Labrinth's Speak Out


Labrinth's Speak Out

Musician Labrinth explores different ways to use your voice in everyday life. He reveals techniques and skills to get your message across in a variety of situations.


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Transcript


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What's up guys, I'm Labrinth. I'm a musician.

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I'm a writer.

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I'm a producer.

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And here's a little bit of what I do.

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# I predict an earthquake

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# Let me hear you say... #

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But I wasn't always this confident.

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When I was younger, I was a little bit of a shy guy, believe it or not.

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I found it hard to speak in public.

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Music was my way of expressing myself.

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It took me a while to find my voice,

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but I'm hoping that it doesn't have to take you guys that long.

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In this programme, we're going to show you some short cuts,

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and we're going to go and meet some people whose voices are their jobs.

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We're also going to take some volunteers along with us

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to see how they do.

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This is Reece and this is Melissa.

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They're both at school in Salford,

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Greater Manchester.

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Today they're down the road at the BBC's MediaCity,

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where they're going to test their speaking skills

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by becoming newsreaders for a day.

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I think it's...

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I think it's a really good opportunity.

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Hello there, guys. Now here with you this sunny Sunday, you're live...

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Their guru is Newsround presenter Nel Hedayat.

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The challenges of my job are time.

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Next it's time to get the sun lotion and sunnies out...

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'We're live telly, I have to make sure that I sound calm'

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and I'm reading at a pace where

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it's leisurely and enjoyable. But I'm like, "I want to get to

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"that last story. I don't want to drop that last story!"

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If you love bizarre world records, you're going to love this.

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Melissa and Reece are going to have a go at what Nel does

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and find out what it takes to be a top TV news journalist.

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One of the most senior soldiers in Afghanistan says recent

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violence there could have been avoided

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if Britain and America had done a deal with the Taliban ten years ago.

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All you need to do is make sure you're reading slowly,

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you're confident in what you're saying -

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even if you're not sure.

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Confidence is so important.

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Be slow in your delivery.

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The speed I'm talking to you now is not the speed I read at, OK?

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So you need to be confident, smile, stand up tall.

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At every full stop, take a breath cos sometimes you'll go,

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"Mama-mama-mama..."

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and it's too much.

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Before they get in front of the camera,

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what are Nel's top tips for news reading?

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This is Newsround.

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Pace yourself, time yourself, don't

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get ahead of yourself thinking,

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"I know the next few words,

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"I'll say them really fast

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"but I don't know this name so I'm going to say it really slowly."

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We don't know the young prince's name just yet

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but we do know he was born at 4.24pm.

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I'll talk to the autocue as though it's my little brother.

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And you know what?

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There's a very tangible,

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very palpable difference in your tone.

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The royal couple managed to keep it to themselves for a couple of hours.

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Practise...practise reading.

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I read in here,

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I read stories in newspapers,

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I go home and read. I read 24/7.

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You've got to educate and inform and entertain a really young person.

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-OK.

-OK? Up for the job? Who's first?

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I feel quite excited to be honest, yeah.

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I don't feel that nervous, actually.

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I thought I would have had like fear of speaking on camera

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but I'm all right.

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It's Reece who's first into the action.

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OK, we are recording. In five, four, three...

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It's just one big story today,

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we can finally bring you the news the world has been waiting for.

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The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge have had a baby boy.

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This is Newsround.

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That's right, a royal baby has been born.

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The official notice went up on the easel yesterday afternoon.

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We don't know the young prince's name just yet,

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but we do know that he was born at 4.24pm,

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he weighed 8 lbs 6oz

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and he is third in line to the throne.

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That is so tough. Well done!

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Reece puts in a professional performance.

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That's great, well done.

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-It's difficult, weren't it?

-What's the hardest thing though?

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Like it's trying to keep like a pace going,

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cos you don't want to start off confident, then slow down.

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Next, it's Melissa's turn in the spotlight.

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MAN: OK, we are recording. In five, four, three...

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There's just one big story today.

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We can finally bring you the news the whole world has been waiting for.

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The Duke and the Duchess of Cambridge have had a baby boy.

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This is Newsround.

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That's right, the royal baby boy has been born.

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The official notice was put up on the easel yesterday afternoon.

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We don't know the young prince's name but yet,

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we just know that he was born at 4.20pm.

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He weighs 8 lbs 6oz and he is the...he is

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the third in line...

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And the royal couple managed to keep it to themselves

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for a couple of hours.

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They spent time with him in...

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After a solid start, Melissa's report falters.

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He has been up early this is... this morning.

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Can I just give you an update on what I think can help you?

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You're not obeying full stops. You must pause at full stops,

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it gives your brain time to like pause and catch up.

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That will help you with your pace.

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OK.

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MAN: Are we still recording? Here we go.

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There's just one big story today, we can finally bring you the news...

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With Nel's helpful advice taken on board,

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it's take two for Melissa.

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This is Newsround.

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That's right, the royal baby boy has been born.

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The official notice was put on the easel yesterday afternoon.

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We don't know the young prince's name yet

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but we just know that he was born at 4.24pm,

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he weighs 8 lbs 6oz

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and he is the third in line to the throne.

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MAN: That's very good. Excellent.

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Genuinely surprised, in the best possible way,

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how well you guys have done.

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The first time I did that, I was a lot worse than you.

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How did you find it?

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It was quite hard but you get used to it.

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You're thinking and you're reading and you're thinking,

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"I think I'm doing it wrong but I'm doing it right."

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It's confusing. It was hard.

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A real crash course in that in different situations,

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in different ways, we all speak differently,

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-and your voice and how you use it is so powerful in that, right?

-Yes.

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Cool.

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How was your experience?

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-I thought it was amazing.

-Yeah?

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Yeah, it was good. Something that I'd never done before, it was good.

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I might just see you guys on Newsround next.

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My nephew's going to be like, "That's my favourite presenter,

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"I love you guys."

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Would you guys want to do it?

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-Yeah, I'd do it as a job happily.

-Yeah?

-Yeah.

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-You know when you have to read the autocue?

-Yeah.

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Erm, when I've done award ceremonies and they've got autocue,

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I find it really difficult to keep my eyes on it

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and sound natural as well.

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I'll be like, "Er, um, coming up next, um,

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"Tinie Tempah with, er..."

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I just sound like a crazy guy.

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So, how did you guys feel when you had to deal with autocue

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and speaking to the camera?

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It's hard at first, but then when you did it the second time

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it got easier cos they were different speeds and stuff.

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-Oh, OK.

-But you got used to it.

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Do you feel like you would be more confident next time you...

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you were put in that situation?

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-Yeah, definitely.

-Yeah?

-Yeah.

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Personally, I think you guys done an amazing job

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cos I wouldn't have been able to do it, I would have been like...

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HE MUMBLES

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That's all I would have done the whole time. Well done, man.

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Thank you.

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Now for a completely different way of speaking out,

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using your voice to entertain an audience with poetry.

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This is Millie.

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And this is Adam.

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They've come to Latitude Festival to meet poet Caroline Bird.

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Long before you tie the knots,

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Divorce moves in...

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Although Millie and Adam enjoy reading,

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today they'll actually be performing poetry.

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The best kind of poems, they work on paper and in the air.

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They'll each read one classic poem

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to a tent full of complete strangers.

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..He sits on the naughty step, patting his knees

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Crowned in towel, I step out of the shower

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and he's there, handing me a raffle ticket.

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Caroline has had four books of poetry published

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and performed them all over the world.

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I had my first book published when I was 15

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and I was invited to give readings.

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I'd never done anything like that before.

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You feel quite naked and you have to be... Like not literally,

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but you have to get up on stage and kind of pour out your heart

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and be all right with that.

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..but we sing Divorce to sleep

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with long love songs.

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Thank you very much.

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-Do you get nervous?

-Yeah.

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What things worry you about performing?

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If people didn't like what I did and they thought it was really bad.

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-OK, so, worried about kind of being judged?

-Yeah.

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I'm all right I-I'm not really bothered.

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-You don't get nervous?

-No.

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-Not at all?

-No.

-Never? Wow.

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So tell me a bit about the poems that you're going to read.

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Mine is called "In Hilly-Wood" by John Clare.

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I don't quite understand what it says

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but I can read it, so that's fine.

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So, what are Caroline's top tips for reading poetry aloud?

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Adam, I know you don't get nervous

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and you said, "Well, I can read it."

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But it would be so much better for you

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if you can have a reason to be communicating it.

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You have to know why you want to say THAT word like THIS!

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And you want to say that word like this and you have to feel it.

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"How sweet to be thus nestling deep in boughs."

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Have you ever nestled deep in any boughs?

