13/11/2017 Monday in Parliament


13/11/2017

Highlights of proceedings in Parliament on Monday 13 November, presented by Mandy Baker.


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Transcript


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Hello and welcome to our look back

at the day here in Westminster.

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Coming up, the Brexit

secretary makes a

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surprise concession to pro-EU MPs,

the Foreign Secretary admits he was

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wrong over controversial remarks

about the British woman jailed in

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Iran, And the Ministry of Justice

gets a dressing down over its

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electronic tagging system.

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Whoever put this down

as a procurement

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strategy I don't think had any idea

what they were trying to achieve.

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But first, Tuesday will be

a big day for Brexit,

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MPs are to start their long-awaited

scrutiny of the

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European Union withdrawal bill.

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But as something of

a curtain raiser the

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government has offered

a concession to MPs,

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calling for Parliament

to

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have a greater say

on the final Brexit agreement.

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In a significant shift

the Brexit secretary told the

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Commons he intends

on bringing forward

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a new lot to implement

the

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final deal, giving MPs the chance

to go through it in detail.

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Labour described the

move as a climb-down

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by ministers facing potential defeat

on the EU withdrawal bill.

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David Davis warns

that if MPs voted the

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new bill down the UK

with leave without a deal.

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Mr Davis unveiled a plan

while reporting back on last

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week's talks with Brussels.

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I can now confirm that once we have

reached an agreement we will bring

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forward a specific piece of primary

legislation to implement that

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agreement known as the withdrawal

agreement and implementation bill.

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This confirms the major policy set

out in the withdrawal agreement,

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will be done correctly implemented

in the UK by primary legislation.

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Not by secondary legislation

of the withdrawal bill.

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This also means that

Parliament will be given time

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to debate, scrutinise

and vote on the final

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agreement we strike

with

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the EU.

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This agreement will only hold

of Parliament approves it.

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Can the Secretary

of State confirm to

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this house that this house will get

a vote in the event that there is no

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deal?

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Mr Speaker these questions have been

pressing for months, this

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last-minute attempt to climb-down

brings them into very sharp focus.

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And we are entitled

to clear answers.

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Will it simply be a question

of take it or leave it?

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The deal or no deal.

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Will the house be given

an opportunity to amend that

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bill as the house must

have the opportunity to amend any

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bill and therefore will the house

have the

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opportunity to amend

to amend the agreement?

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I don't think it is in the gift

of the government to put a

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piece of primary legislation before

the house which is incapable of

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amendment.

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It is the nature of primary

legislation that it is

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always capable of amendment.

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Of course we will have the practical

limitations of having a deal with

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signed and there will be

applications to that, and the whole

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thing will be put in

front of the house.

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I welcome the Secretary of State's

announcement that there will

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be primary legislation to implement

EU withdrawal agreement and I would

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say it is other recognition

of the government having to listen.

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If the House of Commons

votes down the new

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withdrawal bill, will the

consequence be that we will still

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leave on the 29th of March 2019

but without an agreement?

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Yes.

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What was that?

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Yes.

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The Secretary of State said yes.

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Can he confirm that in the event

of no agreement, no deal, this

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place will have no say

and we will leave on that date

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because it is on the face

of the bill without any say

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from this supposedly sovereign

Parliament which voted to take back

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control.

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What I can say to her is that

if we don't have a withdrawal

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agreement we can have

a withdrawal agreement Bill.

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Hasn't he does giving

the game away on what a sham

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offer this is?

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Totally worthless to Parliament,

essentially tried to buy

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people by saying we're

going to give you an act

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to shake things when

in

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fact is a post-hoc after

the horse has bolted

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piece of legislation,

we

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might have left the EU,

the Treaty and the deal would have

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been done and Parliament could do

nothing at

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all to shape the nature of that

withdrawal agreement.

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He has to do much better than this.

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Parliament must have a say

on that withdrawal

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agreement before we are thrown

over the cliff edge.

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Let the repeated and the probable

sequence of events.

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If Mr Barnier hit

his target and I had

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mine we will include the withdrawal

agreement and associated agreements

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in the latter part of next year.

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He is aiming for October next year,

that is his stated aim.

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If we do that then

the withdrawal, the first

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withdrawal and treaty vote will come

to the house, the simple in

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principle vote and then as soon

as possible thereafter

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the withdrawal agreement Bill

will come through the

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house.

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That is the sequence and that

will be plenty of time and it will

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be implemented at the time.

