06/03/2018 BBC Business Live


06/03/2018

A look at the global business stories.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to 06/03/2018. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

This is Business Live from BBC News,

with Sally Bundock and Ben Thompson.

0:00:050:00:09

Tackling the tariffs -

carmakers meet in Geneva

0:00:090:00:11

for the world's largest car show,

but they face a battle over

0:00:110:00:14

President Trump's promise to impose

tough tax on foreign-made cars.

0:00:140:00:19

Live from London, that's our top

story on Tuesday 6th March.

0:00:190:00:24

America is the most valuable market

for European car exports -

0:00:390:00:43

so how will car markers respond,

and does it really help US

0:00:430:00:46

manufacturers as much

as President Trump has promised?

0:00:460:00:50

Also in the programme...

0:00:500:00:52

Cut out the calories -

food manufacturers, supermarkets

0:00:520:00:54

and fast-food chains are told to cut

fat in food or face legal action.

0:00:540:01:02

And from farm to fork.

0:01:020:01:04

-- and financial markets are riding

high in Europe following a bumper

0:01:090:01:14

session in Asia. We will explain

why.

0:01:140:01:16

And from farm to fork.

0:01:160:01:19

We'll get the inside track

on the app that puts farmers

0:01:190:01:21

directly in touch with customers,

cutting out the big supermarkets.

0:01:210:01:24

We'll assess what it means

for prices and pay for farmers.

0:01:240:01:26

And with that warning to food

producers we want to know,

0:01:260:01:29

is the food industry cashing

in on sugar-loaded, unhealthy food?

0:01:290:01:33

Let us know, use the

hashtag #BBCBizLive.

0:01:330:01:38

Hello and welcome to Business Live.

0:01:460:01:52

Are you a foodie or do you have

strong opinions about food? This is

0:01:520:01:57

the programme for you, get in touch

with your comments.

0:01:570:02:00

The Geneva Motor Show starts today.

0:02:000:02:02

It's the largest event

of its kind in the world,

0:02:020:02:04

bringing together manufacturers

and petrol-heads from

0:02:040:02:05

all over the planet.

0:02:050:02:08

But among the glitzy product

launches, one topic of conversation

0:02:080:02:10

is likely to dominate -

President Trump's threat

0:02:100:02:13

to impose tariffs on imports

of European cars to the US.

0:02:130:02:21

So what is at stake

for the car industry?

0:02:210:02:24

Well, if we take a look

at the current state of play,

0:02:240:02:28

the United States already imposes

a 2.5% tariff on cars

0:02:280:02:31

assembled in Europe.

0:02:310:02:39

That is 2.5%.

0:02:390:02:42

Meanwhile Europe imposes a higher

10% tariff on US-built cars.

0:02:420:02:52

Cars which are then brought into

Europe.

0:02:530:02:55

But many German firms -

like Daimler, BMW and VW -

0:02:550:02:58

already build many of their vehicles

at plants within the United States.

0:02:580:03:02

In fact, Germany's car body,

the VDA, said their factories

0:03:020:03:04

in the US made 804,000 units last

year - way more than the 494,000

0:03:040:03:09

exported from Germany.

0:03:090:03:19

Quite interesting when you look at

the facts. Over to you, Ben.

0:03:200:03:26

Andrew Walker is with me now.

0:03:260:03:30

He is our economic correspondent.

You start getting into tit-for-tat,

0:03:300:03:35

you impose this, we will impose

this. When we talk about tariffs,

0:03:350:03:40

though, people will say it is bad

for business?

Of course, it makes it

0:03:400:03:45

more expensive for people buying the

stuff that is imported and means a

0:03:450:03:48

lower pre-term for the exporter in

the foreign country. The real

0:03:480:03:58

economic burden does not depend on

where you collected from, it is

0:03:580:04:02

divided between buyer and seller in

that way. There is no question that

0:04:020:04:06

ultimately if you were to see a

sufficiently large escalation in

0:04:060:04:11

tariffs, you could see quite

significant macro economic damage

0:04:110:04:15

done around the world. We are not

there yet, but clearly the worries

0:04:150:04:19

about that are in play at the

moment. We have a system of rules

0:04:190:04:27

for managing international trade,

policed by the World Trade

0:04:270:04:32

Organisation, and the forces that

brought as the WTA in the first

0:04:320:04:36

place, going back to the aftermath

of the Second World War, they were a

0:04:360:04:40

desire to avoid the tariff

escalation we saw during the 1930s.

