13/03/2018 BBC News at Ten


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13/03/2018

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Tonight at Ten:

0:00:060:00:07

Moscow is set to ignore the midnight

deadline to explain how a Russian

0:00:070:00:10

poison was used to attack

a former spy.

0:00:100:00:13

Sergei Skripal and his

daughter were poisoned

0:00:130:00:16

in Salisbury over a week ago -

the Russians have denied any

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involvement in what happened.

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The police investigation

in Salisbury is being extended

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and Scotland Yard warns it

will take many more weeks.

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The public are going to continue

to

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see a great deal of police activity

in and around the city, including

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potentially more

cordons being erected.

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But don't be alarmed, it is

necessary as part of this major

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investigation.

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As officers appeal for witnesses

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and identify the Skripals' red BMW,

the Government's warnings to Russia

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get a sharp response.

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We will make sure our response -

as I indicated to the House last

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week - is commensurate but robust.

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Russia is not a country to be spoken

into in the language of ultimatums.

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I think it is high time the United

Kingdom learned that.

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We'll be reporting from Moscow

and from Salisbury, as the tensions

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deepen between Britain and Russia.

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Also tonight:

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Just over a year after his

appointment, Rex Tillerson is sacked

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as US Secretary of State.

0:01:170:01:18

President Trump says they had

areas of disagreement.

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Rex and I have been talking about

this for a long time. We got along

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actually quite well, but we

disagreed on things.

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In his Spring

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statement, the Chancellor reveals

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forecasts for higher growth

and lower inflation and debt

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and hints at possible spending

rises in the future.

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And Manchester United are out

of the Champions League after losing

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at Old Trafford tonight.

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And coming up on Sportsday:

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The big race of the opening day

of the Cheltenham festival,

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the Champions Hurdle,

was won by favourite

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Buveur D'Air, who now joins some

of jump racing's greats.

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Good evening.

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There are two hours left

to the deadline announced

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by Theresa May for Moscow

to explain how a nerve agent

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probably made in Russia

was used to attack a former

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spy and his daughter.

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Sergei Skripal and his daughter

Yulia were taken ill over

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a week ago in Salisbury.

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The Kremlin said today it would not

cooperate with any investigation

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until it was given a sample

of the substance involved.

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As tensions deepened

between London and Moscow,

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Scotland Yard gave more details

of the attack and appealed

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for more witnesses.

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Our first report tonight

is from our diplomatic

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correspondent, James Landale

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It began as a brutal attack

on the streets of Salisbury,

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the poisoning of a former Russian

intelligence officer

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and his daughter.

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But it's become tonight

a global diplomatic row,

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with Britain in

confrontation with Moscow

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and looking for allies.

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The Kremlin has just two

hours left to explain

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what role it played

in

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Salisbury.

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To say how a nerve agent

developed in Russia ended up

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here.

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And if midnight passes without that

explanation, the Government is

0:03:220:03:25

promising a robust

and expensive response.

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This is a brazen attempt to murder

innocent people on UK soil.

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Policeman still in hospital,

overwhelmingly likely or highly

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likely the Russian state

was involved, and the use of this

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nerve agent would represent

the first use of nerve agents

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on the continent of Europe

since the Second World War.

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As part of a huge diplomatic push,

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British officials told the chemical

weapons watchdog in the Netherlands

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that Russia was implicated

in the use of a nerve

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agent on British soil.

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The Foreign Secretary called his EU

counterparts, securing

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expressions of support

from France, Germany,

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the European Commission and Nato.

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This afternoon Theresa May spoke

to Donald Trump, who agreed

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with her that Russian must provide

unambiguous answers about how this

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weapon came to be used in Britain.

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Even before the call,

the President acknowledged

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Russia's involvement.

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Theresa May is going to be

speaking to me today.

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It sounds to me like they believe

it was Russia and I would certainly

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take that finding as fact.

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As soon as we get the facts

straight, if we agree with them,

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we will condemn Russia or whoever

it may be.

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Russia is already subject

to sanctions because of its

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interventions in Ukraine and Crimea.

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Ministers insist these damage

Russia's economy, but their impact

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on Moscow's behaviour is doubtful.

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Crucially, these are largely EU

sanctions, the UK can't

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impose them on its own.

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So, what unilateral options

is the Government considering?

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Well, some of Russia's 58 diplomats

in London could be expelled but that

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might provoke a tit-for-tat

expulsion of British diplomats.