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If the agreement only

happens on the very

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last day in March,

could he explain how

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the bill which is intended

to

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ensure the meaningful vote only

comes forward after that date,

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in any sense meaningful?

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A meaningful vote is a vote that

allows you to say you want the deal

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or you don't want the deal.

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While Parliamentary involvement

is essential, this is not and never

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should be construed as

an opportunity to reverse Brexit, to

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return the UK to the EU

or go behind the wishes

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of the British people

as

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expressed in last

year 's referendum.

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My honourable friend is entirely

right, it is a meaningful

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vote but not meaningful

in the sense that some

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believe meaningful,

which

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is that you can reverse Article 50.

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That is not available.

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David Davis.

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Now the case of British Iranian

national being held in prison in

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Iran continues to make headlines.

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Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe is being

held on charges of plotting to

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overthrow the Iranian regime.

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You may remember that the Foreign

Secretary issued a clarification

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after appearing to suggest

she was in the country training

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journalists Rather than merely

on holiday as her

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family have stated.

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The remarks prompted

fears that her five-year

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term could be extended.

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Boris John was called

to the Commons to update

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MPs on the situation

and there was anger on both

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sides of the house.

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The whole house will join me

in expressing our deep concern about

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the ordeal of this young mother

who has spent the last 19

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months in jail in Iran

and have the honourable

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member will join the government

in urging the Iranian authorities to

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release on humanitarian grounds.

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I spoke by phone to her husband,

Richard Ratcliffe, yesterday, and we

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agreed to meet later this week.

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I told Mr Ratcliffe that the whole

country is behind him and we all

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want to see his wife home safe.

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The Foreign Secretary

argued last week

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that his comments to the select

committee and I quote no connection

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whatsoever with the latest threat

by the Iranian authorities to extend

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Nazanin's sentence and that it was

simply untrue to suggest otherwise.

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That, Mr Speaker, is entirely

contradicted by what has been said

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by the Iranian courts last weekend

and an Iranian judiciary websites

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and an Iranian state TV.

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All of them set explicitly

that the Foreign

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Secretary's remarks were the basis

of the renewed action against

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Nazanin so in conclusion after one

week of obtuse Cajun and plaster,

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though he finally take the

opportunity today to states simply

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and unequivocally for the removal

of any doubt, either here or in

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Teheran, that he

simply got it wrong?

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Mr Speaker I am more than happy

to see again what I said to

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the Right Honourable Lady last week,

that yes of course I apologise for

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the distress, for the suffering,

but that has been caused by the

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impression that I gave

that the government believed,

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that I believe that she was there

any professional

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capacity she was there on holiday

and that is the view of...

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I do apologise, I do

apologise and of

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course I retract any suggestion

that she was there in a professional

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capacity.

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You must have heard that from me

about a dozen times.

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Regrettably more than a faint whiff

of opportunism hangs over this

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urgent question.

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Others will question

the wisdom of having this

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discussion at all.

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Would my right honourable

friend not agree with me

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that it is incumbent on each

and every one of us in this house

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to pay very close attention

to what we may

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may not be about to say

because the Iranians

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will be watching

the

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deliberations and we do not want

to exacerbate an already extremely

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difficult situation.

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At the weekend when asked

about the case the

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Environment Secretary

said he did not know

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why Nazanin had been

in

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Iran.

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Why and another Cabinet member not

briefed properly and said live

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on television that he did not

know why she was there?

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What is going on in the heart

of this government?

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Every time he says things

like my words were open

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to misinterpretation for,

he provides a lack of clarity

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and sounds like he's wriggling

in a way other people can exploit.

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So could see for

the sake of the -- of

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Miss Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe, say

unequivocally for the record I got

0:09:450:09:47

it wrong.

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I hope that the house will

understand, with crystal clarity,

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that Mrs Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe

was there on holiday and she was not

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there in any professional capacity,

insofar as people got a different

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impression of what I

was seeing at the FAC

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that was my mistake,

I

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should have been, they should

have been clearer.

0:10:090:10:19

In the Foreign Secretary

tell me if you've

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considered in the quality

and competitiveness of the Foreign

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Office briefings and that they are

promptly made available to other

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government ministers in advance

of media appearances?

0:10:270:10:32

If not, will he sorted out?

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If so does he accept that

that is most useful ministers

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to continue to get it wrong?

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Does my right honourable

friend accept that

0:10:410:10:42

this has not been his finest hour?

