Live Theresa May - Brexit Speech Briefings


Live Theresa May - Brexit Speech

Live coverage of prime minister Theresa May delivering a keynote speech on Brexit negotiations.


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APPLAUSE

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Good afternoon and I am grateful to

the Lord Mayor and all his team at

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Mansion House for hosting us this

afternoon. And in the midst of the

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bad weather, I would like to take a

moment before I begin my speech to

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thank everyone in our country who is

going the extra mile to help people

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at this time. I think of our

emergency services and Armed Forces

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working to keep people safe and all

those keeping our public services

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going and the many volunteers who

are giving their time to help those

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in need. Your contribution is a

special part of who we are as a

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country and it is all the more

appreciated at a moment like this. I

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am here today to set out my vision

for the future economic partnership

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between the United Kingdom and the

European Union. There have been many

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different voices and views in the

debate on what our new relationship

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with the EU should look like and I

have listened carefully to them all.

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But as we charter way forward with

the EU, I want to take a moment to

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look back. 18 months ago, I stood in

Downing Street and addressed the

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nation for my first time as Prime

Minister. I made this pledge then to

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the people that I serve. I know you

are working round the clock, I know

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you are doing your best and I know

sometimes late can be a struggle.

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The government I read will be

driven, not by the interest of the

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privileged few, but by yours. We

will do everything we can to give

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you more control over your lives

when we take the big calls we will

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take not more -- of the powerful bot

of you. When we look at new laws, we

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will not listen to the mighty but of

you. When we look at taxes, we will

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look at the wealthy not you. When it

comes to opportunity, we will not

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entrench the advantages of the

fortunate few, we will do whatever

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we can to help those whatever your

background. We are living through an

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important moment in our country's

history. As we leave the European

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Union, we will forge a bold new

positive role for ourselves in the

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world and we will make Britain a

country that works not for a

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privileged few, but everyone of us.

That pledge, to the people of United

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Kingdom, is what guides meet in our

negotiations with the EU. And for me

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that means five things - first, the

agreement we reached with the EU

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must respect the referendum. It was

a vote to take control of our

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borders, laws and money. And a vote

for a wider change. So that no

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community in Britain would ever be

left behind again. But it was not a

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vote for a distant relationship with

our neighbours. Second, the new

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agreement we reach with the EU must

endure. After Brexit, both the UK

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and the EU want to forge ahead with

building a better future for our

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people. Not find ourselves back at

the negotiating table because things

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are broken down. Third, it must

protect people's jobs and security.

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People in the UK voted for our

country to have a new and different

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relationship with Europe, but while

the means may change, our shared

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goals surely have not. To work

together, to grow our economies and

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keep our people say. Fourth, it must

be consistent with the kind of

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country we want to be as we leave. A

modern, open outward looking,

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tolerant European democracy. A

nation of pioneers, innovators,

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explorers and creators. A country

that celebrates our history and

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diversity, confident of place in the

world. That meets its obligations to

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our new neighbours and far friends

and is proud to stand up for values.

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And fifth, in doing all of these

things, it must strengthen our union

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of nations and their union of

people. We must bring our country

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back together, taking into account

the views of everyone who cares

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about this issue from both sides of

the debate. As Prime Minister, it is

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my duty to represent all of our

United Kingdom, England, Scotland

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Wales and Northern Ireland, northern

side, from coastal towns and rural

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villages to our great cities. So

these are the five tests for the

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deal we will negotiate.

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Reaching an enduring solution,

protecting our security and

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respiratory, delivering an outcome

that is consistent with the kind of

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country we want to be and bringing

our country together, strengthening

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the union of all our people. We are

now approaching a crucial moment.

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There is no escaping the complexity

of the task ahead of us. We must not

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only negotiate our exit from an

organisation that touches so many

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important parts of our national

life, we were just build a new and

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lasting relationship, whilst

preparing for every scenario. We are

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making real progress. At the end of

last year, we agreed the key

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elements of our withdrawal. We are

in the process of turning that

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agreement into legal text. We have

made clear our concerns about the

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first draft published on Monday. No

one should be in any doubt about our

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commitment to the joint report in

December. We are close to an

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agreement on an implementation

period, a key element of December's

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deal. Of course, some points of

difference remained but I am

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confident these can be resolved in

the days ahead. Both the UK and the

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European Union are clear, this

implementation period must be time

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limited and cannot become a

permanent solution. It is vital to

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give Government, businesses and

citizens the time we need to prepare

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for the new relationship. With this

agreed, I want both sides to turn

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all our attention and effort to the

new relationship. Before we can do

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that, we need to set out in more

detail what relationship we want,

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building on my Lancaster house and

Florence speeches. Last month, this

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book in Munich about the partnership

we seek and I want to talk about the

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other pillar of the relationship,

how we built the economic

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partnership. In my speech in

Florence I set out how the models

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for economic partnership do not

deliver the ambition we need or

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impose restraints on our democracy.

For example, the Norway model where

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we would stay in the single market

would mean having to implement new

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legislation automatically and in its

entirety and would also mean

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continued free movement. Others have

suggested we negotiate a free-trade

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agreement similar to that of which

Canada has negotiated or trade on

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world organisation terms. This would

mean a reduction in and access to

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each other's markets. This would

mean customs and checks at the

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border that would affect the supply

chains and be inconsistent with the

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commitments that we and the EU have

made in respect of Northern Ireland.

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This is a wider issue in our

negotiations and I want to dwell on

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this for one minute. Success at --

British governments have worked with

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parties in the Northern Ireland and

Irish Government to bring about the

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achievement of peace. This is an

achievement that we should be proud

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of and protect. That is why I have

consistently put up holding the

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Belfast agreement at the heart of

the UK's approach. Our departure

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from the EU causes challenges for

Northern Ireland and for Ireland. We

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joined the EU together 45 years ago

and it is not surprising that our

0:20:510:20:56

decision to leave has caused anxiety

and a desire for concrete solutions.

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We have been clear all along that we

do not want to go back to a hard

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order in Ireland, we have ruled out

physical infrastructure at the

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border or any related checks and

controls. It is not good enough to

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say, we will not introduce a hard

order, if the EU forces Ireland to

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do it, it is down to them. We chose

to leave you have a responsibility

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to help find a solution. We cannot

do it on our own. It is for all of

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us to work together. The Irish Prime

Minister I agreed that our teams and

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the commission should do just that.

I want to make one final point. Just

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as it would be unacceptable to go

back to a hard order between

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Northern Ireland and Ireland, it

would also be unacceptable to break

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up the United Kingdom's own market.

My personal commitment to this is

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clear. As Prime Minister of the cold

United Kingdom, I am not going to

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let our departure from the European

Union do anything to set back the

0:22:040:22:08

historic progress that we have made

in Northern Ireland, nor will I

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allow anything that would damage the

integrity of our precious union. So

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existing models to not provide the

best way forward for either the UK

0:22:190:22:24

or the EU. But before I turned to

what a better model might look like,

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I want to be straight with people.