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Wealthy Russians in London

with links to the Kremlin could face

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financial sanctions and travel bans,

but who and how?

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There could be tougher laws to crack

down on Russian officials guilty

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of human rights abuses,

and Russian TV stations

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like RT could be targeted.

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The media regulator has already

warned it could lose its licence.

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Here at the Foreign Office,

they are also investing a lot

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of effort and diplomacy in trying

to bring international

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pressure to bear on Russia,

but the bar is high.

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Russia has a veto at the UN and some

EU countries are reluctant

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to contemplate yet more sanctions.

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This evening the Russian Embassy

said Moscow would not respond to

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Britain's ultimatum unless it was

given samples of the nerve agent.

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As diplomats promised retaliation

against any punitive action.

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Russia is not a country to be spoken

to in the language of ultimatums.

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I think it is high time

the United Kingdom learned that.

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Tonight, the investigation

continues in Salisbury.

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Tomorrow the diplomatic

war of words will be

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replaced by deeds,

and outright confrontation.

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James Landale, BBC News.

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Russia has repeated its denial

of any involvement in

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the nerve agent attack.

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The country's Foreign Minister,

Sergei Lavrov, dismissed

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the accusation, while the Russian

Embassy in London warned

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that the threat of sanctions

by Britain would be met

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with a response.

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Our correspondent Sarah Rainsford

reports from Moscow.

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Accused of a crime many

miles from here, under

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pressure to explain a

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chemical attack that

shocked Britain.

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But today the Kremlin

has remained silent.

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The Foreign Minister,

though, was in full

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defensive flow.

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Sergey Lavrov rejected

Britain's 24 hour ultimatum

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to respond to the claim that

Moscow used a nerve agent.

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Russia should get ten

days, he said, accusing

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Britain of flouting the chemical

weapons convention.

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And when I asked about the actual

charge the minister

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called that nonsense.

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TRANSLATION:

Russia is not guilty.

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Russia is ready to co-operate

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In accordance with the Convention

on the Prohibition

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of chemical weapons if the UK

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finally decides to fulfil its

obligations under international law

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within that document.

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Russia's also demanding

a sample of the substance

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used in the attack to

conduct its own tests.

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The UK has identified it

as Novichok, which the BBC believes

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was once produced here

in a secret Soviet programme.

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Reports in Moscow say any

stockpiles were destroyed

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long ago.

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So when the British Ambassador

was called to the Foreign Ministry,

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Moscow says he came to hear

its protest at a sordid attempt

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to discredit this country.

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I reiterated the points

made by Prime Minister

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May that we expect by the end

of today an account from the Russian

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state as to how this material came

to be used in Salisbury.

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Russia has always insisted

it had nothing to do

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with the poisoning

in

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Salisbury and that position clearly

has not changed even with the threat

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of sanctions.

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After all this is a country

that's been living under

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international sanctions for some

time, linked to its actions in

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Ukraine.

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Those actions have not weakened

President Putin politically

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at all.

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If anything, they have

made him stronger.

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Moscow then is in no mood

for ultimatums and it

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will continue to insist

on its

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innocence.

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Sarah Rainsford, BBC News, Moscow.

0:08:420:08:48

Scotland Yard has given further

details about the movements

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of Sergei Skripal and his daughter

Yulia in the hours before

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they became critically ill.

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Counter-terrorism police

say the investigation

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will take many weeks,

but the prime focus

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is discovering exactly how

the poison was administered.

0:09:020:09:04

Our home affairs correspondent

Daniel Sandford has

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the latest from Salisbury.

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This evening, with nerve agent

contamination still a huge concern,

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police were working at the pound

where Sergei Skripal's car was found

0:09:150:09:18

after being towed away

from Salisbury town centre.

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Britain's most senior

counter-terrorism detective warning

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today that the complex operation

in the city will last many weeks.

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We are sifting and assessing

all evidence available

0:09:310:09:33

and we are exploring

all investigative avenues,

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this includes extensive CCTV footage

from across the city and over 380

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exhibits so far.

0:09:410:09:44

Detectives now believe Yulia Skripal

arrived at Heathrow Airport

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from Russia on the afternoon

of Saturday, 3rd March.

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The next day, the day of the attack,

she and her father Sergei drove

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into Salisbury in this red BMW.

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Police are asking anyone who saw

the car between 1.00pm and 1.45pm

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that Sunday to come forward.

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At 1.40pm that afternoon they parked

on the upper deck of the Sainsbury's

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car park, from where they walked

past a small park to the Mill pub.

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After a drink they headed

to the Zizzi restaurant,

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where they were between

2.20pm and 3.35pm.

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They then headed back

to the park where, at 4.15pm,

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they were found desperately ill

on a bench.

0:10:220:10:26

Today, police said Detective

Sergeant Nick Bailey,

0:10:260:10:28

who also became seriously ill

after getting contaminated,

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was making good progress.

0:10:310:10:35

The two people targeted

in the attack, Yulia

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and Sergei Skripal,

are still in intensive care

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here in Salisbury Hospital,

were staff are having to use special

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precautions because of

the military grade nerve agent.

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They're both in a critical

condition, but they are both

0:10:470:10:50

still stable, which means they're

not getting significantly worse.

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I understand that she is doing

slightly better than he is.

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We still don't know if detectives

have a specific suspect in this

0:10:590:11:03

unique and challenging

investigation, they said

0:11:030:11:05

they wouldn't be making that

public at this stage.

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Daniel Sandford,

BBC News, Salisbury.

0:11:070:11:14

In a moment the latest

from our correspondents in Moscow

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and in Downing Street,

but first our security correspondent

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Gordon Corera is with me.

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A sense of how challenging this

investigation is now?

It has been a

0:11:230:11:28

very challenging investigation, more

challenging I'm told even than a

0:11:280:11:34

counter terrorism investigation,

because of the the forensics and the

0:11:340:11:41

contamination. It was only on

Saturday night that they identified

0:11:410:11:46

the nerve agent and hence the

warnings to the public. And we got a

0:11:460:11:51

sense of broadening line of inquiry

for the police. There have been

0:11:510:11:58

questions about deaths of Russians

in the last few years. Today the

0:11:580:12:01

Home Secretary said she had asked

the police and MI5 to look at those

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to see if there was suspicions. In

the afternoon we learned the police

0:12:060:12:09

were investigating what they called

an unexplained death in New Malden

0:12:090:12:17

south of London. We understand that

is Nicholai Glushakov. He was a

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Russian businessman and a friend of

Boris Berezovsky, a critic of

0:12:250:12:30

Vladimir Putin, in turn whose death

is considered suspicious. There is

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no sign at the moment that this

death is suspicion and it could be

0:12:330:12:40

entirely natural causes, but you get

the sense from the way the police

0:12:400:12:42

are treating it, that they feel they

have got to take it seriously,

0:12:420:12:46

because of this changing context of

what might be possible, but that

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challenging information in Salisbury

is certainly the main focus.

Thank

0:12:510:12:53

you.

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Our correspondent is in Moscow. This

deadline is approaching, we have had

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a sense of response in Moscow. What

is your reading of things there?

0:13:030:13:09

Well, I think there is no sense that

Russia is planning to comply with

0:13:090:13:13

that deadline. We have heard unless

London hands over a sample of nerve

0:13:130:13:18

agent it says was used, then Russia

will ignore this deadline. If there

0:13:180:13:22

are any lights on there in the

Kremlin, it is not people worrying

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about that deadline. But what we

have heard is if there are sanctions

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from the UK, then Russia will

respond to that. Specifically on one

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thing, the Foreign Ministry said

that if the pro-Kremlin RT were to

0:13:350:13:40

be closed in the UK, no British

media would remain working in

0:13:400:13:45

Russia. Now, beyond that, she was

also on television here tonight

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reminding viewers of Vladimir

Putin's recent speech when he

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revealed all the new nuclear weapons

that Russia has in itarsenal after

0:13:530:14:01

that it said no one should issue

rush with ultimatums.

Thank you. Now

0:14:010:14:07

live to Downing Street and our

diplomatic correspondent. Once this

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deadline has passed, what is your

sense of what the next the 24 hours

0:14:120:14:16

could bring?

Well, tomorrow, the

Prime Minister will convene her

0:14:160:14:21

national Security Council and be

briefed on the investigation and the

0:14:210:14:24

expected lack of Russian response.