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But before the opposition

make too much of that

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may I offer them

the

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right deadlines such as that

in the independent online where it

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says Boris to should resign

if British

0:11:010:11:03

mother stays in Iranian jail

for even one more day.

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The Iranian regime plays

politics with hostages

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and thus my right honourable friend

agree that if they believe that they

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can get rid of the British Foreign

Secretary by jailing a hostage for a

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longer then they will jail

that hostage for longer?

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Could he reflect on this

and the rest of his conduct

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as Foreign Secretary

and realise that his

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brand of incompetence

is a

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joke that is no longer funny

and consider being replaced by a

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competent politician who will

attract the respect of the world and

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not the ridicule that he attracts?

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Paul Flynn.

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You're watching Monday In Parliament

with me, Mandy Baker.

0:11:520:11:57

If you want to catch

a leader with all the news

0:11:570:12:00

from Westminster on the go,

don't forget our sister programme,

0:12:000:12:02

Today In Parliament,

is available as a download

0:12:020:12:04

from the BBC Radio 4 website.

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Now, some 40 months have passed

since voters north of the border

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decided that Scotland should stay

in the United Kingdom.

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The winning margin for No

to independence was 55% to 45%.

0:12:160:12:19

So that was that then.

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Well, not quite.

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Over the last three years,

a second referendum,

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sometimes called Indy Ref 2,

has been much discussed.

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Now a petition on the Parliamentary

website is demanding that

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a second vote is held.

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While a rival petition

is demanding that a second

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referendum is not held.

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The two pertitions made

for an interesting debate

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in Westminster Hall.

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When people go to the polls

and make their deocratic

0:12:440:12:47

choice to stay part

of the United Kingdom,

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that should be respected.

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Respected for a number of reasons,

one, it's democratic, but secondly,

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we were promised by the proponents

of an independent Scotland it

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would be once in a generation,

or indeed once in a lifetime.

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When proponents say that,

when you go to the polls

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and you put your cross in the box,

whether it's yes or no, you should

0:13:100:13:13

be able to trust what people say

when your are doing that.

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I appreciate that Scotland

being dragged out of the EU

0:13:230:13:26

against its will hasn't yet caught

the fire the general populace

0:13:260:13:29

as a reason to hold a major

referendum just now.

0:13:290:13:31

However, surveys have shown that

people would like a referendum

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when the impact and the effects

of Brexit are fully understood.

0:13:330:13:36

So there is actually

a will to have another referendum,

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just not right now,

but sometime in the future.

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The majority of people in East

Lothian recognise that devolution

0:13:410:13:43

was created to empower

Scotland within the Union,

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not pull it further apart.

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During the recent election,

I ran on the promise of no second

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independence referendum,

and I know some members

0:13:490:13:51

of this House do not agree.

0:13:510:13:52

But the evidence from East Lothian

is that they did not want,

0:13:520:13:55

that they do not want,

a second independence referendum.

0:13:550:13:57

70% of the voters who cast

their votes voted for a party

0:13:570:14:00

or parties that did not want

a second independence referendum.

0:14:000:14:05

It will be no surprise that

I often wear a Yes badge,

0:14:050:14:08

it's something I'm proud

of my involvement in.

0:14:080:14:10

But the reasons are more important

than just being in or out of Europe,

0:14:100:14:14

although that's a very important

issue at the moment.

0:14:140:14:16

My motivation is a hope that

Scotland can become a fairer

0:14:160:14:19

and more equal society.

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But that, to me, requires us

to have the full levers of power

0:14:200:14:23

to make it a successful country.

0:14:230:14:26

Just now, with 70% of tax

and 85% of welfare powers

0:14:260:14:30

remaining controlled by Westminster,

the Scottish Parliament has no say

0:14:300:14:33

over immigration and is powerless

to prevent Trident weapons of mass

0:14:330:14:37

destruction sitting a few miles

from our largest city.

0:14:370:14:40

We need an alternative

to the economics of austerity,

0:14:400:14:43

where our Scottish Government is not

merely restricted to mitigating some

0:14:430:14:47

of the worst aspects of Westminster.

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Since September 2014,

there've been over 17 polls

0:14:480:14:52

taken across Scotland,

and they have consistently said

0:14:520:14:57

the Scottish people do not want

independence and they don't

0:14:570:15:00

want to have another referendum.

0:15:000:15:02

After all these elections that

you have suffered so much from,

0:15:020:15:05

what's it's going to take

for the Scottish National Party

0:15:050:15:09

to listen to the people of Scotland,

who they supposedly represent?

