was the biggest shock in the world to me, cos I was like, "Fuck, we done it."

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We got on Top Of The Pops,

0:21:020:21:03

which was...had been our...you know, ever since I was a little kid,

0:21:030:21:07

I wanted to be on Top Of The Pops, so that was amazing.

0:21:070:21:10

'Just what is it that you want to do?'

0:21:100:21:12

# I'm gonna get deep down, deep down

0:21:120:21:14

# Said, I'm gonna get deep down, deep down

0:21:140:21:18

# Whoo! Hey!

0:21:180:21:20

'We wanna be free to do what we wanna do.'

0:21:280:21:31

Being a rock band that makes people dance is actually quite rare.

0:21:370:21:41

And they really have done so many records now, at this point,

0:21:410:21:45

that are really great dance records, but they're a rock band.

0:21:450:21:48

And then McGee gave us a wage.

0:22:060:22:09

He said to us, "You know, you need a follow-up single.

0:22:090:22:13

"This is a hit, you need a follow-up."

0:22:130:22:14

So we...we wrote Come Together pretty quickly after that.

0:22:140:22:19

The Scream would write the songs and give me their ideas, musically.

0:22:190:22:23

I would then add my ideas, musically.

0:22:230:22:26

I knew how I wanted it to sound but I didn't know how to achieve that sound, which is where Hugo came in.

0:22:260:22:31

Andy was always so positive, actually, in the studio

0:22:310:22:34

so it was always... it was always fun, you know.

0:22:340:22:37

It was always, like, "Oh, here we go,"

0:22:370:22:39

and pushing the boundaries of everything I can do.

0:22:390:22:42

Hugo played a massive part from that, from Come Together onwards

0:22:420:22:45

and then into the album.

0:22:450:22:47

Hugo was the kind of glue that held the whole thing together.

0:22:470:22:51

A lot of what I, you know, was trying to do was make music to shag to, basically.

0:22:510:22:58

HE LAUGHS

0:22:580:23:00

# Come together

0:23:000:23:03

# Oh-oh oh-oh

0:23:030:23:04

# Come

0:23:040:23:06

# Together

0:23:060:23:08

# Oh-oh oh-oh

0:23:080:23:09

# Come together... #

0:23:090:23:12

Ecstasy, you know, that, that was the single, transformative thing

0:23:130:23:20

that happened. It transformed absolutely everything.

0:23:200:23:24

# Kiss me

0:23:240:23:27

# Won't you, won't you

0:23:270:23:29

# Kiss me

0:23:290:23:31

# Won't you, won't you kiss me

0:23:330:23:36

# Lift me right out of this world. #

0:23:360:23:43

I got a phone call from Terry Farley, who I was doing a fanzine with, called Boy's Own.

0:23:430:23:48

And he uttered the immortal words, "There's this great club, it's called the Shoom,

0:23:480:23:52

"it's full of football hooligans wearing Chevignon, taking ecstasy."

0:23:520:23:56

I was going through the dry ice and I bumped into somebody

0:23:560:23:59

and they'd a massive tattoo on their neck, and I was thinking,

0:23:590:24:03

"Oh, my God," you know, "here we go," and the guy turned round

0:24:030:24:06

and went, "All right, what are you doing here?" and hugged me.

0:24:060:24:10

"Hey, mate, you OK? Do you want some water? Hey, you look a bit hot there. Hey, how's it going?

0:24:100:24:14

"What's your name, where do you come from?" It was quite...fantastic, actually.

0:24:140:24:19

Alcohol wasn't being consumed, and that's a very different drug,

0:24:190:24:24

very different drug.

0:24:240:24:25

I went from listening to Throbbing Gristle's Hamburger Lady

0:24:250:24:29

to dancing to Josephine by Chris Rea.

0:24:290:24:32

That shows you how dangerous that drug can be.

0:24:320:24:35

The first nine months I was going out taking E, I didn't touch a drink.

0:24:360:24:40

Just didn't want to. All those early clubs weren't even licensed.

0:24:400:24:45

You know, you were drinking Ribena.

0:24:450:24:47

It was a spur, um, for dancing, it was a spur for artistic creation,

0:24:470:24:53

it was a spur for conversation.

0:24:530:24:55

Now, some of that dancing, artistic output and conversation

0:24:550:24:59

was absolute nonsense, as with the '60s and acid.

0:24:590:25:03

But, um, the core of it,

0:25:030:25:05

yeah, the core of it, ecstasy did, literally and metaphorically, open people up.

0:25:050:25:12

A song like Come Together was made for...it was perfect for the times,

0:25:120:25:17

-and it wasn't

-made

-for the times, it was made by people who were hip to the times, who

-were

-the times.

0:25:170:25:23

The single version, the original version of Come Together is a pretty straight kind of track,

0:25:230:25:27

it's an amazing track and stuff, but then the remix was in the spirit of Loaded.

