22/02/2018 BBC News at Ten


22/02/2018

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Tonight at ten - no agreement

in the UN Security Council

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on establishing a humanitarian

ceasefire in Syria.

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For a fifth consecutive day

in the rebel enclave

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of Eastern Ghouta, the intense

bombardment by Syrian government

0:00:170:00:20

forces has continued,

as the UN warns of a massacre.

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A number of hospitals and medical

centres have been hit,

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making it almost impossible to treat

the many wounded.

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TRANSLATION:

What we're seeing

everyday has caused us to collapse,

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both humanely and psychologically.

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We don't have anything

more to offer.

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We're being bled out.

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We'll have the latest

on the diplomatic efforts

0:00:410:00:43

to establish a ceasefire so that aid

supplies can be delivered.

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Also tonight.

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An away day at Chequers for

Theresa May and senior ministers -

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as they try to agree a collective

position on Britain's future

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relationship with the EU.

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As American students

demand tougher gun laws,

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the powerful gun lobby backs

the president's idea for some

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teachers to be armed.

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To stop a bad guy with a gun,

it takes a good guy with a gun.

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CHANTING:

No ifs, no buts,

no USS pension cuts.

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Thousands of university lecturers

have started strike action over

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planned changes to their pensions.

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And Tracey Emin talks to us

about art, equality, and her legacy.

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Later in the hour, we'll have

Sportsday on the BBC News channel,

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with all the latest reports,

results, interviews and features

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from the BBC Sports Centre.

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Good evening.

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The United Nations has warned

of a massacre in the rebel

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enclave of Eastern Ghouta

on the outskirts of Damascus.

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Syrian government forces have been

pounding the suburb for a fifth

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consecutive day amid reports that

more than 350 people have been

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killed since Sunday night,

including 150 children.

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Russia has said there is no

agreement in the UN Security Council

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on establishing a humanitarian

ceasefire in the region.

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This report by our Middle East

editor Jeremy Bowen contains some

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distressing images.

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More air strikes, more bombs

and more casualties.

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It is not letting up.

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Across eastern Ghouta,

rescue workers sprint into broken

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and burning buildings before

the dust of their

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destruction settles.

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This was another attack

a few miles away.

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A temporary ceasefire

is under negotiation,

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brokered by Russia,

Egypt and Turkey.

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Even if it happens, the horror

of these days will stay

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with the survivors for a lifetime.

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Two sisters, Alaa, aged

eight and Noor, eleven,

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were in their home when it was hit.

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Warplanes bombed our building.

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Now...Ghouta.

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Look at home.

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This was sent to us by their mother.

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Please help us.

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Please save our children

here in East Ghouta.

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Where is the humanity?

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I ask you in the name

of motherhood, please help us.

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Getting on for 400,000 people,

terrified by the sight

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and sound of aircraft,

are thought to be in eastern Ghouta,

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which is the size of Manchester.

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The Syrian regime insists it's

targeting terrorists.

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but it's clear many children

are among the wounded and the dead.

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Improvised hospitals have been set

up in cellars and basements

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during the years of war.

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Now, though, the medics

are at full stretch.

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Dr Amani Ballour wanted to send

a message to the people of Britain.

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TRANSLATION:

We never wanted the war

and we don't want to live under it.

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For the sake of our children who've

been blown to pieces,

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for the sake of our children

who died of hunger, what we're

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seeing every day has

caused us to collapse,

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both humanely and psychologically.

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We don't have anything more

to offer, we're being bled out.

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Dr Amani was treating 12-year-old

Mohammed, who was dying.

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His mother had been cooking

breakfast for her family when three

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air strikes came in.

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TRANSLATION:

I am here,

waiting for my son to die.

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At least he'll be free of pain.

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I pray to God to end his suffering.

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But where are the Arabs,

where are the Muslims?

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Do we have to appeal to Israel?

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When my boy dies, he will go

to heaven, where at least

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he'll be able to eat.

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I'd like to die with him

so I can look after him.

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Syrians have cried so many tears

in the seven years of war.

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The killing is

escalating, not ending.