0:04:400:04:45

The potential costs, if it seriously

got out of hand, are very high, but

0:04:450:04:49

we have not got there yet.

Despite

that, President Trump says it is, in

0:04:490:04:55

his words, putting America first and

protecting jobs in the United

0:04:550:05:02

States. Some would say is that a

price worth paying, it helps protect

0:05:020:05:05

jobs in America?

When you impose a

tariff on one thing going into the

0:05:050:05:12

United States, you are raising costs

for everybody who buys that stuff.

0:05:120:05:16

It means the domestic producers can

raise their prices so if we are

0:05:160:05:21

talking about steel and aluminium,

car-makers will have to pay more for

0:05:210:05:27

their steel and aluminium raw

materials, whether they are buying

0:05:270:05:30

from American suppliers or importing

it. You might be able to save jobs

0:05:300:05:34

in one area but there are

significant risks you will leave

0:05:340:05:38

jobs -- lose jobs in other areas.

What does this tell us about the

0:05:380:05:43

nature of the business in the United

States and firms that want to do

0:05:430:05:47

business with the US?

Many of the

big manufacturers are very much

0:05:470:05:53

international businesses and it is

fair to say that some of them

0:05:530:05:57

clearly get benefit from terrorist

protection. The big industrial

0:05:570:06:04

players are increasingly keen on

Terror free trade. So many have

0:06:040:06:11

international interests, production

operations abroad, and they are

0:06:110:06:15

likely to move their goods easily

and cheaply across borders.

Good to

0:06:150:06:22

see you, thanks for that, Andrew

water. -- Andrew Walker.

0:06:220:06:27

Let's take a look at some of

the other stories making the news.

0:06:270:06:31

Facebook has hired the former

head of BuzzFeed Studios

0:06:310:06:32

and a former Pinterest boss

to join its video team.

0:06:320:06:34

The firm says Matthew Henick

will lead its global video strategy.

0:06:340:06:37

While Mike Bidgoli, who managed

Pinterest's ads, will lead

0:06:370:06:39

Facebook's Watch product team.

0:06:390:06:47

In the UK, concerns over Brexit -

and the fear it will make

0:06:470:06:50

Brits less well off -

has dampened household spending.

0:06:500:06:52

According to Barclaycard,

annual consumption growth slowed

0:06:520:06:54

from January as spending

in supermarkets eased.

0:06:540:06:55

Separately the British Retail

Consortium said that sales

0:06:550:06:57

of non-food items also fell

over the quarter.

0:06:570:07:03

The Chinese messaging app - WeChat -

has hit one billion monthly

0:07:030:07:06

users for the first time.

0:07:060:07:09

The vast majority of its users

are based in China, where the recent

0:07:090:07:12

Lunar New Year tipped usage

past the milestone.

0:07:120:07:16

But it still lags behind WhatsApp -

which is owned by Facebook -

0:07:160:07:19

which has around 1.5

billion monthly users.

0:07:190:07:26

And they are across the world, of

course.

0:07:260:07:36

As we have already mentioned, a top

health official is recommending the

0:07:360:07:40

diets that Brits should be on.

Apparently we all need to go on a

0:07:400:07:45

diet to ward against the problem of

obesity. Also there is a real finger

0:07:450:07:49

being worked at the food industry in

general. That is about what is on

0:07:490:07:54

offer in the supermarkets at what

cost, the fact that lots of the

0:07:540:07:58

cheap food on sale, which many are

opting for right now, is actually

0:07:580:08:03

full of sugar and calories.

We want all your views on this,

0:08:030:08:08

#BBCBizLive.

Ben? Sorry, you just called me

0:08:080:08:12

talking to the director.

I thought you were talking to me!

0:08:120:08:18

Another story I would like to flag

up, Lego, this is a favourite in

0:08:180:08:24

your household, Sally, Lego posting

its first annual fall in sales for

0:08:240:08:27

13 years.

Despite my efforts.

Sally

gets through a lot of like the

0:08:270:08:32

latter with three boys.

Sales were down 8% to $4.2 billion.

0:08:320:08:37

Profits were down 18%. Lego posting

its first annual fall in sales in 13

0:08:370:08:47

years.

That is not one that I'd

built. That is not one of my photos.

0:08:470:08:54

The Lego is all in my Hoover or my

dog's mouth.

