24/01/2017 BBC Business Live


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24/01/2017

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This is Business Live from BBC News with Sally Bundock and Rachel Horne.

:00:00.:00:00.

The United States pulls out of what could be one of the world's

:00:00.:00:07.

biggest free trade deals, but Australia and New Zealand

:00:08.:00:10.

says that doesn't mean its dead in the water.

:00:11.:00:13.

Live from London, that's our top story

:00:14.:00:15.

The Trans-Pacific Partnership was set to cover 40%

:00:16.:00:36.

Will the other 11 nations go ahead without the US? Or can it be

:00:37.:00:49.

replaced by bilateral deals that Donald Trump says he wants?

:00:50.:00:52.

despite corruption allegation and exploding phones, Samsung

:00:53.:00:57.

records its highest quarterly profit in four years.

:00:58.:00:59.

And we'll be getting the inside track on the wearable

:01:00.:01:05.

tech which doesn't just track your heart rate

:01:06.:01:07.

but also tells a woman when she's at her most fertile.

:01:08.:01:23.

When you listen to music do you think about the performer?

:01:24.:01:26.

As Jay Z sells a stake in his artist led music streaming service, Tidal,

:01:27.:01:31.

we want to know, do fans care about the artist or the access?

:01:32.:01:35.

Thank you already for those of you who have tweeted about Jay-Z,

:01:36.:02:02.

nothing we can say out loud on the BBC, so send in some comments we can

:02:03.:02:08.

read out! Let's first of all start with what is going on in terms of

:02:09.:02:10.

global trade. The United States are out,

:02:11.:02:10.

but Japan, Australia and New Zealand say their big free trade deal

:02:11.:02:13.

can go ahead anyway. The Trans-Pacific Partnership

:02:14.:02:20.

was aimed at boosting the economics of 12 nations around

:02:21.:02:23.

the Pacific Ocean. But the new US President Donald

:02:24.:02:34.

Trump has used his first working day in the White House to sign

:02:35.:02:37.

an executive order pulling The Trans-Pacific Partnership

:02:38.:02:40.

covered about 40% of the world's economy and could

:02:41.:02:43.

have added $100 billion That was what they said and

:02:44.:02:45.

predicted. It was signed by 12 nations

:02:46.:02:53.

in the Pacific area at a ceremony in New Zealand

:02:54.:02:55.

last year. The painstaking negotiations

:02:56.:03:00.

took seven years, but one reason implementation

:03:01.:03:04.

was delayed was the failure China was the biggest

:03:05.:03:07.

economy to not be included, and it was widely viewed

:03:08.:03:17.

as a way to cement trade relations without

:03:18.:03:20.

Beijing's influence. now wants to negotiate trade deals

:03:21.:03:25.

on a country-to-country basis, with a 30-day cancellation clause

:03:26.:03:35.

"in case somebody misbehaves". Here's what he said

:03:36.:03:40.

about the withdrawal. We have been talking about this for

:03:41.:03:47.

a long time. OK. A great thing for the American

:03:48.:04:06.

worker, what we just did. That was the President of the United States,

:04:07.:04:08.

Donald Trump. With me is Savita Subramanian,

:04:09.:04:09.

head of US equity and quantitative strategy at Bank of America

:04:10.:04:12.

Merrill Lynch Global Research. You've got a longer title than he

:04:13.:04:19.

has! Let's go back to basics, why has Donald Trump polled the US out

:04:20.:04:23.

of this deal? I think he just said it, it is about US jobs, and he is

:04:24.:04:28.

wasting no time in fulfilling some of his campaign promises to create

:04:29.:04:34.

US jobs growth. So I think that, you know, President Trump is focused on

:04:35.:04:38.

the US worker, he is focused on bringing back jobs to the US, and

:04:39.:04:44.

the TPP represented a threat to the average US worker. I think this is

:04:45.:04:48.

another example of a policy that is good for the mainstream, not

:04:49.:04:52.

necessarily good for Wall Street, because if you think about the US

:04:53.:04:56.

stock market, most of them are multinational companies that have

:04:57.:05:00.

expanded margins from off shoring their businesses and setting up

:05:01.:05:06.

facilities overseas. But I think that Trump's motivation and input is

:05:07.:05:11.

here is jobs growth, that is what he is focused on. And is that the

:05:12.:05:16.