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And once again, the world

is watching from a safe distance.

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Jeremy Bowen, BBC News.

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Live to the UN in New York

and our correspondent, Nick Bryant.

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Bring us up-to-date on the

diplomatic efforts Saturday.

Well,

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the Russians are using their

military power to help the Assad

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regime in eastern Ghouta, and here

at the United Nations Security

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Council in New York they are using

their veto power to help the Assad

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regime. Today, all it took was the

mere threat of a veto to block a

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draft resolution which would have

called for a 30 day ceasefire, which

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would have allowed humanitarian

convoys into places like eastern

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Ghouta ran for medical evacuations

to take place. The Russians are

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proposing amendments, but these

negotiations have been going on for

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two weeks. The Russians have already

been granted Major concessions and

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the Western powers are saying this

is yet another delaying tactic by

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Moscow to grab more time for the

Assad regime to continue its

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military offensive and to kill more

people. Britain and America today,

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again, as they have for many years,

bemoaned Russian obstruction but

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what they've never been prepared to

do is back at those words with

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meaningful action in Syria to

counteract Russia's influence, so

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they get to call the shots there and

increasingly here. I do think there

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will be another attempt to pass a

ceasefire resolution tomorrow, and

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the French ambassador but its

darkest night. He said a failure to

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get that through would be a

devastating loss of credibility for

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the Security Council and could sound

the death knell of the United

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Nations itself.

Nick Bryant, many

thanks for the latest from New York.

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Theresa May and 11 of her senior

ministers are at Chequers tonight -

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the Prime Minister's country home -

to try to unite behind a single

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government strategy on Brexit.

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They've spend several hours

there today, ahead of the next phase

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of the Brexit negotiations

with the EU.

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From Chequers, our political editor

Laura Kuenssberg reports.

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BIRDSONG

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What could break the

calm of the country?

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Birdsong twittering

across the Home Counties Valley?

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Spring's plucky early buds

bravely making their way?

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The zooming arrival of the Cabinet's

cars - that's what.

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Darting into Chequers,

hoping perhaps the rural peace might

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provide inspiration.

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For more than a year,

this group have been attempting

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to hammer out a compromise.

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But for decades, arguably,

the Tory party has been trying

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and not always succeeding.

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So, can they find one today?

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They were at it for eight hours.

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The Prime Minister,

surrounded by her close

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colleagues and advisers -

some who were pitted against each

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other during the referendum.

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Next week she wants to tell

the rest of the world

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more of her Brexit plan.

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But the inner cabinet has struggled

to agree how closely we should stick

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to the EU after Brexit.

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Some compromise perhaps today,

but not a dramatic breakthrough.

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If you look at what happened back

before the December European summit

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there was a lot of speculation

that the Cabinet would

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not reach agreement.

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We all agreed a position

that the Prime Minster took

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to Brussels, and got

a successful outcome.

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And all of us in the Cabinet

are determined to get the best

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possible deal for every part

of the United Kingdom.

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Every modern Tory Prime Minister

who has had the run of this country

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pile has had to deal

with splits over Europe.

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Yet Government insiders suggest

it was only Boris Johnson

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that was likely to dig in furiously.

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One minister told me

the Brexiteers would be reminded

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firmly of the consequences

of failing to agree.

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But there are nerves and suspicion

on both sides in the Tory

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party and their outside

rivals are sceptical.

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It won't last and what our problem

is, is that in trying to deal

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with the Government and be

responsible as an opposition,

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work with them as necessary,

we never know from day to day

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who is in charge and

what the policy is.

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But Theresa May's Brexit plans have

always emerged gradually,

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rather than sudden changes.

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And next she must

persuade the EU, too.

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Any negotiation is compromise.

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The choice for the Prime Minister

is who will take and who must give.

