21/03/2017 BBC World News America


21/03/2017

In-depth reports on the major international and US news of the day with Katty Kay.


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Reporting from Washington, I'm Tim Willcox.

:00:00.:00:13.

Shoes off, no liquids, and now, no laptops.

:00:14.:00:15.

Why Britain is joining the United States in banning some

:00:16.:00:17.

electronic gadgets on certain flights.

:00:18.:00:20.

From bombs to the ballot box - Northern Ireland's Martin

:00:21.:00:22.

The Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam welcomes home two stolen paintings

:00:23.:00:34.

Welcome to our viewers on Public Television in America,

:00:35.:00:50.

For millions of airline passengers long haul flights could soon

:00:51.:00:55.

It follows US authorities announcing a ban on laptops, iPads,

:00:56.:01:03.

cameras and other devices bigger than a mobile phone being allowed

:01:04.:01:06.

The order, based on unspecified threats, affects passengers on US

:01:07.:01:11.

bound flights from certain countries in the Middle East and North Africa.

:01:12.:01:14.

And now Britain has tightened its aviation

:01:15.:01:16.

Our security correspondent Frank Gardner has more.

:01:17.:01:28.

Jamelia, tedious, time consuming. Getting laptops and other devices

:01:29.:01:34.

through airport security on flights from the Middle East to the UK is

:01:35.:01:40.

Anything bigger than a smartphone Anything bigger than a smartphone

:01:41.:01:44.

will now have to go in the hold. British Airways, easyJet and four

:01:45.:01:49.

other UK airlines are affected, so too are Middle Eastern and North

:01:50.:01:53.

Africa and carriers. It follows a similar measure by the United

:01:54.:01:59.

States. The Government has said the security of the travelling public is

:02:00.:02:03.

its highest priority. What has prompted this? Last year's laptop

:02:04.:02:08.

bomb aboard this flight out of Somalia raised a lot of concerns.

:02:09.:02:14.

Smuggled aboard by the group, Al Shabab, it made a hole in the plane.

:02:15.:02:22.

The pilot was able to land safely. The year before so-called Islamic

:02:23.:02:26.

State put a bomb onto a passenger jet coming out of Egypt, killing

:02:27.:02:30.

everyone on board. That device was in the mould with a new ban does not

:02:31.:02:35.

apply. In Whitehall, the BBC understands there were concerns

:02:36.:02:39.

about introducing the band. It does not relate to a specific plot. There

:02:40.:02:44.

was bound to be a commercial and diplomatic price for this. It is

:02:45.:02:49.

also yet one more incumbents for air passengers. The scope for disruption

:02:50.:02:55.

is immense. People will get the wrong end of many sticks. They will

:02:56.:02:59.

think it applies to all flights from the UK, as well as these six

:03:00.:03:04.

countries. People will have organised only hand baggage flights.

:03:05.:03:08.

They will suddenly need to check things in. It is going to be, I'm

:03:09.:03:13.

afraid, and a mighty muddle, until we get used to the idea. Business

:03:14.:03:21.

travellers who need to work on the flight will be especially

:03:22.:03:24.

inconvenienced. There is no end to the ban in sight. The ban on liquids

:03:25.:03:27.

over 100 Mills is still in place. For more on this spoke a short time

:03:28.:03:32.

ago with Matthew Levitt, who heads the Counter-terrorism

:03:33.:03:35.

programme at the Washington How effective will this be? What it

:03:36.:03:46.

will effectively do is get these items into the hole. The idea is

:03:47.:03:51.

that there is better and easier screening of devices that can go

:03:52.:03:54.

beneath and it is harder to do those above. They are interested in the

:03:55.:04:00.

size. It is about how much explosive can be fitted in. What do you mean

:04:01.:04:04.

the screening is more effective question what do they go through

:04:05.:04:08.

bigger machines? Will banks have to be unpacked by more airport workers?

:04:09.:04:12.