0:08:540:09:04

The Chief Executive of Japanese

steel giant Kobe Steel has stepped

0:09:040:09:07

down after an investigation found

"inappropriate corporate behaviour".

0:09:070:09:09

The company recently admitted

falsifying key quality control data.

0:09:090:09:13

Karishma Vaswani has details,

she's in our Asia Business Hub.

0:09:130:09:20

We know this scandal hits all the

headlines, this is the fallout of it

0:09:200:09:24

and you get a sense of how far

around the world it was felt, that

0:09:240:09:29

Steele is used a lot of

manufacturing?

Absolutely. The

0:09:290:09:33

clients that Kobe steel had numbered

from train manufacturers,

0:09:330:09:39

car-makers, aircraft makers. You

name it, they were supplying steel.

0:09:390:09:45

In the mammoth report that has come

out today into the investigation

0:09:450:09:48

into actually what went wrong at

Kobe steel, the company says out of

0:09:480:09:54

the 688 or so incidents of

misconduct, as it called Sid, at

0:09:540:09:59

least 90% of these cases have been

cleared of safety issues. --

0:09:590:10:05

misconduct, as it called it. When

the scandal broke it went the heart

0:10:050:10:09

of what was wrong with corporate

Japan. This investigation has found

0:10:090:10:13

that some of the staff safety

inspection data so it appeared the

0:10:130:10:18

products they were sending into the

WorldCom plied with what their

0:10:180:10:22

clients wanted, and basically they

were lying to clients. Apart from

0:10:220:10:28

removing the CEO from his position,

the company says it will address

0:10:280:10:32

some of these corporate culture

issues which they hope will rectify

0:10:320:10:35

some of the problems at the firm.

Thank you very much indeed. An

0:10:350:10:41

interesting story about Kobe Steel,

that news was quite shocking when it

0:10:410:10:45

across the wires.

0:10:450:10:51

Let's show you the markets. What a

different picture in Asia compared

0:10:510:10:56

to this time yesterday. Japan

closing up 1.5%. I would like to

0:10:560:11:00

quote a US traders saying the

positive story today is the lack of

0:11:000:11:05

anything bad happening. That is the

general feeling. People are brushing

0:11:050:11:09

off the fears we saw yesterday about

possible trade was an turrets.

0:11:090:11:12

Investors leave President shrimp is

blustering and it will not become a

0:11:120:11:20

reality -- investors believe. Let's

look at Europe, Europe closed on

0:11:200:11:25

Monday hair. It was not like Asia on

Monday. Strong gains right across

0:11:250:11:34

the board. We will dig deeper in

just a moment, but let's hear from

0:11:340:11:37

Joe Mellor in New York with what is

ahead on Wall Street.

0:11:370:11:44

After another bumpy day on the stock

markets there is little doubt

0:11:440:11:47

investors will be on tenterhooks for

the latest indication on whether the

0:11:470:11:51

US is about to start a trade war

and, if so, with soon -- with whom.

0:11:510:11:56

There is plenty of the news to

grapple with. In a big week the

0:11:560:12:01

retail stocks, one of the biggest,

retail chain target, reports on

0:12:010:12:07

Tuesday. Its revenue are reported to

have increased due to a particularly

0:12:070:12:12

strong retail shopping season.

Investors also want to hear news and

0:12:120:12:16

how online businesses bearing

against the Bailey Mes that is

0:12:160:12:21

Amazon. The latest factory orders

data is released on Tuesday morning,

0:12:210:12:26

expected to show orders rose by 1.3%

in January.

0:12:260:12:31

Joining us is Nandini Ramakrishnan,

global market strategist at

0:12:310:12:33

JP Morgan Asset Management.

0:12:330:12:37

Good morning. Let's start with some

of the political stuff. At the start

0:12:370:12:43

of the programme we mentioned

President Trump and turrets, lots of

0:12:430:12:46

uncertainty in Europe with the

elections questionably got over the

0:12:460:12:49

weekend there was the big general

election in Italy, it happened on

0:12:490:12:54

Sunday. We also had the results of

the German coalition discussions.

0:12:540:12:59

Two parties finally decided on the

agenda and that they would work

0:12:590:13:03

together for the next several years

in Germany. Lots to wake up to one

0:13:030:13:07

Monday morning. A bit of uneasiness.