feeling, that it will work? We had figures last week suggesting a huge

:05:17.:05:19.

proportion of the jobs that America has lost in recent years are due to

:05:20.:05:24.

automation, machines - rather than outsourcing to other countries. It

:05:25.:05:34.

is a complicated problem, and the thread of global overtaking the US

:05:35.:05:37.

is not the only reason that jobs have gone awake in the US. Man has

:05:38.:05:41.

been replaced by machines in many industries, which is inherently

:05:42.:05:46.

deflationary, but I think what the administration is focused on at some

:05:47.:05:49.

level is creating some healthy inflation which, you know,

:05:50.:05:54.

protectionist policies generally, initially, inflationary, and good

:05:55.:05:59.

for the economy. The risk is, we import a little under $500 billion

:06:00.:06:04.

worth of goods from China. Our economy is made up, 15% of it, is

:06:05.:06:11.

exports. So the risk is that, will this cramp growth down the road? It

:06:12.:06:15.

is good for wage inflation and the US consumer, it creates confidence,

:06:16.:06:19.

but will it actually hurt growth down the road? That is what we are

:06:20.:06:23.

more worried about from the market perspective. One of Obama's main

:06:24.:06:29.

drivers with the TPP was to try to encourage American influence in this

:06:30.:06:33.

region, and China was not included. Is Donald Trump running the risk of

:06:34.:06:38.

being like the bride who leaves her groom at the altar, everyone else

:06:39.:06:42.

has stepped forward, they are ready to sign the deal, and when he

:06:43.:06:45.

doesn't turn up, in terms of damaging relationships with other

:06:46.:06:48.

countries and leaving a gap for China to come in, is that a concern?

:06:49.:06:54.

I'm not a political historian or political economist, but I think

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that, you know, certainly the rationale for TPP initially was to

:07:00.:07:02.

sort of prohibited that thread. I think, from a market perspective,

:07:03.:07:08.

what this represents is risk to multinationals, and it is probably

:07:09.:07:09.

too soon to say whether the other too soon to say whether the other

:07:10.:07:15.

countries can bind together and create a realistic and powerful

:07:16.:07:22.

union amongst themselves if the US is neglected from it and we try to

:07:23.:07:27.

negotiate one-time deals, if we have enough negotiating power, this could

:07:28.:07:32.

work. OK, thank you very much for joining us.

:07:33.:07:35.

Let's have a look at some other stories.

:07:36.:07:41.

Shares in BT have fallen by 15% on the news it has taken a hit of

:07:42.:07:48.

around $180 million after uncovering inappropriate accounting behaviour

:07:49.:07:50.

at its Italian division. The telecoms giant said

:07:51.:07:54.

an internal review had found a complex set of improper sales,

:07:55.:07:56.

purchase and leasing transactions. BT has now cut its revenue,

:07:57.:07:58.

earnings and free cash flow forecasts for this year

:07:59.:08:01.

and next year. So shares in London down by 15% on

:08:02.:08:06.

that story. Yahoo has posted a 15% rise

:08:07.:08:10.

in revenues to nearly $1.5 billion for its fourth quarter,

:08:11.:08:13.

compared to the previous year. is being investigated by the US

:08:14.:08:16.

Securities and Exchange Commission Yahoo is in the process

:08:17.:08:20.

of being bought by US telecoms giant Verizon

:08:21.:08:30.

for about $4.8 billion but has now

:08:31.:08:32.

said the deal won't be completed until at least the second

:08:33.:08:34.

quarter of this year. And back to South Korea,

:08:35.:08:36.

where LG Display is also doing well. It reported a record fourth-quarter

:08:37.:08:40.

operating profit of just over $778 million due to

:08:41.:08:43.

a pick-up in panel prices. The world's biggest liquid-crystal

:08:44.:08:46.

display maker said the profit was caused by the upward trend

:08:47.:08:49.

of panel prices and We have covered Samsung a lot on

:08:50.:09:08.

this programme recently, and for all the wrong reasons, including

:09:09.:09:11.

exploding phones and corruption claims surrounding the boss of the

:09:12.:09:15.

firm. Today we have some good news, because despite all of that, the

:09:16.:09:20.

electronics giant, that side of the business, saw profits jump by $7.2

:09:21.:09:25.

billion in the last three months of last year. Mariko Oi is in

:09:26.:09:29.

