06/03/2018 BBC News at Ten


06/03/2018

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Tonight at Ten - counter-terror

police take charge of the inquiry

0:00:060:00:09

into the suspected poisoning

of a former Russian agent

0:00:090:00:11

and his daughter, in Salisbury.

0:00:110:00:18

Sergei and Yulia Skripal are still

critically ill in hospital,

0:00:180:00:21

after they were found unconscious

two days ago.

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It's believed the father

and daughter were captured on CCTV

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shortly before being found

on a bench nearby.

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Her eyes were just completely white,

wide open but just white

0:00:310:00:34

and frothing at the mouth.

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The man went stiff, his arms stopped

moving but he was still

0:00:350:00:38

looking dead straight.

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Military scientists are testing

samples of the substance thought

0:00:400:00:43

to have caused the illness,

as ministers warn that Russian state

0:00:430:00:46

involvement is being looked at.

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Should evidence emerge that implies

state responsibility,

0:00:500:00:54

then Her Majesty's government

will respond appropriately

0:00:540:00:56

and robustly.

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Mr Johnson added that Russia

was a "malign and disruptive force".

0:01:010:01:04

Moscow said his remarks

were "wild' and "preposterous".

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Also tonight:

0:01:060:01:08

In Syria, the terrible suffering

of civilians who are unable to leave

0:01:080:01:12

the besieged suburb of Eastern

Ghouta.

0:01:120:01:16

North Korea's leader Kim Jong-un,

has hinted that he's willing

0:01:160:01:20

to begin talks about giving

up his nuclear weapons programme.

0:01:200:01:25

Food companies are told to reduce

the calories in products by 20%

0:01:250:01:28

to deal with obesity.

0:01:280:01:30

And, how Picasso celebrated

the beauty of his young lover,

0:01:300:01:33

we visit a major new exhibition

at London's Tate Modern.

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And coming up on

Sportsday on BBC News:

0:01:390:01:41

With it all so comfortable

for Liverpool.

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Could PSG comeback against

Real Madrid in tonight's other

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Champions League game to reach

the quarter finals?

0:01:460:01:54

Good evening.

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Counter-terrorism officers have

taken charge of the investigation

0:02:110:02:14

into the suspected poisoning

of a former Russian

0:02:140:02:16

agent and his daughter,

in Salisbury on Sunday.

0:02:160:02:19

Sergei Skripal had been convicted

in Russia, 12 years ago,

0:02:190:02:22

of passing secrets to MI6.

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He and his daughter Yulia are both

critically ill and military

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scientists are testing samples

of a substance which may have

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caused their illness.

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The Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson

has promised a robust response,

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if there's conclusive evidence that

Russia was involved.

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Our first report tonight

is by our home affairs correspondent

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Tom Symonds in Salisbury.

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A father and a daughter apparently

struck down in public on a Sunday

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afternoon in Salisbury.

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The BBC revealed today that

Yulia Skripal had been

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visiting her father Sergei

from Russia when it happened.

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They were left fighting

for their lives.

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Her eyes were just completely white,

they were wide open but just white

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and frothing at the mouth.

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And the man went stiff,

his arms stopped moving,

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but he was still looking dead

straight.

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CCTV images obtained by the BBC

appeared to show Mr Skripal

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and his daughter walking together

at 15:47 on Sunday afternoon.

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They were heading for a small park

surrounded by shops in the centre

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of Salisbury called The Maltings.

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The camera which captured

these pictures is yards

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from where they were found.

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Police were called at 4:15pm

when people reported the pair

0:03:370:03:40

were unconscious on a park bench.

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Last night Zizzi, an Italian

restaurant nearby, was sealed

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by police, followed today by a local

pub, Bishop's Mill.

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Did someone slip something

into their food or drink?

0:03:500:03:54

For the police this is a highly

sensitive and potentially

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hazardous investigation,

not least for the officers involved.

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The key question of course

is what was the substance that left

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a father and his daughter in such

a terrible condition on the park

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bench covered by the tent behind me?

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There will be toxicology reports

prepared but we understand that

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several police officers

were admitted to hospital,

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one has been kept in.

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Symptoms include breathing

difficulties and itchy eyes.

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Experts at the research

facility Porton Down are now

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involved, testing for a wide

range of substances.