She and her ministers will decide

0:14:240:14:29

how robust they wish to be in their

response to what they see as

0:14:290:14:33

Russia's involvement in the

Salisbury attack. Those decisions

0:14:330:14:36

have yet to be made. But we can

detect I think some patterns. One, I

0:14:360:14:41

think the Government is determined

to make sure this response is far

0:14:410:14:45

more robust than the response given

to the murder of Alexander

0:14:450:14:49

Litvinenko more than a decade ago.

Second, I think tomorrow will be

0:14:490:14:54

very much the first stage of what is

going to be a staged response and

0:14:540:14:58

the focus tomorrow will be on the UK

domestic decisions, the action that

0:14:580:15:03

Britain can take. We are talking

expulsion of diplomats and bans on

0:15:030:15:12

Russians who have wealth here and

then the question will be how Russia

0:15:120:15:15

responds. The Russian Embassy here

in the UK has just said, look, if

0:15:150:15:23

those calling for Russian diplomats

to be expelled don't care about

0:15:230:15:34

British diplomats in Moscow.

Thank

you.

0:15:340:15:43

Some of the day's other news.

0:15:440:15:46

In the biggest change yet

for the Trump administration,

0:15:460:15:49

the President has sacked his

Secretary of State, Rex Tillerson,

0:15:490:15:51

following a series

of public disagreements.

0:15:510:15:52

Mr Trump announced his decision

on social media and told reporters

0:15:520:15:58

that he and Mr Tillerson had

a "different mindset"

0:15:580:16:00

on some key issues,

including the nuclear

0:16:000:16:01

deal with Iran.

0:16:010:16:02

The Director of the CIA,

Mike Pompeo, has been named

0:16:020:16:05

as Mr Tillerson's replacement,

as our North America

0:16:050:16:10

editor, Jon Sopel, reports.

0:16:100:16:11

After a long trip to Africa

glad-handing and promoting the US,

0:16:110:16:14

Rex Tillerson flew back

to Washington overnight.

0:16:140:16:20

But unbeknown to him, the President

had signed his death warrant,

0:16:200:16:23

and it would be death by tweet.

0:16:230:16:25

"Mike Pompeo, director

of the CIA, will become our

0:16:250:16:27

new Secretary of State.

0:16:270:16:28

He'll do a fantastic job.

0:16:280:16:29

Thank you to Rex Tillerson

for his service."

0:16:290:16:31

But Tillerson isn't on Twitter,

so excruciatingly it fell

0:16:310:16:34

to his Chief of Staff to inform him

of his demise.

0:16:340:16:38

There was no contact

from the White House,

0:16:380:16:41

only this afterwards

from the President.

0:16:410:16:43

I think Rex will be much

happier now, but I really

0:16:430:16:45

appreciate his service.

0:16:450:16:50

Happier, he didn't seem it.

0:16:500:16:52

In his farewell statement, he never

mentioned Donald Trump by name,

0:16:520:16:54

didn't thank him or wish him luck.

0:16:540:16:56

Instead, there were these

pointed remarks on Russia.

0:16:560:16:58

Much work remains to respond

to the troubling behaviour

0:16:580:17:01

and actions on the part

of the Russian government.

0:17:010:17:05

Russia must assess carefully

as to how its actions

0:17:050:17:08

are in the best interests

of the Russian people,

0:17:080:17:10

and of the world more broadly.

0:17:100:17:12

I, Rex Wayne Tillerson

do solemnly swear...

0:17:120:17:15

It was all so different

when he was sworn in,

0:17:150:17:19

then seen as one of the grown-ups

of the administration.

0:17:190:17:24

But his fate was probably

sealed last October,

0:17:240:17:28

when it was reported he called

Donald Trump "a moron", an

0:17:280:17:31

accusation he didn't exactly deny.

0:17:310:17:33

I'm not going to deal

with petty stuff like that.

0:17:330:17:36

I mean, this is what I don't

understand about Washington.

0:17:360:17:43

Again, you know, I'm

not from this place,

0:17:430:17:45

but the places I come from,

we don't deal with that

0:17:450:17:47

kind of petty nonsense.

0:17:470:17:48

Then there was the public

undermining of the Secretary

0:17:480:17:50

of State by the President,

sending family to do work that

0:17:500:17:53

would normally be done

by America's chief diplomat,

0:17:530:17:55

and public shaming

on Twitter, like this.

0:17:550:17:58

There's not much love lost

between Donald Trump

0:18:030:18:05

and Rex Tillerson, they disagreed

on policy and didn't much

0:18:050:18:09

like each other personally.

0:18:090:18:11

Mike Pompeo will be much more

to Donald Trump's taste and it's

0:18:110:18:15

vital they do get on,

given the importance

0:18:150:18:17

of subjects like North Korea.

0:18:170:18:20

But will he be the man

who says to the President -

0:18:200:18:23

I think you're wrong,

as Rex Tillerson did?

0:18:230:18:31

Tillerson was isolated trapessing

around the world with little

0:18:330:18:36

support in Washington.

0:18:360:18:37

In his previous life,

the former CEO of of Exxon

0:18:370:18:39

was a corporate titan,

but he's now political road kill.

0:18:390:18:41

Surely the place with

the lowest life expectancy

0:18:410:18:43

anywhere in the world,-

being a member of the

0:18:430:18:45

Trump administration.

0:18:450:18:47

Another senior figure

who didn't smell the coffee.

0:18:470:18:48

Jon Sopel, BBC News, Washington.

0:18:480:18:56

The Chancellor, Philip Hammond,

has delivered his spring statement,

0:18:560:19:01

insisting there's light at the end

of the tunnel for the UK economy

0:19:010:19:04

and hinted at possible increases

in public spending later this year.

0:19:040:19:08

The Office for Budget

Responsibility's growth forecast

0:19:080:19:12

for this year has been increased

modestly by 0.1% to 1.4%.

0:19:120:19:16

And Government borrowing will be

lower this year than expected.

0:19:160:19:20

The OBR now forecasts it

will be £45.2 billion,

0:19:200:19:22

which could give the Chancellor

a potential £5 billion

0:19:220:19:25

for extra spending.

0:19:250:19:29

But the OBR nonetheless downgraded

its forecasts for 2021 and 2022

0:19:290:19:37

and Labour accused the Chancellor

of "astounding complacency", given

0:19:380:19:40

the pressures on public services.

0:19:400:19:44

Our political editor,

Laura Kuenssberg, has the details.

0:19:440:19:52

Is there anybody out there?

0:19:540:19:55

Number Eleven didn't want us to pay

that much attention.

0:19:550:19:58

No fuss, no frills.

0:19:580:19:59

REPORTER:

Do you have good

news today, Chancellor?

0:19:590:20:01

Only the Chancellor

slipping off to work.

0:20:010:20:02

THE SPEAKER:

Statement,

the Chancellor of the Exchequer.

0:20:020:20:04

But what was this, a cheery

Philip Hammond rushing to his place?

0:20:040:20:07

If there are any Eeyores

in the chamber, they're over there.

0:20:070:20:12

I, meanwhile, am at my most

positively Tigger-like today.

0:20:120:20:18

Not much has changed

from the world outside.

0:20:180:20:24

True, the economy will grow

a little bit faster.

0:20:240:20:27

The debt will start to fall, just.

0:20:270:20:29

The day to day deficit,

remember that, it's gone.

0:20:290:20:32

But compared to other countries,

the economy is sluggish

0:20:320:20:36

and slow, only a hint

of easing off months away.

0:20:360:20:39

If, in the autumn, the public

finances continue to reflect

0:20:390:20:46

the improvements that today's report

hints at then, in accordance

0:20:460:20:47

with our balanced approach,

I would have capacity to enable

0:20:470:20:50

further increases

in public spending.

0:20:500:20:54

That might have delighted his side.

0:20:540:20:55

THE SPEAKER:

John McDonnell.

0:20:550:20:57

But Labour accused him of not

being in the real world.

0:20:570:21:00

Hasn't he listened to the doctors,

the nurses, the teachers,

0:21:000:21:04

the police officers,

the carers and even his own

0:21:040:21:09

councillors, they're telling him

they can't wait for the next Budget.

0:21:090:21:12

They're telling him to act now.

0:21:120:21:13

But is he listening?

0:21:130:21:21

This is the eighth year,

the eighth year in a row

0:21:230:21:26

when a Conservative Chancellor has

said to the public that dealing

0:21:260:21:29

with the accounts is more important

than what they might feel they need.

0:21:290:21:31

Well, I hear what you're saying,

Laura, but the facts

0:21:310:21:34

speak for themselves.

0:21:340:21:35

I've put £11 billion -

this is just what I've done,

0:21:350:21:39

since I've been Chancellor -

£11 billion additionally into public

0:21:390:21:43

spending in 2018/19 and have

promised to put more

0:21:430:21:46

into the National Health Service

this year if we get a deal on pay.

0:21:460:21:49

Many of your colleagues now believe

that the evidence is overwhelming

0:21:490:21:53

for more money to go

into the NHS in the longer term?

0:21:530:21:57

Well, the evidence is

clearly there that our

0:21:570:21:59

population is getting older.

0:21:590:22:03

That technology is developing

in a way that makes more and more

0:22:030:22:06

interventions possible,

and indeed desirable

0:22:060:22:09

in the health service,

and that does represent

0:22:090:22:11

a continuous upward pressure.

0:22:110:22:16

Is the Cabinet at the moment

discussing how to find more money

0:22:160:22:19

for the health service,

as some of your

0:22:190:22:21

colleagues have told me?

0:22:210:22:22

Well, this is my responsibility

to look at these things,

0:22:220:22:24

but of course we look

at all these issues.

0:22:240:22:28

As we approach the Budget

in the autumn and then

0:22:280:22:31

the spending review in 2019,

of course we will look at all these

0:22:310:22:34

pressures across the piece.

0:22:340:22:35

Not good enough for these opponents.

0:22:350:22:37

This is a Chancellor that's

asleep at the wheel.

0:22:370:22:41

He really had to show today

he was prepared to take action.

0:22:410:22:44

There was nothing in

that statement that

0:22:440:22:45

creates confidence.

0:22:450:22:46

He has dispelled some

of the gloom about the economy

0:22:460:22:49

by giving statistics

about employment, growth,

0:22:490:22:52

output, debt etc.

0:22:520:22:54

What the Chancellor should have

done, I think, is to be much more

0:22:540:22:57

open and honest with the public

and say there is no more public

0:22:570:23:00

money for public services,

which is very badly needed, and

0:23:000:23:04

therefore we are going to have

to have an increase

0:23:040:23:06

in taxation to pay for it.

0:23:060:23:09

Not admissions the Government

is ready to make.

0:23:090:23:11

Hard choices that will

linger long after today.

0:23:110:23:13

Along with the Brexit bill, revealed

to be hanging around until 2064.

0:23:130:23:16

Spring has not yet really sprung.

0:23:160:23:18

Laura Kuenssberg, BBC

News, Westminster.

0:23:180:23:26

While Philip Hammond spoke

of a "turning point"

0:23:270:23:29

for the economy, the Organisation

for Economic Co-Operation

0:23:290:23:31

and Development, the OECD, was less

confident about the UK's prospects.

0:23:310:23:34

Our economics editor, Kamal Ahmed,

is here to look at the figures.

0:23:340:23:41

How would you characterise that

verdict?

Certainly, Huw, the

0:23:410:23:45

rhetoric very positive. I think the

figures rather more mixed. Yes,

0:23:450:23:49

there was slightly better news on

the economy for this year. Slightly

0:23:490:23:53

better news on borrow, which might

give the Chancellor more head room

0:23:530:23:56

on public spending. The Office for

Budget Responsibility said that

0:23:560:24:00

inflation would be coming down,

prices. That means that income

0:24:000:24:06

squeeze that affected so many people

could come to an end. There is one

0:24:060:24:09

big challenge in these figures. 1.5%

growth is the new normal for the UK.

0:24:090:24:15

We used to have growth of 2% to

2.5%. The OECD, as you said, said

0:24:150:24:20

that put us at the bottom of the G20

list of industrialised nations

0:24:200:24:28

growth, behind America, behind

Germany, behind France. For every

0:24:280:24:32

0.1% of growth that you lose, that's

lower tax revenues, lower Government

0:24:320:24:37

income and that's less room for

manoeuvre for spending on health,

0:24:370:24:41

and for defence and head education

which is what Philip Hammond will

0:24:410:24:44

want to do when it comes to the big

event, the Budget, in the autumn.

0:24:440:24:50

Kamal Ahmed there, our economics

editor.

0:24:500:24:54

A brief look at some

of the day's other news stories:

0:24:540:24:57

The leader of Telford

and Wrekin Council in Shropshire

0:24:570:24:59

is calling on the Home Secretary

to order an independent public

0:24:590:25:02

inquiry into cases of child sexual

exploitation in the town.

0:25:020:25:04

It follows reports claiming that

hundreds of girls may have

0:25:040:25:06

been abused in the town

since the early 1980s.

0:25:060:25:14

A teenager on trial

for the attack at Parsons Green

0:25:280:25:31

underground station in London

has admitted leaving

0:25:310:25:34

a device on a train

but said he never intended

0:25:340:25:37

to kill anyone.

0:25:370:25:39

18-year-old Ahmed Hussan said it

became a 'fantasy' for him

0:25:390:25:41

when he was 'very bored' over

the school holidays.

0:25:410:25:43

He denies attempted murder

and causing an explosion

0:25:430:25:45

likely to endanger life as our home

affairs correspondent

0:25:450:25:47

June Kelly reports.

0:25:470:25:48

Ahmed Hassan has always

admitted setting off on a

0:25:480:25:51

September morning last year to plant

a device on an underground train.

0:25:510:25:53

Today, it was his turn to explain

to a jury why he did it.

0:25:530:25:57

After listening to

days of prosecution

0:25:570:25:58

evidence against him,

he was brought to court

0:25:580:26:00

to mount his defence.

0:26:000:26:01

In the witness box,

he said he expected

0:26:010:26:03

the device to burn,

rather than explode.

0:26:030:26:06

Asked by his barrister,

Tim Maloney QC:

0:26:060:26:09

The device partially detonated

on a train at Parsons

0:26:160:26:19

Green train station.

0:26:190:26:23

Passengers were burned

by the fireball.

0:26:230:26:25

Today, Hassan said he

hadn't looked at this

0:26:250:26:26

footage when it was played in court.

0:26:260:26:34

Last summer, on his bedroom door,

he made plain his boredom with

0:26:340:26:37

his life.

0:26:370:26:38

He told the jury it was partly

boredom which drove him to

0:26:380:26:41

build and plant the device.

0:26:410:26:42

Using the explosive TATP, he

constructed

0:26:420:26:47

it in the kitchen of his

foster parents' home

0:26:470:26:55

it in the kitchen of his foster

parents' home and he said he'd

0:27:000:27:03

packed it with shrapnel,

because he wanted

0:27:030:27:05

it to look serious.

0:27:050:27:06

Under cross-examination

by the prosecutor,

0:27:060:27:07

Alison Morgan, Hassan

denied that he wanted

0:27:070:27:09

to avenge his father's death

in a coalition airstrike in their

0:27:090:27:11

native Iraq.

0:27:110:27:12

She put it to him, "You believed

that the fight against

0:27:120:27:15

Britain should be brought

into this country."

0:27:150:27:17

He replied, "No".

0:27:170:27:18

Hassan was aiming to leave

the UK after the attack.

0:27:180:27:20

Today, he said he fantasised

about being a fugitive chased across

0:27:200:27:23

Europe by police.

0:27:230:27:24

In fact, he was arrested in Dover.

0:27:240:27:28

June Kelly, BBC News

at the Old Bailey.

0:27:280:27:31

The Gulf state of Qatar

will be introducing a sugar

0:27:310:27:34

tax later this year,

a move partly prompted by health

0:27:340:27:36

surveys showing that 70% of Qataris

are overweight or obese -

0:27:360:27:39

almost double the global average.

0:27:390:27:40

The government is taking action

to try to get people to lose weight,

0:27:400:27:43

and it's also set to start screening

adults for diabetes.

0:27:430:27:46

Our global health correspondent,

Tulip Mazumdar, has been given rare

0:27:460:27:48

access to the Qatari health system

and she sent this report.

0:27:480:27:51

It's time for the weekend shop

and families are stocking up,

0:27:510:27:53

the Jamals' are trying

to make healthier choices.

0:27:530:27:57

It's because, at just 16 years old,

Jabor's poor diet, he tells me,

0:27:570:28:00

led to him developing

type 2 diabetes.

0:28:000:28:02

TRANSLATION:

When I was a kid,

I really loved sweets.

0:28:020:28:08

We would just eat, go to bed,

wake up the next day and eat more.

0:28:080:28:14

Qatar has become one of the richest

countries on earth thanks

0:28:140:28:17

to the discovery of oil

and gas here.

0:28:170:28:20

With all that wealth though came

a massive influx of international

0:28:200:28:23

workers and western tastes.

0:28:230:28:27

In a very short period of time,

Qataris have totally

0:28:270:28:29

changed how they live,

where they live and what they eat.

