Scots Scuil


Scots Scuil

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Still thou art blessed, compared with me!

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The present only toucheth thee,

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But, oh, I backward cast my e'e

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On prospects drear,

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And forward, though I cannot see,

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I guess and fear.

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Speaking the Scots language... For some, it comes naturally.

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For others, it's dusted down and used for a week in January.

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For six children from all over Scotland,

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a visit to Scots Scuil in Ayrshire gives them the opportunity to speak

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their ain leed for a week.

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For Thomas in Aberdeen, it's a chance to work out

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what's Doric Scots and what's not.

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For city dweller Nadia, it's the opportunity to learn a new language.

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And for horse-mad Milly, it's a chance to speak

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more like the rest of her family.

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In Ayrshire, Iona and Sandie show off their Scots,

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or Scottish as they call it, with confidence.

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And for Scots language lover Cameron,

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it's time to prove to his parents that Scots isnae slang.

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When I speak Scots I feel different from speaking English,

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cos it feels more like me.

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I am Scottish, I'm not English. And that's why I'd rather speak Scots,

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cos that's my first language.

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My name's Iona. I'm from Muirkirk and I'm nearly 11.

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My name's Sandie. I'm 10 and I live in Muirkirk.

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In Muirkirk, best friends Sandie and Iona are looking ahead

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and making some very big decisions.

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-So what are you taking?

-I'm taking my dad's fitba bag, so it's like...

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I'm taking a suitcase, a wee mini suitcase.

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I'm taking... I don't actually ken whit claes I'm taking yet,

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but I'm definitely taking these.

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-And I'm definitely taking my Converse.

-Aye, aw right.

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So whit do you actually think we'll learn at this Scots Scuil thing?

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Mair Scottish words and like mair ways to develop them.

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Well, the thing I really think is, the way we talk, like,

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we know our words, and it's the words we use.

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-And we're bilingual, whatever that is.

-Aye, bilingual.

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Then you actually just... You don't really need to learn much about Scottish if you're already Scottish.

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I ken, but we'll learn mair.

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I think it's important that people speak Scottish

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because it's the way they've talked all their lives roon aboot here.

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My language basically means everything to me.

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-Hiya!

-Hello, honey.

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-How are you?

-Fine.

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Sandie spends a lot of time at her grandparents' home.

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-They live a few doors down from her.

-When's the school going back?

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-When's the school going back?

-Aye.

-The 18th.

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But you have to buy my shoes on the 15th.

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Aye, you'll need to wait till the pension comes in, Princess.

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-You want something to eat?

-Mm-hm. A roll and cauld meat.

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-A roll and cauld meat? Whit kind of cauld meat you want?

-Onything.

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Onything?

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-Ye staying the nicht?

-Aye.

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Nae fighting, neither you nor Neil, because ony nonsense

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and ye ken whit I tell ye - you're back up that road.

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I'm no' putting up with it.

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-I ken.

-Aye, ye ken.

-She disnae mean it.

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-So whit are you doing the day, Papa?

-Me?

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I'm going to sort my gairden.

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I think the kids roon here speak the way they speak

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because it's what they've heard from mums and dads.

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I don't actually think they know any different.

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They speak the way they speak.

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-Stop playing with it. You've pooked all my jumper.

-Aye, because it was already.

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-I was just pu'ing it.

-It's worse pooked noo.

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I have thought about the way my grandweans talk,

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I've thought about what they're gonnae dae when they grow up,

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and I have thought, "Will the way they talk haud them back?"

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I widnae like to think so.

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I widnae like to think that there was prejudice

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in the way anybody speaks, in any language.

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-Have you got raspberries?

-Just an odd yin. I ate yin.

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I've got peapods, but I ate them tae.

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Aw right, but see when you've got mair,

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actually keep them for me, right?

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-Mmm, you need to be here, you need to be here.

-I ken this.

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Sandie McGraw fae up the raw, used to cry her Heid the Ba'.

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Papa Broon fae up the toon, his belly's awfy awfy roon.

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-Thank you, awfy guid of ye.

-And jelly tae.

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That's a cheap pair of shoes you're getting now.

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-Aye, so it is.

-Aye, you're getting a cheap pair.

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I think my language is important to me because it's my language.

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If I was told I widnae be able to speak Scottish,

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I don't really ken what I'd dae.

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I'd probably, like, speak it anyway.

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Aye, I'd dae that.

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Iona, have you got lost? You got it?

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I was expecting a pair of socks. You usually forget what you're up the stair for.

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'When I'm older I want to be a lawyer,

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'and I widnae change the way I talk

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'because it's my language and I widnae care if they couldnae understand me.'

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I think it's important because it's just, it's our way of talking,

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like, different from some folk.

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It's different from folk in England and America and all that.

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I always encourage Iona to be who she is and speak in her own

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sort of tongue and her own language.

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Sit doon a wee minute. What's the plans noo? What ye gonnae dae?

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-Going to go to the game's hall.

-What's on at the games hall?

-Bouncy.

-Bouncy, OK.

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'I don't think speaking Scots'll hold Iona back,

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'because she knows at times when to slow down a wee bit

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'to make sure people understand what she's saying.'

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It's important to encourage them because if we didn't,

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eventually the Scottish language would just die out

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and everybody would just be sort of the same.

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For Iona and Sandie, the encouragement to speak their language is

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reinforced at their local school.

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In Muirkirk, Scots is their first language for the majority of the children.

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We do have children that come in from different areas of Britain,

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and they very quickly pick up on the Scots because it is...

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Within the school, the children speak Scots quite a lot on their own.

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Within the classrooms, when I first went there about four years ago, I asked a question

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at the first assembly, and the whole place chorused back, "Aye".

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And I thought, "Hmm, very good." So obviously you are bilingual.

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If you speak Scots, English, you are bilingual.

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It's like doing any other language.

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So we have to have its place within the school as well for it.

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I think the most important thing about Scottish language is

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that everybody can speak English but not everybody can speak Scottish.

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This is Scots Scuil, specially set up for one week next to the

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cottage in Alloway where Scotland's bard spent his childhood.

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Scots Scuil has been specially set up for these children.

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It's here for a week.

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What the children are learning this week is skills to do with language,

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learning about Scots and English, the differences between them,

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where Scots comes from, different Scots words.

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Learning Scots, teaching people how to read,

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write and speak Scots as articulately as possible

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and as thoroughly as possible really is a big boost,

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or can be a big boost to their confidence because, if you think about it,

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if you are constantly told that your language is the language of

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the gutter, that it's slang or bad English, you're not going to value it.

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If, on the other hand, you are told that your language is valuable

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and then you realise that it's got a 700-year-old literature and it's got

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a wealth of material that is really fantastic, including

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the poetry of Burns and all the songs and so on that Scotland has,

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then you are going to look upon the language in a much more positive way.

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I think that feeds into self-confidence.

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Scott is about sharing, not excluding but about sharing language

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and that's what Scots Scuil is all about.

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My name's Cameron. I'm from Denny.

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I'm 11 years old and I like playing football and golf.

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When I speak Scots it makes me feel proud that I am Scots and that we've

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got our ain language, cos some countries use other folk's language.

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It's guid that we have our ain languege, eh?

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I like using the language cos I've got into a habit of it

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since it started.

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And it's fluent language, eh?

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Despite Cameron's enthusiasm,

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speaking Scots has caused a wee bit of a stooshie in the family.

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Cameron speaks in his own kind of language which I would say is slang.

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I'll just sit there box here the now and we'll go.

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I would say, "Are you going to speak properly?"