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No.

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OK, have you ever laid out in the lawn and sunbathed?

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Yeah.

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-Yeah. Have you ever felt like "this is great"?

-Yeah.

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I think one of the worries when you're performing a poem

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that is written 300 years ago

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is that it's not in the voice of your time.

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It doesn't mean that you've got to put an olden day voice on

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when you have to go, "Thee."

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It's about transporting that poem into your own mouth

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and into your own time.

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"I strain my heart,

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"I stretch my hands, And catch at hope."

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It's nice cos it's like she's reaching for what she wants

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but she can't get it.

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Remember that you own that poem.

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You are the only person, who will ever see that poem

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in the way that you see it,

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because your voice has never been heard like that before.

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Say it out loud to yourself over and over again,

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find out what it means live.

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Really excited about seeing you doing it.

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This is going to be good.

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There's just enough time for a final run through...

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Faintly are heard the ploughman at their ploughs...

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I never watch the scatter'd fire

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Of stars, or sun's far-trailing train...

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..before they're due on stage.

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APPLAUSE

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Without further ado, I would like to introduce our main acts,

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Adam and Millie. CHEERING AND APPLAUSE

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"How sweet to be thus nestling deep in boughs,

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"Upon an ashen stoven pillowing me;

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"Faintly are heard the ploughmen at their ploughs,

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"But not an eye can find its way to see.

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"Full many a flower, too, wishing to be seen,

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"Perks up its head the hiding grass between -

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"In mid-wood silence, thus, how sweet to be;

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"Where all the noises, that on peace intrude

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"Come from the chittering cricket, bird, and bee,

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"Whose songs have charms to sweeten solitude."

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-Thank you very much.

-CHEERING

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Hi, guys.

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I'm going to be performing De Profundis by Christina Rossetti

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I hope you like it.

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"Oh why is heaven built so far,

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"Oh why is earth set so remote?

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"I cannot reach the nearest star That hangs afloat...

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"I never watch the scatter'd fire,

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"Of stars, or sun's far-trailing train,

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"But all my heart is one desire,

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"And all in vain...

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"I strain my heart, I stretch my hands,

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"And catch at hope."

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I thought you were both really honest

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and genuine in your delivery.

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You went up there, said the poems in your own voices.

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I really felt like I hadn't heard them before.

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You performed at Latitude to a big audience,

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it's pretty good. It's the beginning of your poetry career.

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How was this experience for you?

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I enjoyed doing the poetry.

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It was interesting to do something that I don't usually do.

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Yeah. What about you, Millie?

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It was quite nerve-racking, cos obviously

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if we'd had more time to like study it and know it off by heart

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then we could have like made, done more hand gestures or...

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Yeah, and kind of made it a bit more of a performance.

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Yeah, I see what you mean.

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As an artist we have to, sometimes, perform someone else's song,

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but you have to embody their song in your own way.

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I could do a One Direction song,

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but I would have to do my own version of it.

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How did you feel having to add feeling

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into something that wasn't yours?

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I mean it was hard, cos we don't understand...

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-I don't understand what the poem was about.

-Yeah, yeah.

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So, you had to get full, like, understanding of what it is

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before you can interpret in your own way.

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I find it easier to sing in front of people,

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but, yeah, having to do a poem in front of people,

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I would be, like, "Aargh! I'm going to go home now."

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Do you still get scared when you perform and stuff?

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Without a doubt.

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I think the thing to remember in it is how much you enjoy what you do.

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If you love what you do, then you're going to give it 100%.

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Do you feel like you two have learnt anything from this experience

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that you might want to take away?

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Yeah, I feel like I'm more confident speaking in front of people now

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and I learnt how to put my own twist on things rather than copying it

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exactly how other people do it.

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Yeah, yeah. I think you guys did a great job.

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-Thank you.

-Thank you.

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Next we're off to Preston in Lancashire

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to speak out to a totally different crowd of football fans.

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This is Greg and this is Georgia

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from just outside Manchester.

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They're both sports fans,

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and tonight they're heading to

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Preston North End's Deepdale Stadium.

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But they won't be watching,

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they'll be commentating live for the club's online fans.

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They'll be stepping into the shoes of commentator Jonathan Breeze.

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So, how do you feel about being at Preston North End?

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I think it's a great opportunity to be here,

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it's a great experience to see everyone, meet new people.

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I'm a really big football fan in general,

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so coming down to, to commentate on football every single week

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is like a dream job, really, it's absolutely fantastic.

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Todd Kane here with the throw on the right-hand side,

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up to the edge of the penalty area,

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but they're being forced back by King

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who back-flicks it in towards the path of Kane.

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The most difficult thing with commentary

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is identifying the players and knowing that when there's a goal

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you are calling the right goal-scorer's name out.

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So it's identifying the players,

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knowing the statistics about those players,

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knowing their history, knowing the game in context

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and being able to portray that to the listeners at home.

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Tonight, Georgia and Greg will be doing what Jonathan does

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and commentating on Preston's match against old rivals Blackburn Rovers.

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Preston do have it on the halfway line.

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But before they take to the mic,

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what are Jonathan's top tips for sports commentary?

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..crowd here, inside Deepdale tonight.

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Being able to talk about football is great,

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but you've also got to be able to change the flow and the speed

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of how you talk,

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being able to describe things

0:15:520:15:54

in a way that really gives the listener at home

0:15:540:15:57

the impression that you're their eyes.

0:15:570:15:59

John Welsh here inadvertently got the flick on,

0:15:590:16:02

and the chase is on for DJ Campbell here, down the left-hand side,

0:16:020:16:05

right-footed into the penalty area. Jordan Rhodes with the header

0:16:050:16:08

and Declan Rudd has to make the save.

0:16:080:16:11

Being able to describe where the ball is,

0:16:110:16:13

being able to, kind of, outlaying what the players are doing,

0:16:130:16:16

what they're wearing, where they're standing,

0:16:160:16:18

if the manager's shouting at the referee.

0:16:180:16:20

It's Judge again, running forward,

0:16:200:16:22

all right-footed as he lays it off towards Campbell now,

0:16:220:16:24

who tries to work a way into the penalty area.

0:16:240:16:26

If there's a goal or there's a chance

0:16:260:16:28

then you really need to get excited

0:16:280:16:30

and it's a case of rising your voice a little bit

0:16:300:16:32

just to try and portray that excitement.

0:16:320:16:34

Plenty of movement inside the penalty area,

0:16:340:16:36

Holmes crossing into the penalty area... It's a goal!

0:16:360:16:39

And it's Davies who scores.

0:16:390:16:42

His first Preston North End goal on his Deepdale debut

0:16:420:16:45

against his former side.

0:16:450:16:46

Just making it louder or a little bit quieter

0:16:460:16:49

just to kind of keep the audience listening

0:16:490:16:51

and alert to what you're saying.

0:16:510:16:54

Well the second half's just about to start, it's 1-1 at the moment,

0:16:540:16:57

it's been a really good game,

0:16:570:16:58

we're going to get you two to have a little go at commentating

0:16:580:17:01

and describing the action for the listeners who are tuned in at home.

0:17:010:17:06

Just try and take your time, talk about what's going on,

0:17:060:17:09

talk about who's out there and what they're doing and enjoy it.

0:17:090:17:13

Welcome back to the start of the second half here at Deepdale,

0:17:170:17:21

where it's Preston North End 1, Blackburn Rovers 1.

0:17:210:17:26

Got 15-year-old Georgia, who is sat with me next,

0:17:260:17:30

and Georgia will be bringing us a couple of minutes

0:17:300:17:33

of commentary of the game very shortly.

0:17:330:17:37

Thrust into the hot seat, Georgia's finding it hard to get started.

0:17:370:17:41

Blackburn stand over the free kick.

0:17:410:17:44

Do you want to have a go at commentating on this free kick,

0:17:440:17:46

Georgia?

0:17:460:17:48

OK, we're on the halfway line here.

0:17:490:17:51

That was a shake of the head, by the way,

0:17:510:17:53

if you're listening at home, from Georgia.

0:17:530:17:55

But with a little more prompting from Jonathan,

0:17:550:17:57

Georgia finds her confidence and her voice.

0:17:570:18:01

What did you think of that little passage of play there, Georgia?

0:18:010:18:05

It was a great play, they did really well.

0:18:050:18:07

They broke through really well and I think it's a great game so far

0:18:070:18:09

for the second half. They had a good start

0:18:090:18:11

and are doing really well.

0:18:110:18:13

All the fans are really enthusiastic,

0:18:130:18:15

it's a really bright atmosphere.

0:18:150:18:19

How have you found commentating so far, Georgia?