The reality is that we all need to

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face up to some hard facts. We are

leaving the single market. Life is

0:22:350:22:40

going to be different. In certain

ways our access to each other's

0:22:400:22:44

markets will be less than now. How

could the EU structure of rights and

0:22:440:22:49

obligations be sustained if the UK,

or any country, were allowed to

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enjoy all the benefits without all

of the obligations? We need to

0:22:540:22:58

strike a new balance, but we will

not accept the rights of Canada and

0:22:580:23:02

the obligations of Norway. The

second hard fact is that even after

0:23:020:23:09

we have left the jurisdiction of the

European Court of Justice, EU law

0:23:090:23:14

and the decisions will continue to

affect us. For a start, agreements

0:23:140:23:18

are determined whether EU laws are

legal under the EU law, as the US

0:23:180:23:28

found in the data framework was

found to be invalid. When we leave

0:23:280:23:32

the EU, the withdrawal bill will

bring EU law into UK law. Cases will

0:23:320:23:37

be determined in our courts, but

where appropriate, our courts will

0:23:370:23:42

continue to listen to the judgments,

as they do for the other country's

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courts. If, as part of our future

partnership, Parliament passes and

0:23:480:23:53

identical law to the EU law, it may

make sense for our courts to look at

0:23:530:23:58

the appropriate each see J

judgments. As I said before, if we

0:23:580:24:07

continue to participate in an

agency, we would have two respect

0:24:070:24:11

the remit in that regard. In the

future, the treaties and lot will no

0:24:110:24:19

longer apply in the United Kingdom.

The agreement we reach must

0:24:190:24:23

therefore respect the sovereignty of

both the UK and the EU legal orders.

0:24:230:24:29

That means the jurisdiction of the

European Court of Justice must end.

0:24:290:24:35

It also means the ultimate arbiter

of disputes about our future

0:24:350:24:40

partnership cannot be the court of

either party. The next hard fact is

0:24:400:24:45

this, if we want good access to

markets, it has to be on fair terms.

0:24:450:24:51

As with any trade agreement, we must

accept the need for binding

0:24:510:24:54

commitments, we may choose to have

regulations such as state aid and

0:24:540:25:01

competition to remain in step with

the EU. The UK drove much of the

0:25:010:25:05

policy in this area and we have much

to gain from maintaining discipline

0:25:050:25:10

is on the use of subsidies and

anti-competitive practices.

0:25:100:25:14

Furthermore, as I said and Florence,

we share the same set of beliefs,

0:25:140:25:20

free trade, rigorous and fair

competition, strong consumer rights

0:25:200:25:23

and that trying to beat other

industries by unfairly subsidising

0:25:230:25:29

1's own is the serious and state. In

other areas, worker rights and the

0:25:290:25:36

environment, the EU should be

confident that we will not engage in

0:25:360:25:39

a race to the bottom in the

standards we set. There is no

0:25:390:25:44

serious constituency in the UK that

would support this, quite the

0:25:440:25:46

opposite. Finally, we need to

resolve the tensions between some of

0:25:460:25:52

the key objectives. We want the

freedom to negotiate trade

0:25:520:25:55

agreements with other countries

around the world, we want to take

0:25:550:25:58

back control of our laws, we also

want as frictionless a border as

0:25:580:26:04

possible between us and the EU, so

that we do not damage the integrated

0:26:040:26:08

supply chains are industries rely on

and no hard border between Northern

0:26:080:26:14

Ireland and Ireland. There are

tensions in the EU's position, too.

0:26:140:26:18

Some hard facts for them to face as

well. The commission has suggested

0:26:180:26:23

that the only option available to

the UK is an off the shelf model.

0:26:230:26:28

But at the same time, they have also

said that in certain areas none of

0:26:280:26:35

the EU third country agreements

would be appropriate. The European

0:26:350:26:39

Council guidelines aspire to a

balanced, ambitious and wide ranging

0:26:390:26:43

deal with common rules any number of

areas to insure fair and open

0:26:430:26:48

competition. This would not be

delivered by a Canada style deal,

0:26:480:26:51

which would not give them the

breadth or depth of market access

0:26:510:26:55

that they want, and it is hard to

see how it would be in the EU's

0:26:550:27:01

interest for the UK regulatory

standards to be the same as Canada.

0:27:010:27:04

Finally, we both need to face the

fact that this is in negotiation and

0:27:040:27:09

neither of us can have exactly what

we want. But I am confident that we

0:27:090:27:14

can reach agreement. We both want

good access to each other's markets,

0:27:140:27:21

but competition to be fair and open

and transparent means of verifying

0:27:210:27:26

we are meeting our commitment and

resolving disputes. What is clear is

0:27:260:27:31

that for us both to meet our

objectives, we need to look beyond

0:27:310:27:36

the President and find a new

balance. As an security, what I am

0:27:360:27:41

seeking is a relationship that goes

beyond the transactional to one

0:27:410:27:47

where we support each other's

interest. I want the broadest and

0:27:470:27:53

deepest partnership, covering more

sectors and cooperating more freely

0:27:530:27:56

than any free trade agreement

anywhere in the world today. As I

0:27:560:28:01

will go on to describe, we will need

agreements in a range of areas

0:28:010:28:05

covering the breadth of our

relationship. I believe this is

0:28:050:28:09

achievable because it is in their

interest as well as ours. The EU is

0:28:090:28:14

the UK's biggest market and the UK

is also a big market for the EU.

0:28:140:28:19

Furthermore, we have a unique

starting point. We are on day one we

0:28:190:28:24

have the same laws and rules. -- on

day one. Rather than being laws

0:28:240:28:30

closer together, the task would be

to manage the religion ship when we

0:28:300:28:34

are to separate the good systems. To

do so and to realise this level of

0:28:340:28:38

ambition, there are five ambitions

that must underpin the trading

0:28:380:28:43

relationship. First, our agreement

must have binding commitments to

0:28:430:28:49

ensure fair competition. Such

agreements are pass and parcel of

0:28:490:28:52

any trade agreement. Why would any

country enter into a partnership

0:28:520:28:58

that any means of redress if the

other party engaged in such

0:28:580:29:05

practices. The level of integration

and our geographical proximity means

0:29:050:29:10

these reciprocal commitments will be

important in ensuring the UK

0:29:100:29:16

business can compete fairly in EU

markets and vice versa. A deep and

0:29:160:29:21

comprehensive agreement with the EU

will need to include commitments

0:29:210:29:25

reflecting the extent the UK and EU

economies are intertwined. Second,

0:29:250:29:31

we will need an arbitration

mechanism that is completely

0:29:310:29:37

independent, something which is

common to free trade agreements.