Singapore, I bet they are breathing a temporary sigh of relief, for now

:09:30.:09:38.

at least, at Samsung. Indeed, Sally, I think it is fair to say that not

:09:39.:09:41.

many were expecting such strong numbers, but Samsung managed to more

:09:42.:09:43.

than double its operating profit in the last three months of last year.

:09:44.:09:49.

And that is because it is important to remember that Samsung doesn't

:09:50.:09:53.

just make smartphones, we have been talking about the exploding

:09:54.:09:57.

batteries of the galaxy note seven, but Samsung also makes chips, as

:09:58.:10:02.

well as panels, and its semiconductor unit did very well,

:10:03.:10:07.

and it contributed more than half of the company's quarterly profit, and

:10:08.:10:12.

when it comes to smartphone profits, while consumers' trust has not been

:10:13.:10:17.

restored yet, some of them started buying cheaper Galaxy phones, which

:10:18.:10:22.

helped their profit as well. Challenges still remain, including

:10:23.:10:25.

the corruption scandal surrounding the company's boss. Thank you very

:10:26.:10:31.

much, Mariko, that is the latest on Samsung.

:10:32.:10:35.

In Japan, the markets down, weak dollar, strong yen, do I need to say

:10:36.:10:42.

it again? This is how things are going generally, the Dow Jones a

:10:43.:10:47.

little bit flat, but not far off that 20,000 mark. A bit further away

:10:48.:10:52.

than it was a few weeks ago. A bit of a disappointment about Trump in

:10:53.:10:56.

terms of not enough news about pushing growth, pushing jobs to the

:10:57.:11:00.

US. Let's look at Europe, treading water to a degree at the moment, we

:11:01.:11:07.

have mentioned BT, down in London for very specific reasons, but

:11:08.:11:11.

everyone keeping an eye on the pound and the Supreme Court decision,

:11:12.:11:17.

which is due in about 50 minutes' time, that is about whether

:11:18.:11:20.

Parliament will get a say on the triggering of the Brexit

:11:21.:11:25.

negotiations. News out of France about services sector manufacturing,

:11:26.:11:29.

a bit of a drop-off in manufacturing sector in France, but still showing

:11:30.:11:34.

growth. Let's look ahead to the US, Samira Hussain is on Wall Street

:11:35.:11:35.

today. America's number one

:11:36.:11:39.

wireless carrier, Verizon, will be reporting earnings and it's

:11:40.:11:41.

expected to report yet another decline in quarterly

:11:42.:11:49.

revenue, but analysts, will be eager to hear about any

:11:50.:11:50.

updates to Verizon's deal to purchase Yahoo

:11:51.:11:53.

and whether the recent data breaches Lockheed Martin, the Pentagon's

:11:54.:11:56.

number one weapons supplier, is expected to report a rise

:11:57.:12:00.

in fourth quarter revenue helped by higher sales

:12:01.:12:05.

from the F-35 programme, but it's that programme that drew

:12:06.:12:07.

fire from President Trump Interestingly,

:12:08.:12:10.

the head of Lockheed Martin was one of a dozen business leaders

:12:11.:12:15.

that met with President Trump at the White House on Monday

:12:16.:12:18.

discussion tax reform for corporations and reducing

:12:19.:12:21.

regulations that impede Thank you, Samira. Joining us is

:12:22.:12:42.

Jeremy Stretch, we wanted to start with Turkey, Crete interest rate

:12:43.:12:46.

decision due in a couple of hours, and there is a real conflict between

:12:47.:12:51.

the government calling for interest rates to be dropped to encourage

:12:52.:12:55.

spending, an economist saying, no, we need to curb inflation, give us

:12:56.:13:00.

the figures. Inflation is running just above 8.5%, the central bank

:13:01.:13:05.

target is 5%, and it is going up because of the fall in the currency,

:13:06.:13:09.

it has fallen by 6% against the dollar already this year. We have

:13:10.:13:14.

commodity price pressures as well, which are amplified when you

:13:15.:13:17.

translate them into Turkish prices. So inflation moving and very

:13:18.:13:21.

dramatically. That should mean interest rates will go up, even by

:13:22.:13:26.

at least 1% today, but the government is saying something

:13:27.:13:28.

completely different, putting a great deal of pressure on the

:13:29.:13:31.

central bank governor, so the independence of the central bank is

:13:32.:13:36.

really under threat, just adding to the uncertainty for international

:13:37.:13:40.

investors. This is the government of President Erdogan, which is one type

:13:41.:13:44.

of leadership, but just to say that Turkey, we are familiar with all the

:13:45.:13:49.

headwinds, mostly geopolitical. Indeed, we have seen a substantial

:13:50.:13:57.

deterioration in the economic backdrop, irrespective of the

:13:58.:13:58.

currency movement, a substantial fall in GDP in the third quarter,

:13:59.:14:01.

and with the falling currency, the weakness of the economy, it really

:14:02.:14:06.

does and align the febrile atmosphere in the country, when of

:14:07.:14:08.

course you have the inherent political risk which is making

:14:09.:14:12.

investors and stable beyond just the economic dynamics. Another big

:14:13.:14:15.

announcement this morning which could impact the markets is the

:14:16.:14:19.

decision on whether or not the UK Government can go ahead with Brexit

:14:20.:14:23.

from the High Court, what sort of reaction do you think the markets

:14:24.:14:27.

are going to have to that? After the speech from the Prime Minister last

:14:28.:14:30.

week, you could argue that these events have been somewhat

:14:31.:14:35.

superseded, but that is not totally the case, because they could be a

:14:36.:14:37.

risk that the devolved parliaments are going to be given some degree of

:14:38.:14:41.

say by the Supreme Court. If that were the case, the old Brexit

:14:42.:14:45.

timetable could be thrown out of kilter somewhat, and accordingly

:14:46.:14:49.

that March 31 deadline that the Prime Minister has self-imposed

:14:50.:14:52.

would potentially be under threat, so that would push the whole hard

:14:53.:14:56.

Brexit story further into the long grass and could encourage a sterling

:14:57.:15:00.

rally. Because Scotland and Northern Ireland, Wales as well, all saying

:15:01.:15:05.

they don't want Brexit, and that would be their opinion if they were

:15:06.:15:09.

given the opportunity by the Supreme Court. Of course, but not only that,

:15:10.:15:13.

the picture is even more complicated in Northern Ireland because of the

:15:14.:15:17.

upcoming election, so that delays the process even further. If there

:15:18.:15:22.

were a role for the devolved parliaments, that throws the

:15:23.:15:26.

timetable into doubt. If not, if we are merely left with saying, we're

:15:27.:15:30.

going to go back to Parliament and the Government puts in a short bill,

:15:31.:15:34.

pushing through with it quickly, than the market reaction should be

:15:35.:15:38.

relatively modest, but it is a case of the devil in the detail this

:15:39.:15:43.

morning. OK, Jeremy Stretch, thank you for joining us this morning.

:15:44.:15:47.

You're with Business Live from BBC News.

:15:48.:15:53.

And now a look at some of the stories from around the UK.

:15:54.:16:01.

We have mentioned the Brexit and the Supreme Court ruling.

:16:02.:16:05.

Dixons Carphone, Britain's largest electricals

:16:06.:16:07.

and mobile phone retailer, beat forecasts for Christmas trading.

:16:08.:16:12.

The group's chief executive officer, Sebastian James, joins us now.

:16:13.:16:16.

Thank you for making the time to see us. I'm sure you're pleased to see

:16:17.:16:23.

us given the results you've issued. Why do you think the results went

:16:24.:16:29.

up? Christmas has become promotional trading. Since Black Friday took

:16:30.:16:32.

off, it is about can you put fantastic deals in front of

:16:33.:16:37.

customers. Because we're big and we plan this a year ahead, we put

:16:38.:16:40.

ground-breaking offers in front of people and I think they reacted well

:16:41.:16:45.

to that. It is about pricing, isn't it? With sterling weakness, are you

:16:46.:16:50.

poised to put your prices up because you will be forced to, frankly? We

:16:51.:16:55.

are a bit different to other industries because our products

:16:56.:16:58.

actually deflate over time. So the same TV, next year is likely to cost

:16:59.:17:04.

than it did this year. On the other hand new technologies come in and

:17:05.:17:07.

they are not really comparable. Although it is a mathematical truth

:17:08.:17:13.

that it will take more pounds to buy more dollars and therefore the kit

:17:14.:17:17.

that we buy, I don't think it will feel inflationary to our customers.

:17:18.:17:21.