There is easier and better technology. When there are

:04:13.:04:22.

questions, there will be workers to go through. You have probably

:04:23.:04:24.

travelled and checked bags underneath and there is a tag on

:04:25.:04:27.

their saying, we have had to go through your bag will stop that will

:04:28.:04:30.

happen. It is only from certain countries, probably where the Intel

:04:31.:04:37.

is coming from. It is unclear how long it will last. The trend is for

:04:38.:04:43.

miniaturising agent of devices. We saw in that report the laptop and

:04:44.:04:48.

the group claiming responsibility for that. It really is about the

:04:49.:04:58.

evolving threats of explosives and Al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula

:04:59.:05:04.

has a bomb maker who has been very creative with the types of

:05:05.:05:07.

explosives, what they are made out of a where he puts them. Inside a

:05:08.:05:13.

person boss Max physical being in Saudi Arabia. It is the extent to

:05:14.:05:17.

which they have been able to miniaturise that explosive. Is there

:05:18.:05:22.

anything that can be done to the aircraft itself to sustain or

:05:23.:05:27.

withstand the small explosion? You don't want any explosive to get onto

:05:28.:05:31.

the plane. You do not know where it will be. It is true that our

:05:32.:05:36.

passengers in the immediate area, if there is something small, it will

:05:37.:05:40.

have less of an effect. The do not take that risk. You want to put

:05:41.:05:44.

things down there so it can go through more security checks.

:05:45.:05:48.

Airports around the country, they are really close allies to United

:05:49.:05:55.

States for that Turkey is a member of Nato. Earlier on Turkey said it

:05:56.:05:58.

would appeal for study in the lobby any movement on that front all, is

:05:59.:06:03.

the risk so grave, that the countries will have to follow suit?

:06:04.:06:07.

We do not know the nature of the intelligence was that it is possible

:06:08.:06:10.

there will be other checks will carry on baggage to enable these

:06:11.:06:18.

things to go back at the carry on. There are flights from certain

:06:19.:06:21.

places like United States. It is less likely that this will be

:06:22.:06:25.

something we will have 11 years on, as we do with the liquid gel will

:06:26.:06:31.

have to see how the threat pans out. Thank you very much.

:06:32.:06:35.

On Capitol Hill here in Washington, Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch

:06:36.:06:37.

today faced more hours of questioning from lawmakers.

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The topics ranged from US policy on abortion and torture,

:06:41.:06:42.

to allowing cameras in the courtroom and Gorsuch's own past rulings.

:06:43.:06:49.

But perhaps foremost on lawmakers' minds was the issue

:06:50.:06:50.

of judicial independence, and whether Judge Gorsuch

:06:51.:06:52.

would operate separately from the politics of Washington.

:06:53.:06:54.

Let's go live to Laura Trevelyan on Capitol Hill for us now.

:06:55.:07:04.

Very keen to make people realise he is his own man. Absolutely. In doing

:07:05.:07:12.

so, he is blunting one of the key lines of the attacks from the

:07:13.:07:16.

Democrats. They want to stress how important judicial independence is

:07:17.:07:21.

under this president. Neil Gorsuch said he believed in the separation

:07:22.:07:26.

of powers he said they gave me a gavel and not rubber-stamp. He said

:07:27.:07:30.

no man is above the law, not even the president. On the hot button

:07:31.:07:34.

issues which could camp up in front of the Court, a Republican senator

:07:35.:07:42.

had this to say about what resident tramp said about abortion in 1973.

:07:43.:07:48.

-- president Trump. I would have walked out the door. It

:07:49.:08:04.

is not what judges do. I don't do it at that end of Pennsylvania Avenue

:08:05.:08:07.

and they should not do it at this end.

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This has been billed as a grilling of Neil Gorsuch. The atmosphere has

:08:13.:08:21.

seen quite -- seemed quite warm at stages. There is no disguising the

:08:22.:08:27.

fact that Democrats are sought about the fact that President Obama's

:08:28.:08:30.

nominee never got the chance to have the nomination hearing that Neil

:08:31.:08:35.