0:28:290:28:34

They've gone from active,

outdoor desert living to much more

0:28:340:28:38

indoor sedentary lifestyles and many

are now paying the price

0:28:380:28:41

for adopting some of the worst

of western excesses.

0:28:410:28:44

Qatar is now building more outdoor

areas, like this one,

0:28:440:28:47

it's introducing a sugar tax this

year and improving food labelling.

0:28:470:28:52

We declare it's an epidemic.

0:28:520:28:53

Everyone knows and there is a high

political commitment to face this.

0:28:530:28:56

We try to find the best

approach to tackle this.

0:28:560:29:01

One of those approaches

is funding new research,

0:29:010:29:04

Salem is part of a study targeting

younger people trying

0:29:040:29:08

to reverse their type 2 diabetes.

0:29:080:29:10

TRANSLATION:

I used

to eat very chaotically.

0:29:100:29:13

For breakfast I'd eat sandwiches,

for lunch I'd have a lot of meat

0:29:130:29:16

and I'd have a heavy dinner.

0:29:160:29:19

I started feeling pain

in my joints and my feet.

0:29:190:29:23

Left untreated, the disease

can cause blindness

0:29:230:29:24

and even foot amputations.

0:29:240:29:29

Almost one in five people suffer

with the condition here,

0:29:290:29:31

but through this strict diet

and exercise programme patients

0:29:310:29:36

are going into remission.

0:29:360:29:37

We need to see the long-term

outcomes, but it is possible

0:29:370:29:40

medically to take younger people,

get them fit, improve their life

0:29:400:29:42

without any medication,

without any surgery.

0:29:420:29:45

All these mixture of medals...

0:29:450:29:49

Aldana is part of the women's

national handball team and wants

0:29:490:29:53

to help fight the obesity crisis.

0:29:530:29:55

She says people need better

education on living well.

0:29:550:29:57

By increasing the awareness

and doing programmes for families.

0:29:570:30:00

They're not aware how much

is dangerous for the children.

0:30:000:30:05

They've started to get this

information about healthy lifestyle.

0:30:050:30:11

Unlike many other countries,

Qatar certainly has the resources

0:30:110:30:14

to deal with its obesity epidemic.

0:30:140:30:18

The bigger challenge is ensuring

its people have the will.

0:30:180:30:20

Tulip Mazumdar, BBC News, Doha.

0:30:200:30:26

Tonight's football news.

0:30:260:30:27

Manchester United have

been knocked out of

0:30:270:30:29

the Champions League by Sevilla.

0:30:290:30:31

They lost the second leg

at Old Trafford, 2-1.

0:30:310:30:33

John Watson watched the game.

0:30:330:30:37

All your match day

scarves and souvenirs!

0:30:370:30:39

Champions League nights

are special nights.

0:30:390:30:42

Once commonplace under

Sir Alex Ferguson,

0:30:420:30:46

Manchester United's current crop

hoping to emulate his achievements.

0:30:460:30:49

A return to the knockout stage

of Europe's top club

0:30:490:30:52

competition a start,

Jose Mourinho hoping to mastermind

0:30:520:30:55

a march to the quarter-finals

with victory over Sevilla.

0:30:550:30:59

After a goalless first leg, once

again they were in short supply.

0:30:590:31:02

Marouane Fellaini's effort the best

of a poor first half.

0:31:020:31:05

It was cautious and conservative.

0:31:050:31:07

Jesse Lingard attempting

to find the breakthrough.

0:31:070:31:09

How he's seen it all before.

0:31:090:31:15

But perhaps not quite as

underwhelming and underperforming.

0:31:150:31:18

Where United couldn't,

Sevilla could.

0:31:180:31:18

Ben Yedder putting

his side in front.

0:31:180:31:20

The complexity of the tie

changed in seconds.

0:31:200:31:23

David De Gea, who saved them

from defeat in the first leg,

0:31:230:31:28

couldn't this time,

as Ben Yedder struck again.

0:31:280:31:36

COMMENTATOR:

It is in!

2-0!

0:31:400:31:41

United now needed three goals,

Romelu Lukaku could only get one.

0:31:410:31:43

This, a match United had been

expected to win comfortably.

0:31:430:31:46

On this performance,

they remain some way

0:31:460:31:48

off Europe's elite.

0:31:480:31:49

A not-so-special night

for the so-called Special One.

0:31:490:31:50