You said that generating a successful Christmas means planning

:17:22.:17:23.

from January. Have you started planning from now and are you going

:17:24.:17:27.

to stick to Black Friday? We have seen lots of companies, some big

:17:28.:17:30.

named companies who didn't get involved this year, it did well for

:17:31.:17:34.

you this year, but is that something that's going to continue to be part

:17:35.:17:38.

of your strategy? Yes, we definitely think it is. We love Black Friday.

:17:39.:17:43.

We plan it well ahead. We work closely with our suppliers and we do

:17:44.:17:49.

huge volumes during Black Friday. We sold a Dyson cordless hoover every

:17:50.:17:52.

five seconds during our Black Friday period and it is a promotion that we

:17:53.:17:56.

love. For now, thank you for your time,

:17:57.:18:01.

the boss of Dixons car phone. That's a company that is doing well. Good

:18:02.:18:05.

results. Two companies that have come out with bad thus that have hit

:18:06.:18:09.

markets, BT and easyJet. We've mentioned BT. EasyJet though, its

:18:10.:18:15.

shares dropping 7%. It has warned again about its profits being hit by

:18:16.:18:19.

the weakness of sterling. EasyJet had to warn before today and another

:18:20.:18:25.

warning coming through from the low-cost carrier. More news on our

:18:26.:18:28.

website. Australia and New Zealand have said

:18:29.:18:35.

they believe a big free-trade deal, which America's President Trump

:18:36.:18:41.

has just abandoned, The Trans-Pacific Partnership

:18:42.:18:43.

would have covered about 40% of the world economy if all 12

:18:44.:18:47.

signatories had gone ahead. Will the 11 go ahead regardless? The

:18:48.:19:03.

markets are threading water. Pretty flat. Some sharp movements from

:19:04.:19:08.

companies like easyJet and BT, but keep a close eye on London and the

:19:09.:19:12.

pound sterling as we get that result from the Supreme Court which is due

:19:13.:19:14.

in about 40 minutes. Now let's get the inside track

:19:15.:19:18.

on the wearable tech You can use devices to track

:19:19.:19:20.

everything from physical activity to sleep and exposure

:19:21.:19:26.

to sunlight, and it's women are the leading consumers

:19:27.:19:28.

in the wearable-tech health space. The wearable tech market

:19:29.:19:34.

exceeded $2 billion in 2015, 61% of all devices in

:19:35.:19:40.

the wearable tech market are health trackers,

:19:41.:19:48.

and women make up most users. Ava Fertility is one company hoping

:19:49.:19:53.

to take advantage of these numbers. So they have developed

:19:54.:19:58.

a bracelet that tracks a women's fertility simply

:19:59.:20:01.

by monitoring heart rate. The company claims it can detect

:20:02.:20:04.

fertile days in a women's menstrual Joining now is the co-founder and

:20:05.:20:22.

Chief Executive of the firm Ava Science which makes the tracking

:20:23.:20:27.

device. She has got it on. You were just looking at it. So what's so

:20:28.:20:33.

special about this device? Ava is really the first wearable device

:20:34.:20:37.

that you can use to track your menstrual cycle. So far, when a

:20:38.:20:41.

woman wanted to track her menstrual cycle, she had to, you know, pee on

:20:42.:20:47.

sticks ten times a month and get up to take her temperature and it was

:20:48.:20:50.

really difficult and really inaccurate and now we've solved this

:20:51.:20:54.

with a wearable. Just hold it up to the camera, Ava, so the viewers can

:20:55.:20:59.

see it. My first thought was, are you going to wear that? It is an

:21:00.:21:03.

obvious sign to everyone around you that you're trying to make a baby

:21:04.:21:07.

and for a woman, a career woman, that maybe not the signal you want

:21:08.:21:11.

to give to your bosses? Ava is only worn during the night. So you only

:21:12.:21:17.

wear it while you're sleeping and during the nine it tracks

:21:18.:21:20.

parameters. What you do is really simple. You wear it and in the

:21:21.:21:25.

morning you sync with your phone and you have all the information on your

:21:26.:21:30.

phone. This is an emotive area, people trying for a baby. Sometimes

:21:31.:21:34.

they can feel vulnerable and they will try anything to make it work.

:21:35.:21:37.

What scientific evidence have you got to try and back up your device?

:21:38.:21:41.

So, really, our researcher is the core of what we're doing as a

:21:42.:21:48.

company. We have finalised a first clinical study in Switzerland where

:21:49.:21:53.

we can show 89% accuracy. We are running our second clinical study

:21:54.:21:56.

and to further improve the results and to broaden the scope of the

:21:57.:22:02.

product. And venture capitalists are backing you, you've raised $10

:22:03.:22:05.

million, you're established in the US. Thousands have bout this device

:22:06.:22:12.

and you're launching in the UK and Europe. Tell us what else can it

:22:13.:22:17.

tell you? Can it tell you for example what sex for example? That

:22:18.:22:22.

kind of thing? Rachel and I have got six boys between us! You were really

:22:23.:22:26.

successful in doing what we're doing! It doesn't tell you that,

:22:27.:22:31.

does it? That's just a mystery? T-actually is a mystery. At the

:22:32.:22:34.

moment there is no research how you can determine the sex of your baby,

:22:35.:22:41.

but really Ava is helping you to not only detect your fertile days, but

:22:42.:22:46.

gives you insights in other health per ram terse and it helps you

:22:47.:22:51.

understand how you sleep and your stress levels and the hormonal

:22:52.:22:55.

changes during your menstrual cycle, if you want to understand what signs

:22:56.:22:59.

your body is sending you all the time. Very fascinating. Thank you

:23:00.:23:03.

for coming in. Lots of interest in there I'm sure.

:23:04.:23:08.

Here is how to keep in touch with us.

:23:09.:23:11.

The Business Live page is where you can stay ahead with all the day's

:23:12.:23:15.

breaking business news. We'll keep you up-to-date with all the latest

:23:16.:23:19.

details with insight and analysis from the BBC's team of editors right

:23:20.:23:23.

around the world. And we want to hear from you too. Get involved on

:23:24.:23:31.

the BBC Business Live web page. And on Twitter. And you can find us

:23:32.:23:38.

on Facebook. Business Live on TV and online whenever you need to know.

:23:39.:23:53.

So far the tweets we've received from you about Jay Z and Tidal, we

:23:54.:24:01.

can't say out loud because they are too rude. Near negative. Tidal was a

:24:02.:24:07.

music streaming service launched at the same time as others like

:24:08.:24:13.

Spotify, but it was regarded as a vanity project for Jay Z and

:24:14.:24:18.

Beyonce. You got Beyonce's music and that was the reason to do it, but it

:24:19.:24:22.

was a bit of a flop commercially and it was losing $28 million, it

:24:23.:24:26.

claimed it had three million users and Spotify has 40 million users and

:24:27.:24:29.

most people thought it only had about one million. They pitched it

:24:30.:24:35.

as this is the artist leading the way here, we're fighting against

:24:36.:24:40.

Spotify that's ripping us off? Artists hate Spotify. It is hard to

:24:41.:24:45.

get money ot of Spotify unless you get millions of plays. Lots of

:24:46.:24:50.

artists including Taylor Swift have gone away from Spotify claiming it

:24:51.:24:53.

doesn't pay them enough. The viewers are not bothered anyway? No, I don't

:24:54.:24:57.

think they are. What they want is cheap music. They just want the

:24:58.:25:06.

songs. And preferably for free. Let's talk about a Happy Meal? A-guy

:25:07.:25:11.

charged with reviving McDonald's in the States is a Brit who did very

:25:12.:25:15.

well turning around McDonald's ten or 15 years ago. He brought in the

:25:16.:25:20.

fresh food and the better coffee and he was promoted by McDonald's to do

:25:21.:25:24.

the same thing in America two years ago, he replaced a guy called Don

:25:25.:25:31.

Thompson. One of the things he does is does an all-daybreak fast. It

:25:32.:25:35.

hasn't really worked. Sales are down 1.3%. Wow.

:25:36.:25:45.

Give him time. That's it from Business Live. There will be more

:25:46.:25:50.

business news throughout the day. See you soon. Bye-bye.

:25:51.:26:04.

Good morning. We've had contrasting weather

:26:05.:26:09.

conditions so far today. It has been mild and cloudy to the north and the

:26:10.:26:14.

west, but fog still an issue, not as widespread as yesterday. However, in

:26:15.:26:18.

one or two spots it may linger for much of the day and if that happens,

:26:19.:26:22.

well then, temperatures will struggle

:26:23.:26:23.