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Just in the last few minutes,

ministers have been speeding out of

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the gates here at Chequers, after

talking for eight hours. About all

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of this. Now, you might wonder why

they have to talk still for such a

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long time when they've been talking

about it for more than a year. The

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answer to that is that in the

Cabinet, as through the Tory party,

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there's a of opinion about how

closely we should stick to the EU

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after Brexit, or how much we should

make a dramatic break. There has

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been some optimism at the top levels

of government in recent days that a

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compromise here today, the sort, was

looking more, not less likely. But

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Theresa May will still have to get

whatever has been agreed through the

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whole Cabinet on Tuesday, through

her party, where some elements don't

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want her to give up anything at all,

and then, of course, through 27

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other European countries. This was

an important date and she will hope

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she's made a step forward, but a

step, not a leap, not abound, to

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what happens next.

Laura Kuenssberg with the latest

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light at Chequers.

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The latest official figures

on immigration appear to confirm

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that the vote to leave the EU has

had an impact.

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More EU citizens left Britain

in the year to last September

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than at any time for a decade.

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But overall nearly 250,000 more

people from the EU and the rest

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of the world arrived

here than went abroad.

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Our home affairs correspondent

Daniel Sandford is here

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to look at the figures.

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Yes, Huw, ever since the Brexit

referendum businesses

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and politicians have been tracking

the number of EU citizens

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coming to and from the UK

with great interest.

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And in today's release

of immigration figures we have

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reached a bit of a milestone.

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In the year to last September,

an estimated 130,000 EU nationals

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have left and no longer live

in the UK.

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That is the highest number for ten

years, the highest in fact

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since the financial crash.

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However, in that same time -

despite Brexit - around 220,000 EU

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citizens moved here.

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Which means that still, overall,

90,000 more EU citizens moved

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to the UK than left in the year

to September - though that is

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the lowest figure since 2012.

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What about migration

from outside the EU?

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Well, in the same period,

205,000 more non-EU foreign

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nationals arrived to live

here than left.

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Making their contribution

to the growing population more

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than twice that of the EU citizens.

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And wrapping all the figures up

together, along with the tens

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of thousands of UK citizens

who leave Britain each year,

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overall 244,000 more people arrived

in the UK in the year

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to September than left.

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So today's immigration figures

continue to show what appears to be

0:12:500:12:54

a Brexit effect on the EU

population of Britain.

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But the government's manifesto

commitment to get net immigration

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down below 100,000 a year

is still out of reach.

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Huw.

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Daniel Sandford, our home affairs

correspondent, many thanks.

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America's all-powerful gun lobby,

the National Rifle Association,

0:13:150:13:17

has backed the president's call

to provide teachers with guns -

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after they've been trained

to carry concealed weapons.

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The head of the NRA, Wayne LaPierre,

also accused politicians

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of exploiting the school shooting

in Florida, in which 17 were killed,

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to try to impose tighter gun

restrictions, as our North America

0:13:280:13:31

editor Jon Sopel reports.

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Will the Florida school

shooting come to be seen

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as a landmark moment,

when impotence gave way to rage,

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and rage led to action?

0:13:410:13:43

Never again!

0:13:430:13:45

The vociferous students who have

taken to the streets

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are bringing change.

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But not always in

the way they wanted.

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The President, making clear

that he thinks the way to make

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schools more secure is to train

and arm more teachers.

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Tweeting today, "If a potential

sicko shooter knows that a school

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has a large number of very

weapon-talented teachers and others

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who will be instantly shooting,

the sicko will never

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attack at school.

0:14:080:14:12

Cowards won't go there.

Problem solved."

0:14:120:14:15

He first floated the idea

at an emotional White House meeting

0:14:150:14:17

last night, with victims' families.

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One of those in attendance

was a pupil at the Parklands

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school, Sam Zeif.

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How is it that easy to buy

this type of weapon?

0:14:260:14:29

Afterwards, he was dismissive

about the President's plan.

0:14:290:14:33

Arming teachers is just

not what we need.

0:14:330:14:38

You know?

0:14:380:14:39

This is a problem because guns

were brought into our school.

0:14:390:14:44

Why would it make sense to bring

more guns into school?

0:14:440:14:50

And the President has held another

White House meeting today

0:14:500:14:52

to discuss the issue,

promising action that will win

0:14:520:14:54

the support of many of the students.