If we had to characterise the two

0:13:070:13:13

results, the German sense of

stability, patching together two big

0:13:130:13:17

parties, a pro-Europe stance is very

important. A bit of the opposite in

0:13:170:13:22

Italy. A couple of the parties that

received the most votes are some of

0:13:220:13:27

the more antiestablishment parties,

once interested in thinking about

0:13:270:13:29

Italy leaving the euro zone or

shaking up markets and economic is a

0:13:290:13:33

bit more.

There is a European

Central Bank meeting this week?

The

0:13:330:13:39

European Central Bank has for the

past several years then a huge job

0:13:390:13:44

of getting interest rates very low,

trying to get growth and being quite

0:13:440:13:48

successful. We will have to see what

they do in terms of winding down

0:13:480:13:51

their big programmes and what they

will forecast for growth.

The

0:13:510:13:56

markets shrugging off any concern

about a terrorist war, Trump's

0:13:560:14:03

tariff plans. Interesting that the

Speaker of the House of

0:14:030:14:07

Representatives said he was very

concerned, the Republican leader, he

0:14:070:14:11

does not want to see any of this

going ahead. -- shrugging off

0:14:110:14:15

concerns about a tarriff war.

Opening into today's markets we saw

0:14:150:14:25

that markets were stepping up,

realising what has to happen before

0:14:250:14:28

the implementation of this. Quite

drastic, but an important tax tariff

0:14:280:14:33

plan. If that happens there will be

effects, but it is far from being

0:14:330:14:37

implemented immediately, which is

why markets might be taking a step

0:14:370:14:40

back and regaining some fitting.

Thank you, for now. Nandini will be

0:14:400:14:46

back to look at some of the

newspaper stories, including apple's

0:14:460:14:51

new headquarters

0:14:510:15:01

in San Francisco, $5 billion worth

of lots of reports of people walking

0:15:020:15:05

into glass-walled. A bit too trendy

for its own good. I have done that

0:15:050:15:08

in this building. They have had to

put etching on the glass so you can

0:15:080:15:11

see it.

0:15:110:15:11

Still to come...

0:15:110:15:12

From farm to fork.

0:15:120:15:13

We'll get the inside track

on the app that puts farmers

0:15:130:15:16

in touch with customers -

cutting out the big

0:15:160:15:18

supermarkets and their profits.

0:15:180:15:19

You're with Business

Live from BBC News.

0:15:190:15:29

There is

Live from BBC News.

0:15:290:15:31

There is definitely

Live from BBC News.

0:15:310:15:31

There is definitely a

Live from BBC News.

0:15:310:15:31

There is definitely a food

Live from BBC News.

0:15:310:15:31

There is definitely a food theme

Live from BBC News.

0:15:310:15:31

There is definitely a food theme

today.

0:15:310:15:37

The online takeaway firm Just Eat

has reported a pre-tax loss

0:15:370:15:39

of £76 million for last year -

that's compared to £91

0:15:390:15:42

million the year before.

0:15:420:15:43

But the firm says orders are up 26%

over the period to 172 million.

0:15:430:15:46

Laith Khalaf is senior analyst

at Hargreaves Lansdown.

0:15:460:15:48

He joins us from Bristol.

0:15:480:15:52

Good morning. What do you make of

the figures?

It is a bit of a blip

0:15:520:15:57

in an upward trajectory for Just

Eat, on a charge of late, increasing

0:15:570:16:04

orders, increasing revenues very

strongly. What is happening it is

0:16:040:16:08

being dragged into the delivery

market. Until now, the business

0:16:080:16:11

model has been very cosy, it has

just provided a website, and app,

0:16:110:16:18

connecting restaurants with their

customers. But it is now getting

0:16:180:16:21

into bed with some of the big chains

like Burger King and Kentucky fried

0:16:210:16:26

chicken and they want delivery as

well. That is going to be soaking up

0:16:260:16:32

some investment from Just Eat. That

might be impacting on profit margins

0:16:320:16:36

so we have seen a big fall in the

share price this morning.

What

0:16:360:16:39

impact is Just Eat having an eating

at industry? Are they getting into

0:16:390:16:49

bed with Burger King and others

because Burger King thought they

0:16:490:16:52

would eat into their market?

