12/05/2017 BBC News at Ten


12/05/2017

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The NHS is the victim of a massive cyberattack.

:00:00.:00:07.

39 hospital trusts and GP surgeries are affected.

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There's serious disruption as routine operations

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are cancelled, patients sent home and ambulances diverted.

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I think it is a heinous crime, this hacking,

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because they are putting people's lives at risk.

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As a precaution, they were doing all the paperwork on paper,

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The cyberattack is a form of ransomware, demanding hospitals

:00:29.:00:35.

It is an international attack and a number

:00:36.:00:45.

of countries and organisations have been affected.

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74 countries are known to be affected.

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We'll be looking at the impact of this attack worldwide and what it

:00:52.:00:54.

Jeremy Corbyn insists he's no pacifist, while Theresa May

:00:55.:01:01.

accuses him of deserting patriotic working-class people.

:01:02.:01:06.

The schoolboy who died after an allergic reaction.

:01:07.:01:09.

A coroner says staff could have saved his life.

:01:10.:01:13.

And, Donald Trump versus his former FBI director.

:01:14.:01:15.

Did the President secretly record their conversations?

:01:16.:01:18.

The President has nothing further to add on that.

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The President has no further comment on this.

:01:24.:01:25.

For the third time, there is nothing further to add on that.

:01:26.:01:36.

Chelsea clinch the Premier League title. In Antonio Conte's first

:01:37.:01:41.

season in charge. And coming up in Sportsday on BBC

:01:42.:01:43.

News: Gloucester were hoping to win the first major trophy of the rugby

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union club season in the final of the European Challenge Cup

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against Stade Francais. The NHS has fallen victim

:01:50.:02:10.

to a major cyberattack. 39 hospital trusts and GPs

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in Scotland and across England have had to cancel routine operations,

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send patients home The NHS says its services have been

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targeted by a ransomware attack, which means NHS data is,

:02:22.:02:27.

in effect, being held hostage Dozens of other facilities have

:02:28.:02:30.

shut down their email and computer The scale of the cyberattack

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on the NHS is unprecedented. It's been declared a major national

:02:36.:02:40.

incident, disrupting hospitals and trusts from Glasgow,

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Dumfries and Carlisle, Blackpool and York, to some

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of the big teaching hospitals in London, and services

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in the south of England. The Prime Minister says the incident

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is part of a wider attack affecting It's thought 74 countries

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have been affected. There was serious disruption in some

:02:57.:03:07.

parts of the NHS today, with signs warning of significant

:03:08.:03:10.

delays at A units and some GP All this the result

:03:11.:03:15.

of the biggest cyber attack Some patients like Tom,

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waiting for nonurgent surgery, were told their operations

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had been postponed. It's inconvenient, very frustrating

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for my fellow patients The nurses are absolutely fabulous,

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and the doctors, and also I think it's a heinous crime,

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this hacking, because they are Richard, who was due

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to have an operation on his leg, was also told it

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wouldn't happen today. It was disappointing,

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because I've got all... They helped me, because I was a bit

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nervous about it, so I'll have to go through it again,

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I hope, not very long way. Laura, whose new baby arrived

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yesterday, was delayed As a precaution, they were doing

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all the paperwork on paper, their systems were down

:04:01.:04:09.

because of all these Some patients going to

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Colchester Hospital were told The gentleman just inside the door

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said that all the computers have gone down and, "We're not sure

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whether the doctors can see you, If it's x-rays or breakages

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or whatever, they're It's happened before, at this

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hospital trust covering North IT systems were closed

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for three days as a result Hundreds of operations and patient

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appointments were postponed. People were told to go to A

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only if it was really necessary. There were warnings then that

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NHS IT was vulnerable. And today, staff logging in at some

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other hospitals found this on their screens,

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with the message saying, If you want to recover them,

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you need to pay up." Ransomware, a hidden programme used

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by criminal hackers, was to blame. In a statement, NHS Digital,