0:29:370:29:40

This will ensure any disagreements

about the purpose or scope of the

0:29:400:29:44

agreement can be resolved fairly and

promptly. Third, given the close

0:29:440:29:49

relationship we envisage, we will

need to have an ongoing dialogue

0:29:490:29:52

with the EU and to ensure we have

the means to consult each other

0:29:520:29:56

regularly. In particular, we want to

make sure our regulators work

0:29:560:30:01

together, as they do with regulators

internationally. This will be

0:30:010:30:05

essential for everything from

getting new drugs to patients

0:30:050:30:08

quickly, Jim and taming financial

stability. We start from the place

0:30:080:30:14

where we have deep and long-standing

relationships so the task is and

0:30:140:30:18

taming that trust, not building it

in the first place. Fourth, we will

0:30:180:30:23

need an arrangement for data

protection. I made this point in

0:30:230:30:28

Munich but the free flow of data is

critical for both sides in any

0:30:280:30:33

modern trading relationship, too.

The UK has exceptionally high

0:30:330:30:37

standards of data protection and we

want to secure an agreement with the

0:30:370:30:41

EU that provides the stability and

confidence for EU and UK businesses

0:30:410:30:47

and individuals to achieve our aims

and then taming and developing the

0:30:470:30:51

strong economic links with the EU.

That is why we will be seeking more

0:30:510:30:55

than just an adequacy arrangement

and when to seek an appropriate

0:30:550:31:00

ongoing role for the commission

office. This will ensure UK

0:31:000:31:05

businesses are effectively

represented under the new one-stop

0:31:050:31:09

shop mechanism for resolving data

protection disputes.

0:31:090:31:14

Fifth, we must maintain the links

between our people. EU citizens are

0:31:140:31:19

an integral part of the economic,

cultural and social fabric of our

0:31:190:31:23

country. I know UK nationals are

viewed in the same way by

0:31:230:31:27

communities across the EU, and this

is why, at every stage of these

0:31:270:31:31

negotiations, I have put the

interests of EU citizens and UK

0:31:310:31:35

nationals at the heart of our

approach. We are clear that as we

0:31:350:31:40

leave the EU, free movement of

people will come to an end, and we

0:31:400:31:44

will control the number of people

who come to live in our country. But

0:31:440:31:49

UK citizens will still want to work

and study in EU countries, just as

0:31:490:31:53

EU citizens will want to do the same

here, helping to shape and drive

0:31:530:31:58

growth, innovation and enterprise.

Indeed, businesses across the EU and

0:31:580:32:02

the UK must be able to attract and

employ the people they need, and we

0:32:020:32:08

are open to discussing how to

facilitate these valuable links.

0:32:080:32:11

Reciprocal commitments to ensure

fair and open competition and

0:32:110:32:17

independent arbitration mechanism,

ongoing dialogue, data protection

0:32:170:32:20

arrangements and maintaining the

links between our people. These are

0:32:200:32:23

the foundations that underpinned the

ambition of this unique and

0:32:230:32:28

unprecedented partnership. It will

then need to be tailored to the

0:32:280:32:30

needs of our economies. This follows

the approach the EU has taken with

0:32:300:32:35

its trade agreements in the past,

and indeed with its own single

0:32:350:32:41

market as it has developed. The EU's

agreement with Ukraine CZ align with

0:32:410:32:50

the UK in some but not others,,

whereas the agreement with Canada is

0:32:500:32:57

not extend to camels. Equally, the

Canadian agreement contains

0:32:570:33:00

provisions to recognise each other's

testing machinery, but with South

0:33:000:33:08

Korea does not. The EU was taking a

tailored approach in what it is

0:33:080:33:12

seeking within the UK. For example,

on fisheries, the commission has

0:33:120:33:16

been clear that no precedents exist

for the sort of access it wants from

0:33:160:33:22

the UK. The fact is that every

free-trade agreement as varying

0:33:220:33:27

market access depending on the

respective interests of the

0:33:270:33:31

countries involved. If this is

cherry picking, then every trade

0:33:310:33:35

arrangement is cherry picking.

Moreover, with all its neighbours,

0:33:350:33:40

the EU has burying levels of access

to the single market, depending on

0:33:400:33:46

the obligations those neighbours are

willing to undertake. What would be

0:33:460:33:49

cherry picking would be if we were

to seek a deal where our rights and

0:33:490:33:54

obligations were not held in

balance. I have been categorically

0:33:540:33:58

clear that that is not what we are

going to do. I think it is pragmatic

0:33:580:34:03

common sense that we should work

together to deliver the best outcome

0:34:030:34:06

for both sides. So let me start with

how we will do this for goods. This

0:34:060:34:12

is the area where the single market

is most established and both the UK

0:34:120:34:16

and EU have a strong commercial

interest in preserving integrated

0:34:160:34:20

supply chains that have built up

over 40 years of membership. When it

0:34:200:34:26

comes to goods, a fundamental

principle in our negotiating

0:34:260:34:30

strategy should be that trade at the

UK-EU border should be as

0:34:300:34:34

frictionless as possible. That means

we don't want to see the

0:34:340:34:37

introduction of any tariffs or

quotas, and as the Secretary of

0:34:370:34:42

State for Exiting the European Union

set out in Vienna last week, we must

0:34:420:34:45

ensure that, as now, product only

needs to undergo one series of

0:34:450:34:49

approvals in one country to show

that they meet the required

0:34:490:34:53

regulatory standards. To achieve

this, we will need a comprehensive

0:34:530:34:56

system of mutual recognition. The UK

will need to make a strong

0:34:560:35:00

commitment that it regulatory

standards will remain as high as the

0:35:000:35:05

EU's. That commitment, in practice,

will mean that the readily to be

0:35:050:35:10

standards will remain substantially

similar in the future. Many of these

0:35:100:35:15

regulatory standards are themselves

underpinned by international

0:35:150:35:19

standards, set by non-EU bodies, of

which we will remain a member, such

0:35:190:35:23

as the UN economic commission for

Europe, which sets vehicle safety

0:35:230:35:28

standards. Countries around the

world, including Turkey, South

0:35:280:35:32

Africa, South Korea, Japan and

Russia, are party to the agreement.

0:35:320:35:36

As I said in my speech in Florence,

this could be cheered in different

0:35:360:35:41

ways. Our default is that UK law may

not necessarily be identical to EU

0:35:410:35:47

law, but it should achieve the same

outcome. In some cases, parliament

0:35:470:35:52

might choose to pass an identical

law. Businesses which export to the

0:35:520:35:57

EU tell us that it is strongly in

their interest to have a single set

0:35:570:36:00

of regulatory standards to allow

them to sell into both markets. If

0:36:000:36:05

the parliament of the day decided

not to achieve the same outcomes as

0:36:050:36:09

EU law, it would be in the knowledge

that there may be consequences for

0:36:090:36:14

market access. And there would need

to be an independent mechanism to

0:36:140:36:16

oversee these arrangements. We will

also want to explore with the EU the

0:36:160:36:22

terms on which the UK could remain

part of EU agencies such as those

0:36:220:36:26

which are critical for the

0:36:260:36:30

chemicals, medicines and aerospace

industries. The European medicines

0:36:300:36:32

agency, the European chemicals

agency, and the European Aviation

0:36:320:36:36

Safety Agency. We would, of course,

accept this would mean abiding by

0:36:360:36:40

the rules of those agencies and

making an appropriate financial

0:36:400:36:44

contribution. But I want to explain

what I believe the benefits of this

0:36:440:36:47

approach could be, both for us and

the EU. First, associate membership

0:36:470:36:55

is the only way to meet our

objective of ensuring that these

0:36:550:36:58

product only needs to undergo one

series of approvals in one country.

0:36:580:37:00

Second, these agencies have a

critical role in setting and

0:37:000:37:04

enforcing relevant rules. And if we

were able to negotiate associate

0:37:040:37:08

membership, we would be able to

ensure that we could continue to

0:37:080:37:10

provide our technical expertise.

Third, associate mannish the ship

0:37:100:37:16

could permit UK firms to resolve

certain challenges related to the

0:37:160:37:21

agency through UK courts, rather

than the ECJ. -- associate

0:37:210:37:25

membership. In the case of

Switzerland, associate membership of

0:37:250:37:30

the European Aviation Safety Agency

means that air worthiness

0:37:300:37:32

certifications are granted by its

own aviation authority, and disputes

0:37:320:37:36

are resolved through its courts,

without its membership Swiss

0:37:360:37:40

airlines would need to gain

certification through another member

0:37:400:37:44

state or through the agency, and any

dispute would need to be resolved

0:37:440:37:49

through the ECJ. Fourth, it would

bring other benefit too. For

0:37:490:37:53

example, membership of the medicines

agency would mean investment in new

0:37:530:37:57

innovative medicines continuing in

the UK, and it would mean these

0:37:570:38:01

medicines getting to patients faster

as firms prioritise larger markets

0:38:010:38:05

when they start the lengthy process

of seeking authorisations. But it

0:38:050:38:09

would also be good for the EU,

because the UK regulator assesses

0:38:090:38:14

more new medicines than any other

member state. And the EU would

0:38:140:38:20

continue to access the expertise of

the UK's world leading universities.

0:38:200:38:26

And, of course, parliament would

remain ultimately sovereign. It

0:38:260:38:31

could decide not to accept these

rules, but with consequences for our

0:38:310:38:34

membership of the relevant agency,

and linked market access rights.

0:38:340:38:38

Lastly, to achieve as frictionless a

border as possible, and to achieve,

0:38:380:38:46

avoid a hard border, sorry, let me

but what I mean that, to avoid a

0:38:460:38:51

hard border between Northern Ireland

and Ireland, we also need an

0:38:510:38:55

agreement on customs. The UK has

been clear it is leaving the customs

0:38:550:38:58

union. The EU has also formed a

customs union with other countries,

0:38:580:39:05

but those arrangements, if applied

to the UK, would mean the EU setting

0:39:050:39:10

the UK's external tariffs, being

able to let other countries sell

0:39:100:39:14

more into the UK, without making it

any easier for us to sell more to

0:39:140:39:18

them, all the UK signing up to the

common commercial policy. That would

0:39:180:39:22

not be compatible with a meaningful

independent trade policy. It would

0:39:220:39:26

mean we have less control than we do

now of our trade in the world.

0:39:260:39:33

Neither Leave nor Remain voters

would want that. So we have thought

0:39:330:39:36

seriously about how our commitment

to a frictionless border can best be

0:39:360:39:40

delivered, and last year we set out

two potential options for our

0:39:400:39:45

customs arrangements. Option one is

a customs partnership between the UK

0:39:450:39:49

and the EU. At the border, the UK

would mirror the EU requirements for

0:39:490:39:54

imports from the rest of the world,

applying the same tariffs in the

0:39:540:39:57

same rules of origin as the EU for

those goods arriving in the UK and

0:39:570:40:02

intended for the EU. By following

this approach, all goods entering

0:40:020:40:06

the EU by the UK would pay the right

EU duties, removing the need for

0:40:060:40:12

customs processes at the UK-EU

border. But, importantly, we would

0:40:120:40:17

put in place a mechanism so that the

UK would also be able to apply its

0:40:170:40:22

own tariffs and trade policy for

goods intended for the UK market. As

0:40:220:40:26

we have set out previously, this

would require the means to ensure

0:40:260:40:30

that both sides can trust the system

and robust enforcement mechanisms.

0:40:300:40:35

Option two would be a highly

streamlined customs arrangements,

0:40:350:40:39

where we would jointly agreed to

implement a range of measures to

0:40:390:40:42

minimise friction is to trade,

together with some specific

0:40:420:40:46

provisions for Northern Ireland.

First, measures to ensure the

0:40:460:40:49

requirements for moving goods across

borders are as simple as possible.

0:40:490:40:52

This means we should continue to

waive the requirement for entry and

0:40:520:40:56

exit declarations for goods moving

between the UK and the EU, and we

0:40:560:41:08

should allow goods moving between

the UK and the rest of the world to

0:41:080:41:11

travel through the EU without paying

EU duty is, and vice versa. Second,

0:41:110:41:14

measures to reduce delays at ports

and airports, for instance

0:41:140:41:16

recognising trusted traders schemes

and drawing on the most advanced IT

0:41:160:41:18

solution so that vehicles do not

need to stop at the border. Third,

0:41:180:41:23

we should continue our coverage and

to mitigate customs duty and

0:41:230:41:26

security risks. -- our corporation.

And fourth, measures to reduce the

0:41:260:41:32

cost and burden of complying with

customs requirements, including by

0:41:320:41:37

maximising the use of automation.

And recognising the unique

0:41:370:41:40

circumstances in Northern Ireland

and our shared commitments to

0:41:400:41:43

avoiding a hard border, we should

consider further specific measures.

0:41:430:41:48

80% of north-south trade is carried

out by micro, small and medium-sized

0:41:480:41:54

businesses, so for smaller traders,

who as members of the community are

0:41:540:41:59

most affected, but whose economic

role is not systemically significant

0:41:590:42:02

for the EU market, we would allow

them to continue to operate as they

0:42:020:42:07

do currently, with no new

restrictions. And for larger

0:42:070:42:11

traders, we would introduce

streamlined processes, including a

0:42:110:42:14

trusted traders scheme that would be

consistent with our commitments.