0:15:090:15:12

I feel that reflecting on the binary

nature of that referendum

0:15:120:15:15

was what truly destructed the civic

discourse in Scotland.

0:15:150:15:18

Having the yes or no position

offered a simplistic answer

0:15:180:15:24

to a very complex question.

0:15:240:15:25

That was what was so

unsatisfactory about it.

0:15:250:15:27

I was one of those people

at the very early stages of that

0:15:270:15:30

referendum that favoured a third

option, and that would have actually

0:15:300:15:33

opened up the debate in Scotland

during that referendum for a more

0:15:330:15:36

nuanced discussion about

the process of devolution,

0:15:360:15:38

which, we recall, Donald Dewar

called a process, not an event.

0:15:380:15:40

So enough.

0:15:400:15:42

Indeed, we've heard all the figures.

0:15:420:15:43

There is now no reason,

no will and a lot of

0:15:430:15:47

people would argue no need

for a second referendum.

0:15:470:15:51

Since the Smith Commission,

and the latest tranche of powers,

0:15:510:15:54

which remarkably seems to slip

the minds of the SNP

0:15:540:15:58

at any given opportunity, when they

tell us about the rosy picture

0:15:580:16:01

they've created in Scotland

and ignoring the lack of GPs,

0:16:010:16:05

the shortage of teachers,

the closing of GP practices.

0:16:050:16:10

Christine Jardine there.

0:16:100:16:12

The Government's flagship wellfare

policy, Universal Credit,

0:16:120:16:15

dominated Work and Pensions

questions at the beginning

0:16:150:16:19

of the Commons day.

0:16:190:16:20

Universal Credit combines six

working-age benefits

0:16:200:16:22

into a single payment.

0:16:220:16:24

The Government says it's been

designed to make the system simpler.

0:16:240:16:27

There have been criticisms

from Labour and the SNP over

0:16:270:16:31

length of time claimments

wait for money and the system

0:16:310:16:33

of advance payments.

0:16:330:16:35

While many Conservative MPs have

supported the rollout.

0:16:350:16:38

We hear a lot on the other side

about Universal Credit,

0:16:380:16:42

but we do need to remember this

is a much more effective system

0:16:420:16:45

at getting people into work

and that, nationally,

0:16:450:16:47

113 people move into work under

Universal Credit for every

0:16:470:16:50

100 under the previous system.

0:16:500:16:52

And in my constituency,

which was a pathfinder

0:16:520:16:55

for Universal Credit,

we are seeing very substantial falls

0:16:550:16:58

in people claiming it.

0:16:580:17:00

Isn't this a better

system altogether?

0:17:000:17:02

My honourable friend

is absolutely right.

0:17:020:17:07

Universal Credit is helping

people get into work,

0:17:070:17:13

to progress in work,

and it is also clear that people

0:17:130:17:16

on Universal Credit are spending

more time looking for work

0:17:160:17:21

than on the legacy benefits.

0:17:210:17:23

And I think it's really important

we all work to ensure that

0:17:230:17:28

Universal Credit is a success.

0:17:280:17:29

We believe it will result

in 250,000 more jobs in this country

0:17:290:17:32

as a consequence of its operation,

and that is something

0:17:320:17:34

that is worth achieving.

0:17:340:17:37

I wonder if the Secretary of State

has seen the report from

0:17:370:17:40

the Child Poverty Action

Group on the IPPR?

0:17:400:17:42

They say that cuts to

Universal Credit will leave an extra

0:17:420:17:45

1 million children in poverty.

0:17:450:17:49

Is a million more children

in proverty not evidence enough

0:17:490:17:52

for the UK Government to reverse

the cuts to work allowances

0:17:520:17:55

and make work pay?

0:17:550:17:57

My point was that the Scottish

Government are delivering

0:17:570:18:01

Universal Credit in a different way,

but in a way

0:18:010:18:07

that I think is worse

than the situation

0:18:070:18:09

in England and Wales.

0:18:090:18:12

I have to say, the point

about Universal Credit is that it

0:18:120:18:17

will help people in the work.

0:18:170:18:19

I'll give one brief example,

if I may, Mr Speaker.

0:18:190:18:21

I heard of an account last week

of someone, a single mother,

0:18:210:18:28

on income support, not currently

or previously able to claim

0:18:280:18:33

for her childcare costs.

0:18:330:18:34

Now under Universal Credit,

she is able to do so.

0:18:340:18:37

She is taking up a job working eight

or nine hours a week,

0:18:370:18:40

which she was previously

unable to do.