0:18:190:18:21

Um, it's been a great opportunity,

0:18:210:18:23

it's really interesting to come here with the BBC and watch the match.

0:18:230:18:27

It's the end for Georgia.

0:18:270:18:31

Now I've got Greg next to me, who is sat here

0:18:310:18:33

ready to talk us through some of the action.

0:18:330:18:36

Although nervous, Greg settles down quickly.

0:18:360:18:40

Still Preston North End 1, Blackburn Rovers 1.

0:18:400:18:43

Blackburn, here, are on the ball

0:18:430:18:45

and they're trying to make their way back into the penalty area, Greg.

0:18:450:18:49

Er, yes, and, of course, they're going to throw in.

0:18:490:18:53

Nice low pass towards Chris Taylor.

0:18:530:18:56

Passes to, I believe, is that number 7?

0:18:560:18:59

Yes, that number 7 is Josh King who misses...

0:18:590:19:03

Oh, Jordan Rhodes, sorry, missed a spectacular chance at getting a goal.

0:19:030:19:08

It's a good effort as well for the, er, £8 million man from, er,

0:19:080:19:13

from Blackburn, just in front of the travelling fans as well.

0:19:130:19:17

Preston taking it up the far side now.

0:19:170:19:20

That is Chris Humphrey.

0:19:200:19:23

And...

0:19:240:19:26

Jake Kean has got the ball now, and he's going for a goal kick.

0:19:260:19:30

-Well, Greg, thanks very much for your input.

-Thanks for having me.

0:19:300:19:33

Yeah, thank you very much and very well done for, er, your efforts.

0:19:330:19:37

We're now in the heart of midfield which is probably...

0:19:370:19:41

It was really interesting to be in the commentator's position,

0:19:410:19:44

see what their job's like on a day-to-day basis.

0:19:440:19:46

I was impressed about how he keeps his nerve and he knows

0:19:460:19:49

how to carry on a conversation while staring at a match.

0:19:490:19:54

FINAL WHISTLE BLOWS

0:19:540:19:56

FANS APPLAUD

0:19:560:19:57

Georgia, a little bit nervous at the start,

0:19:570:19:59

but she soon got her confidence going and started

0:19:590:20:02

talking about the game, talking about how things were unfolding.

0:20:020:20:06

I was really surprised with Greg. He was really confident,

0:20:060:20:09

trying to kind of put a bit of description in there

0:20:090:20:11

to try and help the audience understand where the ball is.

0:20:110:20:14

But he was really happy to go on and explain what was going on,

0:20:140:20:17

explain who was on the ball and what was happening.

0:20:170:20:20

They were excellent.

0:20:200:20:22

What's going on, guys, how are you doing?

0:20:270:20:30

-All right.

-Yeah? How do you feel about that?

0:20:300:20:33

It was terrifying.

0:20:330:20:34

Seriously? What was terrifying about it?

0:20:340:20:36

I was just so nervous about the fact that it was live

0:20:360:20:39

-and if you messed up everyone would hear.

-It was just like, "A-a-agh."

0:20:390:20:42

But once you get up there, it's really exciting,

0:20:420:20:44

it's a great experience, you learn to think on your feet

0:20:440:20:47

and just be in the atmosphere of the game, really.

0:20:470:20:49

Do you think it's upped your confidence?

0:20:490:20:51

Yeah, definitely, with speaking more clearly and everything as well

0:20:510:20:55

because I normally speak really fast and rush my words

0:20:550:20:57

cos I'm nervous, but I think I started to grasp a better feel...

0:20:570:21:01

That's exactly, like, I've done that so many times

0:21:010:21:03

where I've been doing interviews,

0:21:030:21:05

and when I first started they'd be like,

0:21:050:21:07

"So, Labrinth, how did you put this album together?"

0:21:070:21:09

And I'd be like, "Well, erm, we, we went with this and we done this

0:21:090:21:12

"and, erm, we worked with this record producer..."

0:21:120:21:15

And it would be like, you don't need to throw the information at them.

0:21:150:21:19

Like, just, just cool it, one word at a time.

0:21:190:21:21

Of course, we all speak differently. I'm from East London,

0:21:210:21:24

and I've got my slang and I'm like,

0:21:240:21:26

"What's up, cuz?" and "What's happening?"

0:21:260:21:28

Not everybody understands that.

0:21:280:21:29

How do you feel about having to change

0:21:290:21:31

the way you articulate your words

0:21:310:21:33

or, you know, like, so people understand what you're saying?

0:21:330:21:36

I feel like I'm doing that right now.

0:21:360:21:38

-Yeah?

-LABRINTH LAUGHS

0:21:380:21:40

Because...

0:21:400:21:42

So am I, mate!

0:21:420:21:43

..wherever you are there's always a bit of slang

0:21:430:21:46

and, like, your own words that you have for your friends or something.

0:21:460:21:49

Yeah. It was an experience, something that you've never done.

0:21:490:21:53

You gave 100% in something that weren't naturally your calling

0:21:530:21:57

but you seemed like a natural.

0:21:570:22:00

-Thank you.

-And the same with you as well. You killed it, babe.

0:22:000:22:03

-My heart was racing.

-It didn't sound like it, you were just like, "Yeah."

0:22:030:22:06

LABRINTH LAUGHS

0:22:060:22:08

Next, a really tough challenge, debating.

0:22:120:22:15

Politicians do it every day, but how easy is it?

0:22:150:22:19

Meet 15-year-old Munevver.

0:22:260:22:28

And 15-year-old Tionne.

0:22:300:22:33

They are, for the very first time,

0:22:330:22:34

about to take part in a debate.

0:22:340:22:38

I'm not sure what to think. I don't know what to expect.

0:22:380:22:41

In English lessons, maybe, I've tried things like this

0:22:410:22:44

but not as big and not as different as this.

0:22:440:22:47

They'll be coached by Jo Box. She is a barrister.

0:22:490:22:53

She specialises in public speaking.

0:22:530:22:55

The motion is that this house would lower the age of voting to 16.

0:22:550:22:59

It's important that people

0:22:590:23:01

get involved in politics from a young age.

0:23:010:23:03

'I'm a barrister.'

0:23:030:23:05

Part of what that involves is making arguments in court.

0:23:050:23:08

So being able to speak confidently,

0:23:080:23:10

to explain yourself clearly, is really important.

0:23:100:23:14

Hey, great to meet you both. I'm Jo.

0:23:140:23:16

'Doing lots of debating when I was at school'

0:23:160:23:18

and university helped me to feel a lot more confident in court.

0:23:180:23:22

Why is that any different to an ordinary manifesto pledge

0:23:220:23:25

where governments put things in that seem popular even if

0:23:250:23:28

they're not necessarily great for society as a whole?

0:23:280:23:31

That's a great point and I'm going to move onto that right now.

0:23:310:23:34

The key thing you need to know is that basically there'll be a topic,

0:23:340:23:38

and your job is to persuade the audience

0:23:380:23:40

that your side is the correct one.

0:23:400:23:42

Normally each side takes it in turns to speak.

0:23:420:23:45

Then often afterwards you'll have a floor debate

0:23:450:23:48

where people in the audience can also put across their view.

0:23:480:23:52

So what are Jo's top tips for debating?

0:23:520:23:54

I think the first key thing is to plan properly.

0:23:540:23:58

Once you know what you're talking about, make a list of points

0:23:580:24:01

and make sure that you have a clear structure.

0:24:010:24:04

What we believe is that actually if students from the age of 16

0:24:040:24:08

were allowed to vote,

0:24:080:24:09

that would make them more interested in the process.

0:24:090:24:12

If you don't sound confident in

0:24:120:24:14

your arguments, nobody else will.

0:24:140:24:16

You can't persuade people

0:24:160:24:17

if you sound nervous or you sound really unsure of what you're saying.

0:24:170:24:22

Don't go too quickly. You need to be as loud as you can

0:24:220:24:26

without sounding like you're shouting.

0:24:260:24:28

It's really important to make sure

0:24:280:24:29

that you project your voice.

0:24:290:24:30

You're not going to persuade people

0:24:300:24:32

if they can't hear what you're saying.

0:24:320:24:34

Do you have any questions?

0:24:340:24:35

Do you have any recommendations of how you would overcome nerves

0:24:350:24:39

or finding things to say?

0:24:390:24:41

Sometimes it is really stressful. You stand up and suddenly all

0:24:410:24:45

the great arguments you'd thought of sort of disappear from your head.

0:24:450:24:49

I think having some notes is a good idea. Not the full speech,

0:24:490:24:53

but sort of key points of what you want to say.