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And he will about the house, but when you hear him

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outside with his friends, it's a total different language.

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And I would just say it's slang.

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The speaking Scots, there is a time and place for it.

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Will it further his career or will it set him back the way?

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That's what I'm a bit frightened of.

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When my dad tells me off for speaking Scots, I always...

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I don't want to answer back because it's my dad,

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but I feel angry inside cos it's my language.

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He might be different to me, no' everybody's the same.

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-Is everybody enjoying it, then?

-Mmm! It's a lovely lunch.

-Yep.

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You won't need a dinner after this.

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In my eyes, when I was young, words like hame I thought were slang,

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or dinnae, words like that I defined more as a kind of slang rather

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than using proper English.

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I do think it is a good thing that they are teaching

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Scots at school, making the children now more aware of the Scots

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language, rather than the way I was brought up.

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-Papa, what poems did you used to read?

-Rabbie Burns.

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Most of his poems. I had books on it, Cameron.

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I was quite interested in them and what he did.

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And there were a lot of Scots words in Burns' poems.

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That was the thing that they spoke,

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that was the language that they spoke then.

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When my papa comes here or I go to his, we're always talking the Scots.

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And then if I get told off by my gran,

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he'll tell us it's our language.

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And cos he understands what I'm saying, like this,

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he doesn't hesitate in telling me to speak English.

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It's guid. I enjoy it mair.

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Cameron's very good at the Scots.

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You need to use it all the time,

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talking to people and that, you know?

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Though he knows the Scots words, it's not ones that are used regular.

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You won't get your sponge unless you...

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It's not a slang, it's a proper tongue.

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That was words that were used and they've just got forgotten

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because people don't use them.

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The connection between my language and Robert Burns' language is

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some of the words are the same but when he used the big giant words,

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I wouldn't use them, so that's when it becomes different.

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Things have changed from then

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and we just use the Scots that we want to use.

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John, you cut it like that.

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-CAMERON LAUGHS

-I'm only taking a wee bit.

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Whit are ye daein'?!

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If Cameron was going for a job interview, I would probably,

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in that instance, tell him to speak more proper.

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And then my phone, we'll need that.

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'If they speak English and not have slang words in with it,'

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cos I think people seem to still have that kind of thing about the way people speak.

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Scots will be useful for me, like, after I've got the job, but when I'm

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in my interview then I need to speak mair English, cos that's the way...

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Professionalism is English these days, eh? It's not...

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It probably used to be that you could speak Scots and get the job,

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but now you need to speak proper English to get the job.

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There are that many children in this country who feel that they

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dinnae have... That they aren't good enough to stand up in class.

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Folk tell them off for the way they speak.

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And that disnae develop a child's confidence,

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it does the opposite, it diminishes their confidence.

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I don't feel that I'm encouraged enough, because they want me

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to speak English and every time I try to speak Scots they will correct me,

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so it's not as if I'm getting, like, allowed to speak Scots.

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It's annoying.

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In Alloway, the children are arriving for their first

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taste of Scots Scuil.

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I'm looking forward to the rap and the songwriting and the poetry.

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I'm looking forward to all the workshops

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and I'm looking forward to the drama yin most.

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I think I'll learn loads of stuff,

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like about Burns' poems that I didnae ken, eh?

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Cos it's like, I'm not the biggest reader of poems,

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so if I knew mair of them it might get me into it, maybe.

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I'm really excited about coming here, having a new experience

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and working with other kids from other cities in Scotland.

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Over the next four days, they will discover more about their Scots

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language from leading experts, and use their new-found knowledge

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to put together a performance for family and friends for the last day.

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The word midge - boy's called midge?

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When children get a chance to use Scots in the classroom,

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when they hear a teacher using Scots, they see it in books

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and it's colourful and it's modern and there's TV programmes made

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out of Scots, it raises the status. They feel good about themselves

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and their confidence goes through the roof.

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What about snotterbox? THEY LAUGH

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That's actually quite cool.

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In Aberdeen, Thomas and his family

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use the Doric dialect of the Scots language.

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I'm Thomas, I'm 12 and I come fae Aberdeen, and I like fitba.

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See, one day, I was, like, doing rock climbing

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and it was like I got to the top and I said, "Jordan, what about noo? Are ye coming doon?"

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He says, "Nah, I'm away o'er." As soon as he seen us, he sprinted to Mooshie,

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and all the rope just came piling doon and I fell aboot 10 feet.

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-Was it sair?

-I hurt my bum.

-Did you cry?

-No.

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'There is definitely a clear distinction between'

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English speaking and Doric speaking because...

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Doric speaking has got a slang to it and...

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Proper is more clear.

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There's a clear difference and you can tell the difference.

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More so with young people. I can tell the difference

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with Thomas when he's speaking it.

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Sometimes... He's a young person, so he does stretch on it

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and there'll be extra bits at the end

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which is not Scottish or Doric at all.

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It's just him being as common as he can.

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When I was at the Isle of Skye,

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went out to a restaurant.

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'I think that my mum prefers me to speak English around her,'

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more sensible language and sometimes...

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we might not even understand words we're saying if we speak Doric.

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All language evolves so it's not surprising

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that the Scots we hear spoken and we speak in Scotland

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in the 21st century

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is substantially different from the Scots of the 18th century.

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So I just see Scots as being on a continuum.

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It's been around for a long, long time

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and I have no doubt at all it'll be around for a lot longer

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but it'll be different in the future from how it is now.

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That's good, Andrew. Well done, Daniel.

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Back, back.

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For Thomas, there is confusion about what language

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he and his friends actually speak.

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'Me and my friends, we normally speak slang.'

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We do speak Doric sometimes

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but nowadays everyone says words like gadgie,

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gadge, sound.

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Gadgie's for "a boy"...

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..and sound is just for "OK".

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Do you know that gadgie is a real Scots word

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and it's in the dictionary? What do you think about that?

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Erm..well, I never knew that.

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Now I know it is a Scots word.

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There is a clear difference between slang, common speaking,

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to Doric speaking.

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I think, as a parent, in understanding Doric speaking,

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you can clearly tell the difference.

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If Thomas could speak proper Doric and learn more about it

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then I would definitely encourage that.

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I think it'll make me more free to speak my own language...

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and I might learn more Scottish words out there

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'which will make me more interested to speak my own language.'

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That was in! That was a beauty. That was a post and in, gadge.

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Well done, Thomas. Keep on 'em, Bri.

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At Scots Scuil, the first class is led by Matthew Foot and James Robertson

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who've both devoted the last 15 years

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to promoting the use of the Scots language.

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The best way to start Scots Scuil might be to find out

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a Scots word fae each of us.

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So I wonder who we'll start with? Sandie, tell us a Scots word.

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-Mockit.

-Mockit, what a brilliant Scots word.

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-Why do you like that word, mockit?

-Just, "you're mockit".

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Who's mockit? Me?

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-I dunno. I just like using the word...

-Like the word mockit?

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I don't like going, "you're dirty". I like going, "you're mockit".

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Mockit's a great word. Tam, what about yourself?

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-Gadgie.

-What's a gadgie?

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It's like a man, but a scruffy man.

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-Does he always have to be scruffy?

-I think so.

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-Cameron?

-Fitba.

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-Fitba?!

-What do you kick the ball with?!

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Your fit.

0:18:500:18:52

And, Nadia?

0:18:520:18:53

-Cuddy.

-Cuddy?

0:18:530:18:56

-Who's been on a cuddy?

-Me!

-You've been on a cuddy?