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I think we are making a lot

of progress, and I can tell

0:14:570:15:01

you it is a tremendous feeling

that we want to get something done.

0:15:010:15:04

He wants increased background

checks on those seeking

0:15:040:15:06

to purchase weapons

and to ban bump stocks -

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this is the device that

turns a semiautomatic

0:15:100:15:12

rifle into a machine gun.

0:15:120:15:14

And he backs raising the minimum age

for buying a rifle to 21.

0:15:140:15:20

To those arguing for comprehensive

gun control measures,

0:15:200:15:23

what Donald Trump is proposing might

seem like teeny-weeny baby steps.

0:15:230:15:31

But any measure will have to get

Congressional approval,

0:15:310:15:33

and doing that is never achieved

without a fight.

0:15:330:15:36

And no-one fights for gun rights

like the National Rifle Association.

0:15:360:15:39

Today, in a rare public appearance,

the leader of the NRA spoke

0:15:390:15:42

out, and he was in no

mood for compromise.

0:15:420:15:46

Lean in, listen to me now,

and never forget these words.

0:15:460:15:54

To stop a bad guy with a gun,

it takes a good guy with a gun.

0:15:540:16:02

APPLAUSE

0:16:020:16:04

Thank you very much.

0:16:040:16:05

In other words, what America needs

is more guns, not fewer.

0:16:050:16:08

The President is being pulled in one

direction by the NRA,

0:16:080:16:11

another by the students.

0:16:110:16:15

If past form is a guide,

there will only be one winner -

0:16:150:16:18

and it won't be the students.

0:16:180:16:20

Jon Sopel, BBC News, Washington.

0:16:200:16:24

Justin Forsyth, a prominent figure

in the world of international aid,

0:16:240:16:28

has resigned as deputy executive

director of Unicef.

0:16:280:16:31

Mr Forsyth, who was appointed two

years ago, used to work

0:16:310:16:34

for Save the Children,

during which time he was accused

0:16:340:16:38

of inappropriate behaviour

towards female staff.

0:16:380:16:43

My colleague Manveen Rana,

who uncovered the story

0:16:430:16:45

earlier this week, is here.

0:16:450:16:48

How did we get to this resignation?

When the investigation came out, we

0:16:480:16:53

revealed that three several women

have complained about Justin Forsyth

0:16:530:16:56

while he was running Save the

Children UK. The allegations

0:16:560:16:59

involved streams of inappropriate

text messages, e-mails, all of which

0:16:590:17:03

the women said had made them feel

Biglia uncomfortable. They were the

0:17:030:17:06

most junior members of staff, he was

the CEO. But in a statement today,

0:17:060:17:12

Justin Forsyth said he wasn't

resigning because of the mistakes he

0:17:120:17:15

had made at Save the Children. He

said he had apologised unreservedly

0:17:150:17:19

at the time and he apologised again

to the three women involved. He said

0:17:190:17:22

he was resigning because he didn't

want to cause any more damage to

0:17:220:17:26

Unicef, Save the Children and the

charity sector as a whole. Questions

0:17:260:17:29

are being asked about how much

Unicef knew about these allegations

0:17:290:17:34

before they appointed Mr Forsyth to

one of the most senior roles in the

0:17:340:17:36

organisation. They say nothing. They

have been conversations in the last

0:17:360:17:43

few days with the children and Mr

Forsyth. They have been told the

0:17:430:17:47

allegations were hidden from them

because they had been in formal

0:17:470:17:51

complaint and had gone three

confidential process of mediation.

0:17:510:17:55

Manveen Rana, thank you.

0:17:550:17:57

Haiti has suspended Oxfam's

operations in the country for two

0:17:570:18:00

months while it investigates

allegations of sexual misconduct

0:18:000:18:02

by some of the charity's staff.

0:18:020:18:05

Seven Oxfam workers in Haiti

were dismissed or resigned in 2011,

0:18:050:18:08

while working in the country

following the earthquake.

0:18:080:18:10

Haiti's government said the charity

had made a "serious error"

0:18:100:18:12

in failing to inform them

at the time.