0:24:530:24:55

Just try to practise beforehand,

0:24:550:24:58

maybe the first sentence of your speech

0:24:580:25:01

so that you've already said those words.

0:25:010:25:04

When you get up, that means you're less likely to stutter or trip up.

0:25:040:25:08

Munevver and Tionne only have half an hour

0:25:080:25:12

to prepare for a debate on the pros and cons of cosmetic surgery.

0:25:120:25:17

The other point is rephrasing this argument

0:25:170:25:19

so it's more compelling to...

0:25:190:25:21

Erm, everyone.

0:25:210:25:23

Their moment has arrived.

0:25:250:25:28

APPLAUSE

0:25:280:25:30

OK, so a very warm welcome, er,

0:25:360:25:38

to our two teams who will be debating the motion,

0:25:380:25:42

"This house believes that cosmetic surgery should be banned".

0:25:420:25:46

I'm Adam and I'm going to be debating, erm, like my colleague,

0:25:460:25:50

that cosmetic surgery should be banned when it's not...

0:25:500:25:53

Munevver and her team-mate are on the proposition side

0:25:530:25:56

and have to convince the audience to vote to ban cosmetic surgery.

0:25:560:26:01

Once they've spoken, it's the turn of the opposition.

0:26:010:26:04

It's a fact of life, some people are born more attractive than

0:26:040:26:07

others, er, and some are not. Surely it's a bonus of

0:26:070:26:10

the 21st century that someone who looks in the mirror and says,

0:26:100:26:12

"I am unhappy with my face,"

0:26:120:26:14

can go to the doctors and they can change that.

0:26:140:26:17

Now it's Munevver's turn in the spotlight.

0:26:170:26:19

A warm welcome to Munevver.

0:26:190:26:21

APPLAUSE

0:26:210:26:23

Erm, yes, we believe that cosmetic surgery should be banned,

0:26:290:26:34

but, in...

0:26:340:26:37

We think that...

0:26:370:26:39

With the...

0:26:410:26:43

Sorry.

0:26:430:26:44

NHS does not supply the surgery for people because it's not such an,

0:26:440:26:51

um, as essential as, like, a brain surgeon so they don't fund it.

0:26:510:26:56

Why should you choose...?

0:26:560:26:58

After a shaky start, Munevver soon grows in confidence.

0:26:580:27:00

..a car accident.

0:27:000:27:02

Some people just think that they would benefit from it

0:27:020:27:05

and they should have the right to do so.

0:27:050:27:08

Cosmetic surgery is not something that saves lives,

0:27:080:27:12

it just changes how you look.

0:27:120:27:13

Yes, it might be your ideal self,

0:27:130:27:16

it might be how you want to look, that's the way you want to live,

0:27:160:27:20

but it's not going to save anyone's life.

0:27:200:27:23

It's now the turn of Tionne for the opposition.

0:27:230:27:27

Firstly, people should look how they want to, they should

0:27:290:27:32

make their own choices. If you're depriving them of the choice

0:27:320:27:35

of getting cosmetic surgery, aren't you depriving them of their rights?

0:27:350:27:41

Also, cosmetic surgery can help increase someone's self esteem.

0:27:410:27:46

What I mean by this is that there's a theory in psychology

0:27:460:27:49

that suggests people have an ideal self and an actual self,

0:27:490:27:53

and to be a happy, happier person you must achieve your ideal self,

0:27:530:27:58

and cosmetic surgery could help this.

0:27:580:28:01

This is why I believe that cosmetic surgery should not get banned

0:28:010:28:04

and I am requesting that you oppose this motion, thank you.

0:28:040:28:08

APPLAUSE

0:28:080:28:10

It's now the time where we take a vote,

0:28:140:28:16

so hands right in the air, all votes for the proposition please.

0:28:160:28:19

And all the votes for the opposition.

0:28:230:28:26

It's a good day to be in opposition, er,

0:28:290:28:31

the opposition have it that this house would not ban cosmetic surgery.

0:28:310:28:35

APPLAUSE

0:28:350:28:37

Oh, my God, the first time I stood up I just froze,

0:28:370:28:40

I didn't know what to say.

0:28:400:28:42

Well done, guys, that was brilliant.

0:28:420:28:44

Really, really good for a first attempt. Did you enjoy it?

0:28:440:28:47

Yes, it was really exciting at first, I thought

0:28:470:28:50

I was going to not be able to speak at all

0:28:500:28:52

but when I said the first word, the rest came so it was fine.

0:28:520:28:55

Your confidence really increased as you went on, I thought,

0:28:550:28:58

which was brilliant. How did you find it, Tionne?

0:28:580:29:00

It was good. As it goes on you get, like, really into it and then

0:29:000:29:03

you can just, like, question other people

0:29:030:29:05

and, yeah, it was really good.

0:29:050:29:07

You were very confident from the beginning, really engaging.

0:29:070:29:11

You both did a brilliant job.

0:29:110:29:12

That was really good to see.

0:29:120:29:14

After the whole experience, how do you guys feel?

0:29:210:29:23

We had to debate about cosmetic surgery and that.

0:29:230:29:26

I don't, I didn't even know, had done no research on it.

0:29:260:29:29

I'm sure your nose is real, bro!

0:29:290:29:31

Like, no research at all.

0:29:310:29:33

Yeah, yeah, yeah.

0:29:330:29:35

They said I'm doing debating and I was like, "No, I can't do that,"

0:29:350:29:39

so, erm... But when I started, I did have a two minute break cos

0:29:390:29:44

I couldn't start, it was really embarrassing actually, but after

0:29:440:29:48

you say the first word it just all comes behind so it was fine.

0:29:480:29:51

I've had many, many moments in my life

0:29:510:29:55

when I've been speaking to an audience, like, especially,

0:29:550:29:59

I remember, like, I think my school took me

0:29:590:30:01

for this kind of conference meeting and I had to stand up and speak

0:30:010:30:04

in front them and literally I froze and I was just like,

0:30:040:30:07

"I don't know what to say,"

0:30:070:30:09

and every good point that I had in my head before,

0:30:090:30:11

exactly what happens, like, erm, kind of, like, happened to me so...

0:30:110:30:16

If you think back to that, erm, moment, what would you have changed?

0:30:160:30:19

I would have tried to make myself more calm

0:30:190:30:22

and not nervous cos I was so nervous at first but after

0:30:220:30:25

I'd had a deep breath and everything, everything just came fluently.

0:30:250:30:29

Even me being on stage, erm, I have to calm myself down,

0:30:290:30:33

like, for my nerves, cos you get massive nerves before performing

0:30:330:30:37

in front of people. Before I go on stage I have to, like,

0:30:370:30:40

relax myself and try and remember what I'm there for,

0:30:400:30:43

what I'm there to say.

0:30:430:30:45

A big thing in public speaking is,

0:30:450:30:48

is to be massively confident and I think you guys did show confidence.

0:30:480:30:52

Now, after having that experience of being able to

0:30:520:30:54

speak in front of an audience,

0:30:540:30:56

I think I would be able to do debating and it was... I enjoyed it.

0:30:560:30:59

I like your mentality cos that's what made me

0:30:590:31:02

want to perform more. Even when it went wrong, it's like,

0:31:020:31:05

it doesn't feel so bad when it goes wrong, it doesn't feel so bad.

0:31:050:31:08

Now for a completely different way of speaking out.

0:31:100:31:13

We're going to Chapel Market in North London.

0:31:130:31:16

This is Esme.

0:31:200:31:22

And this is Dayo.

0:31:240:31:26

Today they're going to meet Tony Napolitano. He's a market trader.

0:31:280:31:33

Don't miss the cherry today, girls, 1.50 a pound

0:31:330:31:36

and they are marvellous.

0:31:360:31:38

You can't buy better cherry anywhere for any price.

0:31:380:31:43

'I mean, originally my father and mother only sold bananas,'

0:31:430:31:47

nothing else, just had a banana stall.

0:31:470:31:49

It's only when I took it over that we branched out a bit.

0:31:500:31:53

Hi, I'm Esme.

0:31:530:31:54

Today, Dayo and Esme are going to step into Tony's shoes

0:31:540:31:58

and tout for business.

0:31:580:31:59

You'll have to watch me

0:31:590:32:01

-and try and pick it up cos I've been doing it a long time.

-Yep.

0:32:010:32:05

It's called "calling out".

0:32:050:32:07

English strawberry and raspberry and gooseberry today.

0:32:070:32:12

'Well, it's a bit of an embarrassment, innit,

0:32:120:32:14

'to stand shouting out in the street?'

0:32:140:32:17

But once you get used to it, once you start, then it's second nature.

0:32:170:32:23

Best of Kent, the strawberry.