Yeah,

they have got to get into the

0:16:520:16:57

delivery market which is growing

very strongly. There is a whole

0:16:570:17:00

piece about what technology is doing

to consumer behaviour. We have seen

0:17:000:17:04

it on the high street. We have seen

declining footfall on the high

0:17:040:17:09

street because people are shopping

online. People are also staying at

0:17:090:17:14

home watching television, Amazon

Video, it all impacts on the

0:17:140:17:20

businesses and particularly Just Eat

which has been a winner until now

0:17:200:17:25

from that trend, but if we are

looking at today's results, they are

0:17:250:17:30

finally going to have to roll up

their sleeves and get their hands

0:17:300:17:33

more dirty than they have until now.

Thank you for your analysis. That is

0:17:330:17:38

in line with this whole discussion

about food, what we are eating, the

0:17:380:17:42

fact we are getting larger. Doing

less exercise. And who is

0:17:420:17:49

responsible. 16 MPs have written to

the Business Secretary, Greg Clark,

0:17:490:17:54

opposing the takeover we have talked

about, GKN Cabinet Aerospace.

0:17:540:18:07

Details on the Business Lives page.

0:18:070:18:09

You're watching Business Live.

0:18:090:18:10

Our top story...

0:18:100:18:11

Carmakers meet in Geneva

for the world's largest car show,

0:18:110:18:13

but they're debating what to do

about President Trump's threat

0:18:130:18:16

to impose tariffs on imports

of European cars to the US.

0:18:160:18:23

We will keep a close eye on that.

This is what the markets are doing

0:18:230:18:27

in Europe. Sally touched on it, some

others suggesting the lack of

0:18:270:18:34

anything bad is keeping markets

afloat which is probably not a great

0:18:340:18:38

basis to be trading on... Not a huge

amount moving at the moment. We will

0:18:380:18:45

hear from the European Central Bank

later in the week and a lot of

0:18:450:18:48

nervousness around the jobs figures

and inflation in the US that caused

0:18:480:18:52

the volatility of late.

0:18:520:18:54

Now, it's often known as farm

to fork - cutting out supermarkets

0:18:540:18:57

and food retailers to let farmers

sell directly to consumers.

0:18:570:18:59

But is it as simple as it sounds?

0:18:590:19:01

In the UK, the six biggest

supermarkets control almost 83%

0:19:010:19:04

of the grocery market.

0:19:040:19:07

That buying power means supermarkets

sell milk, for example,

0:19:070:19:11

for around 45% more than they pay

the dairy farmer who produced it.

0:19:110:19:16

And that's had a big

impact on the industry.

0:19:160:19:20

Farmers are facing soaring levels

of debt - up 57% since 2010 -

0:19:200:19:27

and one in ten dairy farms has

recently gone out of business.

0:19:270:19:30

By putting farmers in direct

touch with consumers,

0:19:300:19:34

Farmdrop is hoping it can cut out

the middleman and help

0:19:340:19:37

farmers and shoppers.

0:19:370:19:39

Joining us is Farmdrop's

co-founder, Ben Pugh.

0:19:390:19:44

Good morning. Welcome to the

programme. Explain how this works,

0:19:440:19:49

what is it you do?

I thought that

statistic was really interesting,

0:19:490:19:54

45% of the retail price of a pint of

milk goes to the dairy and that is a

0:19:540:19:59

really big problem and at Farmdrop

we are saying we need to close the

0:19:590:20:03

gap between the retail price that

the customer pays and what the dairy

0:20:030:20:09

or Baker or organic vegetable grower

retains. At Farmdrop, the dairy or

0:20:090:20:15

baker get more like 70% of the

retail price and the whole thing is

0:20:150:20:19

about efficiency with mobile

technology. As a customer, you go on

0:20:190:20:25

and

0:20:250:20:28

order from over 200 producers and

they get the orders directly and we

0:20:280:20:31

deliver the food in one nice big

green box we take back the next day.

0:20:310:20:36

It sounds idyllic but it sounds

expensive. Could be convenient.

0:20:360:20:42

Maybe not, depending on how long it

takes.

On the convenience, if you

0:20:420:20:46

order before noon, you would get

your delivery the following

0:20:460:20:51

afternoon. We think that is very

convenient and that is comparing to

0:20:510:20:54

people like Tesco, Sainsbury's. One

hour time slot which is important as

0:20:540:21:00

well. No point in trying to fight

the tide of convenience. In terms of

0:21:000:21:06

pricing, our view is that by being

so efficient, we can be the lowest

0:21:060:21:10

price access to this kind of amazing

independent locally produced food.

0:21:100:21:14

You would be cheaper than an Ocado

livery?