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responsible for IT, said... NHS England said it wanted

:05:14.:05:28.

to reassure patients that, in the event of emergencies,

:05:29.:05:31.

they should visit A as normal, but some GPs are warning

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there will be disruption There will be referrals that GPs

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have made this afternoon or wanted to make a referral that will now

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have to be processed on Monday. Hoping that everything

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is back up and running. And there will be a backlog

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of things like repeat prescriptions, We'll have patients unable

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to book future appointments and things this afternoon,

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so there will be things that will give us a backlog from this,

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depending on how long it The Prime Minister gave

:06:00.:06:02.

the Government's response. It's an international

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attack on a number of The National Cyber Security Centre

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is working closely with NHS Digital to ensure that they support

:06:08.:06:13.

the organisations concerned and that Some hospitals and GP surgeries

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in Scotland have been caught up The Scottish Government,

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like ministers at Westminster, and NHS leaders, will be trying

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to assess the extent of the problem Well, similar ramsomware attacks

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have been reported at organisations in 74 countries across the world,

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including the US, China, Security analysts believe

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the incidents are all linked. It looked at first like an attack

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just an hospitals in the UK, but it's now becoming clear that this

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malicious software has run riot Russia, the United States

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and many points in between have been hit by what is now

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a common form of cybercrime. It's become a tool of choice

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for an awful lot of criminals simply because it's very easy to make

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money very quickly. You can buy ransomware online

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for as little as $39. At the top end of the market,

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it comes with a lot of support and payment systems

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to help you get your money. It often arrives in an innocuous

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looking e-mail. You click it, the software is downloaded and spreads

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through June at work, locking up the files on it. Then a message flashes

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up on screens, warning that if you want your data on blogs, you will

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have to pay a ransom, often in Bitcoin. The irony is that security

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experts think a hacking tool allegedly leaked from America's

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National Security Agency in April may have been used by the attackers

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will stop Microsoft warned about the threat this vulnerability post, it

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said anybody who had secured a security update the previous month

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would be OK. The worry is that many health service computers may not

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have been updated. The NHS is vulnerable, because it has not

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invested enough in computer security, they use old systems, and

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if they don't keep them patched, they will keep on getting hit by

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attacks like this. The health service will point out it is one of

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many organisations around the world that had by this attack. It now

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faces what could be a lengthy process of cleaning up its computers

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and making the network safe again. Our Health Editor Hugh Pym

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is at the Department of Health. What's the likely

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impact on patients? Presumably people are busy getting

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the system back up and running? Officials here have been working

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late this evening, Jeremy Hunt has been here, keeping in touch with NHS

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leaders who have been trying to gather information from around the

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system. It is a disparate system, trying to work out what is happening

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takes time. It was a key hours before the centre could get any

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information about how badly services were affected. There seems to be a

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consensus that around 40 organisations have been affected, it

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is not clear how many trusts, how many GP practices and other NHS

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groups. There are more than 200 NHS bodies in England. The priority over

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the weekend will be to try to help hospitals and other NHS facilities

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stabilise their systems and try to get back to normal. There will be a

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debate about how formal ball the NHS is, how much investment there has

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been to avoid this sort of thing, that is one source said, that is a

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question for another day, he priority now is to stabilise the

:10:00.:10:04.

system. What about the disruption for patients? How badly will it

:10:05.:10:09.

affect them? How likely's how long is this likely to go on? NHS leaders

:10:10.:10:14.

are making clear that emergency care is there as normal for people who

:10:15.:10:20.

need it, but when it comes to routine surgery Tom outpatient

:10:21.:10:25.

appointments, quite a lot postponed today, it is likely that more will

:10:26.:10:29.

be postponed on Monday and maybe Tuesday, which will create a backlog

:10:30.:10:33.

which could run for some time, because the NHS is under such

:10:34.:10:37.

pressure. GPs say they have been affect it in some areas, that will

:10:38.:10:41.