0:32:230:32:26

It looks quite nerve-racking to do.

0:32:260:32:28

1.50 a pound, the cherry. 1.50 a pound, English strawberry.

0:32:280:32:32

It's going to be a bit nerve-racking, shouting,

0:32:320:32:35

he's always shouting out the cherries, so, yeah...

0:32:350:32:39

1.50 a pound cherry today. That's the bargain today, girls.

0:32:390:32:44

Before they start,

0:32:440:32:46

what are Tony's top tips for working on a market stall?

0:32:460:32:49

The message has to be the right message in the first place.

0:32:490:32:52

You know, I mean, if you're

0:32:520:32:53

calling out with the right gear

0:32:530:32:54

at the right money, it sells itself.

0:32:540:32:57

English strawberry, raspberry and gooseberry today.

0:32:570:33:02

'If people are queuing

0:33:020:33:03

'and you walk round'

0:33:030:33:04

and shout in their ear, they tend to turn round,

0:33:040:33:07

give you a dirty look and walk straight up the road.

0:33:070:33:10

Humour's good in any situation, innit?

0:33:100:33:13

You know, it's nice to have a bit of a repartee with your punters.

0:33:130:33:16

They feel more at ease, they're more likely to come back.

0:33:160:33:19

Don't miss the cherries today, girls, they are marvellous.

0:33:190:33:22

-You've heard me calling out all day, haven't you?

-Yeah.

0:33:240:33:27

So, do you think you could give it the same?

0:33:270:33:30

Try and call 'em in?

0:33:300:33:31

OK. Wait, these are 1.50.

0:33:310:33:35

But things get off to a quiet start.

0:33:350:33:38

Let them know our strawberries are English.

0:33:380:33:40

Tell them that, that the strawberries...

0:33:400:33:42

Strawberries are English. Would you like some cherries?

0:33:420:33:46

They just need to get a bit more confidence.

0:33:480:33:51

Just with a little schooling they should be able to do it.

0:33:520:33:55

You that side, tell them about our English strawberries.

0:33:550:33:59

English strawberries from Kent.

0:33:590:34:01

Come on, let's see you calling out with the cherries,

0:34:010:34:04

we've got a lot to sell yet.

0:34:040:34:06

Young man seems to be a bit more nervous but there again it's

0:34:070:34:10

only experience, it's only, you know, if you keep doing it,

0:34:100:34:15

same as anything, really, if you keep doing it long enough

0:34:150:34:18

you'll get better.

0:34:180:34:19

English strawberries, only £1.20.

0:34:190:34:21

Come and get your cherries, 1.50. Best cherries ever.

0:34:220:34:27

English strawberries, raspberries and gooseberries, guys.

0:34:300:34:33

1.50 cherries.

0:34:340:34:36

£1, £1.20, English strawberries per box.

0:34:390:34:42

Once they find their voices, however, business picks up.

0:34:420:34:46

Strawberries, raspberries and gooseberries, guys.

0:34:460:34:49

OK. Thanks. 30. That's 2.10.

0:34:490:34:53

I was just a bit nervous.

0:34:530:34:54

As time went on, you start to get the hang of it, that,

0:34:540:34:57

"Oh, well, you shout out

0:34:570:34:59

"people will, somebody in a car might just hear and come."

0:34:590:35:02

-Thanks.

-£1.20 per box, English strawberries.

0:35:020:35:06

It's not really in my personality to just, like, shout it out.

0:35:060:35:10

English strawberries, guys, only 1.20 for a whole box.

0:35:100:35:13

It took a bit of time to get used to,

0:35:130:35:15

but after a while it was actually, like, quite fun.

0:35:150:35:18

Come and get your cherries £1.50. English strawberries £1.20 per box.

0:35:180:35:23

-Thanks very much.

-Thank you very much for your help.

0:35:230:35:26

-Have a nice day.

-Thank you, all the best, bye.

0:35:260:35:29

Yeah they done very well for a first effort, all they need is

0:35:290:35:32

a little bit of experience and then they can both come and work for me.

0:35:320:35:37

I'd be happy to employ them.

0:35:370:35:38

Cool. Erm, welcome. I just wanted to know how you found it.

0:35:450:35:49

-Erm, it was challenging to say...

-Yeah?

-Yeah.

0:35:490:35:53

They were like, "You're going to be working on a market stall,"

0:35:530:35:55

and I was like, I was so scared.

0:35:550:35:58

When we went on it first it was really scary,

0:35:580:36:01

but by the end it was all right.

0:36:010:36:03

What kind of tricks or, like, ideas did your mentor give you?

0:36:030:36:08

Well, they just said that if you're confident then people will

0:36:080:36:11

see that you're confident in the things that you're selling.

0:36:110:36:13

-Yeah, yeah, yeah.

-Cos if you're not confident then

0:36:130:36:16

they're not going to be confident in buying it.

0:36:160:36:18

-In buying it, yeah, yeah, yeah.

-Once you get the hang of it

0:36:180:36:20

and you look like you know what you're doing, then people know.

0:36:200:36:24

They start to see, like, a positive reaction?

0:36:240:36:27

-Yeah.

-Yeah?

0:36:270:36:28

I remember your mentor saying that the more you do it,

0:36:280:36:31

the better you get at it...erm, you only had how much time?

0:36:310:36:34

Half an hour, I think, yeah.

0:36:340:36:37

You guys done an amazing job, you sold products, that was,

0:36:370:36:40

that's... You should be proud of yourself.

0:36:400:36:42

Would you do it again?

0:36:420:36:44

I would do it again but I wouldn't do it as a job.

0:36:440:36:46

THEY LAUGH

0:36:460:36:48

All right, I just want to say congratulations,

0:36:480:36:50

for what, of course, you and Dayo did. He couldn't make it today, so

0:36:500:36:54

you're speaking on behalf of him a team member...and, yeah, well done.

0:36:540:36:59

Thank you.

0:36:590:37:00

For our next Speak Out Challenge,

0:37:030:37:04

we're in London finding out how to interview people.

0:37:040:37:07

It's not as easy as it looks.

0:37:070:37:10

This is Toni. And this is Renee.

0:37:130:37:16

Both from South London.

0:37:160:37:18

Today, they'll be quizzing Bonita Norris,

0:37:190:37:22

one of the youngest people in the UK to have climbed Mount Everest

0:37:220:37:26

with expert assistance from national news journalist Kimberley Dadds.

0:37:260:37:30

So, Bonita, you climbed the biggest mountain in the world, erm...

0:37:300:37:34

I mean, tell me how did that feel?

0:37:340:37:36

Er...Everest definitely changed my life completely.

0:37:360:37:40

The first big person I ever interviewed was actually Snoop Dogg,

0:37:400:37:44

it was very intimidating, obviously.

0:37:440:37:46

I was very starstruck, I was quite young at the time.

0:37:460:37:50

And I just had to try and get it done and I did.

0:37:500:37:53

How do you, kind of, move on from such a big thing like that,

0:37:530:37:57

what, what's next?

0:37:570:37:59

People always said to me, "Oh, now you've done Everest,

0:37:590:38:02

"there's no point climbing another mountain."

0:38:020:38:04

But for me that was just, like, that's crazy.

0:38:040:38:06

So, what are Kimberley's top tips

0:38:060:38:08

for conducting an effective interview?

0:38:080:38:11

I think number one is just be confident,

0:38:110:38:13

it will put your interviewee at ease.

0:38:130:38:15

What on earth was it that possessed you to do this challenge?

0:38:150:38:19

Well, when I decided to climb Everest,

0:38:190:38:21

I hadn't ever climbed before.

0:38:210:38:22

Number two,

0:38:220:38:24

I'd say do a lot of research,

0:38:240:38:25

as a journalist you have

0:38:250:38:26

to do a lot of research and you need

0:38:260:38:28

to know what you're talking about.

0:38:280:38:30

When you're, kind of, in the middle of the interview, just you've

0:38:300:38:34

got to kind of keep it going,

0:38:340:38:35

it's down to you, not the interviewee.

0:38:350:38:37

So, I think it's just quite important to keep it, like, flowing,

0:38:370:38:41

have a bit of conversation there.

0:38:410:38:43

You might be a bit nervous, so you've got a list of questions

0:38:430:38:46

but just remember to listen to what they're actually saying,

0:38:460:38:50

because they might have just told you something earth-shattering

0:38:500:38:53

or really important and interesting

0:38:530:38:56

and you don't want to just say, "OK, question number four is..."

0:38:560:38:59

So, you're both about to interview Bonita,

0:38:590:39:01

are you feeling nervous or how are you feeling about it?

0:39:010:39:04

Er, I'm quite nervous because it's like the first interview I've done

0:39:040:39:07

but I'm looking forward to it at the same time cos it's a new experience.

0:39:070:39:11

Yeah, I'm slightly nervous about it but it seems all right.

0:39:110:39:15

I think the one thing I'd say is just enjoy it

0:39:150:39:18

and be confident, she's very lovely, it's a one-time opportunity.

0:39:180:39:24

Hi, Bonita, it's nice to meet you

0:39:240:39:26

and your story's really inspiring to, like, young children.

0:39:260:39:29

Thank you.

0:39:290:39:31

Erm, what inspired you to become a climber?

0:39:310:39:34

Erm, lots of different things inspired me.

0:39:340:39:37

I had my childhood heroes, like, when I was growing up,

0:39:370:39:40

Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay,

0:39:400:39:42

their stories from when they actually were the first people

0:39:420:39:45

to summit Mount Everest in 1953,

0:39:450:39:47

I read their book and I just thought it was the most amazing thing.

0:39:470:39:51

When you were climbing Mount Everest, did you, like, have

0:39:510:39:54

any, like, near-death experiences?

0:39:540:39:56

Yeah, I did, er, I guess probably more near-death experiences than

0:39:560:39:59

I realised because you could just be walking round a corner

0:39:590:40:03

on the mountain and just behind you a piece of ice might have

0:40:030:40:06

fallen down and I would never have known about it.

0:40:060:40:08

Erm, in the Daily Mail it said that, erm,

0:40:080:40:10

you was inspired by Bear Grylls, erm, account on his, erm, time...

0:40:100:40:16

What in his account inspired you?

0:40:160:40:18

Erm, I think, I remember hearing about Bear Grylls' story,

0:40:180:40:22

because he had a really bad accident when he was in the Army,

0:40:220:40:26

and to go from being so low and to setting a big challenge

0:40:260:40:29

for yourself and taking on a huge amount of risk, erm...

0:40:290:40:33

just massively inspired me that he actually stuck to his guns

0:40:330:40:36

and did it.

0:40:360:40:37

Toni and Renee start confidently but then grind to a halt.

0:40:370:40:42

Can't remember now. Gosh!

0:40:430:40:45

But they quickly recover.

0:40:450:40:47

Um, like, what career choice would you have

0:40:470:40:50

if you hadn't begun to climb in the first place?

0:40:500:40:53

Erm, I think I would probably be doing something with...

0:40:530:40:57

kids anyway, like teaching or something.

0:40:570:41:00

So, for you, what's the best thing about what you do, like,

0:41:000:41:03

what do you find is most interesting about it?

0:41:030:41:06

What I love about climbing is just the moments that are,

0:41:060:41:11

like, so unique and special. Just see the most amazing views, like the

0:41:110:41:15

mountains spread out below you, the Himalayas, sunrises and you just

0:41:150:41:20

think, "Wow, I am the only person in the world who can see this."

0:41:200:41:24

Now, all that's left is to wrap up the interview.

0:41:240:41:28

So, like, have you got any more, like, challenges, like, planned?

0:41:310:41:36

For the future, I'd love to go back to the Himalayas

0:41:360:41:39

and also I love climbing in the UK.

0:41:390:41:41

Well, it was really nice to meet you

0:41:430:41:45

and, like, everything you've said has been really helpful.

0:41:450:41:48

Thanks very much.

0:41:480:41:50

-Yeah, it was really nice meeting you, thanks.

-Thank you.

0:41:500:41:53

I think you both did really well, so well done.

0:41:530:41:57

You did a lot of the things that I said. Like you did

0:41:570:41:59

bounce off what she had been telling you

0:41:590:42:02

and reacting rather than just sticking to the interview, so...

0:42:020:42:05

it was really good.

0:42:050:42:06

I think you did really well and the questions are really good,

0:42:060:42:10

lots of research there.

0:42:100:42:11

Did you enjoy it?

0:42:110:42:13

Yeah, I enjoyed it.

0:42:130:42:14

I'd love to do it again.

0:42:140:42:15

What's up? Welcome.

0:42:220:42:23

How did you guys feel in the whole experience

0:42:230:42:25

and what was it like for you?

0:42:250:42:27

In the beginning it was kind of nervous

0:42:270:42:29

but, as the day progressed, it got easier.

0:42:290:42:31

-Yeah?

-Yeah, definitely I'd agree with that.

0:42:310:42:33

I remembered your mentor saying it's, like,

0:42:330:42:35

incredibly important to be prepared. Did you guys find that difficult?

0:42:350:42:41

Well, we'd already, like, prepared some questions so we had those but

0:42:410:42:44

after those questions were finished we couldn't, like, just stop the

0:42:440:42:47

interview so we had to react on how she replied to our questions...

0:42:470:42:51

-OK.

-..and carry it on from there.

0:42:510:42:53

It was awkward at first, cos you couldn't think of anything

0:42:530:42:56

but after a while it just became more natural.

0:42:560:42:58

It was more natural, yeah.

0:42:580:42:59

This is something that happens to me all the time,

0:42:590:43:01

I get interviewed by journalists, if they're not prepared with their

0:43:010:43:04

questions or they don't do their research, like you girls did your

0:43:040:43:09

research, like, I think that makes an interview very interesting.

0:43:090:43:13

You can tell when someone doesn't know what they're talking about

0:43:130:43:16

and you know, like, they were just told to do it.

0:43:160:43:19

I think some of the facts and stuff that you guys brought to her

0:43:190:43:23

and the questions that you asked her showed her that you were

0:43:230:43:26

interested in her background and what she's done.

0:43:260:43:28

Personally, I think you guys done a great job and I would have

0:43:280:43:31

loved to be interviewed by you both. Erm, well done, man.

0:43:310:43:35

BOTH: Thank you.

0:43:350:43:36

So, how can you really engage an audience with the power of speech?

0:43:390:43:43

We go to Cardiff to find out.

0:43:430:43:44

This is Safoua and this is Owen.

0:43:470:43:49

Today, they're going to meet

0:43:530:43:55

Mark Miodownik -

0:43:550:43:56

he's a scientist.

0:43:560:43:57

Tell me what the most important invention of all time was.

0:43:570:44:00

-The wheel.

-The wheel?

0:44:000:44:02

I mean, I love working out how the world works, I never tire of it.

0:44:020:44:05

-Yeah?

-Fire.

-Fire, thank you very much.

0:44:050:44:08

One of my biggest fears as a kid was I'd get bored. I had all these games

0:44:080:44:11

and things, I'd get bored of them - I never got bored of science.

0:44:110:44:14

As well as doing science, Mark also talks about it to encourage people

0:44:140:44:18

to get involved themselves.

0:44:180:44:20

As soon as you start cooking, you realise that you have to eat

0:44:200:44:23

with your hands. They build the pyramids, they build ships,

0:44:230:44:25

they build cities but they're still eating with their hands.

0:44:250:44:29

Safoua and Owen are going to try and do what Mark does.

0:44:290:44:32

Get up on the stage and try

0:44:320:44:34

and make an audience enthusiastic about something they love.

0:44:340:44:37

The first couple of times you ever gave a talk, how did you...

0:44:370:44:41

how did you overcome your nerves?

0:44:410:44:43

One trick I did is, I started to write out the first two sentences

0:44:430:44:47

I was going to say and learned them, so that I knew I had it in my head.

0:44:470:44:51

When you're on stage and people start talking, like,

0:44:510:44:55

while you're talking, what should you do?

0:44:550:44:57

Become completely silent and stand there and actually it's

0:44:570:45:00

amazing how a crowd will pick up on that and go silent themselves.

0:45:000:45:03

Before they get up on stage,

0:45:040:45:06

what are Mark's top tips for engaging an audience?

0:45:060:45:09

So my top tips are, first of all, be real.

0:45:090:45:11

I mean, that's easier

0:45:110:45:12

said than done, I know,

0:45:120:45:14

but they've got to believe that you are saying this from the heart.

0:45:140:45:19

This stuff has an amazing property.

0:45:190:45:20

Not only because it doesn't rust, OK, hence the word stainless,

0:45:200:45:23

but...

0:45:230:45:24

'It's really important to realise'

0:45:260:45:27

that you're striking up

0:45:270:45:29

a relationship with an audience.

0:45:290:45:31

It doesn't taste of anything.

0:45:310:45:33

That means you actually have to

0:45:330:45:35

look at them and talk to them and engage them.

0:45:350:45:38

But look, you don't realise how incredible that is.

0:45:380:45:40

'Basically almost all communication to humans'

0:45:400:45:43

is about storytelling,

0:45:430:45:44

that's how we understand things.

0:45:440:45:46

So if you're trying to

0:45:460:45:47

explain anything at all -

0:45:470:45:48

the birth of stars, how the biology of the womb works -

0:45:480:45:50

tell a story.

0:45:500:45:51

All of history has been waiting for this material

0:45:510:45:55

and it took until the 20th century to invent it.

0:45:550:45:58

The most important thing is that

0:45:580:45:59

they feel that you care about

0:45:590:46:01

this, that you're passionate

0:46:010:46:02

about what you're talking about.

0:46:020:46:03

You've got to get passionate about them.

0:46:030:46:05

It's 100 years old today

0:46:050:46:07

and it allows us to finally get the benefits of inventing fire.

0:46:070:46:11

APPLAUSE

0:46:110:46:15

The time has come for Owen and Safoua to take to the stage.

0:46:180:46:21

Nervous, obviously, but looking forward to it.

0:46:230:46:25

And it feels like it's going to last an hour instead of two minutes.

0:46:250:46:29

I'm not really looking forward to it, but I'll try my best.

0:46:290:46:32

And so I hope that you can give them a warm round of applause

0:46:320:46:35

and welcome Owen.

0:46:350:46:38

APPLAUSE AND CHEERING

0:46:380:46:41

Hi, I'm Owen, and I'm going to talk to you about games for a bit.

0:46:410:46:44

So, do you have any games that you really like to play,

0:46:440:46:47

that you think are cool?

0:46:470:46:48

-You, right here in the front.

-Me?

0:46:480:46:50

Yeah, what kind of games do you like to play?

0:46:500:46:52

-Grand Theft Auto.

-Oh, nice. Well, I'm going to talk about

0:46:520:46:55

a slightly different kind of game, it's bridge, it's a card game.

0:46:550:46:58

Do any of you have any idea what kind of game it is?

0:46:580:47:01

-Yeah?

-Do you stack the cards up?

0:47:010:47:03

Not quite, that would be a house of cards.

0:47:040:47:07

Bridge is... I'm going to tell you why I like it.

0:47:070:47:09

It's a very old game

0:47:090:47:10

and in bridge you have a partner, so it's a team sport,

0:47:100:47:14

so if you do badly...

0:47:140:47:15

Owen starts confidently and even throws in a joke.

0:47:150:47:18

There is an old bridge expression

0:47:180:47:20

which is that you should never, ever play bridge with your wife,

0:47:200:47:24

cos you'll just end up getting a divorce.

0:47:240:47:26

I think it's just a fantastic game, it's really tense.

0:47:260:47:29

So I really think you guys should give it a go. Thank you.

0:47:290:47:33

APPLAUSE

0:47:330:47:35

That was Owen. Everybody, a big hand for Owen.

0:47:350:47:38

He did brilliantly well.

0:47:380:47:40

So we've got one more for you.

0:47:400:47:42

Give a big, very warm round of applause to Safoua.

0:47:420:47:44

Safoua's only been speaking English for two years,

0:47:440:47:47

so it's an even bigger challenge for her.

0:47:470:47:49

She's going to talk about

0:47:490:47:51

her favourite dish from her homeland - couscous.

0:47:510:47:53

Hello, my name is Safoua and I'm Algerian,

0:47:530:47:56

I've been here for two years.

0:47:560:47:58

I just want to ask you, have you ever tried couscous before?

0:47:580:48:01

Most times when I go to the shops I see people buying it

0:48:010:48:05

with salads and stuff,

0:48:050:48:07

but today I want to talk to you about how to cook it properly

0:48:070:48:12

in, like, a traditional way.

0:48:120:48:14

You cook it, like, in water with salt, twice.

0:48:140:48:20

You can serve it with fish sauce, chicken sauce and lamb.

0:48:200:48:24

In the sauce you can have spices,

0:48:240:48:27

chickpeas, vegetables, water,

0:48:270:48:30

herbs, onions and courgettes.

0:48:300:48:34

It's made a month before it's actually served,

0:48:340:48:39

because it needs to get dried for so many days.

0:48:390:48:42

And I hope you enjoy it and try it, when you have time.

0:48:420:48:46

APPLAUSE

0:48:460:48:49

I can't speak right now.

0:48:550:48:57

Good, I'm shaking now,

0:48:570:48:59

I'm more nervous now than I was before.

0:48:590:49:02

I think what you did really well is that you meant it.

0:49:020:49:05

That this came from... They could tell it was not fake, it was you,

0:49:050:49:08

you were speaking as yourself about something you cared about,

0:49:080:49:11

and that's not easy to do.

0:49:110:49:13

Cos often people become someone else in this situation

0:49:130:49:15

and you did it really well.

0:49:150:49:17

You did the brilliant thing

0:49:170:49:18

at the beginning of interacting with the audience.

0:49:180:49:20

It's quite a hard thing to do on your first talk.

0:49:200:49:22

You didn't say, "Who?" and then just race on,

0:49:220:49:24

but you actually picked a few other people out.

0:49:240:49:26

I thought that was really good.

0:49:260:49:28

You left them wanting to hear more. That's good.

0:49:280:49:31

Was that the biggest audience

0:49:380:49:39

you guys have been in front of, or spoken to?

0:49:390:49:41

Yeah, definitely, it was. It was nerve-racking,

0:49:410:49:44

but it was a good experience, good thing to do.

0:49:440:49:46

-Yeah?

-I was really scared.

-Yeah?

-And I couldn't stand up,

0:49:460:49:49

like, literally I was, like, shaking the whole way...

0:49:490:49:53

Yeah, I was, like, dying.

0:49:530:49:55

Now, do you know, I had exactly the same thing

0:49:550:49:58

when I was first, like,

0:49:580:49:59

kind of going on stage to perform as an artist

0:49:590:50:02

and I was like this...

0:50:020:50:03

Erm, my name is Labrinth and... I need to go home.

0:50:030:50:07

Like, I think, personally, you guys done amazing,

0:50:070:50:11

because to take it all the way to the end,

0:50:110:50:13

you could have just walked off the stage

0:50:130:50:16

and been like, "I can't do this."

0:50:160:50:18

It was actually surprising for me

0:50:180:50:19

because I didn't think they would say anything.

0:50:190:50:22

-Yeah, yeah, yeah.

-And they wouldn't cooperate with me,

0:50:220:50:24

And then when I asked them and they answered,

0:50:240:50:26

I was like, "OK, they're actually listening to me."

0:50:260:50:28

-Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah.

-And that gave me back a bit of confidence.

0:50:280:50:32

Did you guys learn any tricks that you could maybe use

0:50:320:50:35

in other circumstances or situations?

0:50:350:50:38

He said to not be too serious

0:50:380:50:39

and, like, I think it was good to keep in mind

0:50:390:50:42

to kind of joke about a bit and not just be like, "Bridge..."

0:50:420:50:45

Yeah, yeah, this is what it is.

0:50:450:50:47

I think it was a good experience that I can use in, like, the future

0:50:470:50:50

maybe in school assemblies and stuff.

0:50:500:50:52

-Do you think you will be a lot less scared?

-Yeah.

0:50:520:50:55

-You guys done a great job.

-Thank you.

-Without a doubt!

0:50:550:50:58

Next up it's another kind of audience - tourists.

0:51:010:51:04

What speaking skills does it take to introduce them to London?

0:51:040:51:08

This is Shade.

0:51:110:51:12

And this is Kai.

0:51:140:51:15

They've lived in London all their lives,

0:51:170:51:18

but they've never had to describe it to strangers before.

0:51:180:51:21

On the left-hand side of the bridge is the world-famous Tower of London.

0:51:210:51:25

Today they're going to meet Paul Prentice.

0:51:250:51:28

It dates back to 1078.

0:51:280:51:31

He's a pleasure-boat captain and tour guide on the Thames.

0:51:310:51:35

I've been working on the river... it must be 40-odd years now,

0:51:350:51:38

and I think it was my first couple of days in,

0:51:380:51:42

I was going around the handrail

0:51:420:51:44

and I was watching my feet to see where I'm stepping,

0:51:440:51:46

then all of a sudden there was no handrail, so off I went.

0:51:460:51:49

As well as skippering the boat,

0:51:490:51:51

Paul also tells the passengers

0:51:510:51:53

about the famous London sights along the way.

0:51:530:51:56

I am sure you'll recognise Christopher Wren's masterpiece,

0:51:560:52:00

St Paul's Cathedral.

0:52:000:52:02

We take tourists from Westminster Pier onto Greenwich.

0:52:020:52:06

Within that journey, we point out the places of interest

0:52:060:52:10

which we pass on to our passengers.

0:52:100:52:12

Kai and Shade are getting thrown in at the deep end.