We are 5% more. Our

0:21:140:21:27

customers tell us our spinach is 20

times more delicious. -- Ocado

0:21:270:21:33

delivery. It is so much fresher, it

has come from close by, and that is

0:21:330:21:38

one of the things that has helped

the company grow tenfold.

I am not

0:21:380:21:43

going to ask you how you measure 20

times more delicious! The

0:21:430:21:48

supermarkets say they put the

margins on it because they have big

0:21:480:21:52

stores, we pay for the convenience,

I can nip in on the way home because

0:21:520:21:56

I do not know what I am going to

have for dinner tonight. If I order

0:21:560:22:00

your box, I have to plan. Otherwise

I just pop in on the way home and

0:22:000:22:04

pick up something.

It is a fair

point that for the segment of

0:22:040:22:11

shoppers and when I was in my 20s,

it would not have occurred to me to

0:22:110:22:15

have done online home food delivery

because I was out most of the time,

0:22:150:22:20

and now I have two small children, I

will put my order in this morning,

0:22:200:22:25

it will all arrive tomorrow

afternoon, not a huge amount of

0:22:250:22:28

planning in place. The value is I

know I am supporting local

0:22:280:22:33

producers, getting really amazing

quality food, healthy food. I and I

0:22:330:22:36

am not paying very much.

Is the

market solid enough for you as a

0:22:360:22:40

company, given the economic

environment? We are spending less on

0:22:400:22:46

the supermarkets because we are

concerned about the outlook.

There

0:22:460:22:49

are real issues. Certainly, I am not

an expert on those on the economy.

0:22:490:22:56

But I can tell you every day more

and more people are waking up and

0:22:560:23:00

having a better understanding about

what food quality really means, not

0:23:000:23:04

all calories are created equal, so

if I do spend 5p more on an amazing

0:23:040:23:08

fresh bag spinach, I'm going to be

better off, it is a worthwhile

0:23:080:23:15

investment, and that group of people

is growing very fast at the moment.

0:23:150:23:18

If you can make spinach 20 times

more tasty and nicer, I will order.

0:23:180:23:24

I accept your challenge!

Really good

to see you, thank you very much.

0:23:240:23:28

Maybe that will be an online

offering on the Business Live page,

0:23:280:23:35

spinach tasting challenge with the

two Bens. Stay up-to-date with the

0:23:350:23:42

business news as it happens on the

BBC's Business Live page. Insight

0:23:420:23:48

and analysis from our team of

editors around the globe. We want to

0:23:480:23:51

hear from you. Get involved on the

BBC's Business Live web page. And on

0:23:510:23:58

Twitter... You can find us on

Facebook. Business Live on TV and

0:23:580:24:07

online. What you need to know when

you need to know. There you have it.

0:24:070:24:14

Let's take you to some of the

stories the papers are looking at,

0:24:140:24:17

including this one on the BBC

business website. Britain needs to

0:24:170:24:21

go on the diet, interesting because

it is talking about who was

0:24:210:24:24

responsible for the obesity crisis,

the manufacturers putting too much

0:24:240:24:29

sugar and fat end? Is it the

retailers selling it cheaply? Or are

0:24:290:24:35

we responsible because we are not

eating properly? You do not need to

0:24:350:24:41

see that in every angle. Interesting

one as far as business is concerned,

0:24:410:24:46

they are in it to make money, if we

do not want to eat it, we should not

0:24:460:24:51

buy it?

Exactly. But looking from

the health perspective, it is

0:24:510:24:54

important how broader health issues

like obesity cost the NHS and people

0:24:540:24:59

in terms of days on their lives. It

is quite an extensive list of

0:24:590:25:05

products and the classic culprits,

pizza, meat, interesting ones about

0:25:050:25:13

dressings, sauces, trying to cut the

calories.

One of my favourite

0:25:130:25:19

things!

Sad reading each item on the

list.

We have heard from so many of

0:25:190:25:23

you, thank you. John, people are not

done, you cannot blame food for

0:25:230:25:28

making a person fact, it is up to

human beings to look after

0:25:280:25:33

ourselves. Another one says, surely

everyone knows what is good and bad,

0:25:330:25:37

will informing us do more? Another

one suggesting the cost of the NHS.

0:25:370:25:43

Barry says, I would rather not worry

about my weight, Aunt Sally. OK,

0:25:430:25:50

don't! We are out of time. That is

Business Live. Bye-bye.

0:25:500:25:58

Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS