06/12/2017 BBC Business Live


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06/12/2017

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This is Business Live from

BBC News with Sally Bundock

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and Ben Thompson.

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Can Luxury firms control who sells

their goods online?

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That's the question that

could get an answer today

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in a case that could change how

we all shop in the future.

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Live from London, that's our top

story on Wednesday, 6th December.

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The luxury of buying high end

goods on Amazon and Ebay

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could be about to end.

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We have the latest on what could be

a landmark ruling in the European

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courts.

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Also in the programme,

The price of entering

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the chinese tech market,

we have a special report

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on the lengths silicon

valley is going to, to get

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behind the great firewall.

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For financial markets. It is a sea

of red. We'll explain why.

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And if you can't leave

home due to illness,

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how about sending a robot to school

or work instead?

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We'll get the inside track

from a Norwegian start-up that's

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using robots to help children take

part in school lessons,

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even if they can't leave the house.

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And one in five Brits have

admitted they never work

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to the best of their ability.

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Are you one of them or do you see

those people in the office

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and it drives you mad?

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Let us know.

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Just use the hashtag BBCBizLive.

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Let's name and shame the lazy ones

in the workplace.

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Hello and welcome to Business Live.

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Should luxury brands be

able to stop retailers

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from selling their products

on online marketplaces

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such as Amazon and Ebay?

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That's the question at the heart

of a decision being made

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by Europe's top court today.

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It's a battle that's been ongoing

for a decade and could have wide

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ranging consequences

for internet shopping.

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So the test case was initially

bought in Germany by Coty,

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the multi-billion dollar US beauty

company whose luxury brands

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include Marc Jacobs,

Calvin Klein, Rimmel and Chloe.

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Coty argues it should

have the right to choose

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who sells its products and how.

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That would allow the firm

to protect its image and exclusivity

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as part of the global personal

luxury goods market

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that is worth some $295 billion.

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However a German retailer called

Parfumerie Akzente argues it has

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the right to sell Coty's goods

on sites including Amazon and Ebay

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and the restrictions violate

EU competition rules.

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62% of German retailers use

online marketplaces -

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more than any other EU country

and many argue that offers consumers

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more choice and lower prices.

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Alan Davis the head of Competition,

EU & Trade at Pinsent Masons.

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Alan nice to see you. Welcome to

Business Live. Sally has run through

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the details there. It strikes me

this is something that all retailers

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do. They take brands and they sell

them on. Why is this so significant?

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This is significant because luxury

brand owners have made huge

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investments in developing the brand

image, the prestige of their luxury

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products and they want to be able to

protect that. They are concerned

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about retailers being able to free

ride on that investment by selling

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goods in an environment or on a site

that does not portray the same sort

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of prestige and brand image.

But

that must open up a wider market for

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them to more can yous ustomers who

are able to access it. They are able

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to sell to more customers, are they

not?

Well, that is that argument and

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if you look at the statistics for

online selling on platforms in

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Germany, but by and large, the

prestige of the product is so

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important to them that they want to

be able to protect that.

Is this

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also about the cost that they have

put into marketing that brand? They

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have made it unique. They have made

it niche. They have made it

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exclusive. So is it about that they

want a return on the money they have

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spent?

Exact lip. Ly. It enables

them to ensure the price level for

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the products is maintained in the

market. Online selling generally

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results in lower prices for

consumers because there is a

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downward spiral if products are

being sold and there is competition

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at that level of the market, but by

able to restrict how the products

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are sold enables them to control the

price at which the products are sold

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in the market.

You might say a cynic

would suggest controlling the price

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means they can keep the price

higher. You might get it cheaper on

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eBay or Amazon, but they say we want

to keep the price high?

Correct. If

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the prices are not sufficient, kept

sufficiently high, they won't be

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able to justify making the

investments and consumers will not

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benefit from the range and quality

of those prestige products in the

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market.

A brief word on what we

expect today. Which way are you

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expecting it to fall?

The opinion

came out in July which favoured the

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luxury brand owners and the court

will normally follow the opinion of

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the advocate general, but we really

don't know.

Normally. We will wait

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and see. Alan, thank you for

explaining that.

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Let's take a look at some of

the other stories making the news.

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The United States has

imposed a range of tariffs

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on some steel products that

are imported from Vietnam.

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The Commerce Department says

many of them originate in China

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and are trying to circumvent

existing duties tackling dumping

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and state subsidies.

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The new tariffs range

from 39% to 265%.

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Australia's economy grew

by 0.6% in the three months

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from June to September -

that's an annualised rate of 2.8%.

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It was driven by higher business

investment and government spending

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on infrastructure projects.

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The world's 12th largest economy

is trying to diversify away

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The world's 12th largest economy

is trying to diversify away

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from its dependence on mining and -

like many countries - faces

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the problem of weak wage growth.

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German firms will reconsider

their trade links to the UK

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if there is no clarity on a Brexit

deal by March, the country's

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business lobby has warned.

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The head of the powerful BDI group,

told the BBC there was "a certain

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urgency" for companies that do

business in Britain and recently

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asked its members to prepare

for a "very hard Brexit".

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One of China's most prominent

businessmen has told the BBC that

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foreign firms must play

by the country's controversial rules

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and regulations on the internet

if they want to compete

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in the world's biggest market place.

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Jack Ma - the head of the online

retail giant Alibaba -

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and he was speaking

at an annual gathering

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of government and corporate

leaders which is often over

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shadowed by the country's

tough censorship laws.

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From the conference

in Woo-jen our correspondent

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Robin Brant sent this report.

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Robin Brant sent this report.

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Every year China invites the world

to this serene water town

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to talk about the internet.

Its vision of the internet and that

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includes openness this year.

China is staying open to face...

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But there is less talk about China's

widespread censorship online.

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The strict controls on access,

the great firewall that this man

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is partly responsible for

that keeps Twitter,

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Google and others out.

It's no big secret. There wasn't

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much openness though from one

of the ministers in charge

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of the internet.

These are names familiar to many

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online here in China

and they're coming to a mobile

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or a tablet near you.

But China doesn't just to sell

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you stuff, it's ramping up it's

investment in how the web works.

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Artificial intelligence,

big data, cloud computing.

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The big idea at this

conference is openness.

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China open to the world,

apparently, and in return,

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the world, of course, open to China.

But there is a very sinister

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side to China online.

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China's internet controllers went

into overdrive this year to help

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this man, the president, Apple

agreed to remove dozens of apps that

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allow free access to the web.

Whatsapp was blocked. Pictures of

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were not allowed. None of that

deterred big names from coming to

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the conference. Facebook is banned

from China. When is Facebook coming

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to China legally?

No comment.

When

will you be coming to China legally?

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Will you be sensoring your comment

in China?

No comment.

There wasn't

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much openness from their man.

Excuse

me.

This man is a star in China. He

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made billions. He is the best known

businessman.

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He has a very direct message for the

foreign firms who want in.

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China's president promised this

conference he will open the doors

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wider and wider. He knows some

foreign firms don't like his vision

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of the internet, but they will

accept it and join in.

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Let's look at markets in Asia today.

Now, don't be fooled by the big

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numbers in red over there because

the Nikkei closed down 1.97% lower.

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It was their biggest percentage fall

since March for the Nikkei. The

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closing number is correct. We have

got a funny quirk with the

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percentage numbers there, but you

can see across-the-board in Asia,

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Hong Kong lower. Australia, South

Korea, they were having a torrid

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session following on from a bad

night the night before on Wall

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Street. If we look at Europe, it is

a similar story. Let's look at

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Europe right now. So we can get a

sense of how we are doing in London,

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Paris and Germany. We are seeing

declines across-the-board. A lot is

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to do with people locking in profits

right now as we come towards the end

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of the year with many issues going

on in the world of geopolitics which

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are causing nervousness. North

Korea, the US President and what he

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might say today about Jerusalem and

Israel. We have got Brexit and the

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stalemate, the lack of breakthrough,

all on the minds of investors. Let's

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look ahead to what's happening on

Wall Street later.

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Samira Hussain has the details about

what's ahead on Wall Street Today.

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The employment report is coming out

later.