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From things that are chemically

toxic to things that

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are radiological such

as was used against Litvinenko.

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I think people will have an open

mind, they will be looking

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at what is in the environment,

what is on the clothing,

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on the skin of the people and also

what is in blood and urine

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and any other samples.

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So far the tiny Wiltshire Police

Force has led the investigation

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but that changed today

in a significant department.

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This afternoon the Metropolitan

Police have confirmed that,

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due to the unusual circumstances,

the counterterrorism network will be

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leading this investigation as it has

the specialist capability

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and expertise to do so.

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After all, as the Foreign Secretary

made clear in Parliament this

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afternoon, this incident could have

implications for Britain's

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relationship with Russia.

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Should evidence emerge that implies

state responsibility,

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then Her Majesty's government

will respond appropriately

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and robustly.

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Sergei Skripal was arrested in 2004,

accused of spying for MI6,

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convicted, but in 2010 handed over

to Britain as part of a spy swap.

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Sergei Skripal's wife,

older brother and son have

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died in recent years -

the family believe in

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suspicious circumstances.

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He has been living quietly here,

vigilant and fearful

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of Russian intelligence,

his relatives said,

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but under his own name.

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He would not have been hard to find.

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Tom Symonds, BBC News, Salisbury.

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In Moscow, the Russian government

has vehemently denied any

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suggestion of involvement,

and promised to cooperate

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with the inquiry if asked.

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A foreign ministry spokesman accused

Boris Johnson of making "wild"

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and "preposterous" statements,

and the Russian ambassador in London

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accused the British media

of trying to demonise Russia,

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as our correspondent Steve Rosenberg

reports from Moscow.

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It sounds chillingly familiar.

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Russia under suspicion of planning

and executing an attack,

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2,000 miles away, in Britain.

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In 2006, the target was former

Russian agent Alexander Litvinenko,

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murdered in London.

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The man Britain believes

poisoned him is Andrei Lugovoy.

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Today, he dismissed claims

that Moscow had attacked

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Sergei Skripal as propaganda.

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TRANSLATION:

Why do

they say he was poisoned?

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Perhaps he poisoned himself

or had a heart attack.

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You talk about propaganda,

but what about Alexander Litvinenko?

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The inquiry in Britain

into his death found that

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you had poisoned him,

probably on the orders

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of Vladimir Putin.

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TRANSLATION:

There was no

official investigation

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into Litvinenko's death.

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There was an attempt to accuse

Russia and a Russian citizen,

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me, of poisoning him

in Britain with polonium.

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As for the Kremlin, well,

it's been saying very little today

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about Sergei Skripal.

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President Putin's spokesman told me

earlier, "We have no information

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about what happened.

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We cannot comment."

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Although he did add,

it was a "tragic situation."

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But catching spies has become one

of Vladimir Putin's priorities.

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Yesterday, the former KGB officer

praised Russia's security service

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for uncovering 397 spies last year.

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The Kremlin leader has never

hidden his contempt for those

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who betray the Motherland for money.

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"Traitors will kick

the bucket, trust me."

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"These people betrayed their

friends, their brothers in arms.

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Whatever they got in exchange

for it, those 30 pieces

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of silver they were given,

they will choke on them."

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Yet Sergei Skripal wasn't an obvious

target for the Kremlin.

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TRANSLATION:

There are certain rules

that the secret services keep to.

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When there's an exchange of spies,

the matter is considered closed.

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Skripal had been exchanged,

Russia had no problem with him.

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Moscow denies any connection,

but a former double agent,

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collapsing in Britain,

it can only add to the chill in

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relations between the UK and Russia.

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Steve Rosenberg, BBC News, Moscow.

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As we've heard, the man

at the centre of the investigation,

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Sergei Skripal, arrived in the UK

in 2010, as part of

0:09:050:09:07

an exchange of spies.

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He was a former colonel in Russian

military intelligence.

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And Mr Skripal's relatives have told

the BBC that he believed Russia's

0:09:130:09:16

special services could come

after him at any time.

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Our security correspondent

Gordon Corera examines

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whether the signs so far point

to a state-sponsored

0:09:220:09:24

assassination attempt.

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Does the long arm of the Kremlin

reach all the way from Moscow

0:09:310:09:34

to Salisbury in Wiltshire?

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And if the attack on Sergei Skripal

did come from Russia, why?

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After being released from jail,

Skripal had spent the last eight

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years living quietly in Salisbury

but he still had enemies.

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Sergei Skripal had been imprisoned

in Russia for selling secrets

0:09:480:09:51

to British intelligence here at MI6.

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It's claimed he provided

the identity of hundreds of Russians

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operating undercover in Europe.

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Even though he had been pardoned

as part of a spy swap,

0:10:030:10:07

his former colleagues

would still have regarded

0:10:070:10:09

him as a traitor.

0:10:090:10:12

The fact that he blew a whole range

of Russian agents, there may be

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personal animosities there.

0:10:160:10:17

The fact that he was a British spy,

a former member of the Russian

0:10:170:10:21

military, in most Russians' minds

actually it would categorise

0:10:210:10:22

him as a traitor.

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So yes, there would have been,

there are people there

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delighted to see him dead.

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No one yet is confirming that Moscow

was involved but there have been

0:10:330:10:36

other incidents involving Russians

in the UK.

0:10:360:10:42

As we have heard, most famously

Alexander Litvinenko,

0:10:420:10:44

another former Russian spy,

poisoned in London's Mayfair.

0:10:440:10:48

And there have been other figures

whose deaths have aroused suspicions

0:10:480:10:51

like Badri Patarkatsishvili.

0:10:510:10:55

Alexander Perepilichny died

suddenly jogging in Surrey.

0:10:550:10:58

One test revealed traces of a rare

toxin in his stomach

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and a businessman campaigning

over his death says not enough has

0:11:010:11:05

been done to deter Russia.

0:11:050:11:08

Based on the reaction of the British

government to the murderer

0:11:080:11:11

in Mayfair using nuclear material

with Alexander Litvinenko,

0:11:110:11:14

which has nothing, it basically gave

a green light to Vladimir Putin

0:11:140:11:22

that he could do

whatever he wants here.

0:11:220:11:29

And he has been doing whatever

he wants here for quite awhile.

0:11:290:11:31

It is still too early to be sure

this investigation will go.

0:11:310:11:34

But if the trail does connect

Salisbury to Moscow,

0:11:340:11:36

then the pressure will be

on the British

0:11:360:11:38

government to respond.

0:11:380:11:44

Gordon is here, how close are we to

finding out what this substance was?

0:11:440:11:50

Tests have been going on and it is

possible they may have some kind of

0:11:500:11:55

preliminary assessment of what it

might be. But officials know, they

0:11:550:11:59

are not saying until they are sure.

One possibility it was some kind of

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nerve agent. Some counts about

eyewitness of foaming and voluntary

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movements, it might fit above. It

was a nerve agent used on the Korean

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leader's half brother. It is usually

a spray. It could be a poison or

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tucks in ingested in a drink. With

Alexander Litvinenko, it was a cup

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of tea. That might be harder to do

surreptitiously. If it is some kind

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of unusual toxin or some kind of

chemical weapons, that may point to

0:12:410:12:46

a state being behind and potentially

a small group of states who have

0:12:460:12:51

that capability. So it could be a

very important piece of the puzzle.

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Ministers will be updated on the

latest are at a meeting of the

0:12:550:13:01

Cabinet Office emergency committee

Cobra which is taking place tomorrow

0:13:010:13:04

morning chaired by the Home

Secretary.

Thank you very much for

0:13:040:13:08

the update.

0:13:080:13:11

In Syria, the intense

bombardment of rebel-held

0:13:110:13:14

territory in Eastern Ghouta,

has left around 800 civilians dead

0:13:140:13:18

over the past fortnight,

according to local activists.

0:13:180:13:21

The besieged enclave is the last

area under rebel control

0:13:210:13:24

near the capital Damascus.

0:13:240:13:26

The Russian military, which supports

the Syrian government,

0:13:260:13:28

has offered civilians what it

calls "safe passage".

0:13:280:13:30

But the UN says some

are being prevented

0:13:300:13:32

from leaving by rebel fighters,

as our Middle East editor

0:13:320:13:34

Jeremy Bowen reports and, a warning,

there are some graphic images

0:13:340:13:37

from the start.

0:13:370:13:38

It was another day in the life

and death of Eastern Ghouta.

0:13:380:13:41

The BBC's been following

Dr Amani Ballour, a paediatrician

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in an under ground hospital,

through the worst days of attacks.

0:13:440:13:47

This was filmed for the BBC,

the Syrian government won't allow

0:13:470:13:51

us into the enclave.

0:13:510:13:54

Dr Amani and her colleagues

were dealing with the results

0:13:540:13:58

of an air strike on a market,

more than 20 dead and 90 injured.

0:13:580:14:06

TRANSLATION:

The hospital is stuffed

with injured people,

0:14:060:14:11

including women and children.

0:14:110:14:12

Their injuries include brain damage,

fractured and amputated limbs.

0:14:120:14:16

A child's arm was amputated.

0:14:160:14:19

Some children were seriously

wounded, others were killed.

0:14:190:14:26

Dr Amani examined a boy who'd been

brought in, presumed dead -

0:14:260:14:29

she found a pulse.

0:14:290:14:34

They went to work to

get him to breathe.

0:14:340:14:38

He was rushed into intensive care,

but it was a false hope,

0:14:380:14:44

a few hours later he was dead.

0:14:440:14:48

In a siege surrounded

by casualties, the world shrinks

0:14:480:14:51

to a few essentials.

0:14:510:14:55

The most important is survival -

living through this day

0:14:550:14:58

to have the chance to start another.

0:14:580:15:04

On the battlefield the Syrian

army, helped by Russia,

0:15:040:15:07

has been advancing.

0:15:070:15:09

Resistance seems to be collapsing.

0:15:090:15:12

The trucks that took

aid into the enclave

0:15:120:15:14

were forced out by shelling,

with ten out of 46 still unloaded.

0:15:140:15:17

UN aid workers said civilians

were terrified, angry

0:15:170:15:21

and many wanted to get

out, but couldn't.

0:15:210:15:26

They feel that they're

being blocked.

0:15:260:15:28

There are snipers sitting

at the checkpoint exit,

0:15:280:15:31

the corridor that is there.

0:15:310:15:34

They're very unhappy

with their own armed groups inside,

0:15:340:15:39

but there is also this other

narrative, which is very strong

0:15:390:15:41

amongst the elders and the leaders,

is that this is our place,

0:15:410:15:44

we're not moving out from here.

0:15:440:15:47

A Russian general, Yuri Yevtushenko,

said his men would guaranteed

0:15:470:15:50

the safety of civilians who wanted

to get out, and he said fighters

0:15:500:15:53

could leave with their personal

weapons and immunity.

0:15:530:15:58

Russian troops are very visible

around the war zone.

0:15:580:16:04

Moscow has given the Syrian army

the fire power to break

0:16:040:16:06

into rebel strongholds.

0:16:060:16:09

On the front-line, around

Eastern Ghouta, most

0:16:090:16:14

of the troops were Syrian,

but the Russians were

0:16:140:16:16

there, alongside them.

0:16:160:16:18

Russia is now the most important

foreign power in this war.

0:16:180:16:21

President Putin was given equal

billing with President

0:16:210:16:23

Assad in this position.

0:16:230:16:31

The Russians are preparing

for the day after.

0:16:310:16:34

It looks as if the end game

is approaching for the armed

0:16:340:16:37

opposition in Eastern Ghouta.

0:16:370:16:39

Elsewhere in the country,

rebels still control territory,

0:16:390:16:42

though not nearly as much as before.

0:16:420:16:45

And fighting goes on, It's

particularly fierce at the moment up

0:16:450:16:47

near the Turkish border.

0:16:470:16:51

Syria's war is changing,

but it's not ending.

0:16:510:16:55

Jeremy Bowen, BBC News, Damascus.

0:16:550:17:02

After months of growing tensions

on the Korean peninsula,

0:17:020:17:08

North Korea's leader,

Kim Jong-un, has hinted

0:17:080:17:10

he is willing to start talks

about dismantling his nuclear

0:17:100:17:17

weapons, if his country's

safety can be guaranteed.

0:17:170:17:19

He's agreed to meet the South Korean

leader at a summit next month,

0:17:190:17:22

the first meeting of its kind

for more than a decade.

0:17:220:17:24

Our correspondent,

Laura Bicker, is in Seoul.

0:17:240:17:26

Laura, this does seem to represent a

significant change in tone. What do

0:17:260:17:29

you make of it?

Well not only is Kim

Jong-un willing to discuss getting

0:17:290:17:36

rid of his nuclear weapons he's

willing to do so with the United

0:17:360:17:39

States and he said he will halt any

missile tests while those talks take

0:17:390:17:45

place These are extraordinary

announcements. They come from a

0:17:450:17:48

dinner in Pyongyang hosted by Kim

Jong-un where he welcomed ministers

0:17:480:17:53

from South Korea for the first time.

Those delegates will travel from

0:17:530:17:57

here in Seoul to Washington to brief

the Trump administration. The US

0:17:570:18:03

President believes its his policy of

maximum pressure, those

0:18:030:18:06

international sanctions, that has

forced Kim Jong-un to the table. It

0:18:060:18:10

may well be that Pyongyang is

running out of cash, but it could

0:18:100:18:15

also be that Kim Jong-un is lying,

trying to buy time to continue to

0:18:150:18:21

build his missile programme. Or it

could be that the young leader is

0:18:210:18:25

looking for something that his

father and grandfather failed to

0:18:250:18:29

achieve, a peace treaty with the

South. Whatever the motivation

0:18:290:18:32

behind this change of heart,

ministers here in Seoul say they are

0:18:320:18:36

dealing with the North with clear

eyes, but they are also very aware

0:18:360:18:41

of the effects of war on this

peninsula and they're willing to go

0:18:410:18:44

wherever these talks may lead them.

Laura, many thanks for the latest

0:18:440:18:49

there. Laura Bicker, our

correspondent in South Korea.

0:18:490:18:57

Food companies have been told

to reduce the calories

0:18:570:18:59

in their products, or face

legislation if they fail to comply.

0:18:590:19:03

The target of a 20% reduction,

over the next five years,

0:19:030:19:06

is the latest attempt to tackle

the problem of obesity,

0:19:060:19:08

which is costing the NHS

an estimated £6 billion a year.

0:19:080:19:11

Public health officials are also

recommending new reduced calorie

0:19:110:19:13

limits for meal times,

as our health editor,

0:19:130:19:15

Hugh Pym, explains.

0:19:150:19:16

It's time for action and food

companies must cut calories.

0:19:160:19:21

That's the demand from public health

chiefs, who want to see new recipes,

0:19:210:19:26

smaller portions or more effort

to move customers

0:19:260:19:28

to healthy options.

0:19:280:19:29

Here's the obesity problem.

0:19:290:19:36

A child's diet might include

breakfast with nearly 500 calories.

0:19:360:19:42

A packed lunch with more than 1,000.

0:19:420:19:47

An after-school snack at around 250

and pasta and a pudding for dinner,

0:19:470:19:50

with more than 800 calories.

0:19:500:19:51

But that's nearly 600

above the recommended limit

0:19:510:19:53

for children, which is like eating

an extra meal a day.

0:19:530:20:00

But with an ice cream

van parked outside this

0:20:000:20:02

school in Salford today,

parents told us it wasn't easy

0:20:020:20:04

keeping their children's

diets under control.

0:20:040:20:10

Well, look, there's an ice cream van

right now outside the school.

0:20:100:20:13

There's something

everywhere, isn't there?

0:20:130:20:14

So it's hard, but I do try.

0:20:140:20:16

If children want an ice

cream, they just want

0:20:160:20:18

an ice cream, don't they?

0:20:180:20:19

Kids are just going in McDonald's

and eating burgers and stuff,

0:20:190:20:25

and even I don't even

know what calories are

0:20:250:20:27

in them, to be fair.

0:20:270:20:28

McDonalds, in fact, is one

of the big companies which has

0:20:280:20:31

agreed to a calorie cutting plan

for its meals and it's

0:20:310:20:33

backed a campaign telling

customers what they can get

0:20:330:20:36

if they want to stick

to a 600 calorie limit.

0:20:360:20:38

Subway is another company

publicising nutritional information

0:20:380:20:40

and says all its individual items

are under 600 calories.

0:20:400:20:42

Do you acknowledge that your

company and others have

0:20:420:20:46

contributed to this problem?

0:20:460:20:48

I think with the choice that

customers have today,

0:20:480:20:50

there is so much choice

on the high street.

0:20:500:20:54

Four out of ten Subs

purchased every single week

0:20:540:20:57

is from our low-fat range.

0:20:570:20:58

There's still a lot of detail

to be worked out on how

0:20:580:21:01

the calorie reduction plan

will work in practice.

0:21:010:21:04

The fast-food chains

and supermarkets have until 2024

0:21:040:21:07

to deliver the 20% cut.

0:21:070:21:13

So the question arises, what happens

if things aren't on track?

0:21:130:21:16

So what we need to see is regular,

transparent reporting so we can see

0:21:160:21:19

which parts of industry

are playing their role

0:21:190:21:21

and who's lagging behind.

0:21:210:21:22

If change doesn't happen fast

enough, we need the government

0:21:220:21:24

to introduce legislation

to make this mandatory.

0:21:240:21:26

There's already a sugar

reduction plan for cakes

0:21:260:21:32

and other sweet items.

0:21:320:21:33

That has to deliver by 2020.

0:21:330:21:35

But the new calorie initiative

for other food runs

0:21:350:21:37

four years beyond that.

0:21:370:21:39

Some say that's not fast enough

to tackle what's been called

0:21:390:21:41

an obesity epidemic.

0:21:410:21:42

Hugh Pym, BBC News.

0:21:420:21:46

A brief look at some

of the day's other news stories.

0:21:460:21:49

The body of a woman,

who'd been stabbed, has been found

0:21:490:21:52

in her family home in south-west

London.

0:21:520:21:53

The discovery was made

an hour after the bodies

0:21:530:21:56

of her husband and two boys,

aged seven and ten,

0:21:560:21:59

were discovered at the foot

of cliffs in East Sussex.

0:21:590:22:02

Police say they're not looking

for anyone else in connection

0:22:020:22:04

with the investigation.

0:22:040:22:06

A lorry driver has been

convicted of causing

0:22:060:22:09

the deaths of eight people

in a crash on the M1,

0:22:090:22:11

near Milton Keynes, last August.

0:22:110:22:15

Ryszard Masierak had stopped

in the inside lane for 12 minutes

0:22:150:22:18

when a second lorry and a minibus

collided with his vehicle.

0:22:180:22:21

The threat of plastic pollution

in the world's oceans has

0:22:210:22:24

been highlighted again,

this time by a British diver.

0:22:240:22:26

Rich Horner filmed himself swimming

through large quantities

0:22:260:22:30

of plastic waste off the coast

of the Indonesian island of Bali.

0:22:300:22:33

The Balinese authorities

have previously warned

0:22:330:22:35

about the problem and its effect

on the tourist industry.

0:22:350:22:41

Thousands of people in parts

of the UK have spent a fourth day

0:22:410:22:45

without water after pipes that froze

last week burst as temperatures

0:22:450:22:48

rose at the weekend.

0:22:480:22:51

Water companies have continued work

to restore supplies to homes

0:22:510:22:59

and businesses in parts of London,

Kent, Sussex and parts of Wales.

0:23:000:23:03

The industry regulator, Ofwat,

said suppliers had "fallen well

0:23:030:23:05

short" on their forward planning.

0:23:050:23:07

Our correspondent,

Emma Simpson, reports.

0:23:070:23:08

A Sussex country pub with lots

of beer, but no running water.

0:23:080:23:13

Not today.

0:23:130:23:14

I'm really sorry.

0:23:140:23:15

That's all right.

0:23:150:23:20

They've been saying sorry

to customers since Saturday,

0:23:200:23:22

200 lost bookings, and counting.

0:23:220:23:23

How much is this all

going to cost you?

0:23:230:23:27

Probably £6,000, £7,000 so far.

0:23:270:23:32

It's devastation,

we can't open and we've lost food.

0:23:320:23:34

We've lost our revenue, you know.

0:23:340:23:39

Down the road, yet more emergency

supplies for households in need.

0:23:390:23:42

Oh, we're managing.

0:23:420:23:44

You know, we're British, aren't we!

0:23:440:23:48

They were helping themselves in west

Wales, and there are still thousands

0:23:480:23:51

without water in London.

0:23:510:23:57

Here's the problem -

just one of many burst pipes

0:23:570:24:00

still being repaired.

0:24:000:24:02

No quick-fix, but

progress is being made.

0:24:020:24:06

The big freeze has put an enormous

strain on the water network,

0:24:060:24:11

but critics say the water companies

should be investing much

0:24:110:24:16

more in improving ageing

infrastructure and making

0:24:160:24:18

the system more resilient.

0:24:180:24:21

South East Water will invest

£450 million into its infrastructure

0:24:210:24:25

from 2015 to 2020.

0:24:250:24:31

We're dealing with an unprecedented

event here due to the weather,

0:24:310:24:34

where we've seen a 25% increase

in burst and water demand

0:24:340:24:37

over a couple of days.

0:24:370:24:42

Back at the pub, the chef's

cleaning, not cooking.

0:24:420:24:45

They just want to know

when they can re-open.

0:24:450:24:48

This ale won't keep

if it's not soon, yet more

0:24:480:24:51

money being poured away.

0:24:510:24:52

Emma Simpson, BBC News, Wadhurst.

0:24:520:24:58

A former private investigator,

engaged by the Sunday Times

0:24:580:25:01

and other media, has spoken

for the first time about the extent

0:25:010:25:04

of the criminal activity

he was involved in while obtaining

0:25:040:25:07

information for the papers.

0:25:070:25:11

John Ford told the BBC that hundreds

of members of the public and well

0:25:110:25:14

over a dozen leading politicians,

including Tony Blair and Gordon

0:25:140:25:16

Brown, were among his targets.

0:25:160:25:18

His admissions come days

after the Government

0:25:180:25:20

abandoned the second phase

of the Leveson Inquiry

0:25:200:25:22

into press standards.

0:25:220:25:25

Our media editor, Amol

Rajan, has the story.

0:25:250:25:26

I did their phones,

I did their mobiles,

0:25:260:25:28

I did their bank accounts.

0:25:280:25:32

I stole their rubbish.

0:25:320:25:36

For 15 years, John Ford was engaged

by The Sunday Times.

0:25:360:25:40

Now, for the first time,

he's speaking out about what he did,

0:25:400:25:43

including targeting Tony Blair

and Gordon Brown.

0:25:430:25:47

He received a police caution

for fraud in the course of his work.

0:25:470:25:55

As a private investigator,

he earned up to £40,000 a year.

0:25:550:25:58

There were a lot of people who say

that Britain's newspapers for many

0:25:580:26:01

years harboured huge and industrial

scale criminal activity.

0:26:010:26:05

Does your experience, working

for them, suggest that's true?

0:26:050:26:08

Absolutely, and I was at

the forefront of it,

0:26:080:26:10

I'm ashamed to say.

0:26:100:26:14

For almost two centuries,

The Sunday Times has been

0:26:140:26:17

an ornament to British journalism,

launching many of the most famous

0:26:170:26:20

campaigns and names in the trade.

0:26:200:26:23

Like other titles owned

by Rupert Murdoch, it was involved

0:26:230:26:26

in the Leveson Inquiry

into press ethnics.

0:26:260:26:29

Last week the Government

finally scrapped phase two

0:26:290:26:32

of the Leveson Inquiry,

which was due to look at allegations

0:26:320:26:35

of police corruption and failures

of corporate governance

0:26:350:26:38

at Murdoch's News International

and other media organisations.

0:26:380:26:40

The Government and newspapers argue

it would be an expensive distraction

0:26:400:26:44

from the real challenges

facing the industry.

0:26:440:26:47

But together with Hacked Off,

the group campaigniing

0:26:470:26:49

for victims of press abuse,

John Ford wants to see

0:26:490:26:51

phase two happen.

0:26:510:26:54

How many members of

the British Cabinet in that

0:26:540:26:57

New Labour period, after 1997,

do you think you targeted?

0:26:570:26:59

15 to 20.

0:26:590:27:00

Can you describe the nature

of your attacks on members

0:27:000:27:04

of the British Cabinet?

0:27:040:27:06

Aggressive, unprincipled.

0:27:060:27:14

Fishing expeditions often.

0:27:150:27:19

What is the nature of the fishing

expeditions that you conducted

0:27:190:27:22

on the British Cabinet?

0:27:220:27:23

Hundreds of telephone interceptions,

hundreds of bank interceptions.

0:27:230:27:25

Utilities, I've been

through mortgages,

0:27:250:27:26

I've stolen rubbish.

0:27:260:27:27

I've...

0:27:270:27:33

I mean, I'm afraid

the list is endless.

0:27:330:27:38

Not all that John Ford did

was illegal, some of it may have

0:27:380:27:41

been in the public interest.

0:27:410:27:43

In a statement, a spokesperson

for The Sunday Times said...

0:27:430:27:46

The Sunday Times has also said "it

has always been its expectation

0:28:130:28:16

and practice that its contractors

work within the law."

0:28:160:28:18

The Government says that we need

to move on and fight the next

0:28:180:28:21

battle, but with Sir Brian Leveson

and victims of press

0:28:210:28:23

abuse saying that we need

phase two of his inquiry,

0:28:230:28:26

Fleet Street's past still casts

a long shadow over its future.

0:28:260:28:29

You're aware clearly that you're

confessing, as it were,

0:28:290:28:31

to large scale criminality?

0:28:310:28:32

Yeah.

0:28:320:28:35

What do you think are likely to be

the legal repercussions for you now?

0:28:350:28:38

I don't know.

0:28:380:28:42

But as far as whatever

is coming my way, I'm ready

0:28:420:28:45

to accept it because what I want

is my conscience to be clear.

0:28:450:28:48

Amol Rajan, BBC News.

0:28:480:28:56

Picasso's young lover,

Marie-Therese Walter,

0:29:010:29:03

inspired some of his most celebrated

works of art.

0:29:030:29:05

A new exhibition, at

London's Tate Modern,

0:29:050:29:09

focuses on Picasso's work

from the year 1932

0:29:090:29:11

and includes The Dream,

and Nude In A Black Armchair.

0:29:110:29:14

One of Picasso's portraits

of Walter sold recently

0:29:140:29:17

for nearly £50 million.

0:29:170:29:18

Our arts correspondent, David

Sillito, reports from Tate Modern.

0:29:180:29:26

There's a lot of emotion in this

exhibition. It's kind of into lust

0:29:330:29:40

and into life. There's also drama.

Normally a Tate show would be a

0:29:400:29:49

retrospective of a life's work, but

this is just one year of Picassos.

0:29:490:29:54

That year is 1932. This is Picasso

and this is his wife Olga. But when

0:29:540:29:59

you look at the paintings, it's

another face.

0:29:590:30:08

Wherever you look you see the same

shock of blonde hair, the same

0:30:080:30:14

profile. Here she is again. The same

hair, the same profile. We're not

0:30:140:30:19

looking at Picasso's wife here

though, this is Marie-Theres Walter.

0:30:190:30:27

This is her granddaughter, Diana.

Two generations may have passed, but

0:30:270:30:32

I think you can probably see a

certain family likeness.

What I

0:30:320:30:35

think of, it as a granddaughter,

when I walk in an exhibition like

0:30:350:30:41

this, is that it's not a great

artist it's a an accounter.

She is

0:30:410:30:49

everywhere. An obsession. Picasso

was approaching 50 when the affair

0:30:490:30:54

began. Marie-Therese was a teenager.

She was very young when she met

0:30:540:31:00

Picasso. 17.

She was 17-and-a-half!

And she's accepting the idea to see

0:31:000:31:08

him again the following day. So she

was young, but she was also

0:31:080:31:14

adventurous. If a relationship can

bring you to an extraordinary level

0:31:140:31:19

of life experience, I could never

judge that.

These days we've grown

0:31:190:31:25

used to this new way of seeing. A

Marie.

0:31:250:31:32

-Therese Picasso can go for £100

million. That is the art market.

0:31:320:31:37

This is the story of the man and the

women behind the paintings. David

0:31:370:31:43

Sillito, BBC News.

0:31:430:31:45

Newsnight is coming up on BBC Two.

0:31:450:31:47

Here's Kirsty Wark.

0:31:470:31:48

Tonight, as a former Russian double

agent and his daughter remain

0:31:480:31:51

critically ill in hospital, our

diplomatic editor has the latest on

0:31:510:31:53

his condition.

0:31:530:31:54

Join me now on BBC Two.

0:31:540:31:56

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