0:25:270:25:32

That's the version that appears on the album and it is kind of amazing,

0:25:320:25:35

it captures the spirit of the times and what it felt like being in those clubs at that time.

0:25:350:25:40

# Come

0:25:400:25:43

# Together as one

0:25:440:25:49

# Come

0:25:500:25:53

# Together as one... #

0:25:540:25:59

In the summer of 1990, we built a studio, which was in Hackney,

0:25:590:26:03

quite near where the Creation office was.

0:26:030:26:05

That part of Hackney's been gentrified now, but back then it was pretty rough.

0:26:050:26:09

I think that's why McGee had his label there,

0:26:090:26:11

so people were too scared to go and ask for their royalties.

0:26:110:26:15

There was no Tube line there, they might have got mugged.

0:26:150:26:19

It had a room that was sound-proofed.

0:26:190:26:22

And we had a small computer screen in there,

0:26:220:26:26

and the S-1000 and a keyboard.

0:26:260:26:29

And we had a microphone.

0:26:290:26:31

We had a vocal booth, and we just... we went in there to write.

0:26:310:26:37

Um...Andrew, myself and Robert Young.

0:26:370:26:40

We realised we had to sort of...

0:26:400:26:42

..write things differently, because, you know,

0:26:430:26:47

the, er...

0:26:470:26:49

..the music was taking a turn.

0:26:500:26:52

This is the S-1000, I think it's the second.

0:26:520:26:55

The 900 was the first sort of commercial one,

0:26:550:26:59

but this is the S-1000, the one we'd got, it was stereo,

0:26:590:27:02

and it had one minute of sampling, which was quite a lot in those days.

0:27:020:27:05

But suddenly, you could...

0:27:050:27:07

Suddenly, you could play... but suddenly you could...

0:27:070:27:11

People'd give you discs for it,

0:27:110:27:13

there were floppy disks that went in it and people would give you discs and go, "There's tablas on that,"

0:27:130:27:18

and suddenly you didn't have to learn how to play a tabla, or know a tabla player.

0:27:180:27:23

You could play tablas on your keyboard. Or somebody'd give you...

0:27:230:27:27

Or a sample them from an Indian record, you know.

0:27:270:27:29

Somebody would give you a flute, you know, a flute sample

0:27:290:27:33

and you'd put it in there and then you could write a melody...

0:27:330:27:36

And you could put the flute sample onto the keyboard and play the melody that you wrote.

0:27:360:27:41

If you wrote the melody, you could play the flute sample as a melody.

0:27:410:27:44

FLUTE SOUND PLAYS

0:27:440:27:47

So there's the flute...

0:27:470:27:48

..and to anyone who's listening that probably does sound like a flute,

0:27:510:27:56

but I spent ages trying to make that sound better, and I think I made it sound a bit better.

0:27:560:28:03

Just because we've got a bass player and a drummer

0:28:030:28:05

doesn't mean you've got to have bass and drums in every track.

0:28:050:28:08

I like tracks that are just... no bass and drums in it,

0:28:080:28:13

just a voice and...some sounds, or maybe just some sounds,

0:28:130:28:19

and I like instrumentals that don't have a voice, and you've got Inner Flight, you know.

0:28:190:28:24

If we'd used a real flute, it wouldn't have been as psychedelic.

0:28:240:28:27

The fact it was synthetic, cos I think it was a flute sample, so it was...

0:28:270:28:31

it was kind of synthetic, gives it a kind of more trippy texture.

0:28:310:28:35

We never did E in the studio, it was, um...

0:28:350:28:39

but I think being involved in the acid scene and doing ecstasy informed the record

0:28:390:28:44

and that's why the record came out of that, it came out of that experience.

0:28:440:28:48

The start of that song, Higher Than The Sun, is a major ninth.

0:28:570:29:03

-HE SINGS NOTES

-See, I can't sing it, but Bobby can.

0:29:030:29:07

Harmonically it's very brave because there's no intro, then there he goes with this big jump,

0:29:080:29:13

it's a very ambitious thing to do.

0:29:130:29:14

# My brightest star's my inner light, let it guide me

0:29:150:29:21

# Experience and innocence bleed inside me... #

0:29:210:29:27

Higher Than the Sun by The Orb which is six minutes 43, which is an epic 12-inch,

0:29:270:29:32

but these records at the time, they were meant to be 12-inch records,

0:29:320:29:37

they were meant to be experimental pop records.

0:29:370:29:40

We brought that different element of the ambient side,

0:29:400:29:42

the dreamy side of Higher Than the Sun,

0:29:420:29:45

which to date is the best thing I've ever done, so I'm quite proud of it.

0:29:450:29:50

When I moved into that flat in Bethnal Green with Andrew Innes,

0:29:500:29:54

The Orb to him was just like a disease that was not to be played on his stereo.