0:18:120:18:18

Thousands of university lecturers

have started strike action over

0:18:180:18:23

planned changes to their pensions,

which they say could leave them

0:18:230:18:26

thousands of pounds a year

worse off in retirement.

0:18:260:18:28

Students' studies could be

disrupted for up to a month

0:18:280:18:32

if all the planned strikes go ahead.

0:18:320:18:34

Our education correspondent

Elaine Dunkley reports from Leeds.

0:18:340:18:37

At Leeds University,

lecturers out on the picket line.

0:18:370:18:41

Thousands of lectures have been

cancelled on campuses across the UK,

0:18:410:18:44

the message - "Give us

the pensions we paid into,

0:18:440:18:47

or there will be mass disruption".

0:18:470:18:55

We're expecting things

to grind to a halt, really.

0:18:570:18:59

Forms won't be signed,

classes won't be taught,

0:18:590:19:01

research deadlines won't be met.

0:19:010:19:03

We're likely to lose

about £10,000 a year.

0:19:030:19:10

Now, vice chancellors are earning

about £250,000 to £280,000 a year,

0:19:100:19:13

so I have questions about why

the money shouldn't be coming out

0:19:130:19:16

of their salaries and not

out of our pensions.

0:19:160:19:24

The universities say

a £6 billion deficit in the scheme

0:19:250:19:28

means it's unsustainable,

and could only be maintained

0:19:280:19:30

by making cuts to jobs and research.

0:19:300:19:31

Universities say they have

offered a good deal,

0:19:310:19:34

but lecturers are not convinced.

0:19:340:19:36

Currently, we have what is called

a defined benefit scheme,

0:19:360:19:40

which means we put money

in and we will definitely

0:19:400:19:42

get a certain amount

back when we retire.

0:19:420:19:44

The defined contribution scheme

which is being offered means that

0:19:440:19:50

what we end up with in the pot

will depend on the vagaries

0:19:500:19:53

of the market and other things,

and it means we can't be

0:19:530:19:56

certain of what we'll have.

0:19:560:19:57

Left unresolved, more lectures could

be cancelled and exams affected.

0:19:570:20:01

You pay over £9,000 in fees.

0:20:010:20:03

Do you feel short-changed

by all of this?

0:20:030:20:05

The students support their

lecturers, but are also worried

0:20:050:20:09

These students support their

lecturers, but are also worried

0:20:090:20:12

about their future.

0:20:120:20:13

More than 80,000 students have

signed petitions

0:20:130:20:14

calling for fees to be reimbursed.

0:20:140:20:17

When we signed up to university,

it was specified in the curriculum

0:20:170:20:21

that we would have a certain number

of hours of contact time

0:20:210:20:24

with our lecturers.

0:20:240:20:25

Anything short of that is

essentially a breach of contract.

0:20:250:20:28

We worked out that it works out

at about £1,150 worth

0:20:280:20:30

of lost contact time.

0:20:300:20:33

But we fully support our lecturers

in going on strike.

0:20:330:20:37

This dispute is being fought

on university campuses

0:20:370:20:42

across the UK, which included

marches in Cardiff...

0:20:420:20:44

Belfast, and Glasgow.

0:20:440:20:49

How it's resolved will have

a significant impact

0:20:490:20:51

on the retirement of thousands

of lecturers, and the future

0:20:510:20:53

of millions of students.

0:20:530:20:56

Elaine Dunkley, BBC News.

0:20:560:21:00

In Venezuela, hundreds

if not thousands of people

0:21:000:21:07

with transplanted kidneys

are at risk of losing the organs

0:21:070:21:10

due to the country's chronic

shortage of medicines.

0:21:100:21:13

The Venezuelan Federation

of Pharmacies says 85%

0:21:130:21:15

of the medicines they need

are not available.

0:21:150:21:16

The UN has warned that people

are dying of treatable illnesses.

0:21:160:21:20

Venezuela, which has the largest oil

reserves in the world,

0:21:200:21:23

is nonetheless in the grip

of an economic crisis.