Gorsuch is going through. They are divided as to how far they can go in

:08:36.:08:39.

opposing him, given that Neil Gorsuch has shown himself to be

:08:40.:08:43.

erudite, highly qualified, able to cope with the pressure. He seems

:08:44.:08:48.

barely to have put a foot wrong. It is a big dilemma for Democrats. Do

:08:49.:08:54.

they throw the kitchen sink at this? It is difficult for them right now.

:08:55.:08:56.

Thank you very much. The other big story on Capitol Hill

:08:57.:09:06.

is the fight over the new health care bill. It is close. The real

:09:07.:09:16.

winners and losers could be those in states like Pennsylvania. This was

:09:17.:09:26.

such a huge issue for Trump on the campaign trail. He is finding that

:09:27.:09:31.

health care is Commper gated. We all remember that rallying cry on the

:09:32.:09:37.

campaign Trail to repeal and replace Obamacare. He is repealing a banner

:09:38.:09:44.

care. We saw that as an executive order on day one. -- Bama care. He

:09:45.:09:49.

has come up with some will call Trump care. It looks slightly

:09:50.:09:55.

different, very different if you are a Democrat. President Obama help the

:09:56.:10:05.

most vulnerable and the sick. A lot of that will be shrunk and withdrawn

:10:06.:10:10.

foot. Making insurance is compulsory and stop insurers having to find

:10:11.:10:14.

insurance premiums for their workers for the bidders more market-driven

:10:15.:10:19.

and there is less subsidy. The funding is through tax credits for

:10:20.:10:23.

the bus is very much a businessman's. He has come up with

:10:24.:10:28.

something in the past month that everyone has hated. The moderate

:10:29.:10:36.

Republicans have been very spooked by anon parties and budget office

:10:37.:10:43.

saying millions of Americans could be uninsured over the next decade.

:10:44.:10:49.

On the right of the party, the real conservatives, they say they hate

:10:50.:10:55.

it. They think it does not repeal enough and that it will be too

:10:56.:10:59.

expensive for the Government. Just very briefly on the numbers, it will

:11:00.:11:05.

be tight, will it? The numbers on Capitol Hill. We talked to

:11:06.:11:09.

congressmen there this morning, some on the right of the party. They

:11:10.:11:14.

think it will not pass. All he needs to lose our 22 votes. We think the

:11:15.:11:19.

numbers against him are between possibly 25, 30 five. He might try

:11:20.:11:24.

to cancel the vote on Thursday altogether. It does not look good if

:11:25.:11:31.

you are President and cannot get the first piece of legislation through.

:11:32.:11:34.

Rebel and jihadist forces in Syria say their latest

:11:35.:11:37.

assault on the capital, Damascus, is sending a powerful

:11:38.:11:39.

message to the government just days before another round of peace talks.

:11:40.:11:42.

They say it shows they can still mount a major attack

:11:43.:11:45.

on what is regarded as Syria's most heavily protected city.

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The Syrian military response has included moving dozens of tanks

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into the city centre, airstrikes, and artillery fire.

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You're watching BBC World News America.

:11:58.:11:59.

Still to come on tonight's programme:

:12:00.:12:00.

We'll speak with the US negotiator of the Northern Ireland peace

:12:01.:12:04.

South Korean prosecutors have spent 14 hours questioning

:12:05.:12:12.

the former President, Park Guen-haye over her involvement

:12:13.:12:15.

in the growing corruption scandal that led to her impeachment.

:12:16.:12:19.

Ms Park travelled voluntarily from her home to the prosecutor's

:12:20.:12:22.

She's always denied wrongdoing but as she arrived to be

:12:23.:12:27.

interviewed, she apologised to the country.

:12:28.:12:28.

Hidden in the motive Cade, Park Guen-haye. As an ordinary citizen,

:12:29.:12:54.

the prosecutor calls her in and she complies. I am sorry, she said, to

:12:55.:13:04.

the Korean people. But it is not clear what she is sorry for. Two

:13:05.:13:09.

weeks ago, when she was evicted from the presidential palace, she was

:13:10.:13:15.

defiant. Her innocence, she said, would emerge. Others are also facing

:13:16.:13:20.

the heat, like the patriarchs who control the biggest businesses in

:13:21.:13:23.

South Korea, the head of some sun is on trial. The ex-president's best

:13:24.:13:31.

friend has been charged accused of getting money from business. Park

:13:32.:13:36.

Guen-haye is said to have favoured donors in return. Outside, her

:13:37.:13:44.

supporters, angry at what they call political persecution. This

:13:45.:13:49.

symbolises the whole division of the country. There will be an election

:13:50.:13:54.

in two months' time. There may well be a movement to the left of the

:13:55.:13:58.

Government. Even after that, the divisions will remain. Park

:13:59.:14:05.

Guen-haye still has her fans. The prosecutor probably is not one of

:14:06.:14:06.

them. Martin McGuinness, the former IRA

:14:07.:14:16.

leader turned deputy first minister of Northern Ireland has died

:14:17.:14:20.

at the age of 66. He'd been suffering

:14:21.:14:24.

from a rare heart condition. From one of the Provisional IRA's

:14:25.:14:27.

most senior and ruthless commanders, responsible for many deaths and acts

:14:28.:14:30.

of terror he went on to embrace electoral politics and became

:14:31.:14:34.

a principal architect of the peace process that led to the 1998

:14:35.:14:36.

Good Friday Agreement. To paint a true picture of Martin

:14:37.:14:53.

McGuinness, you have to accept contradictions. He was a

:14:54.:14:57.

paramilitary who once embraced violence but also a peacemaker who

:14:58.:15:02.

reached out to rivals. A man who could be seen in very different

:15:03.:15:08.

lights. Born in Londonderry into a large Catholic family, Martin

:15:09.:15:13.

McGuinness came of age as Northern Ireland's divides became prevalent.

:15:14.:15:19.

In that time, he joined the IRA, quickly rising through its ranks.

:15:20.:15:23.

Can you say whether the bombings are likely to stop in the near future in

:15:24.:15:32.

response to demands? I would take into consideration the feelings of

:15:33.:15:37.

the people. He became one of the faces of ruthless Irish

:15:38.:15:40.

republicanism and was jailed for terrorist offences in Dublin. He

:15:41.:15:44.

changed considerably from the own man he is to swagger around the no

:15:45.:15:49.

go areas in Londonderry as commander of the provisional IRA. What started

:15:50.:15:54.

as a fight for civil rights has become a vicious battle. Alongside

:15:55.:15:59.

the many bombings and shootings, Martin McGuinness sought

:16:00.:16:05.

opportunities for Sinn Fein, the political party linked to the irony.

:16:06.:16:11.

Even then, the language remain. We don't believe winning elections and

:16:12.:16:14.

any amount of votes will bring freedom. In the end of the day it

:16:15.:16:18.

will be the cutting edge of the IRA who will bring freedom. After years

:16:19.:16:24.

of chaos, in the 1990s, the ceasefires offered the opportunity

:16:25.:16:29.

for talks between unionists and Republicans. Would you like to shake

:16:30.:16:35.

hands? There are no guns here. Not only would they shake hands, after

:16:36.:16:41.

the signing of the Good Friday Agreement, they joined each other.

:16:42.:16:46.

Eventually at its head was the murky partnership of two former enemies.

:16:47.:16:52.

Ian Paisley and Martin McGuinness. The firebrand and Unionist radical

:16:53.:16:56.

Republican became so close they were nicknamed the Chuckle Brothers.