0:29:540:30:00

I remember the first night when I put Little Fluffy Clouds on,

0:30:000:30:03

he was like, "Get that crap off".

0:30:030:30:05

Six weeks later, Higher Than The Sun.

0:30:050:30:08

One of the best mixes ever done, in my opinion.

0:30:080:30:12

I just remember the recording process of Higher Than The Sun, and it being so spectacular,

0:30:120:30:20

and realising that what we'd done was we'd made another Little Fluffy Clouds,

0:30:200:30:25

and I can't give that much higher praise again.

0:30:250:30:28

We did a seven-inch edit, hoping that it might get played on the radio.

0:30:280:30:32

But if you want the full version, it's the 12-inch version.

0:30:320:30:36

But when we were sequencing Screamadelica,

0:30:360:30:41

Andrew felt that it was better to put the shorter version of Higher Than the Sun on,

0:30:410:30:47

and I thought maybe the long version, cos that was my favourite.

0:30:470:30:52

But he said, "No do the short one, I think it's gonna run better within the context of the record"

0:30:520:30:57

and he was right, 100% right.

0:30:570:31:00

# I believe in live and let live

0:31:010:31:06

# I believe you get what you give...#

0:31:060:31:12

Somebody called it the hymn to hedonism,

0:31:120:31:14

and I suppose that's exactly what it is, I think Bobby sometimes is underrated as a lyricist,

0:31:140:31:20

but that's a great lyric.

0:31:200:31:22

Higher Than The Sun, it's a hymn to drugs, it's genius. It's a genius hymn to drugs,

0:31:220:31:27

I was actually thinking when I actually snuff it, I might die to Higher Than The Sun.

0:31:270:31:33

Then the next single was Don't Fight It Feel It, which was strange again cos Bob doesn't sing it,

0:31:330:31:37

Denise sung it, but that's how confident we were feeling -

0:31:370:31:41

we can do what we want, we can have a girl who's not been in the band, we can have her sing it.

0:31:410:31:49

The only demarcation lines were that us three wrote the songs.

0:31:490:31:53

Andrew, Robert and me. Together, we put the songs together.

0:31:530:31:56

And when it came to the studio...

0:31:560:31:57

It was just whoever had a really good idea.

0:31:570:32:00

You know, if somebody had a good idea, we would go, "OK, let's try that".

0:32:000:32:04

The ego was the last thing, it was put to the side - it was like,

0:32:040:32:10

whatever makes it sound good.

0:32:100:32:13

Well, basically we ended up doing a showcase at Shoom in London

0:32:130:32:19

and I think it was Innes and Duffy that came along, and Throb came to the gig,

0:32:190:32:24

Bobby didn't come. So we do this PA and you know, I'm singing and all that kind of stuff,

0:32:240:32:30

and as the story goes, as Innes told me,

0:32:300:32:33

Innes got on the phone to Bobby and said, "You better get the fuck down here,

0:32:330:32:37

"I found the fucking singer for Don't Fight It, Feel It".

0:32:370:32:39

# Rama-lama-lama, fa-fa-fa

0:32:390:32:43

# I'm gonna get high till the day I die

0:32:430:32:47

# Rama-lama-lama, fa-fa-fa

0:32:470:32:51

# I'm gonna get high till the day I die. #

0:32:510:32:56

We wanted to make it, a soul, '60s soul track, but modern, to fit in with the acid house thing.

0:33:000:33:06

# Rama-lama-lama, fa-fa-fa

0:33:110:33:14

# I'm gonna get high till the day I die

0:33:140:33:18

# Rama-lama-lama, fa-fa-fa

0:33:180:33:22

# I'm gonna get high till the day I die. #

0:33:220:33:27

You write what you can sing, and if you write something you can't sing,

0:33:270:33:31

like Don't Fight It, Feel It,

0:33:310:33:32

you've got to find somebody to sing it. We found Denise and she sang it beautifully.

0:33:320:33:36

When she sang it, it made sense.

0:33:360:33:38

# Dance to the music All night long

0:33:380:33:42

# Getting up, gettin' down Gonna get it on

0:33:420:33:46

# Gonna live the life I love

0:33:460:33:50

# I'm gonna love the life I live...#

0:33:500:33:55

But it was just a really weird session and I wasn't used to that sort of session.

0:33:570:34:02

I'd been doing sessions in Manchester where you turn up, sing, do your thing, have a listen,

0:34:020:34:08

"Yeah, everything's great" and then you leave, whereas this was like a whole day and night

0:34:080:34:12

just trying out things and a little bit of a party going on.

0:34:120:34:17

It was open, I mean, it was... experimental, spontaneous and experimental.

0:34:170:34:22

It's quite odd record, Don't Fight, It Feel It, even at the time

0:34:220:34:26

if you play it now, it's stripped down,

0:34:260:34:30

the hook's an out-of-tune whistle.

0:34:300:34:32

That was the summer anthem in clubs and that's when,

0:34:460:34:49

to me, they really crossed over

0:34:490:34:52

because that track was, all these dance kids going up to Bobby G and going,

0:34:520:34:57

"Shit, that's your record, it's amazing."

0:34:570:34:59

I think it's Andy Weatherall's masterpiece, it's just total drugs.

0:34:590:35:03

It is the sound of rushing on ecstasy,

0:35:030:35:07

or it's kind of acid-y as well, but it's, it's just pure...

0:35:070:35:12

it is the sound of that time.

0:35:120:35:14

And the reason that there were so many singles that came out

0:35:140:35:18

was that they were so fucked up on drugs, not on heroin at this point,

0:35:180:35:23

just on ecstasy and stuff like that

0:35:230:35:26

and speed and you know, acid and shit, like we all were, to be fair,

0:35:260:35:33

but I could actually get to the office and do things

0:35:330:35:36

and they couldn't even get to the studio and make a fucking record.

0:35:360:35:40

Anywhere in the Home Counties where Andy Weatherall was DJ-ing, we would kind of call him up,

0:35:400:35:45

find out where he was DJ-ing that particular weekend and get a car together,

0:35:450:35:50

get our drugs and go and, you know, hang out, listen to him play records

0:35:500:35:55

and, you know, get absolutely fucking wasted.

0:35:550:35:57

And end up in some stranger's house till, you know...

0:35:570:36:02

Monday morning, having a party and having a good time and a...

0:36:020:36:07

Then back in the studio on Tuesday.

0:36:070:36:09

Or Wednesday.

0:36:090:36:12

I think Wednesday night, back late Wednesday night,

0:36:120:36:14

we'd start about 11 o'clock at night and then work through the night.

0:36:140:36:18

It's just blind loyalty to somebody that we just, you know...

0:36:180:36:23

I trusted the guy.

0:36:230:36:24

He said, "No, you've got to make an album now, you've gotta get some more tracks,

0:36:240:36:29

"write some more songs, make an album.

0:36:290:36:31

"You can't keep releasing singles."

0:36:310:36:33

And he came up with the goods.

0:36:330:36:35

I think an important thing with Screamadelica is that we stopped writing on guitar.

0:36:350:36:39

Before that, we were like, three or four guys jamming in a room with guitar riffs and electric guitars,

0:36:390:36:46

trying to write rock'n'roll songs. But with Screamadelica, all the songs were written on keyboards.

0:36:460:36:53

Or they were written round the sample...

0:36:530:36:56

But you know, the actual melodic structure of the chords and the melody was all keyboards. All of it.

0:36:560:37:01

The only time that we got together as a band to record was Damaged

0:37:010:37:05

We were each in the corner of the studio.

0:37:050:37:08

Bobby was in the control room,

0:37:080:37:09

and that was the only time we played live together as a band.

0:37:090:37:13

# Sweet summer days when I was feeling so fine

0:37:270:37:34

# Just you and me girl was a beautiful time

0:37:340:37:40

# Ah yeah... #

0:37:400:37:43

Throb on acoustic, you on electric, Duff on piano, Henry on double bass, Toby on...

0:37:430:37:50

they were...

0:37:500:37:52

you think he's just got a ride and a snare.

0:37:520:37:55

This is take two, cos I think when we did take one it was pretty good...

0:37:550:38:00

but he forgot to do something, like turn the mics on or something, or some technical problem,

0:38:000:38:04

and then we did take two, and take two is the master take.

0:38:040:38:08

The acoustic guitar, it's just pure feeling.

0:38:080:38:12

You know, soft and gentle and just, it's feeling.

0:38:120:38:15

When Duffy plays piano,

0:38:150:38:17

he plays with as much feeling on the piano as Throb plays on the guitar.

0:38:170:38:21

So, for me as a vocalist, you know, it's...

0:38:210:38:24

it's there, they've set, they've set the song up already before I even sing.

0:38:240:38:28

I mean, I just play, it's kind of a country style, really.

0:38:390:38:43

I think we've got a really great feel, you know.

0:38:580:39:02

There's real sensitivity amongst the musicians for, you know,

0:39:020:39:06

playing this soft and this gentle, but very intensely, with a lot of emotion.

0:39:060:39:11

# I'd wake up beside you you'd hold me in your arms

0:39:150:39:21

# Nothing and nobody's gonna do me any harm

0:39:210:39:28

# Ah yeah

0:39:280:39:32

# Said I felt so happy

0:39:320:39:37

# My, my, my

0:39:370:39:40

# And the way I felt inside... #

0:39:400:39:47

Well, he had a left a long-term relationship,

0:39:470:39:50

and I had around the same time. I had similarly left a long-term relationship,

0:39:500:39:55

so maybe there was a wee bit of sadness in there that came out in Damaged.

0:39:550:40:00

That's, that's what I think, you know.

0:40:000:40:02

We're Scottish, we cannae be too happy for too long

0:40:020:40:05

or we think there's something wrong in the world!

0:40:050:40:07

GUITAR RIFF PLAYS FROM EQUIPMENT

0:40:180:40:22

Now there's several claimants to who did this.

0:40:280:40:31

Robert was supposed to play the guitar solo on "Damaged",

0:40:320:40:37

And he wasn't at the studio that night, and I was there with Andrew and Bobby

0:40:380:40:42

and I said something like,

0:40:420:40:44

"It should sound like Ronnie Wood in the Faces"

0:40:440:40:47

so Innes gave me his guitar, "Go on then".

0:40:470:40:50

I said, "I don't want to do this, I don't want to upset Robert,"

0:40:500:40:54

"No, it will be all right", so I played it, Andrew had a go and I had a go.

0:40:540:41:00

I think it's a bit of you and a wee bit of Henry, I think.

0:41:000:41:04

It's always the same when something's good.

0:41:040:41:06

Success has many fathers.

0:41:060:41:10

Next day Robert comes in, I said "Look, I played the guitar solo on Damaged with Andrew last night,

0:41:100:41:17

"are you ok with it?" "Yeah, no problem it's a great solo", it was easy, fantastic.

0:41:170:41:23

If Henry could do the guitar part better, then you do it,

0:41:230:41:28

cos we'd got two days to go, and you know, he played the part better.

0:41:280:41:33

This is I think what I played on it, my bits of it anyway.

0:41:330:41:37

To share your music that way is a fantastic thing,

0:42:090:42:12

and it also, it did away the concept of a band where this person did this and this person did that,

0:42:120:42:18

it just became a load of people saying "I've got an idea!"

0:42:180:42:21

See, this is the history of Primal Scream,

0:42:210:42:23

it's a band that's not really a band.

0:42:230:42:26

You know, it's, you know, do you know what I mean?

0:42:260:42:30

Which is the way we like it.

0:42:300:42:33

Slip Inside This House, has got like, I think, 16 verses.

0:42:330:42:37

It's like a long, like a... it's like an epic poem.

0:42:370:42:40

It's a radical take of a song by the 13th Floor Elevators,

0:42:400:42:46

who were a Texan psychedelic band from the '60s.

0:42:460:42:50

It's tough to cover bands like 13th Floor Elevators,

0:42:500:42:52

like, to me you don't cover Elevators, Zeppelin, Bob Marley,

0:42:520:42:56

some stuff you just don't really cover,

0:42:560:42:58

cos you don't have much of a chance of doing it as good or better than the original artist.

0:42:580:43:04

But that's a great cover.

0:43:040:43:06

So when we came to record it, I was supposed to sing it.

0:43:060:43:10

And I brought the lyrics up that I'd cut up and stuff, and edited. And, um...

0:43:100:43:15

but I'd, um... I wasn't in the best of shape. And, um...

0:43:150:43:18

Acid house flu.

0:43:180:43:21

Um, I-I remember it was a really, really hot summer's day.

0:43:210:43:26

And, um, I kind of sang a couple of takes.

0:43:260:43:29

And then I sort of more or less collapsed.

0:43:290:43:31

He was like, he was dying. He was lying on the floor like dying of flu.

0:43:310:43:35

So basically we had one day in the studio and I had to...

0:43:350:43:39

..somebody had to do it.

0:43:400:43:42

And I'm not a singer. Trust me.

0:43:420:43:45

But...you know, replicating his voice was...

0:43:450:43:48

I just had to do whispering.

0:43:500:43:52

And the only song he ever sang. But he sings it good.

0:43:520:43:55

He sings it good.

0:43:550:43:57

He sings it great, actually.

0:43:570:43:58

There's Robert.

0:43:580:44:00

MUSIC PLAYS FROM EQUIPMENT

0:44:000:44:02

# Live where your heart can be given

0:44:050:44:09

# And your life starts to unfold...#

0:44:090:44:14

If you listen to any LPs at the time, they're all just like,

0:44:140:44:20

contemporary albums, they're all pretty similar.

0:44:200:44:24

You know, it's just bass, guitar, drums, you know and so...

0:44:240:44:28

and this was, you know, there'd be a song like,

0:44:280:44:31

like Shine Like Stars, and then a song like Don't Fight It, Feel It

0:44:310:44:34

and you can't even...

0:44:340:44:36

..say that they sound like they're the same band, or even sound like they were made in the same century.

0:44:370:44:43

We had a couple of days to come up with a title for the album.

0:44:430:44:47

I was at home with Andrew Innes and Bobby and his girlfriend at the time

0:44:480:44:53

and Andrew was adamant that the word Scream had to be in the title,

0:44:530:44:58

Adamant.

0:44:580:44:59

So this ludicrous conversation started

0:44:590:45:02

and it was like Scream Next, Scream Out, Scream Off, Scream This, Scream That

0:45:020:45:06

and then the conversation just petered out. Some hours later,

0:45:060:45:12

Andrew was playing his records

0:45:120:45:14

and he put this tune on. I said, "This is really good, what is it?" And he was like, "It's Funkadelic".

0:45:140:45:19

And I just sort of went. "Funkadelic. Screamadelic". And he went, "What did you say?"

0:45:190:45:25

I said, "Screamadelic." And he went, "That's it! Screamadelic! Screamadelic!"

0:45:250:45:30

That was it.

0:45:300:45:33

The sun was a detail from an enormous painting

0:45:350:45:38

from the mind of a guy called Paul Cannell.

0:45:380:45:42

Bob had gone over to Paul's house and looked at Paul's work and found the sun, the detail, like,

0:45:420:45:48

"I don't want the whole picture, but that, I want that."

0:45:480:45:51

It kind of looks like a sun that's taken a pill.

0:45:510:45:55

You know, that's what it looks like, and it just, and it's psychedelic,

0:45:550:45:59

it was everything that the record stood for, it was kind of warm and psychedelic.

0:45:590:46:05

We thought it was gonna be, like, an underground classic,

0:46:050:46:08

you know like Tago Mago by Can.

0:46:080:46:11

Or Metal Box by Public Image, you know.

0:46:110:46:13

Records that weren't big commercial hits, but they were really cool,

0:46:130:46:16

and they were pop, but they were experimental at the same time.

0:46:160:46:20

We pressed 60,000 records, thinking...

0:46:200:46:22

Not because we thought they were a bad band, we loved the record, but we just thought,

0:46:220:46:28

"It's a cult record", and it sold 60,000 records in the first week

0:46:280:46:33

I thought "My god", and I went out of stock from the Monday to the Wednesday

0:46:330:46:37

the following week, we were pressing up about another 100,000 records.

0:46:370:46:40

You know, suddenly Creation would say "You're in Woolworths"

0:46:400:46:44

and the sales went, but people love the weird stuff as well, so it's good,

0:46:440:46:50

I think we took people on our trip.

0:46:500:46:52

It got nominated for the Mercury Prize, and we're like, "Whatever, it's not going to win

0:46:520:46:56

"so let's just go down for the party have a drink, something to eat."

0:46:560:47:00

The first Mercury Prize, I mean, everybody kind of forgets

0:47:000:47:03

but it was dreamt up by a marketing man at Virgin Records,

0:47:030:47:07

the guy that put together all those Now! albums and stuff like that, so it was a marketing thing.

0:47:070:47:12

Bobby and Andrew refusing to attend, for reasons that elude me,

0:47:120:47:17

so the rest of us rock up to the Savoy.

0:47:170:47:20

There's some photographers there, and I think one flash went off

0:47:200:47:24

and I heard someone go, "Who's this lot?"

0:47:240:47:27

Start ordering drinks, the prices were exorbitant,

0:47:270:47:30

so someone was sent down to an off-licence and bought six bottles of Jack Daniels which were concealed

0:47:300:47:36

under the table, it was like, "We'll have 24 Coca-Colas please".

0:47:360:47:40

"And the winner of the Mercury Prize..."

0:47:400:47:43

we're just like, we're pretty half-cut now as well,

0:47:430:47:46

"The winner of the Mercury Prize is Primal Scream", and we were like, totally shocked

0:47:460:47:51

cos it was up against U2 that year, there was some really big names about.

0:47:510:47:57

We won it, and they couldn't give a shit.

0:47:570:48:00

We left the building, not fulfilling any of our media obligations.

0:48:000:48:06

I've got the cheque and I lost it, the cheque went missing.

0:48:060:48:10

We never got to the bottom of it.

0:48:100:48:12

You have talked to Martin Duffy, haven't you?

0:48:120:48:16

It was him.

0:48:160:48:18

So I had to call up the Mercury PR department,

0:48:180:48:21

who were obviously less than impressed that they hadn't really got much out of Primal Scream

0:48:210:48:27

in terms of media coverage and said, "I am the manager of Primal Scream,

0:48:270:48:32

"we've lost the cheque." Deathly silence. "Could you possibly bike another one?"

0:48:320:48:37

And I've still got the award, but I've lost the bulb on top.

0:48:370:48:43

To win the first one, I suppose it's good.

0:48:430:48:45

There is something irresistible about that music,

0:48:450:48:49

and I think everybody caught it at the time

0:48:490:48:54

and it really showed its full potential when the band ended up going live.

0:48:540:49:00

The first gig was, I think it was up in Glasgow, Glasgow Barrowlands,

0:49:000:49:06

I think we were up there, and it was just incredible,

0:49:060:49:10

cos we were used to playing in front of 200 kids maximum, and this was ram-packed

0:49:100:49:16

and there was thousands there, and I remember we were walking on stage, and there was this huge roar.

0:49:160:49:22

Me and Andrew just looked at each other and thought, "What's this about?"

0:49:250:49:29

It was like, totally alien to us.

0:49:290:49:32

We were tying to basically recreate a night out at a rave, not the usual rock show,

0:49:350:49:41

7.30, 8pm, the support slot, we wanted a full night

0:49:410:49:46

we wanted Weatherall DJing, you know, get the right atmosphere.

0:49:460:49:52

And just turn it into a rave, basically, not just a normal rock show.

0:49:520:49:55

# Rama-ramma-ramma Fa-fa-fa

0:49:550:49:59

# Gonna get high till the day I die

0:49:590:50:03

# Rama-ramma-ramma Fa-fa-fa

0:50:030:50:07

# Gonna get high till the day I die...#

0:50:070:50:12

I got a phone call from their manager saying "They'd love you to come on tour with them",

0:50:120:50:18

and I was, like, "I don't know about that, I don't think so",

0:50:180:50:22

and then I thought, "I might actually learn something here, it might actually be a good laugh,

0:50:220:50:27

"it might actually be something that I might end up really liking,"

0:50:270:50:31

so I said yes.

0:50:310:50:33

# Stoned love Stoned love singing

0:50:330:50:39

# Stoned love Stoned love singing

0:50:390:50:45

# Stoned love Stoned love singing...#

0:50:450:50:50

So she became a part of the live band, and it was great, you know?

0:50:560:51:00

Just another... I think that's the way bands should be.

0:51:000:51:03

# Moving on up, now

0:51:030:51:05

# Gettin' out of the darkness

0:51:080:51:11

# My light shines on Shine on

0:51:120:51:17

# My light shines on

0:51:170:51:20

# My light shines on

0:51:200:51:22

# My light shines on

0:51:220:51:25

# My light shines on

0:51:250:51:27

# My light shines on...#

0:51:270:51:31

With success comes a bit more money, comes better drugs,

0:51:310:51:35

comes better, you know, whatever.

0:51:350:51:37

And if you've got that kind of personality, then that's what you'll go for.

0:51:370:51:42

We'd finished the record, I went on tour with them,

0:51:420:51:45

it was a huge eye-opening experience.

0:51:450:51:47

I had never seen anything like it.

0:51:470:51:49

I'd been out clubbing before, I'd partied, you know, but it was...

0:51:490:51:54

I was like, "Shit, what's going on?"

0:51:540:51:57

This is a different level of experience.

0:51:580:52:02

Backstage, we had a big crew, lights, you know, roadies and what have you,

0:52:020:52:08

we didn't have that before, and catering, didn't have that before.

0:52:080:52:12

Riders, copious amounts of alcohol, whatever we could drink, basically.

0:52:120:52:19

I think there was one time there was 12 bottles of Jack Daniel's -

0:52:190:52:23

this was for the band - four litres of vodka, whatever,

0:52:230:52:28

it was all there, and it got drunk. I mean, me and Throb were going on stage with pints of vodka

0:52:280:52:36

and, um, we had, you know, our own drug dealers with us,

0:52:360:52:40

our own personal drug dealers.

0:52:400:52:42

They came along with us, and that was what we were getting up to.

0:52:420:52:47

With every tour I've done where it's been a bus,

0:52:470:52:50

there's the back lounge which was the party bit

0:52:500:52:54

there was the bunk bit, where everybody fell into after the party

0:52:540:52:59

and the front lounge was for those people who read Classic Car Monthly

0:52:590:53:04

and gardening magazines and listened to free jazz.

0:53:040:53:08

Who was in front?

0:53:080:53:11

Me and Denise.

0:53:110:53:13

That was their business. I didn't get involved in it.

0:53:130:53:16

I didn't judge them for it. If that's what you wanna do then that's what you wanna do

0:53:160:53:21

so long as you're kinda happy.

0:53:210:53:23

I dunno, how much excess do you want? I mean, you know, we just enjoyed ourselves.

0:53:230:53:29

It was insane. It was insane,

0:53:290:53:32

but it was...

0:53:320:53:33

you know, I'd like to say it was fun and I think it was,

0:53:330:53:39

but there are parts of me that do sadly regret it,

0:53:390:53:44

you know, cos it did take its toll on me.

0:53:440:53:48

There was one time in America I ended up in a bar at four o'clock in the morning on my own

0:53:480:53:54

and this guy pulled a gun on me in the toilets and, like, put a gun to my head

0:53:540:53:59

and he was trying to scare me and I said, "Look, mate you're not scaring me, honestly,

0:53:590:54:04

"just pull it, you'd be doing me a favour."

0:54:040:54:07

We went to Australia, something happened to me

0:54:070:54:10

and I was found by this friend of mine

0:54:100:54:14

looking for the steering wheel of the Sydney Opera House

0:54:140:54:17

so I could drive it to Atlantis.

0:54:170:54:19

Yeah, it got dark.

0:54:190:54:22

And...

0:54:220:54:24

..this is a tough, tough subject to talk about.

0:54:290:54:32

End of '91, it started to get really...

0:54:320:54:35

It was finished. It was over, you know. It was negative.

0:54:350:54:38

And it kind of fucked us for a bit, because creatively, we never recovered from that for a long time.

0:54:380:54:45

We went through the mill, we've done it all...

0:54:450:54:48

Been there, done it

0:54:500:54:52

and all come through the back end...

0:54:520:54:55

Is be-bop, Charlie Parker, the sound of heroin?

0:55:000:55:04

I don't think so.

0:55:040:55:06

I think it's the sound of the of be-bop despite the heroin,

0:55:060:55:10

it's the sound of Charlie Parker despite it, so...

0:55:100:55:14

I'd like to think that Screamadelica is the sound of some...

0:55:150:55:19

..you know, very intense,

0:55:210:55:24

creative musicians who weren't, I don't think, trying to make anything new

0:55:240:55:30

but were trying to make something, passionate and important

0:55:300:55:34

and something that mattered.

0:55:340:55:37

And I think that's what the sound of that record is

0:55:370:55:40

as opposed to the sound of some little pill.

0:55:400:55:44

We recorded this song, Shine Like Stars.

0:55:440:55:47

It's beautiful.

0:55:490:55:50

I'm not gonna say it's like a comedown, but it's like, really...

0:55:520:55:56

You know, soothing, yeah.

0:55:580:56:00

Makes you glad you're alive, I think.

0:56:010:56:03

I wouldn't go that far!

0:56:030:56:05

-I think this song's like a lullaby.

-Yeah.

0:56:100:56:12

Just like, you know, going on drifting off to sleep, you know.

0:56:120:56:16

When Jimmy Millar finished the mix for Moving On Up

0:56:160:56:20

and we knew that that was gonna be the opening track on the album,

0:56:200:56:23

just sounded like a great start to the record.

0:56:230:56:26

When Weatherall finally mixed this, Shine Like Stars,

0:56:260:56:31

we knew we had the last track for the record, you know, it just sounded perfect.

0:56:310:56:37

The album is definitely a journey. It is the weekend, a night out,

0:56:370:56:43

it's for getting ready to go out,

0:56:430:56:45

it's for chilling out and sort of floating off into sleep

0:56:450:56:49

satisfied at the end of it - it's everything, it's perfectly put together.

0:56:490:56:53

It just captures that moment perfectly and, um...

0:56:530:56:58

I think it always will, it's just that album, you know, that's the album to have.

0:56:580:57:03

I've always loved that tangled mess of beauty that they seem like, you know.

0:57:030:57:07

They really do seem like you couldn't untangle them, you know?

0:57:070:57:12

But why would, what would you want to do that for?

0:57:120:57:15

It is the spirit of the times, just the fact it's this big melange of all this stuff, this gospel music,

0:57:150:57:22

Stones, space rock, dub, psychedelica, you know, it's just absolutely brilliant.

0:57:220:57:27

And it got the, you know, it got DJs and rock musicians together,

0:57:270:57:35

brilliant, really good.

0:57:350:57:36

Throb's a genius, basically he's a musical genius at playing rock'n'roll

0:57:360:57:42

and Andrew's an incredible talent that seems to be able to play any kind of instrument known,

0:57:420:57:47

give him a clarinet, the guy could get a tune out of that.

0:57:470:57:50

These two are really talented. The one that's really clever, though, is Gillespie, to be honest,

0:57:500:57:56

but then he plays it down,

0:57:560:57:58

he's one of these guys who loves to play dumb, but he's a smart, smart, smart guy.

0:57:580:58:03

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:58:160:58:19

E-mail [email protected]

0:58:190:58:23

# Shine like stars

0:58:230:58:26

# Shine like stars

0:58:270:58:32

# Shine like stars

0:58:330:58:38

# Shine like stars. #

0:58:390:58:45

Primal Scream's seminal album Screamadelica was released in 1991, and synthesized the band's rock 'n' roll roots with the dance culture of that time; for many, the album's sound and imagery came to be regarded as quintessential symbols of the acid house era, perfectly catching the spirit and mood of the early 90s.

Using rare archive footage and special performances, this film tells the story of Screamadelica and its hit singles and dance anthems Loaded, Movin' On Up, Come Together and Don't Fight It, Feel It. From the formation of the band in Glasgow to winning the first-ever Mercury prize, the band members explain the record's inception with insights from main producer Andrew Weatherall, Creation Records founder Alan McGee and many others involved with or inspired by this joyful record.

Screamadelica both defines a generation and transcends its time, and is a true Classic Album.


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