0:18:560:18:58

I think Millie's got... You've got a cuddy, haven't you?

0:18:580:19:01

Do you have a cuddy?

0:19:010:19:02

If you can think of any words at all that you think are Scots words,

0:19:020:19:06

can you write them doon?

0:19:060:19:07

Heid.

0:19:090:19:11

Puddock.

0:19:110:19:12

Clypes.

0:19:120:19:14

-Tumshie.

-Glaikit.

-Doon.

0:19:140:19:17

Bogle.

0:19:170:19:19

The initial input for the early part of the day was to see

0:19:190:19:22

if the children could tell us as many Scots words as they kent.

0:19:220:19:26

I was amazed that Scottish children tell you screeds and screeds

0:19:260:19:30

and screeds of Scots words.

0:19:300:19:32

You've given us all these brilliant braw Scots words,

0:19:320:19:35

written them down and spoken them out loud.

0:19:350:19:37

Where do you think they all come from?

0:19:370:19:39

Scots wasn't always for Scotland. It came to Scotland from somewhere.

0:19:390:19:43

A tribe of people called the Angles came from Denmark

0:19:430:19:50

round about the 5th century and they were looking for new land.

0:19:500:19:53

They thought, "Haud on here, that's looking quite nice.

0:19:530:19:56

"We're going to move there."

0:19:560:19:57

Their language is the origin of Scots.

0:19:570:20:00

Their language was the first German type language to come to this island.

0:20:000:20:04

There's another tribe who we've not mentioned so far who came from Ireland

0:20:040:20:09

around about the time that the Angles were coming over from Denmark.

0:20:090:20:12

What's the name of the tribe that came over from Ireland?

0:20:120:20:15

Scottish.

0:20:150:20:16

Yeah, the Scots had a different language.

0:20:160:20:19

-It wasn't Scots.

-Irish.

0:20:190:20:22

Brilliant. Irish. What language did Irish become?

0:20:220:20:25

-Gaelic.

-Gaelic, brilliant.

0:20:250:20:27

For a long time, in Scotland, they were speaking Scots and some people were speaking Gaelic,

0:20:270:20:31

and in England, they were speaking English.

0:20:310:20:33

In Scotland, around about the time of Robert the Bruce

0:20:330:20:36

and William Wallace, the kings and queens all spoke in Scots

0:20:360:20:40

but something happened...

0:20:400:20:42

round about 1600. Does anyone know what happened?

0:20:420:20:46

What do you think?

0:20:460:20:48

Did one of the kings go over to England

0:20:480:20:50

and then he started speaking English?

0:20:500:20:53

Does anyone ken what king?

0:20:530:20:55

-James?

-James. Absolutely brilliant.

0:20:550:20:59

What would have happened when he went to England to become King of England?

0:20:590:21:04

What would happen to his English skills?

0:21:040:21:06

His skills would have improved

0:21:060:21:08

and that meant the official language of Scotland

0:21:080:21:13

slowly stopped being Scots and started being...

0:21:130:21:19

-English.

-English.

0:21:190:21:20

The wee play that the pupils perform is called the Union of the Crowns

0:21:200:21:24

and I wrote it.

0:21:240:21:26

It was there as a structure for them to work on.

0:21:260:21:30

I'm King Jamie. Een, twa, three, four, five, six.

0:21:300:21:36

Jamie the Saxt of Scotland.

0:21:360:21:38

They've done very well with it. They've performed it beautifully.

0:21:380:21:42

The idea is to give children a dramatic sense of Scotland's history.

0:21:420:21:45

The news fae England, sir, is that Queen Elizabeth I isnae weel.

0:21:450:21:50

But I heard it's worse than that.

0:21:510:21:53

Aye, she's affy no' weel.

0:21:530:21:56

No, even mair worse than that.

0:21:560:21:59

Worse than affy no' weel?!

0:21:590:22:02

Whit's worse than affy no' weel?

0:22:020:22:04

Does that not mean she's...she's...

0:22:040:22:07

Aye. Deid as a bubbly-jock on Christmas time.

0:22:070:22:11

Thomas is a very interesting young man.

0:22:110:22:14

When he started to play King Jamie the Saxt, he was just going for it.

0:22:140:22:18

You felt like if he had been a real king in the late middle ages,

0:22:180:22:22

he might have been chopping people's heads off all over the place.

0:22:220:22:25

He really grew into that part and he's grown into the whole idea of what Scots Scuil is about.

0:22:250:22:30

Wha's going to rule England now?

0:22:300:22:32

Who will get to live in the braw-most palaces?

0:22:320:22:34

Wha will get their hauns on aw that English gold?

0:22:340:22:37

Me, that's who. See you efter.

0:22:370:22:40

King, are you not going to bide here and rule baith kingdoms fae Edinburgh?

0:22:400:22:45

Are you mad?!

0:22:450:22:46

The castles here are Baltic. See, in the winter,

0:22:460:22:49

the draft goes right up my nicky tams.

0:22:490:22:52

I'm going to walk to England. Cheerio, Scotland.

0:22:520:22:55

The fact that they've acted this out

0:22:550:22:58

means they will always remember who James the 6th was and that he went

0:22:580:23:01

to England and the impact that had on the Scots language.

0:23:010:23:04

Over a period of time,

0:23:040:23:06

English replaces Scots as the official language of Scotland.

0:23:060:23:10

And the Bible and Acts of Parliament and all those things start to be written in English

0:23:100:23:16

and everybody has to learn how to read and write English.

0:23:160:23:19

How do you think people in Scotland would feel when they saw

0:23:190:23:24

the Scots language being replaced by the English language?

0:23:240:23:27

-Upset.

-They'd be upset about it. Uh-huh. Why would they be upset?

0:23:290:23:34

They might feel, like,

0:23:340:23:36

a bit not important to the world, not liked.

0:23:360:23:40

Has anybody here ever been telt aff for speaking in Scots?

0:23:400:23:45

Has anybody here ever been given a prize for speaking in Scots?

0:23:450:23:50

-What did you get a prize for?

-For singing Tam O'Shanter.

0:23:500:23:54

Tam O'Shanter?

0:23:540:23:55

It shouldn't just be at Burns that you're allowed to use Scots.

0:23:550:23:59

I think you should be allowed to use it whenever you want.

0:23:590:24:02

I wonder if we can make a drama out of the situation

0:24:020:24:05

where you're praised for speaking Scots,

0:24:050:24:07

and around about the same time, telt aff for speaking it.

0:24:070:24:10

Say like at Burns, if somebody reads a Burns' poem

0:24:100:24:15

and then they say, "Go on, gie me my jaicket."

0:24:150:24:18

-Something like that?

-Aye.

0:24:180:24:20

Everyone is complimenting him when it comes to the last person,

0:24:200:24:24

they could say, "This kid's a blether." And then storms out.

0:24:240:24:27

So that person walks out?

0:24:270:24:29

Someone that paid to get in could say,

0:24:290:24:32

"I want my £5 back." Or, "My five poo-nds back."

0:24:320:24:36

Your five poo-nds back?!

0:24:360:24:37

LAUGHTER

0:24:370:24:39

So there's somebody who doesnae like the performance

0:24:390:24:42

and they want their money back?

0:24:420:24:43

'The workshop was fabulous.

0:24:430:24:45

'I enjoyed everything.

0:24:450:24:47

'We had a brilliant time with Matthew and James.'

0:24:470:24:50

I've learnt more how Scotland lost the language of Scots

0:24:500:24:55

and then how it's come back in.

0:24:550:24:59

'My name is Nadia and I'm 11 years old and I live in Glasgow.

0:25:060:25:11

'At home, I speak English, a bit of Scots

0:25:160:25:20

'and a tiny bit of Urdu,

0:25:200:25:22

'but I enjoy mostly Scots and English.'

0:25:220:25:26

The Scots language is fun...

0:25:260:25:30

..and it's my own magic, secret language.

0:25:310:25:36

Scots poetry is nice and magical to me

0:25:380:25:43

but sometimes rough and a bit gentle sometimes,

0:25:430:25:48

because it can get really loud,

0:25:480:25:50

and at that point, it can be a bit angry sometimes.

0:25:500:25:54

I'm Nadia's dad and I'm a writer. I've used a lot of Scots words

0:25:540:25:58

in my short stories and novels, too,

0:25:580:25:59

and words from Glasgow, in different ways.

0:25:590:26:02

Although a learner of Scots,

0:26:020:26:05

Nadia's interest in it has been fired up by her dad.

0:26:050:26:09

You can write in really deep Scots

0:26:090:26:11

using lots of almost forgotten words, semi-forgotten words.

0:26:110:26:15

Or you can just pepper English with well-known words

0:26:150:26:18

like glaikit and dreich, that if you live in Scotland you will hear,

0:26:180:26:21

but when you go out of Scotland, people don't know what they mean a lot of the time.

0:26:210:26:25

So it's quite good to use those words

0:26:250:26:28

and you give different readers different ways of entering the story

0:26:280:26:32

and understanding it in different ways if you use these other words.

0:26:320:26:36

Living in the West End, which is quite cosmopolitan

0:26:360:26:39

because of Glasgow University and a lot of student population,

0:26:390:26:43

'you do get to hear different languages and that, of course,

0:26:430:26:47

'includes Scots language as well.'

0:26:470:26:50

We also have to think about what you want to pack

0:26:500:26:53

and take when you go for your week at the Robert Burns...

0:26:530:26:57

'For the children of the first and second generation immigrants,'

0:26:570:27:01

it is important to know or become familiar with the Scots language

0:27:010:27:07

because it is the historical language of Scotland

0:27:070:27:11

'and as a lot of our languages are becoming extinct in a way

0:27:110:27:15

'which are from smaller communities and minorities

0:27:150:27:18

'and I think Scots language is in a similar situation.

0:27:180:27:22

'In terms of the first and second generation immigrants,'

0:27:220:27:25

I think it's a challenge not only for them but also

0:27:250:27:28

for the mainstream Scottish population as well

0:27:280:27:31

that their children learn or retain the Scots language

0:27:310:27:34

which is part of their ancient identity.

0:27:340:27:37

-Did we put any salt or pepper in last time?

-Yeah. And butter.

0:27:370:27:42

'I would like to go to Scot Scuil because...'

0:27:420:27:45

it will be quite fun

0:27:450:27:47

and I'd like to learn more Scots and improve my confidence

0:27:470:27:52

'because everyone says that I'm a bit shy.

0:27:520:27:56

'In the school reports, it's always,

0:27:560:27:58

'"She needs to improve on her confidence."'

0:27:580:28:00

Are you looking forward to next week? Hmmm?

0:28:000:28:04

I think Nadia will get a lot out of the Scots Scuil.

0:28:050:28:08

I think she'll get on with the other kids there and if they are all

0:28:080:28:11

immersed in Scots in that context then I think she will respond.

0:28:110:28:18

I think hearing it being spoken by people in that way,

0:28:180:28:21

as a living tongue, not just on the page, is crucial.

0:28:210:28:25

Especially with a language like Scots.

0:28:250:28:27

It's oral and I think she will respond to that.

0:28:270:28:31

In Alloway, it's the day of the music workshop,

0:28:340:28:38

but with show-time looming, the pressure is on.

0:28:380:28:41

The girls have to put together a Scots song with folk musician

0:28:410:28:45

Emily Smith.

0:28:450:28:47

Hi, girls. My name is Emily, this is Jamie and we play folk music.

0:28:470:28:52

I'm a folk singer.

0:28:520:28:53

So, to get started, girls, we're going to sing you

0:28:530:28:56

a little bit of a type of song I would normally sing,

0:28:560:28:58

an old, old Scots song called The Beggar Man.

0:28:580:29:02

# A beggar, a beggar

0:29:090:29:11

# Came ower the lea

0:29:110:29:13

# He was asking lodgings for charity

0:29:130:29:17

# He was asking lodgings for charity

0:29:170:29:22

# Saying, would ye loo a beggar man

0:29:220:29:25

# Laddie wi' my tow row ray

0:29:250:29:28

# A beggar, a beggar... #

0:29:280:29:30

'To start off this morning, I sung them a little excerpt of a folk song.

0:29:300:29:33

'The kind of song that I would usually sing.'

0:29:330:29:36

# I had ae dochter and Jeanie was her name

0:29:360:29:40

# She ran awa' wi' a beggar man

0:29:400:29:44

# Laddie wi' my tow row ray

0:29:440:29:46

# Laddie wi' my tow row ray. #

0:29:460:29:49

-Thank you.

-That was guid, you're an awfu guid singer.

0:29:510:29:54

-Thank you very much.

-You're an awfu guid guitar player.

0:29:540:29:58

Singing in Scots is really important to me

0:29:580:30:01

and I'm passionate about it because it's my culture. It's my heritage.

0:30:010:30:04

Girls, we're going to try and write a song together today

0:30:040:30:08

and what we're going to try and write it about is identity.

0:30:080:30:12

So, we're going to think about what makes us who we are as individuals

0:30:120:30:18

and, Nadia, if you could write down some of the ideas that we

0:30:180:30:21

maybe are going to come up with.

0:30:210:30:24

Just words, just random words

0:30:240:30:26

and phrases that might pop into your heads.

0:30:260:30:29

-What makes us different from anyone else?

-The way you speak.

0:30:290:30:33

The way you speak is a big one, especially this week.

0:30:330:30:37

-What about where you live?

-Oh, aye.

0:30:370:30:40

We all live in Scotland but we all live in different parts.

0:30:400:30:43

These are good.

0:30:430:30:44

-Colour of your skin?

-Colour of your skin.

0:30:440:30:47

-What about the things that you like to do.

-Sing?

-Singing.

0:30:470:30:51

I'll just write for Milly, singing.

0:30:510:30:53

-For Sandie, it's everything.

-Animals.

-Animals.

0:30:550:31:00

Really, the environment around you forms who you are, doesn't it?

0:31:000:31:04

We've got a country girl, a village girl and a city girl.

0:31:040:31:09

We did a bit of a brainstorming session

0:31:090:31:11

just jotting down some ideas and then from there,

0:31:110:31:14

we started to try and form a chorus to frame the song upon.

0:31:140:31:17

What about, "This sang is made for me"?

0:31:170:31:22

-Sitting beside the window?

-Sing beside the window?

0:31:220:31:26

-Sitting beside the window.

-Sitting beside the window.

0:31:260:31:30

-To sing beside the window?

-To sing beside the window.

0:31:300:31:34

Maybe about aw the folk ootside.

0:31:340:31:35

This sang is made for me tae sing beside the window.

0:31:350:31:39

Watching aw the folk that's ootside.

0:31:390:31:42

Don't forget, we can change it if we want to.

0:31:420:31:44

Watching aw the folk.

0:31:440:31:47

This sang is made for me to sing beside the windae.

0:31:470:31:51

-Would you say window or windae?

-Windae.