affect appointments and prescriptions and so on. It is not

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clear how long it will last, but almost certainly well beyond the

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weekend. Jeremy Corbyn says the war on terror

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isn't working and Britain In a speech outlining his foreign

:10:49.:10:50.

policy, he said he wasn't a pacifist and could see circumstances

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in which he would involve Britain in a war, but he warned

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against what he called a "bomb Mr Corbyn accused Theresa May

:11:02.:11:04.

of pandering to Donald Trump, who he said was making the world

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a more-dangerous place. He's used to it now,

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all the attention, and not always friendly, though

:11:15.:11:17.

he still tries to be. Labour's campaign is so much

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about Jeremy Corbyn, his character, ideas he's held dear for 30 years,

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though some in his party wish And today the Labour leader

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was holding to his oldest and deepest convictions,

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writing off years of Britain's way The fact is that the war

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on terror has been driven, which has driven these

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interventions, has not succeeded. It has not increased

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our security at home. In fact, many would say

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just the opposite. But this, Britain's leader onside

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and alongside with Donald Trump, More talking, less fighting, yes,

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and a lot less cosiness Britain deserves better than simply

:11:58.:12:02.

outsourcing our country's security and prosperity to the whims

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of the Trump White House. A Labour Government

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will conduct a robust In this election, it's become clear

:12:13.:12:18.

that a vote for the Conservatives would be a vote to escalate the war

:12:19.:12:24.

in Syria, risking military confrontation with Russia,

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adding to the suffering of the Syrian people

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and increasing global insecurity. The message - when facing terrorism,

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time somehow to rely But what about Britain's nuclear

:12:35.:12:38.

deterrent, and Jeremy Corbyn's lifelong opposition

:12:39.:12:44.

to nuclear defence? For a potential Prime Minister,

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it's become a nagging question, a live election issue,

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and he knew it. I'm often asked if,

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as Prime Minister, I would order It's an extraordinary question,

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when you think about it. Would you order the indiscriminate

:12:56.:13:00.

killing of millions of people? Would you risk such contamination

:13:01.:13:06.

of the planet that no life could exist across large parts

:13:07.:13:08.

of the world? He wanted nuclear defence

:13:09.:13:12.

reconsidered, too. We cannot obviously decide

:13:13.:13:17.

what a review would decide, otherwise you wouldn't

:13:18.:13:20.

have a review. What do you say to supporters

:13:21.:13:21.

of British military power, when it's not clear in what circumstances

:13:22.:13:24.

you would ever order forces into battle, in or out of Nato,

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and including strikes I doubt many, if any in this room

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would have questioned the legitimacy ultimately of the Second World War

:13:32.:13:38.

because of the catastrophe that had But controversy today

:13:39.:13:43.

is about recent conflict. British air strikes on the so-called

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Islamic State in Iraq and Syria, He is proud now that he joined

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the marches against the Iraq invasion in 2003, a war which drove

:13:53.:13:57.

down support for Today, he wanted British raids

:13:58.:14:01.

against IS reviewed. We examine what they are doing

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straightaway, examine what their presence is straightaway,

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but above all, that fits into the whole point I'm saying,

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that I would do everything I possibly could in order

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to reignite the whole peace process. Political opponents,

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out campaigning too, A Labour Party led by Jeremy Corbyn

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would simply chuck away our ability I think that is crazy,

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and it's not the way I want to go. We see defence policy sucking

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in billions of pounds on Trident at a time when our conventional

:14:36.:14:40.

defence forces have seen cut Approval for the leader's line

:14:41.:14:43.

here today, but Labour needs Well, Theresa May was campaigning

:14:44.:14:49.

in the north-east today, in an attempt to win over

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Labour voters. And as Mr Corbyn was outlining

:14:58.:14:59.