0:21:230:21:27

In the second of two exclusive

reports from inside the country,

0:21:270:21:31

Vladimir Hernandez reports

from the capital Caracas.

0:21:310:21:32

Her fate is out of her hands.

0:21:320:21:36

For more than a decade, Judith has

had a transplanted kidney,

0:21:360:21:40

but due to the severe shortage

of medicines, for four months

0:21:400:21:43

she's been unable to get the drugs

to keep the kidney going.

0:21:430:21:51

Her doctor says he has about 700

more patients in hospital,

0:21:540:22:00

also facing the imminent loss

of a transplanted kidney.

0:22:000:22:03

For Venezuelans, the hunt

for medicines is desperate.

0:22:240:22:31

Most drugs are out of stock,

and even when you find them,

0:22:310:22:34

there's another problem.

0:22:340:22:41

This person was looking for several

types of medicines here,

0:22:410:22:44

but she could only find this one.

0:22:440:22:47

These are two boxes

she needs per month,

0:22:470:22:52

but it costed her 12 million

bolivars, which means about a third

0:22:520:22:55

of what she makes in a whole year.

0:22:550:22:57

I've met other people around this

pharmacy and they are saying there's

0:22:570:23:00

no chance they could afford

something like this.

0:23:000:23:02

Critics say this is an example

of the failure of the so-called

0:23:020:23:06

socialist revolution,

but the Venezuelan president says

0:23:060:23:10

US-led sanctions prevent him

from importing medicines.

0:23:100:23:14

Things are worse away

from big cities.

0:23:140:23:17

This is Apure in the south,

near the Amazon forest,

0:23:170:23:20

and one of the poorest states

in the country.

0:23:200:23:23

Here, I gained very rare access

to a public hospital,

0:23:230:23:26

a place where the government does

not allow the media in.

0:23:260:23:31

This baby is seven months

old and malnourished.

0:23:310:23:35

The scabs on his head and body

were caused by an illness

0:23:350:23:38

related to malnutrition.

0:23:380:23:40

His mother cannot afford his

medicines once she leaves hospital.

0:23:400:23:46

Children like these are having

to get, for instance,

0:23:460:23:49

antibiotics for a price

which could be ten times

0:23:490:23:53

the monthly minimum wage.

0:23:530:23:57

And the people who live in poor

communities like these

0:23:570:24:00

are unable, absolutely unable

to buy these medicines.

0:24:000:24:04

Little Oriana has

an uncertain future.

0:24:040:24:06

She needs surgery to

treat her lung failure.

0:24:060:24:10

But her family can't

afford the antibiotics

0:24:100:24:11

to get her ready for it.

0:24:110:24:17

A simple drug, out of the hands

of many Venezuelans.

0:24:170:24:20

For Oriana, as for many

Venezuelans, lack of medicine

0:24:360:24:41

is an almost certain death.

0:24:410:24:42

Vladimir Hernandez,

BBC News, Caracas.

0:24:420:24:50

Let's have a brief look

at some of the day's

0:24:520:24:54

other other news stories.

0:24:540:24:55

Two brothers, aged six and two,

have died after a suspected

0:24:550:24:58

hit-and-run crash in Coventry.

0:24:580:24:59

A black Ford Focus was found

abandoned a short time

0:24:590:25:01

after the crash, and a man

and a woman have been arrested.

0:25:010:25:04

Britain's biggest energy supplier

Centrica, which owns British Gas,

0:25:040:25:06

says it's cutting 4,000 jobs over

the next two years.

0:25:060:25:09

The company saw a sharp fall

in profits last year.

0:25:090:25:13

It says political interference

in the energy market

0:25:130:25:15

was partly to blame.

0:25:150:25:19

A letter reportedly addressed

to Prince Harry and his fiancee

0:25:190:25:21

Meghan Markle is being treated

by police as a racist hate crime.

0:25:210:25:24

Scotland Yard say it was delivered

along with a package

0:25:240:25:27

containing a substance,

which they tested and found

0:25:270:25:28

not to be harmful.