0:31:510:31:53

Let's try and look at this last line here.

0:31:530:31:55

This sang is made for me to sing beside the windae,

0:31:550:31:58

watching aw the folk ootside.

0:31:580:32:01

-When there's nothing else tae dae.

-Needs more Scottish in it, like.

0:32:010:32:05

-Nu'hin.

-Nu'hin or naethin'?

-Nu'hin.

-Naethin'.

0:32:050:32:10

I think it depends where you come from, doesn't it?

0:32:100:32:13

I think now is the time we're going to ask Jamie to come in

0:32:130:32:16

and help us write our melody.

0:32:160:32:18

We've got our chorus words and we gave them happy sounds, sad sounds,

0:32:200:32:25

fast, finger-picked, strumming.

0:32:250:32:28

Does that sound happy? If it was sad it would sound more...

0:32:280:32:33

Bonnie, it sounds bonnie, but in a bonnie, jumpy way,

0:32:330:32:37

no' a bonnie, pretty way.

0:32:370:32:39

It's kind of sad-sounding, isn't it?

0:32:410:32:44

We're not going to go down that way. We're going to stick

0:32:440:32:47

-with a happy...

-Happy, happy.

-Sandie says happy.

0:32:470:32:50

-Jamie can play in different ways.

-In the jungle.

0:32:500:32:53

We just started talking the words of the chorus over

0:32:530:32:57

with Jamie playing some chords and through that we found our melody.

0:32:570:33:01

# This sang is made fir me tae sing beside the windae

0:33:010:33:06

# Watchin aw the folk ootside when there's naethin else tae dae. #

0:33:060:33:11

Did you hear he changed a little bit at the end? Did you like that?

0:33:110:33:14

We've got to change the chord a wee bit in there.

0:33:140:33:17

'Then we moved on to the verses.'

0:33:170:33:19

We focused in on where

0:33:190:33:20

each of my three girls in the workshop came from.

0:33:200:33:24

Milly is from a country background, grew up on a farm.

0:33:240:33:26

From ma house, you've got a window where the kitchen is

0:33:260:33:29

and you can see outside the grass, the horses and then

0:33:290:33:33

if you look down a bit further, you can see the pony.

0:33:330:33:37

I watch ma ponies fae ma windae.

0:33:380:33:42

-There's another word that could rhyme with it - straw?

-Straw.

0:33:420:33:46

-Watch ma ponies fae the windae munchin on their straw?

-Aye.

0:33:460:33:50

-You know what, Milly, to make this even more Scots.

-I was thinking...

0:33:500:33:56

-were you going to say champin there?

-I was.

-So was I!

-That's amazing.

0:33:560:34:03

Sandie, she's from Muirkirk, so it's a wee toon.

0:34:030:34:07

We talked about, even though she lives in the toon,

0:34:070:34:09

she likes to gaze up at the sky.

0:34:090:34:11

-I like tae watch the stars.

-Do you like to watch the stars?

0:34:110:34:15

-That's quite nice.

-Through ma windae I like to watch the stars.

0:34:150:34:20

-You've got your windae as well?

-Aye.

0:34:200:34:22

That's what you're going to need to rhyme with.

0:34:220:34:24

I know what I'm going to dae.

0:34:240:34:27

Ma dad helps me look at Mars cos he does. Wi his big telescope.

0:34:270:34:31

Then moved on to the city for Nadia's verse and just about

0:34:310:34:35

the people she knows, the people she sees coming and going

0:34:350:34:38

and saying hello to them.

0:34:380:34:41

# I bide in a city, the West End is ma hame

0:34:410:34:44

# I've neighbours up and doon the stairs and I ken aw their names... #

0:34:440:34:49

Nadia's neighbours.

0:34:490:34:52

I guess, just to tie the end of that verse together

0:34:520:34:56

was about all of us, basically.

0:34:560:34:58

Not just the three or four of us but everybody and about bringing it back

0:34:580:35:02

to the language, I suppose, which is what today is about - the Scots.

0:35:020:35:07

# Some o us were born here, some cam fae far awa

0:35:070:35:11

# But we fin oot the way we speak unites us yin and aw... #

0:35:110:35:16

The singing she wrote was amazing, I loved it.

0:35:180:35:20

It was one of ma favourite things.

0:35:200:35:22

Just the way that we put aw the work into daeing it

0:35:220:35:26

and you didnae get bored ae it.

0:35:260:35:29

I didnae get bored of anything else that much

0:35:290:35:31

but I liked the singing thing, the way that we got a singer in

0:35:310:35:36

and she actually helped us write our ain song.

0:35:360:35:38

My name is Milly, I am 10 years old.

0:35:550:35:58

I live in Selkirk and my hobbies are horse riding, singing and art.

0:35:580:36:05

We've always noticed that Milly does speak slightly different

0:36:070:36:11

from us, which some of us make a joke out of it and that, because I'm

0:36:110:36:16

that broad and Milly just seems to be posh, we call her the posh kid.

0:36:160:36:21

If I say a word, if I say, "aye" and "hoose,"

0:36:220:36:26

she'd say, "yes" and "house".

0:36:260:36:28

We just seem to have that border tongue

0:36:280:36:31

and Milly's got this different accent.

0:36:310:36:33

Where it comes fae, I've no idea. I'm as broad as you'll probably get

0:36:330:36:37

and Milly just seems to be the totally other end of the scale.

0:36:370:36:41

I think it's from singing because my singing teacher...

0:36:410:36:46

I have to pronounce my words properly because

0:36:460:36:51

If I don't, when you're singing, they're not going to hear you.

0:36:510:36:54

I think that's why I'm a bit clear

0:36:540:36:58

and different language from my family a bit more.

0:36:580:37:03

When Dad's at the side gaun on aboot the ladders

0:37:030:37:06

but they were gaun tae go on doon tae the hoose.

0:37:060:37:08

They were just missing the top of the house.

0:37:080:37:11

THEY SPEAK BROAD SCOTS

0:37:110:37:17

'When I'm with my family, when my gran and grandpa and all that come,

0:37:220:37:27

'and my auntie and everybody comes in the house, I speak more broader'

0:37:270:37:32

and when I go with my friends, I speak a bit more posher.

0:37:320:37:37

Two, three, up! That's it.

0:37:380:37:41

Sometimes I do speak Scottish words

0:37:410:37:44

and I think I'm speaking English but I'm actually speaking Scots.

0:37:440:37:50

It suits the countryside.

0:37:500:37:51

It would be a shame if it all just disappeared and English took over

0:37:510:37:56

and the English language took over,

0:37:560:37:58

because it's been the history for a long time.

0:37:580:38:02

Robert Burns used them and he's quite famous.

0:38:020:38:07

It's like, all the famous people are just going to get washed away

0:38:070:38:11

by the English language and I don't really want that.

0:38:110:38:15

Every little border town has got their own accent

0:38:150:38:19

and little special words they use,

0:38:190:38:22

so you know where you come from because of the words that you use

0:38:220:38:26

and the accent, the different tones in the voice.

0:38:260:38:29

I hope I learn a lot from the Scots Scuil

0:38:330:38:35

and I've a feeling I am going to learn a lot because I feel

0:38:350:38:39

there's going to be a lot of Scottish people there and I hope

0:38:390:38:42

that will improve my language, a bit more Scots

0:38:420:38:45

other than speaking English. All the rest of my family speaks Scottish

0:38:450:38:49

and I am like the odd one out here.

0:38:490:38:51

I really like the Scots language.

0:38:510:38:53

-I hope I'll start speaking that language a bit more.