0:52:120:52:16

They'll see if they can tell a boat full of tourists

0:52:170:52:20

about London's rich history.

0:52:200:52:22

Speak nice and clearly and slowly.

0:52:240:52:28

-Feeling nervous?

-Yeah, a little bit.

-A little bit.

0:52:280:52:30

You'll be all right.

0:52:300:52:31

Get them first few words out and then you'll cruise along.

0:52:310:52:34

So what are Paul's top tips for tour guides

0:52:360:52:39

to ensure it's all plain sailing?

0:52:390:52:41

Looking to our right-hand side is the London Eye.

0:52:420:52:45

Speak as slowly and as clearly as possible.

0:52:460:52:49

The first time you do it,

0:52:490:52:51

you obviously start to dry up. But you've got to keep calm

0:52:510:52:53

and you've got to keep battling on through it, you know?

0:52:530:52:57

On your left is Somerset House.

0:52:570:53:00

I should imagine it's like an artist at a theatre,

0:53:000:53:02

if they're getting the crowd behind them,

0:53:020:53:05

they'll give 100%.

0:53:050:53:06

Once you get into it, you can see people enjoying it.

0:53:060:53:08

What we're going to do now, ladies and gentlemen,

0:53:100:53:12

one of my young colleagues here,

0:53:120:53:13

they're going to have a little go now

0:53:130:53:16

at telling you about some of these interesting buildings.

0:53:160:53:19

It's a daunting task.

0:53:210:53:23

The white vessel coming up now is the HMS President,

0:53:240:53:28

which was fought throughout World War I

0:53:280:53:30

and was used during World War II as a decoy vessel.

0:53:300:53:33

And to begin with, Kai and Shade are obviously nervous.

0:53:340:53:38

If we keep looking to our left,

0:53:380:53:40

there are a few interesting buildings,

0:53:400:53:43

the first one is the red Gothic-style building.

0:53:430:53:46

Kai and Shade are just too quiet,

0:53:460:53:48

and the passengers are getting restless.

0:53:480:53:51

You can see the top parts of the bridge have been removed,

0:53:510:53:54

the pillars are only to be remained.

0:53:540:53:58

PASSENGER: Speak up!

0:53:580:54:00

But Kai keeps calm and carries on.

0:54:000:54:03

Here on your left, also you can see the school.

0:54:030:54:06

It was the first-ever public school for boys

0:54:060:54:08

and many famous people attended,

0:54:080:54:10

such as Sir Winston Churchill.

0:54:100:54:12

Now directly ahead of us there is a series of three bridges,

0:54:140:54:17

the first one is Blackfriars.

0:54:170:54:19

With more guidance from Paul,

0:54:190:54:22

Shade and Kai soon grow in confidence.

0:54:220:54:25

The white building with the red roof

0:54:250:54:26

is the New Globe Playhouse Theatre.

0:54:260:54:29

It has been built near the site of the original Globe

0:54:290:54:32

and it was once, at the original theatre,

0:54:320:54:34

where many of Shakespeare's plays were first performed.

0:54:340:54:38

Now ahead of us is the Southwark Road Bridge,

0:54:380:54:41

it's probably the most unused bridge

0:54:410:54:43

to span the tidal Thames.

0:54:430:54:45

If you do see anyone walking across the bridge,

0:54:450:54:47

do give them a wave because they're probably lost.

0:54:470:54:51

When I stopped thinking about them and started thinking more about

0:54:510:54:54

what I was actually meant to be pointing out,

0:54:540:54:57

I think it went a bit better.

0:54:570:54:58

Coming into your view,

0:54:580:54:59

you'll see the tallest building in Western Europe.

0:54:590:55:01

This is the Shard, and it's supposed to represent a shard of glass.

0:55:010:55:04

When there's people that you don't know and it's a bit...

0:55:040:55:09

You get a bit nervous at first.

0:55:090:55:11

But when I gained confidence, I spoke up a bit.

0:55:110:55:14

The bridge that we are about to pass beneath is New London Bridge,

0:55:140:55:18

it was opened by Her Majesty the Queen back in 1974.

0:55:180:55:22

It's made me a bit more confident at speaking.

0:55:220:55:24

At first, I was a bit nervous,

0:55:300:55:32

but towards the end I think I got a bit better.

0:55:320:55:35

Yeah, you did, both of yous. You started off a little bit...

0:55:350:55:38

But you could see you was getting more and more confident by the end.

0:55:380:55:41

90-odd people we had, and for them to stand up there,

0:55:410:55:44

never, ever done it before, I thought they done brilliant.

0:55:440:55:47

I wanted to ask you guys how was it for you

0:55:530:55:55

and what was the experience like?

0:55:550:55:58

I was quite nervous.

0:55:580:55:59

-Oh, seriously?

-Got a little bit more confident towards the end.

0:55:590:56:02

Yeah, yeah, yeah.

0:56:020:56:03

What kind of tricks did, erm,

0:56:030:56:05

did your mentor teach you that you feel like you could

0:56:050:56:08

take into a career that you want to go into?

0:56:080:56:11

Maybe if I wanted to be, I don't know, a lecturer or something,

0:56:110:56:14

-cos I've never talked in front of that many people.

-Seriously?

0:56:140:56:17

But, yeah, he taught me to just calm and breathe and also be clear.

0:56:170:56:21

I've learnt that the more that you practise something,

0:56:210:56:25

the better you will get at it.

0:56:250:56:27

And when you do speak in front of people,

0:56:270:56:30

you need to remember that you need to speak slowly and clearly.

0:56:300:56:33

Tinie Tempah said, when he started in the music business,

0:56:330:56:36

he was like, he used to go to clubs and he was so shy, like,

0:56:360:56:40

nobody could hear what he was saying.

0:56:400:56:42

So he would come off stage and think, like,

0:56:420:56:45

he'd done a really bad job.

0:56:450:56:46

But it would be like, "Well, mate, I didn't hear anything you said,

0:56:460:56:49

"so how was I supposed to enjoy your performance?"

0:56:490:56:51

So that would probably be something he learnt from,

0:56:510:56:54

and, of course, when you hear Tinie Tempah on stage, he's just like,

0:56:540:56:57

"Gah!" He's louder than the music now.

0:56:570:57:00

I remember, like, while you were reading your scripts,

0:57:000:57:03

-someone said something. What did they say?

-Speak up.

0:57:030:57:06

How did that affect your performance?

0:57:060:57:10

Erm, well, it told me that some people can't hear me,

0:57:100:57:13

but also threw me off a bit, cos I was reading.

0:57:130:57:16

I've had a few shows where I've been performing

0:57:160:57:19

and people would, like, heckle.

0:57:190:57:21

It's something that could throw you off while you're performing.

0:57:210:57:24

But I've always learnt from, like,

0:57:240:57:26

some of the artists I've worked with, like, even Emeli,

0:57:260:57:29

I remember her saying that, like, you know,

0:57:290:57:32

when you go on stage you have to forget

0:57:320:57:34

that you're sometimes in front of an audience

0:57:340:57:36

and you've got to, like, enjoy it for yourself before they enjoy it.

0:57:360:57:40

It's almost like you've got to put a little force field in front of you

0:57:400:57:43

and just say, "I came here to enjoy myself,

0:57:430:57:45

"I came here to give you my information,

0:57:450:57:47

"are you ready to hear what I've got to say?"

0:57:470:57:49

No, I think you guys done absolutely amazing.

0:57:530:57:55

Learning how to speak out in different circumstances,

0:57:570:58:00

from news reporting to sports commentating,

0:58:000:58:03

from reading poetry to debating,

0:58:030:58:05

is a massively useful skill to have.

0:58:050:58:08

And if there's one top tip to take away, it's be confident.

0:58:080:58:12

So, what you waiting for? Express yourself!

0:58:120:58:15

# I say the same thing twice I'm awkward when I speak

0:58:210:58:26

# Ain't got the perfect smile Don't turn heads on my street

0:58:260:58:31

# Trying to be a superstar Like everybody else

0:58:310:58:36

# But being myself is something I do well

0:58:360:58:41

# Express yourself

0:58:410:58:43

# Express yourself

0:58:460:58:51

# Said, see, it's not what you look like

0:58:510:58:55

# When you're doin' what you're doin'

0:58:550:58:56

# Express yourself. #

0:58:560:58:58

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:58:580:59:01

Musician Labrinth explores different ways to use your voice in everyday life. He reveals techniques to get your message across in a variety of situations, from newsreading to being a tour guide. In each short film, he challenges two young people to try out new oracy skills. He explores how to 'speak out' with confidence and clarity, and the programme features handy advice from experts.


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