Labour's foreign-policy plans, Mrs May accused him of deserting

:15:00.:15:01.

proud and patriotic What the Tories might expect,

:15:02.:15:04.

a raw reception in much The Tories will ruin

:15:05.:15:18.

our environment. Will the Conservatives

:15:19.:15:21.

win around here? It is a small selection

:15:22.:15:23.

of people canvassing for the Tories, we have a huge

:15:24.:15:27.

following for the Labour. But inside, Theresa May believes

:15:28.:15:33.

she can swell these polite ranks of her supporters,

:15:34.:15:37.

trying to stir up national pride with talk of security and defence,

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while slamming her Labour opponents, who have been in charge around

:15:42.:15:46.

here for a long time. Proud and patriotically

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working-class people in towns and cities across Britain have not

:15:51.:15:54.

deserted the Labour Party, We respect that parents

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and grandparents taught their children and grandchildren

:16:00.:16:05.

that Labour was a party that shared their values and stood up

:16:06.:16:08.

for their community. But across the country today,

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traditional Labour supporters are increasingly looking

:16:12.:16:13.

at what Jeremy Corbyn believes Can she really take

:16:14.:16:18.

the Tories beyond small Look at the side of the bus to see

:16:19.:16:23.

how they hope she will. Her name in giant letters,

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you almost need a magnifying She may be well ahead in the polls,

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but the Tory manifesto Just working life and what is

:16:34.:16:42.

happening in this country, You will be voting for them

:16:43.:16:54.

for the first time? Strong opinions on Brexit,

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that is what I want to see, us standing alone and moving

:17:03.:17:08.

forward that way. Getting on the road

:17:09.:17:13.

in the north-east is part of a deliberate strategy,

:17:14.:17:15.

not just to try to win, But however she travels,

:17:16.:17:18.

and whatever the polls say today, shifting huge numbers of votes

:17:19.:17:31.

in Labour territory is a hard sell. Theresa May has already been to more

:17:32.:17:36.

than 20 Labour seats, including some here in the north-east that should

:17:37.:17:39.

traditionally be safe as houses. The Tories say she is having

:17:40.:17:43.

a positive message, but every day they are trying to display contrast

:17:44.:17:47.

between her and Jeremy Corbyn, brutally trying to strip

:17:48.:17:52.

away Labour's vote. You don't get anyone more important

:17:53.:18:03.

than the Prime Minister! Convention suggests whole chunks

:18:04.:18:06.

of the north of England, Scotland and Wales just are not safe

:18:07.:18:08.

for the Conservatives. But Theresa May wants to persuade

:18:09.:18:10.

you the country's future The Liberal Democrats have confirmed

:18:11.:18:12.

they would legalise the sale The party would allow licensed

:18:13.:18:18.

shops to sell the drug People would also be able to grow

:18:19.:18:22.

cannabis at home and smoke A coroner has called for changes

:18:23.:18:27.

in the way schools care for pupils with severe allergies after finding

:18:28.:18:34.

that a 14-year-old boy who collapsed during a detention and later died

:18:35.:18:36.

could have been saved The coroner said staff

:18:37.:18:39.

at Nasar Ahmed's school in East London last November weren't

:18:40.:18:45.

familiar with his condition and his medical kit contained

:18:46.:18:47.

no instructions on how Nasar Ahmed loved maths and science

:18:48.:18:51.

and wanted to be a politician. He also suffered from severe

:18:52.:19:00.

asthma and food allergies. His family have heard in detail how

:19:01.:19:05.

he came to die after having an extreme allergic reaction

:19:06.:19:08.

to an ingredient in a curry he had A couple of hours after he had

:19:09.:19:12.

eaten, he told staff There was confusion as to what might

:19:13.:19:19.

be wrong and his personal It contained an adrenaline pen,

:19:20.:19:23.

but there were no instructions as to how or when to use it,

:19:24.:19:29.

so nobody did. The coroner concluded that

:19:30.:19:33.

if the pen had been used promptly, and he had been administered

:19:34.:19:38.

adrenaline, there is a possibility, but not a probability,

:19:39.:19:41.