-Good.

0:38:530:38:56

Make a wish, but dinnae tell us.

0:38:560:38:58

It's the morning of the poetry workshop at Scots Scuil.

0:39:030:39:07

Today's class is perfect for a potential poet like Nadia

0:39:070:39:10

who's looking for a language to write in.

0:39:100:39:12

The teacher is poet Liz Niven,

0:39:120:39:14

who's been teaching Scots poetry for over 20 years.

0:39:140:39:18

It's cried, Let's Hear Whit The Dragon's Got To Say.

0:39:180:39:21

Listen, it's no gonnie be easie this.

0:39:210:39:24

If ye think it's a skoosh case ye're wrang.

0:39:240:39:26

A've been ettlin tae mak masel heard fir yonks

0:39:260:39:30

An naebodie a mean naebodie listens.

0:39:300:39:33

A've goat ma shades, ma iPod, ma Nokia

0:39:330:39:35

An a've stoapt spittin fire.

0:39:350:39:39

That's a good line, that.

0:39:390:39:41

It's good how she was taking it from a kid's point of view

0:39:410:39:47

with the dragon and the Nokia,

0:39:470:39:49

the iPod and the realistic features into the imaginative features.

0:39:490:39:56

It was good how she done that.

0:39:560:39:58

We concentrated on two different forms of writing.

0:39:580:40:01

One of them was looking at each kid's individual toon,

0:40:010:40:06

where they came fae, because it's something that each child knows

0:40:060:40:10

about, a lot about their own place so the comfort of actually

0:40:100:40:13

writing about material they know well was a way in to get them writing.

0:40:130:40:18

Although most of them are really good speakers of Scots,

0:40:180:40:20

they find it difficult to write in it cos it's no what they're used tae.

0:40:200:40:23

How do you spell "farm" in Scots again?

0:40:230:40:28

-F-E-R-M.

-Thanks.

0:40:280:40:32

OK, folks, that's fantastic, you can stop all your busy screeving

0:40:320:40:36

and writing the noo. Ye've got two choices, twa choices.

0:40:360:40:40

You can write in English and in Scots, baith thegither in the same poem.

0:40:400:40:44

If you're wanting to rhyme, "fitba" and "ma" works, "football" and "mum" disnae.

0:40:440:40:49

So it's brilliant, Scots opens up the choices of

0:40:490:40:52

a whole lot of different words and rhymes.

0:40:520:40:54

Ask yourself if you've got any changes of vocabulary.

0:40:540:40:57

If you've said the sky, do you want to say the lift?

0:40:570:41:00

If you've said a wee bit of a fuss, do you want to have a stooshie?

0:41:000:41:05

A boorach? Right, Sandie, let's hear your poem.

0:41:050:41:08

Tabby's Brig.

0:41:080:41:10

In winter, icy water, freezin caul, I cracked the ice wi ma mates

0:41:100:41:16

and ma faither chuckin aw the stanes into the water.

0:41:160:41:19

That was great, Sandie.

0:41:190:41:20

A lovely atmospheric poem connected with the seasons

0:41:200:41:24

and the time of year. Thank you.

0:41:240:41:25

-Thomas, could you read your poem now?

-The pitch And Me.

0:41:250:41:31

A 75 metre-long rectangle, concrete-flaired

0:41:310:41:34

Fitba pitch wi the ba pounding off the wa

0:41:340:41:37

Wi the birds humming to the beat

0:41:370:41:39

That sunny lift that nothing could beat.

0:41:390:41:42

That's lovely. I love that.

0:41:420:41:44

'The second exercise that we worked on today was we wrote riddle poems.'

0:41:440:41:48

We had a discussion about what is a riddle

0:41:480:41:52

and what is the point of a riddle and they knew exactly what that was,

0:41:520:41:55

that it's a kind of trick poem.

0:41:550:41:58

We then asked the children to write their ain poems,

0:41:580:42:01

they could maybe choose an animal or a beast

0:42:010:42:04

or a bird or a person or something and then think through

0:42:040:42:08

different aspects or properties of that person or animal.

0:42:080:42:13

What its size was, what its colour was and then it's a "Whit am I" poem,

0:42:140:42:19

so at the end of it all,

0:42:190:42:21

the listener has tae work out what's being described.

0:42:210:42:25

I'm as wee as a moose and as muckle as a tiger,

0:42:250:42:29

I'm as saft as a baby's skin and as strong as a boxer,

0:42:290:42:33

I'm furry and four leggit

0:42:330:42:35

and my name starts wi the fourth letter of the alphabet.

0:42:350:42:39

Whit am I?

0:42:390:42:40

-Dog?

-Aye.

-That was easy.

0:42:410:42:44

I can be as tall as a door and as small as the length o' your arm

0:42:440:42:51

when I come into the world, I can live in something tall

0:42:510:42:56

and big that's warm,

0:42:560:42:58

my skin colour can be pinky-white to black,

0:42:580:43:02

I have to go to bed at night,

0:43:020:43:05

I can only live for at least 100 years or 99 years.

0:43:050:43:10

What am I?

0:43:100:43:12

It's a human!

0:43:120:43:14

OK, let's have a wee chat, folks, a wee blether about which poem

0:43:160:43:20

you would like to read in your performance.

0:43:200:43:23

Ye've got a riddle poem and ye've got a poem about your toon.

0:43:230:43:26

-Thomas, what do you think?

-I think a riddle.

0:43:260:43:29

I think a toon because I think we get mair Scots language in it.

0:43:290:43:34

Right. That's what this is about, isn't it?

0:43:340:43:38

Trying to get using our Scots a wee bit mair.

0:43:380:43:40

-OK, what do you think, Cameron?

-I think the riddle.

0:43:400:43:45

Can you explain why you prefer the riddle to the toon?

0:43:450:43:49

I think the riddle's kinda... Even though I like doing the toon one,

0:43:490:43:54

I think the riddle's kinda mair fun cos...

0:43:540:43:57

'I'm hoping that they learn from the workshops today'

0:43:570:44:00

that they havenae to feel, when they're writing in Scots,

0:44:000:44:04

that every word has to be different fae English.

0:44:040:44:07

I'm hoping they take away fae it a mair relaxed feeling

0:44:070:44:10

about their writing in Scots and also maybe listen to their own voices

0:44:100:44:14

'and think, "I can speak Scots, therefore I can try and write it."'

0:44:140:44:19

Sometimes, I can sometimes live for 100 year. Would that work?

0:44:190:44:23

-I can sometimes live for 100 year, or even mair.

-Or even mair.

0:44:230:44:27

That would work fine, wouldn't it?

0:44:270:44:29

Is there a kind of feeling, then, that you quite like Nadia's?

0:44:290:44:32

Aye, I like Nadia's.

0:44:320:44:34

OK, I think we're going to go with Nadia's.

0:44:360:44:38

My name is Eunice, aka Sweets from NorthernXposure.

0:44:400:44:44

And I've been rapping since about the age of 13.

0:44:440:44:48

OK, so, today we're going to be doing some Scots Scuil action

0:44:480:44:53

and we are going to be talking

0:44:530:44:54

and, hopefully, writing a wee rap in Scots.

0:44:540:44:57

'The first thing I did is I performed one of the tracks off my new album.'

0:44:570:45:01

I did that kind of just to make them feel a bit more comfortable.

0:45:010:45:06

Cue the music.

0:45:060:45:07

# You can take the game oot the block

0:45:090:45:11

# But you just cannae stop them people wanna flock

0:45:110:45:14

# Street like vox shop

0:45:140:45:15

# Rough like dry rot weak as hip hop

0:45:150:45:18

# And we havenae got a lot but we still use too hot

0:45:200:45:23

# We getting tipped up we getting tipped up

0:45:230:45:26

# Life is a wan stop shop or should I say wan short stop?

0:45:260:45:30

# Wan short stage

0:45:300:45:31

# Revelations bout to blow you away and reap what you want to see

0:45:310:45:35

# Play how you want to play be what you want to be

0:45:350:45:38

# See what you want to see say what you want to say... #

0:45:380:45:41

'I think it is very helpful for them

0:45:410:45:44

'to hear somebody rapping with a Scots accent.'

0:45:440:45:49

So, that's it.

0:45:490:45:51

Thank you very much. That's wicked, give me five.

0:45:530:45:57

-It's a sweet tune.

-Do you like that tune?

0:46:010:46:03

Do you get it? Sweet, Sweets!

0:46:030:46:07

So, I'm thinking we should do something to do with, like, identity.

0:46:070:46:12

Like ourselves.

0:46:120:46:14

-Aye, ourselves.

-Well, Scotland.

0:46:140:46:17

'When it came to creating the actual rap itself,

0:46:180:46:22

'we were just brainstorming, asking the kids,

0:46:220:46:25

'OK, what Scots words do you know?'

0:46:250:46:27

-Hame.

-Hame. Perfect.

0:46:270:46:29

'And then we were just making a list of the different words that we knew.'

0:46:290:46:34

-Masel.

-Masel, we'll write that doon.

0:46:340:46:37

'The words that we thought were really important to be in the rap.'

0:46:370:46:40

Faimily.

0:46:400:46:41

Faimily.

0:46:410:46:43

Could be something like, "It's oor hame."

0:46:430:46:46

It's oor hame. Let's write that sentence down.

0:46:460:46:48

Then we've used "oor" as well.

0:46:480:46:50

So, we've got Scotland is oor hame.

0:46:500:46:53

Sometimes it's freezin' in the rain.

0:46:530:46:57

-So that uses your word.

-So, will we write our next bit?

0:46:570:47:00

'The kids were fantastic.

0:47:000:47:01

'They really understood the concept of what we were trying to do.'

0:47:010:47:05

You could have Scotland is oor hame. Sometimes it's freezin' in the rain.

0:47:050:47:10

But other times... the weather is our gain.

0:47:100:47:14

We could write that down.

0:47:140:47:15

But sometimes the weather is our gain, you says, aye.

0:47:150:47:20

-Aye.

-Is our gain.

0:47:200:47:22

That's good, I like that cos that makes it quite positive.

0:47:220:47:27

'They understood about adding in the Scots.

0:47:270:47:30

'They actually had a wide vocabulary of Scots, but they might not

0:47:300:47:33

'have been necessarily aware that that is actually defined as Scots.

0:47:330:47:37

'It's something we use on a day-to-day basis.'

0:47:370:47:40

We decided the best thing to do was to look at

0:47:400:47:43

how we were actually going to deliver the rap.

0:47:430:47:46

So, we got together with the drummer

0:47:480:47:51

and it enabled us to add a little bit of movement to the actual rap

0:47:510:47:55

and then go on to add a little bit of character and a little bit of fun.

0:47:550:47:59

# Scotland is oor hame.

0:47:590:48:01

# Sometimes it's freezing in the rain

0:48:010:48:04

# But while the weather is our gain... #

0:48:040:48:07

For this crew, the rap, whatever the language,

0:48:070:48:11

is a bit of a guddle for now.

0:48:110:48:13

That was an epic fail!

0:48:160:48:18

I found it easier to do it like fast then slow.

0:48:180:48:21

I know, that's why you need to practise it slow.

0:48:210:48:24

Well, let's do it again from the top, right?

0:48:240:48:26

I'll tell yous what it is, right?

0:48:260:48:29

So, Scotland is oor hame, sometimes it's freezing in the rain

0:48:290:48:34

but while the weather is our gain the main thing is we are all the same.

0:48:340:48:39

We are nae daen it for the fame, masel and ma faimly play the game,

0:48:390:48:43

we're wan of Scotland's biggest names, if you're no listning...

0:48:430:48:47

..What ye daen?

0:48:470:48:48

That's it, let's try it again from the top, right?

0:48:480:48:51

Mr Drummer.

0:48:510:48:53

DRUMMING

0:48:530:48:55

OK, guys.

0:48:570:48:59

One, two,

0:48:590:49:01

one, two, three, four.

0:49:010:49:04

# Scotland is oor hame

0:49:040:49:06

# Sometimes it's freezing in the rain...#

0:49:060:49:09

The words in the rap are sort of, like, special,

0:49:090:49:14

cos they do tell the truth about Scotland, the cauld,

0:49:140:49:18

freezing weather and we're all from Scotland.

0:49:180:49:21

And it does, like, speak to me and Cammy

0:49:210:49:26

cos it includes some of the features we like

0:49:260:49:29

and some Iona likes and some Eunice likes.

0:49:290:49:32

# If you're no listening what you daein? #

0:49:320:49:36

-Yeah, that was good.

-We need it better.

0:49:360:49:38

-Let's do it again.

-Gie it laldie!

0:49:380:49:41

It's performance day at Scots Scuil

0:49:430:49:45

and the children hope to put nerves to one side

0:49:450:49:48

and show off all they've learned and practised during the week.

0:49:480:49:51

APPLAUSE

0:49:510:49:54

Still thou art blest, compared wi' me!

0:49:560:50:00

The present only toucheth thee.

0:50:000:50:02

But, oh! I backward cast my e'e,

0:50:020:50:04

On prospects drear!

0:50:040:50:07

An' forward, tho' I canna see,

0:50:070:50:08

I guess an' fear.

0:50:080:50:10

-Och! He was gad.

-He was great!

0:50:160:50:18

-Certainly gied it laldie but he's an awfu blether, that boy!

-Ach!

0:50:180:50:21

He just blethered on and on. I want my five pound back.

0:50:210:50:25

-Wheesht!

-I've the receipt here in ma pootch somewhere.

0:50:250:50:28

Shut yer mooth, pal!

0:50:280:50:30

-Jolly good show!

-Bravo!

0:50:300:50:33

'The drama performance today was absolutely amazing.'

0:50:330:50:37

Those kids had not done much drama until, I think, I met them.

0:50:370:50:41

And they have suddenly become actors.

0:50:410:50:44

I think there were actors inside them anyway

0:50:440:50:46

and the fact that they were doing it in this language, this strange,

0:50:460:50:50

weird language, Scots language, is something amazing.

0:50:500:50:53

So I'm really pleased with them.

0:50:530:50:54

Well, Alan, you said your poem so beautifully, you are the winner!

0:50:540:51:00

Here's your book token.

0:51:000:51:02

What are you going to buy with it, Alan?

0:51:050:51:07

Thanks, Miss, I'm going to buy hunners of books wi' it.

0:51:070:51:11

Hunners? The proper word is hundreds, isn't it, Alan?

0:51:110:51:14

(No.) Aye, I suppose so!

0:51:140:51:16

Gauin gie us ma jaiket, ower?

0:51:160:51:18

Oh, Alan, it's your jacket, not your jaiket.

0:51:180:51:21

But it's pouring doun wi' rain oot there, I'm goin' tae git droukit.

0:51:210:51:24

Oot! He doesnae act like this at hame.

0:51:240:51:27

I just dinna ken where he gets it fae!