:16:57.:17:03.

There were Republicans who continue to threaten that political progress.

:17:04.:17:09.

When a police officer was killed, the then Deputy First Minister stood

:17:10.:17:12.

side by side with the chief Custer Paul to condemn the dissident

:17:13.:17:20.

groups. -- Chief Constable. They are traitors to Ireland. Alongside the

:17:21.:17:25.

words there were reactions from all sides. The Queen was a cousin Lord

:17:26.:17:31.

Mountbatten was killed by the IRA. After the troubles, they put their

:17:32.:17:38.

differences aside. Relationships at Stormont always seemed strange. As

:17:39.:17:42.

Ian Paisley stepped down as First Minister to be replaced by Peter

:17:43.:17:49.

Robinson and then Arlene Foster. His ill-health became obvious. Martin

:17:50.:17:56.

McGuinness walked out of government. The boy's from the Bogside retiring

:17:57.:18:00.

as First Minister after years in the irony. It breaks my heart. My heart

:18:01.:18:14.

lies in the Bogside and with the people of Derry. The past actions of

:18:15.:18:24.

the IRA will colour many people's you of Martin McGuinness. As a

:18:25.:18:28.

Republican who work towards reconciliation, he will be

:18:29.:18:31.

remembered as a key figure in a changing Northern Ireland.

:18:32.:18:38.

The Queen has sent a message of condolence to the widow of Martin

:18:39.:18:42.

McGuinness. Another prominent figure in those

:18:43.:18:44.

peace talks was George Mitchell, the US envoy to Northern Ireland

:18:45.:18:46.

during that pivotal time. He knew Martin McGuiness well,

:18:47.:18:49.

and earlier my colleague Katty Kay spoke to him as part of the BBC"s

:18:50.:18:51.

100 Days programme. Senator Mitchell, when you went to

:18:52.:19:00.

Northern Ireland in the mid-90s and you started to deal with Martin

:19:01.:19:05.

McGuinness, what made you think that you could trust him, given his past

:19:06.:19:12.

record? He was obviously a political leader, chosen by the people of

:19:13.:19:18.

Northern Ireland. When the peace talks began, all of the delegates

:19:19.:19:22.

were elected. They represented the people of Northern Ireland. So it

:19:23.:19:26.

another, it was wanting to accept another, it was wanting to accept

:19:27.:19:31.

the will of the people of Northern Ireland. Martin McGuinness was

:19:32.:19:38.

intelligent, articulate, a strong and effective leader of the

:19:39.:19:44.

community and his point of view. In that way, along with leaders on both

:19:45.:19:51.

sides, they helped to reach the decision to end the violence and

:19:52.:19:57.

move towards democratic and peaceful ways of resolving disputes. Of

:19:58.:20:00.

course he is a controversial figure. Many would say he had blood on his

:20:01.:20:05.

hands. Whilst you were in the process of negotiating with him

:20:06.:20:08.

during the years leading up to the Good Friday Agreement did you ever

:20:09.:20:14.

discuss his past actions with him? I never discussed past actions with

:20:15.:20:18.

Martin or any other participant in the Northern Ireland peace process.

:20:19.:20:21.

Many of them were in a similar circumstance. The problem was, they

:20:22.:20:29.

were embedded in the past. I was trying to get them to look to the

:20:30.:20:34.

future. The last thing I wanted to do was to get them focus on and

:20:35.:20:38.

talking about the past when I was trying to get them to talk about the

:20:39.:20:45.

future. But this transformation from leader of the IRA, as somebody who

:20:46.:20:48.

have been convicted in the 70s for crimes related to the IRA and

:20:49.:20:52.

actions related to the IRA committed being seen today is one of the key

:20:53.:20:56.

peacemakers, I think that is what people struggle with in Martin

:20:57.:21:00.