this would have changed the outcome. His family say the school let

:19:42.:19:46.

them and their son down. They failed their care

:19:47.:19:52.

of duty for my son. If they gave him the injection that

:19:53.:19:58.

time, within five minutes, before the ambulance,

:19:59.:20:05.

maybe that would have The school issued a statement today,

:20:06.:20:08.

saying that following his death, "We rigorously reviewed

:20:09.:20:15.

all of our safety procedures and are providing more training

:20:16.:20:17.

for staff across the board." The coroner will be

:20:18.:20:22.

writing several reports, including to his school,

:20:23.:20:25.

in an effort to prevent She will also suggest

:20:26.:20:27.

to the Chief Medical Officer in England that if the pens

:20:28.:20:30.

were more widely available and President Trump has warned the man

:20:31.:20:33.

he fired as the director of the FBI against talking to the media,

:20:34.:20:44.

and suggested that there could be tape recordings

:20:45.:20:46.

of their conversations. James Comey had been leading

:20:47.:20:50.

an inquiry into possible collusion between Trump election

:20:51.:20:52.

officials and Russia. Now the President has tweeted,

:20:53.:20:55.

"James Comey better hope there are no tapes of our conversations

:20:56.:20:59.

before he starts Well, our North American Editor Jon

:21:00.:21:02.

Sopel is at the White House. Mr Trump has come out fighting

:21:03.:21:07.

against his former FBI director with a threat and now a suggestion

:21:08.:21:10.

that he may secretly be recording his conversations

:21:11.:21:14.

at the White House. Yes, and those are the two things

:21:15.:21:25.

that are utterly fascinating from an extraordinary week of kind of tumult

:21:26.:21:30.

in Washington. It was just the tone of that tweet from the president

:21:31.:21:35.

early this morning, suggesting to James Comey, you'd better keep your

:21:36.:21:41.

mouth shut or else. And, you know, I'm sure it is pure coincidence that

:21:42.:21:45.

this afternoon we've learned that James Comey, who had been invited to

:21:46.:21:49.

testify before the intelligence committee next Tuesday, has declined

:21:50.:21:54.

that invitation. More remarkable still is the suggestion there may be

:21:55.:21:59.

some kind of secret recording devices in the White House where,

:22:00.:22:02.

wherever you are, you are being recorded, because it may be that

:22:03.:22:06.

there is a recording of a dinner that James Comey had with the

:22:07.:22:09.

president shortly after Donald Trump took office. Inevitably, it was the

:22:10.:22:15.

only question people wanted to ask that they's briefing with Sean

:22:16.:22:16.

Spicer. Did President Trump

:22:17.:22:17.

record his conversations with former FBI director,

:22:18.:22:18.

Director Comey? I assume you are referring

:22:19.:22:19.

to the tweet, and I've The President has nothing

:22:20.:22:22.

further to add on that. Are there recording

:22:23.:22:25.

devices in the Oval Office As I've said, for the third

:22:26.:22:29.

time, there is nothing Does he think it's appropriate to

:22:30.:22:41.

threaten somebody not to speak? That's not a threat, it's stating a

:22:42.:22:49.

fact. Retweet speaks for itself. One reason it has been so chaotic in

:22:50.:22:53.

Washington is that people stories have kept changing. White House

:22:54.:22:57.

briefing people have said one thing, the president has contradicted the

:22:58.:23:01.

few minutes later. This morning, the president tweeted that maybe the

:23:02.:23:04.

answer that is to stop briefings altogether because it's hard to give

:23:05.:23:09.

accurate information when things are changing so quickly. At the end of

:23:10.:23:14.

this week, it's been a rare week of tumult and turbulence. And it's hard

:23:15.:23:19.

to believe that the thunderclaps are over yet. This could go on for some

:23:20.:23:21.

time yet. A brief look at some

:23:22.:23:22.

of the day's other news stories. Police forces have warned

:23:23.:23:25.