0:42:140:42:18

Both of these options for our future

customs arrangement would leave the

0:42:180:42:23

UK free to determine its own tariffs

with third countries, which would

0:42:230:42:27

simply not be possible in a customs

union. Now, I recognise that some of

0:42:270:42:33

these ideas depend on technology,

robust systems to ensure trust and

0:42:330:42:38

confidence, as well as goodwill. But

they are serious and merit

0:42:380:42:41

consideration by all sides. So to

conclude on goods, a fundamental

0:42:410:42:46

principle in our negotiating

strategy is that trade at the UK-EU

0:42:460:42:50

border should be as frictionless as

possible with no hard border between

0:42:500:42:56

Northern Ireland and Ireland. We

believe this can be achieved via a

0:42:560:42:59

commitment to ensure that the

relevant UK regulatory standards

0:42:590:43:03

remain at least as high as the EU's

and a customs arrangement. We

0:43:030:43:09

recognise this would constrain our

ability to lower regulatory

0:43:090:43:12

standards for industrial goods, but

in practice we are unlikely to want

0:43:120:43:16

to reduce our standards, not least

because the British public would

0:43:160:43:20

rightly punish any government that

did so at the ballot box. This

0:43:200:43:24

approach to trade in goods is

important for agriculture, food and

0:43:240:43:28

drinks, but other considerations

also apply there. We are leaving the

0:43:280:43:33

Common Agricultural Policy and will

want to take the opportunity that

0:43:330:43:36

brings to reform our agriculture and

fisheries management. The UK has

0:43:360:43:41

among the highest environmental and

animal welfare standards of any

0:43:410:43:44

nation on earth. As we leave the EU,

we will uphold environmental

0:43:440:43:50

standards and go further to protect

our shared natural heritage. And I

0:43:500:43:55

fully expect that our standards will

remain at least as high as the EU's,

0:43:550:44:00

but it will be particularly

important to secure flexibility

0:44:000:44:04

there, to ensure we can make the

most of the opportunities presented

0:44:040:44:07

by our withdrawal from the EU for

our farmers and exporters. We are

0:44:070:44:13

also leaving the Common Fisheries

Policy. The UK will regain control

0:44:130:44:18

of our domestic fisheries management

rules and access to our waters. But

0:44:180:44:22

as part of our economic partnership,

we will want to continue to work

0:44:220:44:27

together to manage shared stocks in

a sustainable way, and to agree

0:44:270:44:30

reciprocal access to water is and a

fair allocation for fishing

0:44:300:44:35

opportunities for the UK fishing

industry. And we will also wants to

0:44:350:44:40

ensure open markets for each other's

products. Just as our partnership in

0:44:400:44:44

goods needs to be deeper than any

other free trade agreement, so in

0:44:440:44:51

services we have the opportunity to

break new ground with a broader

0:44:510:44:54

agreements than ever before. We

recognise that certain aspects of

0:44:540:44:59

trade in services linked to the

single market and therefore market

0:44:590:45:04

access in these areas will need to

be different. But we should only and

0:45:040:45:07

eye out new barriers to be

introduced where absolutely

0:45:070:45:10

necessary. -- only allow new

barriers. We don't want to

0:45:100:45:14

disseminate against EU service

providers in the UK, and we wouldn't

0:45:140:45:18

want EU to discriminate against UK

providers. We want to limit the

0:45:180:45:22

number of barriers that could

prevent UK firms from setting up in

0:45:220:45:25

the EU and vice versa, and agree

appropriate labour mobility

0:45:250:45:30

frameworks which enables UK

businesses and the self-employed

0:45:300:45:34

professionals to travel to the EU to

provide services to clients in

0:45:340:45:39

person, and that allows UK

businesses to provide services to

0:45:390:45:42

the EU over the phone or the

inter-net. And we want to do the

0:45:420:45:46

same for EU firms providing services

to the UK.

0:45:460:45:54

It would make sense to continue to

recognise qualifications in the

0:45:540:46:00

future. There are two areas which

have never been covered in a

0:46:000:46:04

free-trade agreement and any

meaningful way before, broadcasting

0:46:040:46:08

and, despite the EU's best efforts

in the Transatlantic Trade and

0:46:080:46:15

Investment Partnership, financial

services. We have ideas how we can

0:46:150:46:17

do this and it is in our interests

to explore these. On broadcasting,

0:46:170:46:23

we recognise we cannot have the same

arrangements with the EU as we do

0:46:230:46:27

now. Currently, because of the

country of origin principle, the

0:46:270:46:31

company based in the UK can be

broadcast into any EU state and vice

0:46:310:46:37

versa. The relevant directive will

not apply to the UK as we leave the

0:46:370:46:43

EU, and replying on presidents will

hurt businesses on both sides. The

0:46:430:46:47

UK creative hub leads to the

development of products that

0:46:470:46:52

European and tumours want. The UK

currently resides 35% of the

0:46:520:46:59

channels available in the EU. There

are 35 channels and OnDemand

0:46:590:47:07

services which are offered in the UK

the licensed in the EU. We should

0:47:070:47:13

explore creative options with an

open mind, including mutual

0:47:130:47:18

recognition, allowing for Frontier

broadcasting, recognising the

0:47:180:47:22

enriching role that UK broadcasters

play in British but more broadly in

0:47:220:47:30

our common European culture. On

financial services, the Chancellor

0:47:300:47:33

will be setting out next week have

financial services can and should be

0:47:330:47:37

part of the deep and comprehensive

partnership. We're not looking per

0:47:370:47:42

passport in because we know this is

intrinsic to the single market, of

0:47:420:47:45

which we will longer be a member. It

will require us to be part of a

0:47:450:47:51

single rule book of which we will

have no say. The UK has

0:47:510:47:57

responsibility for the financial

stability of the world's most

0:47:570:48:01

significant financial centre and our

taxpayers bear the risk. It would be

0:48:010:48:05

unrealistic for us to implement new

legislation automatically and in its

0:48:050:48:09

entirety. But with UK located banks

underwriting around half of the debt

0:48:090:48:16

and equity issued the EU companies,

and providing more than £1.1

0:48:160:48:22

trillion of cross-border lending to

the rest of the EU in 2015 alone,

0:48:220:48:27

this is a clear example of only

looking at President would hurt both

0:48:270:48:31

the UK and economies. As in other

areas of the partnership, our goal

0:48:310:48:38

should be to establish the ability

to reach each other's markets, based

0:48:380:48:45

on maintaining the same regulatory

outcomes over time. The consequences

0:48:450:48:52

whether or not maintained. Given the

high rate regulated nature of

0:48:520:48:59

financial services and our desire to

avoid risks, we would need a

0:48:590:49:04

framework that is reciprocal,

mutually agreed and permanent and

0:49:040:49:09

therefore liable for businesses.

There are many other areas with the

0:49:090:49:14

UK and EU economies are closely

linked, including energy, transport,

0:49:140:49:18

digital, Law, science, education and

culture. On energy, we want to

0:49:180:49:25

secure broad energy cooperation with

the EU. This includes protecting the

0:49:250:49:30

Single Electricity Market across

Northern Ireland and Ireland, and

0:49:300:49:33

exploring options for the continued

participation in the EU internal

0:49:330:49:37

market. We also believe it is a

benefit for both sides for the UK to

0:49:370:49:42

have a close association with... On

transport, we want to ensure the

0:49:420:49:49

continuity of real and maritime

services and the rights of road

0:49:490:49:53

hauliers to reach the EU market, and

vice versa. On Digital, the UK will

0:49:530:49:59

not be part of the EU's digital

single market, which will continue

0:49:590:50:02

to develop after our withdrawal from

the EU. This is a fast evolving

0:50:020:50:07

innovative sector in which the UK is

a world leader. It will be

0:50:070:50:13

particularly important to have

domestic flexibility, to ensure the

0:50:130:50:20

regulatory environment can respond

to new environments. We want our

0:50:200:50:24

agreement to cover cooperation, with

the EU has shown it can reach

0:50:240:50:31

agreement with non-member states,

through the Ricardo convention. Our

0:50:310:50:38

agreement will also be to cover

company law and intellectual

0:50:380:50:42

property, to provide legal certainty

and coherence. The UK is also

0:50:420:50:48

committed to establishing a far

reaching science and innovation pact

0:50:480:50:53

with the EU, facilitating the

exchange of ideas and researchers.

0:50:530:50:56

This will allow the UK to

participate in key programmes

0:50:560:51:02

alongside our EU partners. They want

to take a similar approach to

0:51:020:51:05

education and culture, to promote

our shared values and enhance our

0:51:050:51:11

intellectual strength in the world,

again making an ongoing contribution

0:51:110:51:14

to cover our fair share of the costs

involved. In all of these areas,

0:51:140:51:19

bald and creative thinking can

deliver new agreements that are for

0:51:190:51:23

the very best for our people, and

across the EU. In the face of a

0:51:230:51:32

worrying rise of protectionism, I

believe such agreements can let us

0:51:320:51:36

set an example to the world. For the

world is watching. We should not

0:51:360:51:42

think of is leaving the EU as

marking and ending, as much as a new

0:51:420:51:47

beginning for the United Kingdom and

our relationship with our European

0:51:470:51:52

allies. Change is not to be feared,

so long we face it with a

0:51:520:51:57

clear-sighted determination to act

for the common good. Nor is Brexit

0:51:570:52:03

an end in itself. Rather, it must be

the means for which we reaffirm

0:52:030:52:08

Britain's place in the world and

renew the ties that bind us here at

0:52:080:52:13

home. And I know that the United

Kingdom can emerge from this process

0:52:130:52:18

is stronger and workers use of

nation. The United Kingdom which is

0:52:180:52:22

a cradle for innovation, a leader in

the industries of the future, a

0:52:220:52:27

champion of free trade based on high

standards, a moderate, outward

0:52:270:52:33

looking, tolerant country, proud of

our values and confident of our

0:52:330:52:36

place in the world. This is an

optimistic and confident future

0:52:360:52:40

which can unite us all, a global

Britain which thrives in the world

0:52:400:52:46

by forging a bold and comprehensive

economic partnership with our

0:52:460:52:50

neighbours in the EU and reaches out

beyond our continent to trade with

0:52:500:52:55

nations across the globe. The

approach I have set up to date would

0:52:550:53:01

implement the referendum result,

provide an enduring solution,

0:53:010:53:05

protect our security and

respiratory, help us build the kind

0:53:050:53:07

of country we want to be and bring

our country together by commanding

0:53:070:53:13

the confidence of those who voted

leave and those who voted remain. It

0:53:130:53:17

is an approach to deliver for the

whole of our United Kingdom and our

0:53:170:53:21

wider family of overseas

territories. I am in no doubt that

0:53:210:53:26

whatever agreement we reach with the

EU, our future is bright. The

0:53:260:53:33

stability and continuity of

centuries of self-government, our

0:53:330:53:35

commitment to freedom under the rule

of law, our belief in enterprise and

0:53:350:53:40

innovation, but above all, the

talent and genius of all our people

0:53:400:53:45

and especially our young people at

the seeds of our success in the

0:53:450:53:49

future, as they have been the

0:53:490:53:53

guarantors of our success in the

past. I look forward to discussing

0:53:530:53:57

our future partnership with our

European friends, because although

0:53:570:54:00

we are leaving the EU, and in that

regard we will become separate, we

0:54:000:54:07

are all still European and will stay

linked by the many Thais and values

0:54:070:54:12

we have in common. And because it is

only by working together we will

0:54:120:54:16

find solution that work for all our

people. -- the many ties. Yes, there

0:54:160:54:22

will be ups and downs in the months

ahead. No one will get everything

0:54:220:54:26

they want, we will not be buffeted

by the demands to talk tough or

0:54:260:54:31

threaten a wok out, just as we will

not accept the councils of the spear

0:54:310:54:37

that this cannot happen. We will

move forward with calm and patient

0:54:370:54:41

discussion of the positions. It is

my responsibility of Prime Minister

0:54:410:54:45

to provide that leadership for our

country at this time. By following

0:54:450:54:50

the course I have set out today, I

am confident we will get there and

0:54:500:54:54

deliver the right outcome for

Britain and the EU. A generation

0:54:540:54:58

from now, what will be remembered is

not the rough and tumble of

0:54:580:55:04

negotiation, but whether we reached

an enduring solution has to meet

0:55:040:55:07

interest of the people we are all

here to serve. So my message to our

0:55:070:55:12

friends in Europe is clear, we know

what we want, we understand your

0:55:120:55:20

principles, we have a shared

interest in getting this right. So,

0:55:200:55:25

let's get on with it. Thank you.

APPLAUSE

0:55:250:55:36

Now, I am going to take some

questions. I will start off with

0:55:460:55:50

questions from the media then take

some from the wider audience.

0:55:500:55:57

Laura's Laura's BBC News.

What you

describe as hard facts could also be

0:55:570:56:06

described as compromises, many of

which seemed obvious months ago. Do

0:56:060:56:11

you accept now that we cannot have

it all as we leave? , you have

0:56:110:56:15

outlined you want to pick and mix,

even though the EU has rejected that

0:56:150:56:19

approach. What is it you think you

can say to the EU leaders that will

0:56:190:56:25

actually change their minds?

First

of all, what I have set out today is

0:56:250:56:30

what I believe to be the right

Brexit deal for Britain. Also, I

0:56:300:56:35

believe it is the right deal for the

European Union. I am confident that

0:56:350:56:39

as we come and sit down together, we

will be able to show that mutual

0:56:390:56:46

interest and benefit from the

proposals that I have put forward.

0:56:460:56:50

The European Union itself in its own

guidelines, as I said in my speech,

0:56:500:56:54

have said they want an ambitious and

wide ranging relationship and

0:56:540:56:58

agreement and deal with the United

Kingdom for the future and I have

0:56:580:57:02

set out in my speech the various

areas in times of economic

0:57:020:57:07

partnership where we want to sit

down and talk to them about what

0:57:070:57:10

that future relationship would be.

As I say, I am confident that we

0:57:100:57:15

will achieve the right Brexit deal

for Britain because I believe that

0:57:150:57:19

deal is also the right Brexit deal

for the EU. Robert?

BBC. Prime

0:57:190:57:29

Minister, millions of people voted

to coin a phrase, to take back

0:57:290:57:35

control, but today you have said

that in order to maximise

0:57:350:57:42

frictionless low-cost trade with the

EU, you will promise not to exercise

0:57:420:57:50

the control of taking back, so what

can you say to those people who

0:57:500:57:55

voted for Brexit was the point of

Brexit?

Well, people voted to take

0:57:550:57:59

back control of our money, laws and

borders and that is exactly what the

0:57:590:58:04

will be doing. Yes, there are some

areas where... Parliament will

0:58:040:58:11

always be sovereign and it will be

parliament to make these decisions.

0:58:110:58:15

There are some areas, as I have set

out in the description of goods,

0:58:150:58:19

where, from economic point of view

businesses say it makes sense to

0:58:190:58:23

operate on the same basis we can

continue that good trading

0:58:230:58:27

relationship. The decision on those

rules will be for Parliament. Yes,

0:58:270:58:33

as I sat in my speech, there will

need to be binding commitments, as

0:58:330:58:37

the is and any trade agreement. You

sit down and you work out what laws

0:58:370:58:43

both sides are going to operate on,

particularly on issues on

0:58:430:58:49

competition and state aid. That is

what we will be doing on negotiating

0:58:490:58:52

this trade agreement. We will be

taking back control of our borders,

0:58:520:58:56

free movement will end. We will be

taking back control of our money, we

0:58:560:59:01

will not be sending vast sums of

money to the European every year and

0:59:010:59:05

we will be insuring we take back

control of our lords and Parliament

0:59:050:59:11

will make decisions. -- control of

our laws.

Sky News. On customs, a

0:59:110:59:18

specific question and a more general

one. As the custom partnership

0:59:180:59:23

option the number one option? It was

described as the blue sky optioned

0:59:230:59:27

by the Brexit secretary months ago

and I think they had of Customs said

0:59:270:59:31

it could take five years to put

these systems in place. Would we

0:59:310:59:36

stay in the interim? You say this is

about bringing the country back

0:59:360:59:40

together, but you describe those

people who want to reform a customs

0:59:400:59:44

union as betraying the vote. There

are people from the CBI here,

0:59:440:59:47

members of your own party. How does

that help when you say that that

0:59:470:59:57

betrays the boat?

What I have set

out today in my speech, and we set

0:59:571:00:00

out previously as a Government in

more detail, is two options for what

1:00:001:00:03

we believe is a Customs arrangement

that would enable us to both trade

1:00:031:00:09

and develop our own independent

trade policy and trade deals with

1:00:091:00:12

other countries around the world,

but also ensure we have as

1:00:121:00:16

frictionless trade across the border

as possible and ensuring we have no

1:00:161:00:21

hard order between Northern Ireland

and Ireland. What I want to do now,

1:00:211:00:24

and as I said in my speech I agreed

with the Prime Minister of Northern

1:00:241:00:29

Ireland when I saw him in Belfast,

that we will be sitting down with

1:00:291:00:32

the commission to discuss the

details of this. We want to explore

1:00:321:00:36

those options with those partners so

that we can ensure that we really go

1:00:361:00:42

into them and develop the solution

that is right, that delivers that no

1:00:421:00:47

hard order between Northern Ireland

and Ireland, as frictionless trade

1:00:471:00:51

as possible and continues to enable

us to develop our own independent

1:00:511:00:58

trade policy around the world. I

think that those are what the

1:00:581:01:02

majority of people want us to

achieve, and we have set out ways in

1:01:021:01:07

which we can do just that.

1:01:071:01:13

Thank you, Prime Minister, Tom

Newton Dunn from the Sun. You have

1:01:131:01:17

said you will be patient, you will

not threaten to walk out, but what

1:01:171:01:21

if you don't get what you want? What

have you don't get anywhere near

1:01:211:01:25

what you want? Is no deal still a

possibility, is it still better than

1:01:251:01:30

a bad deal, and if so, will you

repeat that now?

Yes, I've said on

1:01:301:01:35

many occasions that no deal is

better than a bad deal. At the

1:01:351:01:40

beginning of my speech, I said one

of the complexities as we go through

1:01:401:01:43

this as we are not only in a queue

shooting on that future publisher

1:01:431:01:46

but ensuring we are preparing for

possible outcomes because it is a

1:01:461:01:51

negotiation, and that is only the

right and sensible thing to do. But

1:01:511:01:54

I am confident, as I say, I am

confident in reaching a good deal,

1:01:541:02:01

the right deal, because I believe it

is in the interests of both the

1:02:011:02:05

United Kingdom and the European

Union. Jason?

Thank you, Daily Mail.

1:02:051:02:15

Some of your colleagues have been

seeking full autonomy over our laws

1:02:151:02:19

after we leave, you are suggesting

that maybe impossible, it is a hard

1:02:191:02:24

fact to swallow. Cover sorry, I

couldn't quite hear the question.

1:02:241:02:28

Can you hear me now? Some of your

colleagues have suggested they want

1:02:281:02:33

full autonomy over the UK's laws,

you seem to be suggesting that won't

1:02:331:02:37

be possible, and some of your

colleagues in Cabinet see this as a

1:02:371:02:42

bottom line, this speech you have

given today, rather than opening

1:02:421:02:48

position. Is it your bottom line, or

could there be more hard facts to

1:02:481:02:53

swallow in the future?

When we look

at the question of taking back

1:02:531:02:56

control of our laws, it is very

clear that Parliament will be

1:02:561:02:59

sovereign and will determine our

laws. I set out in my speech there

1:02:591:03:05

are certain circumstances, as other

countries have found, if you look at

1:03:051:03:08

the United States and the safe

harbour framework, for example, they

1:03:081:03:12

had an agreement with the European

Union, but the EU end of that is

1:03:121:03:18

determined by the ECJ, and the ECJ

took a decision that affected that

1:03:181:03:21

agreement, but they came to another

agreement. So what I was setting out

1:03:211:03:28

was that the ECJ will still continue

to have responsibility and a remit

1:03:281:03:33

within the European Union, but the

EU laws and the ECJ will no longer

1:03:331:03:38

have jurisdiction in the UK, and it

will be Parliament making these

1:03:381:03:42

decisions about our future. Anushka

1:03:421:03:51

will be Parliament making these

decisions about our future. Anushka.

1:03:511:03:52

Anushka Asthana from the Guardian.

You have admitted there will be

1:03:521:03:56

difficult decisions and trade-offs

head, and I think that makes it

1:03:561:04:01

important to understand what your

priorities are, particularly among

1:04:011:04:04

the five tests, one of which is

prosperity. I want to ask, is in the

1:04:041:04:10

end and negotiating a customs union

with the European Union is shown to

1:04:101:04:13

be the best way to protect the

economy, in that situation, would

1:04:131:04:18

British jobs Trump new trade deals

after Brexit?