McGuinness personally? Were you convinced that was a genuine

:21:01.:21:06.

transition and had really been made? You'll occur I did not make

:21:07.:21:11.

judgments of that kind. What I did was tackle each problem on a daily

:21:12.:21:18.

basis. Participate and try to get them to look forward and understand

:21:19.:21:23.

that whatever the circumstances of the Democratic peaceful future work,

:21:24.:21:27.

they would be better than returning to the conflict that had dominated

:21:28.:21:33.

society. Martin McGuinness accepted that challenge was instrumental in

:21:34.:21:38.

bringing his community and his side along in the peace process. That is

:21:39.:21:43.

why I think he will be remembered. I think that the ultimate, iconic

:21:44.:21:48.

picture of the Northern Ireland peace process will be Ian Paisley as

:21:49.:21:53.

the First Minister of Northern Ireland, Martin McGuinness as Deputy

:21:54.:21:57.

First Minister, embracing each other, serving the people of

:21:58.:22:01.

Northern Ireland through a democratic process and appearing to

:22:02.:22:03.

enjoy each other at the same time. Art lovers in Amsterdam

:22:04.:22:09.

are celebrating the return, and re-hanging of two paintings

:22:10.:22:11.

by Vincent van Gogh. The images, a seascape,

:22:12.:22:17.

and a depiction of a church attended by the artist's father,

:22:18.:22:22.

were stolen in 2002 on the orders They were found last year

:22:23.:22:25.

during a police raid in Naples. The BBC's Anna Holligan has

:22:26.:22:28.

more from Amsterdam. After 14 years and a traumatic

:22:29.:22:32.

journey, the paintings Now protected by thick screens,

:22:33.:22:36.

they're not taking any chances. Two early works by one

:22:37.:22:44.

of the Netherlands' We have no idea what happened

:22:45.:22:46.

to them in the intervening years. In this beach view, a small

:22:47.:22:53.

piece in the lower left But it does not really disturb

:22:54.:22:56.

the image as such too much, and the small church

:22:57.:23:01.

is practically unharmed. It took opportunist thieves less

:23:02.:23:06.

than four minutes to break in through the roof using

:23:07.:23:09.

a rope and sledgehammer, rip the paintings from the nearest

:23:10.:23:11.

wall with brutal force, and escape before the police

:23:12.:23:15.

arrived, leaving a hole Italian police arrested

:23:16.:23:19.

two men in 2016. They'd been investigating

:23:20.:23:26.

allegations of drug trafficking, but apparently one detainee

:23:27.:23:28.

confessed that the network The Italian authorities

:23:29.:23:30.

were proud of their work. These two works are of vast historic

:23:31.:23:43.

and sentimental value. The Sea View at Scheveningen is one

:23:44.:23:46.

of only two seascapes painted by Van Gogh during his time

:23:47.:23:49.

in the Netherlands. The wind was so blustery that day it

:23:50.:23:53.

blew tiny grains of sand The Congregation Leaving

:23:54.:23:56.

the Reformed Church in Nuenen was a gift for Van Gogh's mother

:23:57.:24:00.

after she'd broken her leg. He changed it after his father

:24:01.:24:05.

died to include images The museum is deliberately

:24:06.:24:07.

displaying the paintings as they were found, with slight

:24:08.:24:14.

damage representing Now, anticipating the moment they're

:24:15.:24:16.

back in the admiring public eye. inside the Van Gogh

:24:17.:24:22.

museum in Amsterdam. That is it. You can find plenty more

:24:23.:24:41.

on the website. And to reach me and most of the BBC

:24:42.:24:50.

team simply go to Twitter - For all of us here at

:24:51.:24:54.

World News America, thank you for watching and please

:24:55.:24:57.

tune in tomorrow. More spring sunshine on the way by

:24:58.:25:09.

the weekend and into next week as well. On Tuesday we seem to jump

:25:10.:25:13.

back into winter.

:25:14.:25:15.

In-depth reports on the major international and US news of the day with Katty Kay.


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