of an increase in the number of young people carrying knives

:23:26.:23:27.

and other weapons in schools. They say that more than 2,500

:23:28.:23:30.

weapons were seized in schools in England and Wales

:23:31.:23:32.

in the past two years. The value of finance deals

:23:33.:23:36.

used to buy new cars has ?3.5 billion of loans

:23:37.:23:39.

were taken out in March, The Financial Conduct Authority has

:23:40.:23:43.

said it will investigate whether there has been irresponsible

:23:44.:23:48.

lending. The United States has

:23:49.:23:53.

signed a number of trade agreements with China,

:23:54.:23:55.

in an attempt by Washington to reduce its trade

:23:56.:23:57.

deficit with Beijing. Among American firms

:23:58.:24:00.

to benefit will be beef and natural-gas exporters,

:24:01.:24:02.

plus big credit-card companies such Football, and Chelsea clinched

:24:03.:24:06.

the Premier League title tonight with a 1-0 win at West Bromwich

:24:07.:24:18.

Albion. It means they have their hands

:24:19.:24:20.

on the trophy with two games to spare in what's been manager

:24:21.:24:22.

Antonio Conte's first Our Sports Editor,

:24:23.:24:25.

Dan Roan, reports. Glory was within their grasp.

:24:26.:24:35.

Chelsea strolled to the title almost complete. West Brom have also

:24:36.:24:39.

enjoyed their season, and victory at the hawthorns would have to be

:24:40.:24:43.

earned. The visitors enjoyed the better chances but failed to break

:24:44.:24:46.

down a stubborn defence in a cagey first half. There was added urgency

:24:47.:24:52.

after the restart. Victor Moses denied by Ben Foster. Chelsea's

:24:53.:24:56.

prostration beginning to show. In the final ten minutes, and with the

:24:57.:24:59.

game seemingly heading for a draw, the pressure finally told. Batshuayi

:25:00.:25:08.

with the crucial touch. The substitute has barely played this

:25:09.:25:13.

season, now he scored the goal to sealed the title. This is how much

:25:14.:25:17.

it meant to manager Antonio Conte. Chelsea were champions once again.

:25:18.:25:23.

It has rarely been in doubt, but this, a moment to savour for a

:25:24.:25:26.

reunited team and their coach in his debut season. From the moment he

:25:27.:25:33.

arrived in England last year, the Italian has been an animated and

:25:34.:25:36.

passionate presence on the touchline but, having been top of the table

:25:37.:25:41.

for months, his team's March towards the title has been calm and assured.

:25:42.:25:46.

Every single player is playing to their potential, everybody from

:25:47.:25:50.

goalkeeper to centre forward, and when the squad players come in, they

:25:51.:25:54.

also perform at a very high level. So what you can see there is that

:25:55.:25:58.

Antonio Conte has created a culture of achievement, one of competition,

:25:59.:26:03.

but healthy competition, and the players have delivered. Winchelsea

:26:04.:26:09.

and Watford at Stamford Bridge on Monday, they and their fans will be

:26:10.:26:12.

able to celebrate a second Premier League triumph in three seasons,

:26:13.:26:16.

re-establishing this club is the dominant force in the English game.

:26:17.:26:21.

When you consider what went on here last season, it's an achievement

:26:22.:26:25.

that shouldn't be underestimated. Jose Mourinho was sacked after a

:26:26.:26:28.

Celtic defence of the title, the club finishing tenth. -- after a

:26:29.:26:35.

chaotic defence. Chelsea hired Conte but had to wait until after the

:26:36.:26:39.

Euros. There were one or two big signings, Antonio Conte, the Player

:26:40.:26:46.

of the Year, but the new coach has largely transformed an

:26:47.:26:48.

underperforming squad. It's not easy to adapt new methods and new

:26:49.:26:56.

philosophies, and also to work very hard, to change totally your work.

:26:57.:27:03.