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Compared with a gain of 235,000 jobs

in the previous month. The report

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could give us clues on what we can

expect on Friday when the Labour

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department releases the latest jobs

report. Broadcom will be reporting

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later this week. Finally, also

reporting is discount store

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Dollarama, they are likely to have

boosted prophets. Investors will be

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eager to hear about forecasts for

the rest of the year and how the

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company will drive sales to counter

competition from online sales.

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Joining us is Jane Sydenham,

Investment Director

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at Rathbones Investment Management.

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What are you watching this week?

Well, we are looking ahead to see

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what is going to happen next year.

As you just said, you know, it's

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very much a case of investors

looking forward. It has been a good

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year overall and I think to some

extent the retreat in Asia is that

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worry about is China's growth going

to continue at a reasonable rate,

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high levels of debt, are they going

to have to re-position and slow

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down. As you rightly say, we are

worried about politics. But it's

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also, you know, rising rates in the

US as well. I think there is a lot

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of strategy talk going on. We are

starting to talk to all of the

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businesses that we deal with and

they are all beginning to think

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ahead. So, I think there is a lot of

profit taking and re-positioning.

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All the markets are coming from a

very high level as well. 1.97% fall

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for the Nikkei today is not much

compared to its rise in the last

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sort of year. Could there be some

things triggering another flurry of

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buying like US tax reform being

actually nailed down that kind of

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thing?

I think that's right. That's

been anticipated, but there is quite

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a lot of doubt because you know,

Donald Trump has sort of got there

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and then had to pull back and

re-think. So there is no certainty

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until it actually happens. If it

does pass, yes, markets will be

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happy. But there has been a lot of

good news. So and some stocks are

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really over rated. They are really

too highly priced. The gap between

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the most expensive and the cheapest

is the widest it has been for 35

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years. That's a spectrum. So there

is a lot of re-positioning going on.

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All right. Jane, thank you very much

indeed.

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Jane is not one of the lazy

workers...

Why are you looking at

0:13:490:13:54

me?

I'm saying Jane is not one of

those because she has to do some

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more work for us later.

We are asking if people you work

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with don't work to the best of their

ability.

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Still to come, we hear

about the robots allowing children

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to feel part of the classroom

experience when they are too

0:14:110:14:14

ill to go to school.

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You're with Business

Live from BBC News.

0:14:150:14:19

If you are ever faced

with a decision

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of whether you should take a job

at Google, consider yourself one

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of the privileged few.

0:14:360:14:37

The tech giant has been named

the best company to work

0:14:370:14:40

for across Europe and North America.

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Joining us now is Mark Di-Toro.

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He's with Glassdoor, the job site

which conducted the survey.

0:14:440:14:51

Nice to see you Mark. I am not

surprised to hear what you found

0:14:510:14:55

out.

Yes, first and fore most we are

here to help everyone find a company

0:14:550:14:59

in a company that they love. That's

why we do the awards. Google for the

0:14:590:15:04

first time after two years of

Expedia being number one, Google

0:15:040:15:09

have usurped them and taken the top

spot, but followed by Anglian Water

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and Bromford a social housing

company in Wolverhampton.

0:15:170:15:23

Google, followed by Anglian Water,

what were you asking?

To be on these

0:15:230:15:30

awards, Best places to work, there

is no panel, people do not pay, this

0:15:300:15:35

is purely given by reviews and

ratings given voluntarily by

0:15:350:15:39

employees over the last 12 months,

on Glass Door, companies do not have

0:15:390:15:48

much of a weight of in this.

What

makes Google the best place to work

0:15:480:15:56

at, or Anglian Water a close second?

Google has a culture of great career

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development, strong senior leaders,

great pay, great perks, what we

0:16:020:16:07

found with Anglian Water, they

interviewed their CEO, and we

0:16:070:16:12

realise that all of their senior

leaders, all their top directors,

0:16:120:16:16

have been through the company for

many years. Their employees trust

0:16:160:16:21

them, they know what they are about,

and I think that makes a big

0:16:210:16:26

difference.

0:16:260:16:33

Full details of all the other

stories that we are following,

0:16:330:16:36

including news that Sakho profits

have taken a hit after the collapse

0:16:360:16:42

of Monarch Airlines. It says profits

will fall by 5% over the next year.