0:51:270:51:29

I'M YOUR HEADMISTRESS!

0:51:300:51:34

TALK PROPERLY, BOY!

0:51:350:51:37

I'm your faither, talk properly, son.

0:51:370:51:40

And dinna ye speak slang, no in front o' yer old granny.

0:51:400:51:44

# Dinna talk Scots, boy Dinna speak slang

0:51:450:51:49

# Dinna speak Scots, boy ye ken it's aw wrang

0:51:490:51:52

# Dinna speak Scots, boy help ma Boab

0:51:520:51:55

# Dinna speak Scots boy you'll never get a job. #

0:51:550:51:59

NO! IT'S NO FAIR!

0:51:590:52:02

You gave me a prize for speaking Scots,

0:52:020:52:05

then you gie me into trouble for speaking it.

0:52:050:52:07

Scots was good enough for Robert Burns,

0:52:070:52:09

how's it not good enough for me?

0:52:090:52:11

We will now perform a poem written by Nadia.

0:52:200:52:23

Helped along with the rest of us called, "Whit Am I?"

0:52:230:52:26

You can try and guess what it is at the end.

0:52:260:52:29

Whit am I?

0:52:290:52:30

I can be as tall as a door or as smaw as yer airm.

0:52:300:52:35

I started off as a wean when I came into the world.

0:52:350:52:37

I can be black, broun, yellow or white

0:52:370:52:39

and when I got a beamer I gaun reid.

0:52:390:52:42

I can live for a hundred year and I'm no close to extinction.

0:52:420:52:46

I have a bahookie, hurdies, twa lugs and I live in a faimily.

0:52:460:52:51

Sometimes I'm bonnie but sometimes ma fizzog is pure minging.

0:52:530:52:58

-ALL:.

-Whit am I?

0:52:580:53:01

Human?

0:53:010:53:02

Aye!

0:53:020:53:04

It was happy, it was sad because it was the last day and it was...

0:53:060:53:11

It was just everything.

0:53:140:53:16

# This sang is made for me Tae sing aside the windae

0:53:200:53:26

# Watching all the folk ootside when there's naething else tae dae

0:53:260:53:31

# This sang is made for me Tae sing aside the windae

0:53:310:53:36

# Watching all the folk ootside when there's naething else tae dae

0:53:360:53:40

# I live on a ferm where the air smells fresh and braw

0:53:450:53:49

# I watch ma ponies fae the windae champing on the straw

0:53:490:53:55

# I live in a toon where I like to watch the stars

0:53:550:53:59

# Through ma windae tae the sky I hae a keek at Mars

0:53:590:54:04

# This sang is made for me Tae sing aside the windae

0:54:040:54:09

# Watching all the folk ootside when there's naething else tae dae

0:54:090:54:14

# This sang is made for me Tae sing aside the windae

0:54:140:54:19

# Watching all the folk ootside when there's naething else tae dae

0:54:190:54:24

# I bide in a city the West End is ma hame

0:54:280:54:33

# I've neighbours up and doon the stairs

0:54:330:54:35

# And I ken aw their names... #

0:54:350:54:37

I liked the bit where we had just finished off the chorus

0:54:370:54:41

and Nadia's bit of the song and then the rapping comes straight in.

0:54:410:54:45

# But while the weather is our gain

0:54:530:54:56

# The main thing is we're aw the same

0:54:560:54:58

# Me and ma faimily play the game

0:54:580:55:00

# We're wan of Scotland's biggest name

0:55:000:55:03

# If you're no listnin'

0:55:030:55:04

# Whit ye daen? #

0:55:040:55:06

# This song is made for me Tae sing aside the windae

0:55:060:55:10

# Watching aw the folk ootside... #

0:55:100:55:14

'Well I think today's performance went fantastically well,

0:55:140:55:17

'the kids really all worked together

0:55:170:55:19

'and they really came through or gave it laldie!'

0:55:190:55:22

'I think they did it fantastic, yeah,

0:55:220:55:26

'they were oozing with confidence and they remembered their lines

0:55:260:55:29

'and they did me proud.'

0:55:290:55:32

#..Made for me. #

0:55:320:55:35

APPLAUSE AND CHEERING

0:55:350:55:39

I love hearing them speaking out their Scots really confidently

0:55:470:55:51

and loudly and there was a mixture of the moral of speaking it in January

0:55:510:55:56

and no' speaking it later and then there was fun elements

0:55:560:55:58

and rhythmic elements. So, I think it was a really excellent mixture

0:55:580:56:02

of different things going on.

0:56:020:56:04

Absolutely brilliant.

0:56:040:56:07

Didn't know Scotland had as many talented children

0:56:070:56:10

in the one small place. It was phenomenal.

0:56:100:56:14

What an experience for them to get, you know? Song, poetry writing.

0:56:140:56:19

It was great to see what they'd been getting up to all week

0:56:190:56:23

and seeing the finale of what they'd been learning.

0:56:230:56:26

And it's definitely made me as a parent look at the Scots language differently

0:56:260:56:30

and encourage both my children to use it more.

0:56:300:56:35

Coming to Scots Scuil, I think it's built up my confidence

0:56:350:56:38

but don't remind me I have to leave.

0:56:380:56:40

Cos I don't want to leave.

0:56:400:56:43

Going to Scots Scuil has helped a lot with my confidence.

0:56:430:56:48

She is familiar with Scots but to know it at such a deep level,

0:56:480:56:52

I think it's been great for her.

0:56:520:56:54

It just made me feel mair positive and everything in myself

0:56:540:56:59

and it's made me realise that I don't need to be shy

0:56:590:57:02

about everything I dae.

0:57:020:57:04

I do think that I'll talk more Scots now than I used to

0:57:040:57:12

and I do think I'm sounding much more Scots than I used to.

0:57:120:57:19

So I hope I'm more like the family now instead of the odd one out.

0:57:190:57:24

While I was watching the play, I could see in myself

0:57:240:57:28

the way the head teacher was correcting

0:57:280:57:32

when they were using the Scots language after performing the poem.

0:57:320:57:36

That was kind of like myself and Cameron was using words

0:57:360:57:39

and I was correcting him.

0:57:390:57:41

And it kind of made me think, well, you shouldn't correct them,

0:57:410:57:44

you should allow them to use the language, it is the Scots language.

0:57:440:57:48

So, I think from that, it's made me not be so quick in correcting him

0:57:480:57:54

and just let him go with it.

0:57:540:57:56

What I'm really interested in is what happens next

0:57:560:57:59

to those wee performers.

0:57:590:58:01

Like, is there a legacy for that now in their lives

0:58:010:58:05

and when they go back into school?

0:58:050:58:07

And when they talk about their language issues

0:58:070:58:10

with their parents and with their faimilies and with their friends,

0:58:100:58:13

I think it'll be interesting to see

0:58:130:58:15

is there increased confidence about their use of Scots?

0:58:150:58:19

You can speak it, you can sing it, you can write it,

0:58:190:58:21

so I'm hoping that it's raised their feeling

0:58:210:58:25

about the status of the language.

0:58:250:58:27

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:58:490:58:51

E-mail [email protected]

0:58:510:58:53

Six young Scots from across the nation gather at Robert Burns's birthplace for an intensive week of Scots language and its variety of regional dialects. We follow their progress and see the wide range of children who find themselves drawn to Scots, whether their parents and teachers approve or not. Mentored by leading figures in Scots poetry, drama, music, writing and rapping, the children experience an intensive week of workshops leading to the final performance in front of their families, tutors and friends. How will they fare?


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