What I set out in the

1:04:181:04:25

five test is the five tests that we

will be setting when we look at

1:04:251:04:28

these negotiations of the future

partnership, and it is those five

1:04:281:04:32

tests that I set out at the

beginning of the speech which will

1:04:321:04:36

have determined the approach I set

out today and the future

1:04:361:04:38

negotiations. I have explained that

when we leave the European Union, we

1:04:381:04:44

want to be to make those trades

deals around the rest of the world.

1:04:441:04:47

I believe there is a way, as I set

out in my speech, in which it is

1:04:471:04:52

possible to come to a customs

arrangements which enable us to have

1:04:521:04:55

as frictionless a border possible,

to ensure that has no hard border

1:04:551:05:00

between Northern Ireland and

Ireland, and be able to negotiate

1:05:001:05:03

deals around the rest of the world.

I will take a couple of journalist

1:05:031:05:07

not from UK media. From handles

Handelsblatt?

You seem to be

1:05:071:05:24

preparing EU people for difficult

decisions, saying there will be ups

1:05:241:05:27

and downs, saying you don't want to

be part of the customs union, do you

1:05:271:05:34

think Brexit is all worth it?

If

that was an attempt to say will we

1:05:341:05:40

think again on Brexit, the answer is

no, the British people voted for

1:05:401:05:46

Brexit, and I think it is incumbent

on politicians to deliver on the

1:05:461:05:50

decision that we asked them to take.

Parliament overwhelmingly voted for

1:05:501:05:55

this to be a decision of the British

people, and I think it is right,

1:05:551:05:58

having taken that decision, that

Parliament and politicians now

1:05:581:06:02

deliver on that. What have I done

today? Unlike some politicians, I am

1:06:021:06:07

being straight with people, because

there are hard facts to be faced. I

1:06:071:06:14

have set out, though, what I believe

is an economic partnership alongside

1:06:141:06:18

the security partnership that I set

out in my speech in Munich a couple

1:06:181:06:22

of weeks ago, that will ensure that

we deliver for the British people on

1:06:221:06:27

that referendum result, but at the

same time we have an arrangement, we

1:06:271:06:31

have an agreement, a deal that is

right for the British people in

1:06:311:06:35

terms of our prosperity, but also

for people across the European Union

1:06:351:06:38

in terms of their future prosperity

as well. Is Sonia here from

1:06:381:06:44

Liberation?

Liberation, the French

newspaper. Prime Minister, about

1:06:441:06:53

Northern Ireland, you have just

repeated your red lines, no customs

1:06:531:06:58

union, no single market. Isn't it

time you tell the truth to the

1:06:581:07:01

British and the Europeans that there

will indeed be a border in Northern

1:07:011:07:07

Ireland, a light, hi-tech border,

there will be a border in Northern

1:07:071:07:10

Ireland?

We have been very clear

there will be no hard border in

1:07:101:07:14

Northern Ireland, and as we have

said previously, we will not be

1:07:141:07:17

returning to the borders of the

past. What I have set out in my

1:07:171:07:21

speech today in ways in which that

can be achieved. I am pleased that

1:07:211:07:25

we have now agreed with the

Taoiseach that the Irish garment and

1:07:251:07:28

the UK Government and the commission

will now be sitting down to work

1:07:281:07:32

through those options that have been

proposed and to be working through

1:07:321:07:35

them in detail. I am very clear

there will be... We will not be

1:07:351:07:40

returning to a hard border in

Northern Ireland, between Northern

1:07:401:07:44

Ireland and Ireland, and we will be

ensuring that we also maintain the

1:07:441:07:49

common market of the United Kingdom,

and that there is no hard border

1:07:491:07:52

down the Irish sea either. I said I

would take a couple of questions

1:07:521:07:56

from the audience. Is Mike Jerry

here? I thought I had seen you

1:07:561:08:09

somewhere.

Good morning Prime

Minister. Small businesses will very

1:08:091:08:14

much welcome your views around

mutual recognition, and you also

1:08:141:08:17

mentioned certain sectors, but with

over 40% of our members looking to

1:08:171:08:21

grow their own business through

global exports and needing

1:08:211:08:27

certainty, what is your message for

them today as Prime Minister,

1:08:271:08:30

please? My message

for them is the

first of all we want to continue to

1:08:301:08:37

get a good trade deal with the

European Union, but we want to make

1:08:371:08:41

sure they can expand their export

markets around the rest of the world

1:08:411:08:43

as well, and that is why the

Department for International Trade

1:08:431:08:48

is already talking to a number of

countries around the world about

1:08:481:08:50

what our future trade arrangements

might be. But I am also clear that

1:08:501:08:56

we want to find ways of helping and

encouraging more small and

1:08:561:08:59

medium-sized enterprises to export

around the world, to the EU, but

1:08:591:09:05

also around the rest of the world. I

was very pleased to take some SMEs

1:09:051:09:09

with me on my recent trip to China,

and they had good results from the

1:09:091:09:19

networking they were able to do

there. As a government, through the

1:09:191:09:23

work of export finance guarantee and

so forth, we are working actively to

1:09:231:09:27

encourage and help not just large

companies but also small and

1:09:271:09:30

medium-sized enterprises be able to

trade outside of the United Kingdom,

1:09:301:09:35

be that to the European Union or

other countries around the world.

1:09:351:09:37

Thank you.

Thank you, Prime

Minister, from Virgin Money, I live

1:09:371:09:48

in Scotland and run a business in

Newcastle, and I wonder how your

1:09:481:09:52

vision of Britain after Brexit

improves things for the people who

1:09:521:09:54

live in both of those places and

other cities around the UK?

Well,

1:09:541:10:00

first of all, the important thing, I

would say, is kidding the United

1:10:001:10:04

Kingdom such that we have the

ability for you to live in Scotland

1:10:041:10:07

and run a business in Newcastle. --

is keeping. As we look at United

1:10:071:10:15

Kingdom outside of the European

Union, it is not just about what I

1:10:151:10:18

have been talking about today, our

relationship with the EU or trade

1:10:181:10:22

relationships with the rest of the

world, it is how we develop our

1:10:221:10:25

economy here in the United Kingdom,

that is where the industrial

1:10:251:10:28

strategy is an absolutely key part

of what we are delivering. We are a

1:10:281:10:37

nation of innovators, we are world

leaders in so many areas, if you

1:10:371:10:40

look at the the automotive sector,

fintech, we are leading the world,

1:10:401:10:50

and we want to create an environment

in the UK to enable people to do

1:10:501:10:55

that, to make real successes across

industrial sectors and the financial

1:10:551:11:02

sector as well. But also creating an

environment in which new innovation

1:11:021:11:09

can come forward, and part of that

is also getting our people skilled

1:11:091:11:12

up so that they can take the jobs of

the future. Thank you.

1:11:121:11:17

APPLAUSE

1:11:171:11:27

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