0:16:420:16:51

That is because it has seen a

downturn in travel business as a

0:16:510:16:54

result...

One of the big losers on

the FTSE 100, saga shares are down a

0:16:540:17:00

lot. -- Saga.

0:17:000:17:11

You're watching Business Live,

our top story Luxury goods firms get

0:17:140:17:16

set for a landmark European ruling

on whether they can control

0:17:160:17:19

how their goods are sold online.

0:17:190:17:27

A quick look at how

markets are faring.

0:17:270:17:36

We can see the market is taking a

turn for the worse.

0:17:360:17:40

A lot going on as the week

progresses, on Friday, end of the

0:17:440:17:48

week, something that is quite

significant, we have a US jobs

0:17:480:17:51

report coming out, on Friday, and

also, as well, just to bear in mind,

0:17:510:17:57

talking about geopolitics earlier, a

lot of concern about how Brexit

0:17:570:18:02

negotiations are going this week.

The UK is seen to be in a position

0:18:020:18:07

of weakness right now, depending

upon which angle you are looking at

0:18:070:18:11

it from, a lot of discussions about

internal politicking going on within

0:18:110:18:17

Theresa May's cabinet, that is

weighing on the pound sterling.

0:18:170:18:25

Breaking news on the top story we

were telling you about, news we were

0:18:250:18:28

expecting from the European Union

about whether the grand firms can

0:18:280:18:34

ban other retailers selling some of

their goods. Within the last few

0:18:340:18:37

minutes, US cosmetics

0:18:370:18:47

company Coty can indeed block. Many

of these retailers want to protect

0:18:480:18:54

profit margins but certainly their

brand. We are hearing that the

0:18:540:18:58

European Court of Justice has said

US cosmetics company Coty can blog

0:18:580:19:04

retailers from selling their

products online.

0:19:040:19:14

Now, in an increasingly digital

world, problems of isolation and

0:19:150:19:20

solitude can feel amplified by the

constant presence of social media.

0:19:200:19:22

But technology can - of course - be

part of the solution. A Norwegian

0:19:220:19:25

startup called 'No Isolation' is

using robots to help children who

0:19:250:19:27

can't go to school because of

long-term illness to continue to

0:19:270:19:29

feel part of the action. The small

machines act as a proxy for the

0:19:290:19:32

child and allows him/her to feel

part of the classroom experience,

0:19:320:19:34

albeit remotely. And that can help

them to feel less lonely. The

0:19:340:19:37

company estimates that in the UK in

October of this year, 70,000

0:19:370:19:39

children spend great parts of the

school year at home sick or in the

0:19:390:19:42

hospital.

0:19:420:19:52

Joining us, Karen Dolva, is

co-founder & CEO of No Isolation.

0:19:540:19:57

And in the studio, we have one of

the robots which could be in a

0:19:570:20:04

classroom representing a child that

cannot be there. Lovely to meet you.

0:20:040:20:09

Tell us about this little fellow. I

am falling in love with it!

0:20:090:20:15

Explained how it will work.

It is a

total presence robot, if you are

0:20:150:20:21

really ill and must stay at home for

months or years, this represents you

0:20:210:20:25

in the class, you have a tablet, a

phone at home, you control

0:20:250:20:30

movements, you can see and talk to

everyone, friends can pick you up

0:20:300:20:34

and put you out to break.

We are

keeping cameras on him, or her...

0:20:340:20:39

What is really important, the child

at home, the user, can change how

0:20:390:20:45

this robot looks. Light up the head

with different lights, if they are

0:20:450:20:50

not feeling well enough to be

involved, if they want to alert the

0:20:500:20:55

teacher, then there is different

ways of communicating.

One of the

0:20:550:20:57

first things we saw, we have been

testing this with real kids for

0:20:570:21:02

quite a long time, one of the things

that is difficult for them is saying

0:21:020:21:06

out loud, I am not feeling well.

They have a setting where they can

0:21:060:21:10

turn the head blue, indicating, I am

watching you, but do not ask me hard

0:21:100:21:14

questions, don't bring me out for

the break.

That is how children

0:21:140:21:21

interact, what about students in the

classroom... What research have you

0:21:210:21:26

got about how they interact?

We have

been observing them, it takes other

0:21:260:21:29

kids two minutes to get the concept,

they are used to having avatars

0:21:290:21:35

representing them. The teachers take

a couple of hours, they need more

0:21:350:21:41

information when it comes to privacy

and it is only the child on the

0:21:410:21:45

other end that is supposed to see

it.

I have three children in state

0:21:450:21:53

school education, you think about

the money, money is tight,

0:21:530:21:56

everything we want to do, expand,

invest in, it is not there, and

0:21:560:22:00

parent groups are busy having

fundraisers to make it possible.

0:22:000:22:05

Luckily, it is very few kids we are

talking about, so it is not

0:22:050:22:09

something everyone should have.

Who

pays for it?

Mostly the schools. At

0:22:090:22:15

least in the Nordic, so far, 300

units out there, but we have five or

0:22:150:22:22

six customers here in the UK, they

have done it on their own. The

0:22:220:22:26

parents have rented it.

How does

this work as a business for you, you

0:22:260:22:30

sell these things, is there an

ongoing revenue stream that you can

0:22:300:22:34

license these further afield?

I

think we will continue doing what we

0:22:340:22:37

are doing, maybe selling it to

schools and renting to parents. More

0:22:370:22:44

revenue heavy than a telepresence

robot for kids, if we rent it to

0:22:440:22:50

seniors.

Tomorrow, if we are not

here, apps I can stay at home... We

0:22:500:23:00

are not saying anyone is lazy...

Thank you very much for coming in.

0:23:000:23:05

Really nice to see it.

0:23:050:23:09

In a moment, we will look through

the business newspapers, if I am

0:23:090:23:13

still here, but here a quick

reminder of to get in touch:

stay

0:23:130:23:18

up-to-date with the business news as

it happens on the BBC's business

0:23:180:23:21

life page. Insight and analysis from

the team of editors write around the

0:23:210:23:26

globe. We want to hear from you,

too, get involved on the web page.

0:23:260:23:34

We want to remind you of the lead

story today, the European Court of

0:23:490:23:54

Justice with regards to its decision

on this case between the US

0:23:540:23:57

cosmetics company, Coty, that is the

ruling from the top court last few

0:23:570:24:08

minutes, that it can block its

products being sold on Amazon, for

0:24:080:24:12

instance. They want to protect

branding full. Back with us to talk

0:24:120:24:16

us through some of the stories,

let's talk about Twitter, lazy

0:24:160:24:21

people in the workplace, we all have

got them, somebody who is not quite

0:24:210:24:25

pulling their weight.

I'm afraid we

have a few like that in our office.

0:24:250:24:29

We want you to name and shame...

LAUGHTER

0:24:290:24:33

Really interesting thing, this

survey, talks about Brits, may not

0:24:330:24:38

be British workers, talking about

how we are more inclined to be a

0:24:380:24:41

little bit on the lazy site unless

we are massively motivated.

A lot of

0:24:410:24:48

it is about communication, employees

are not clear about what their job

0:24:480:24:52

is and the job description and what

is expected, sometimes they drift

0:24:520:24:57

because they are not clear.

There

might be an issue with weak wage

0:24:570:25:01

growth as well, they tweeted here

says, I work to the best of what my

0:25:010:25:05

salary justifies(!) people feel that

they have not had a pay increase for

0:25:050:25:09

a long time, they will not go the

extra mile because employers are not

0:25:090:25:15

valuing them.

Motivation is always

an issue, if you feel you are not

0:25:150:25:19

rewarded for the if effort that you

make.

Christopher says, some jobs

0:25:190:25:24

don't allow people to work to their

potential, managers must accept they

0:25:240:25:28

are part of the problem. Rudolph

says, perhaps they are working at

0:25:280:25:32

the level that reflects their pay,

the point you are making.

Working to

0:25:320:25:37

the best of your ability often has

little or no impact on status of

0:25:370:25:41

prospects, though management pretend

it does.

People learned that it is

0:25:410:25:46

not a meritocracy. Time is against

us, I'm afraid, really good to see

0:25:460:25:49

you.

0:25:490:25:51

Business live pages updating all the

time, with all the latest news. We

0:25:510:25:55

will see you soon.

0:25:550:26:01