If you compare the work of the season and the past. And there could

:27:04.:27:08.

yet be more success. Conte is also guided Chelsea to the FA Cup final.

:27:09.:27:14.

Other managers may have grabbed more headlines and created more

:27:15.:27:16.

controversy, but the Italian has eclipsed them all.

:27:17.:27:17.

At the start of the season, all the talk was about Pep Guardiola against

:27:18.:27:25.

Jose Mourinho, the two big Manchester clubs, and it's dead is

:27:26.:27:30.

Antonio Conte's Chelsea who have prevailed, with two games to spare.

:27:31.:27:35.

-- instead it is Antonio Conte this isn't like Leicester City. After

:27:36.:27:39.

all, Chelsea are one of the wealthiest clubs in the world and

:27:40.:27:43.

this is the fifth title triumph of the Roman Abramovich era. But this

:27:44.:27:51.

represents a real turnaround in fortunes and one senses that this

:27:52.:27:55.

could be a double winning season and then next big challenge for the

:27:56.:27:57.

champions again as well. The international art festival

:27:58.:27:59.

the Venice Biennale opens tomorrow and some artists have decided

:28:00.:28:01.

to challenge the customary idea of countries having

:28:02.:28:03.

their own national pavilions This year there are pavilions

:28:04.:28:05.

for imaginary countries, complete with their own unusual form

:28:06.:28:08.

of passport control. The whole point of the Venice

:28:09.:28:16.

Biennale is for countries across the world to have their own

:28:17.:28:18.

national pavilion in which they proudly present the work

:28:19.:28:21.

of one of their artists. But the notion of art belonging

:28:22.:28:25.

to nation states is becoming an increasingly anachronistic

:28:26.:28:28.

concept for many artists and curators, some of whom have set

:28:29.:28:30.

up alternative pavilions, such as NSK State, an imaginary

:28:31.:28:34.

country which we are all welcome to come along and join,

:28:35.:28:37.

although they have made it a bit This is a state without rules

:28:38.:28:42.

or regulations, rights or responsibilities -

:28:43.:28:46.

although citizens do need to get You've got to do all the boring

:28:47.:28:49.

admin stuff and hand over your fee to a passport officer,

:28:50.:28:56.

who, in this instance, is a migrant seeking

:28:57.:28:58.

a European passport. So, in a way, the power dynamic

:28:59.:29:01.

is being turned on its head. You then go up this moving stair

:29:02.:29:05.

to an elevated office, where you come along and hopefully

:29:06.:29:09.

pick up your authorised passport. And then there is the Diaspora

:29:10.:29:15.

Pavilion, showing the work of predominantly non-white British

:29:16.:29:20.

artists, which is challenging the very notion of nationhood,

:29:21.:29:24.

arguing that a multicultural society needs a fresh approach

:29:25.:29:27.

to established ideas It's about what is

:29:28.:29:29.

represented by the nation. For us, that terrain or that

:29:30.:29:36.

definition has to change. We feel diaspora is really

:29:37.:29:39.

much more appropriate, to talk about fluid communities

:29:40.:29:42.

and diversity within the UK, For some countries, though,

:29:43.:29:46.

those that maybe feel marginalised or misunderstood,

:29:47.:29:50.

Biennale offers a public platform Venice becomes even more important

:29:51.:29:54.

for a country like Iraq, that can participate because it's

:29:55.:29:59.

allowed to - you know, as a national pavilion,

:30:00.:30:04.

as defunct as that notion may be. It's one of the few

:30:05.:30:07.

venues available. These antiquities from

:30:08.:30:11.

the Iraq Museum form Some have never left

:30:12.:30:12.

the country before. Others were looted after

:30:13.:30:16.

the fall of Saddam Hussein. They represent both traditional

:30:17.:30:18.

craft and contemporary politics, like much of the work at this year's

:30:19.:30:21.

Biennale. Now on BBC One, it's time

:30:22.:30:24.

for the news where you are.

:30:25.:30:34.