0:25:280:25:36

The big tech companies,

such as Google, Amazon and Facebook,

0:25:380:25:41

could face much higher tax bills

in the UK if ministers go ahead

0:25:410:25:44

with some new policy options.

0:25:440:25:45

They've told the BBC that they're

considering proposals to tax

0:25:450:25:49

those companies on their sales

revenue, rather than their profits.

0:25:490:25:52

But the Government has been warned

against taking action that isn't

0:25:520:25:54

co-ordinated globally,

as our economics editor

0:25:540:25:56

Kamal Ahmed explains.

0:25:560:25:57

They are some of the biggest

companies in the world,

0:25:570:25:59

and many of them count their profits

in the billions of pounds,

0:25:590:26:02

if not their tax bills.

0:26:020:26:07

That could be about to change,

as the Government signals it

0:26:070:26:09

will launch a new attempt at raising

more tax from these

0:26:090:26:12

global tech giants.

0:26:120:26:13

The minister driving

the move told me

0:26:130:26:15

that these successful companies,

0:26:150:26:16

used by millions of people,

would pay higher bills.

0:26:160:26:21

We recognise that there

are businesses generating

0:26:210:26:26

substantial value within the UK,

who we don't believe are currently

0:26:260:26:28

paying a fair rate of tax.

0:26:280:26:30

But that is quite different

from saying they're not

0:26:300:26:32

paying the taxation

that they should be paying.

0:26:320:26:35

And fair tax means,

in your mind, higher tax?

0:26:350:26:37

It will in the case of a number

of those businesses, absolutely.

0:26:370:26:40

The companies make clear

that they play by the rules,

0:26:400:26:42

but the fact is that the Treasury

wants to change them.

0:26:420:26:45

Let's take Google as one example.

0:26:450:26:47

It has sales or revenues

in the UK of over £1 billion.

0:26:470:26:52

It makes profits in the UK

of £149 million, and pays tax

0:26:520:26:56

on those profits of £38 million.

0:26:560:27:04

But if it paid tax on its sales,

a much larger number,

0:27:040:27:07

its tax bill would rise.

0:27:070:27:08

The Government has certainly opened

the door to new taxes for those

0:27:080:27:11

big global technology companies,

0:27:110:27:14

but this is not just

a debate raging in Britain.

0:27:140:27:16

Here in France, the Government wants

to increase taxes on those

0:27:160:27:19

global digital giants.

0:27:190:27:24

There's a similar

argument in Germany.

0:27:240:27:26

It's a race, but it's

a race with risks.

0:27:260:27:28

If every country follows

their own path on taxes,

0:27:280:27:32

might there be the start

of a tax war?

0:27:320:27:34

And the organisation charged

with stopping that

0:27:340:27:36

is based right here in Paris.

0:27:360:27:38

The OECD is concerned

about Britain's

0:27:380:27:42

and other countries' proposals.

0:27:420:27:43

A tax on turnover

is not a great idea.

0:27:430:27:46

It may be the last resort,

0:27:460:27:48

a political measure or stopgap

measure, but it's not a great idea.

0:27:480:27:55

Apple's HQ in America,

and here's the point.

0:27:550:27:58

Most of these companies

are American, and that is where

0:27:580:28:00

they pay the bulk of their taxes.

0:28:000:28:04

This would be a fundamental change.

0:28:040:28:11

They're certainly willing

to pay their fair share

0:28:110:28:13

or their responsible share of tax.

0:28:130:28:16

The risk of the UK behaving

or acting in a unilateral fashion

0:28:160:28:18

would be that there could be

the risk of double taxation

0:28:180:28:21

for some of these companies,

and then I think you would see

0:28:210:28:24

a lot of money spent on lobbying

to protest against that.

0:28:240:28:27

It has been a tortuous battle.

0:28:270:28:28

What does fair tax look like?

0:28:280:28:30

This is the latest Government

attempt

0:28:300:28:31

to answer that

controversial question.

0:28:310:28:34

Kamal Ahmed, BBC News.

0:28:340:28:37

The artist Tracey Emin,

famous for her autobiographical

0:28:370:28:41

installations, including

an embroidered tent naming previous

0:28:410:28:44

lovers, and her own unmade bed,

is being honoured by MTV's

0:28:440:28:47

Staying Alive Foundation

for her long-standing support

0:28:470:28:50

of HIV and Aids charities.

0:28:500:28:55

The former Turner Prize nominee has

been discussing art,

0:28:550:28:57

gender equality and her legacy

with our arts editor Will Gompertz.

0:28:570:29:03

Your subject is you.

0:29:030:29:04

You, your life, your experiences.

0:29:040:29:05

Has that over the years become

something which you feel

0:29:050:29:09

is an endless seam which you can

mine, or something that you think,

0:29:090:29:13

"God, it's become a bit of a cage,

I want to get out of it

0:29:130:29:16

and explore something else"?

0:29:160:29:17

Well, if I was to think like that,

I'd be dead, wouldn't I?

0:29:170:29:20

I don't know, would you?

0:29:200:29:23

Yeah, or I'd just stop making art.

0:29:230:29:25

I don't have to make art.

0:29:250:29:26

No one made me make art,

but I do have a physical

0:29:260:29:29

compulsion to do it.

0:29:290:29:30

It's within me.

0:29:300:29:31

I've done nothing else all my life.

0:29:310:29:33

Looking at the subjects you've

explored about yourself,

0:29:330:29:35

there's the rapes and the abortion

and the sexual abuse.

0:29:350:29:41

Do you feel, looking at what's

going on now and all the Me Too

0:29:410:29:45

and Time's Up and Harvey Weinstein

and all the rest of it,

0:29:450:29:48

do you feel that you were incredibly

prescient and that in fact,

0:29:480:29:50

you were trying to say something

but no one was listening

0:29:500:29:53

to you 20 or 30 years ago?

0:29:530:29:55

Yeah, but no one was listening

to anyone, was they?

0:29:550:30:00

So I wasn't the only woman that

wasn't being listened to.

0:30:000:30:03

It takes women en masse to be

able to say something.

0:30:030:30:06

But this was something

you were speaking out

0:30:060:30:07

about and getting criticised for.

0:30:070:30:09

Yeah, I was, a lot.

0:30:090:30:10

Yeah.

0:30:100:30:11

But I was also being criticised

for being vivacious,

0:30:110:30:13

precocious, quite sexual.

0:30:130:30:14

But at the same time,

I was saying "I'm allowed to be

0:30:140:30:17

like this and I'm also allowed

to say it's not on to rape someone,

0:30:170:30:20

it's not on to abuse someone.

0:30:200:30:22

Listen to what women are saying".

0:30:220:30:23

But no one did.

0:30:230:30:25

But now what is good is that

lots of people are listening.

0:30:250:30:28

What's changed?

0:30:280:30:29

I think, being the most

optimistic I possibly can,

0:30:290:30:34

I think a lot of men have changed.

0:30:340:30:36

There's a younger generation of men

out there that would find it, like,

0:30:360:30:40

unbelievable to be abusive

or sexually prevalent

0:30:400:30:47

towards a woman, especially someone

in their place of employment.

0:30:470:30:50

They'd find it horrific.

0:30:500:30:52

If you could pick one work,

and you've made thousands,

0:30:520:30:56

if you could pick one work,

which is the most important work

0:30:560:30:59

you feel you've created for you?

0:30:590:31:03

Well, I might not have said

this a few years ago,

0:31:030:31:07

but I think I've got to go

with the bed.

0:31:070:31:09

Really?

0:31:090:31:10

Yeah.

0:31:100:31:11

Because?

0:31:110:31:12

Because it's so me.

0:31:120:31:14

It's like a three-dimensional

version of my paintings.

0:31:140:31:19

Tracey Emin talking to our arts

editor, Will Gompertz.

0:31:190:31:23

Newsnight is coming up on BBC Two.

0:31:230:31:26

Here's Emily Maitlis.

0:31:260:31:31

Tonight, one of the most powerful

men in the charity sector, Unicef's

0:31:310:31:36

Justin Forsyth, has quit. We will

here from a colleague who said

0:31:360:31:39

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