0:18:400:18:42

A first step on the ladder,

that is an example of

0:18:420:18:44

what Universal Credit is delivering.

0:18:440:18:46

I won't ask the Government bench

for a fifth time whether I should

0:18:460:18:51

believe his statement

that the roll-out of

0:18:510:18:53

Universal Credit in Birkenhead

will go hunky-dory, or the foodbank

0:18:530:18:59

that says it will need ten times

more food to prevent a scenario

0:18:590:19:02

of people going hungry.

0:19:020:19:09

They can't abide the word starving.

0:19:090:19:10

We have a debate on Thursday,

which is signed by members

0:19:100:19:13

across the House of Commons.

0:19:130:19:15

It will be the first time

when members opposite can actually

0:19:150:19:18

vote whether they want to reform

Universal Credit.

0:19:180:19:22

Will he be opening that debate

and hearing it and taking

0:19:220:19:25

a message directly back

to Cabinet, please?

0:19:250:19:30

Well, the position we have made very

clear for a long time

0:19:300:19:34

is that we want to ensure that

Universal Credit works.

0:19:340:19:37

This is a test and learn system,

and we are always looking for ways

0:19:370:19:41

in which we can improve the system,

particularly for that first period.

0:19:410:19:46

David Gauke.

0:19:460:19:48

The top civil servant

at the Ministry of Justice has

0:19:480:19:50

admitted to MPs his department

was too ambitious when it attempted

0:19:500:19:54

to introduce a new form

of electronic tagging for criminals.

0:19:540:19:58

The ankle tagging scheme makes use

of GPS satellite technology.

0:19:580:20:02

It was meant to be a cheaper

alternative to prison.

0:20:020:20:05

But a National Audit Office report

found that, by March,

0:20:050:20:08

it cost the Government £60 million

and still hasn't been implemented.

0:20:080:20:14

Monday's session of the Public

Accounts Committee investigated

0:20:140:20:17

the report's findings.

0:20:170:20:19

The failure to pilot

is something we all now regret.

0:20:190:20:22

I think it was done

because the Department wanted to see

0:20:220:20:26

results quickly and had faith

in the contract being able

0:20:260:20:28

to deliver more quickly

than we realise now that they

0:20:280:20:31

could have delivered.

0:20:310:20:32

And there was an overoptimistic

belief that tagging could be

0:20:320:20:38

used as an alternative

to other disposals.

0:20:380:20:42

And without an insight into either

behaviour of sentences

0:20:420:20:45

or behaviour of offenders

under a tagging regime.

0:20:450:20:47

There was some basic research done,

I understand, by the Home Office,

0:20:470:20:50

but it was very limited.

0:20:500:20:53

What I am accepting is that,

by the time we came to renew

0:20:530:20:56

the contracts that we had that

were running out in 2013,

0:20:560:21:00

we were effectively looking at this

as a reprocurement, with wanting,

0:21:000:21:04

through that reprocurement,

to provide options for the future.

0:21:040:21:08

What we got wrong was not

recognising that this was a major

0:21:080:21:12

transformation programme,

and that should have been based

0:21:120:21:14

on a much more solid policy base

than we had,

0:21:140:21:19

and we should have had

better research to be able

0:21:190:21:22

to launch it in that way.

0:21:220:21:23

Having been an IT procurement badger

myself, I do have insights here.

0:21:230:21:26

The procurement was

absolutely shambolic.

0:21:260:21:32

You had untested providers.

absolutely shambolic.

0:21:320:21:34

You had no clear accountability for

who was responsible for the service.

0:21:340:21:40

And you didn't have an integrator,

so whoever put this town

0:21:400:21:45

as a recruitment strategy,

I don't think had any idea

0:21:450:21:55

what they were trying to achieve.

0:21:550:21:56

It was completely,

fundamentally flawed.

0:21:560:21:57

This is a mistake we made thinking,

as part of the reprocurement,

0:21:570:22:01

we could somehow get suppliers

to invent on the hoof tags that

0:22:010:22:04

could do everything.

0:22:040:22:05

That was an overly ambitious

reading of what the market

0:22:050:22:07

was capable of delivering.

0:22:070:22:08

Richard Heaton.

0:22:080:22:09

Earlier this year, new penalties

were introduced for people

0:22:090:22:11

caught driving while using

a hand-held mobile phone.

0:22:110:22:15

A fine of £200 as well as six

penalty points could be imposed

0:22:150:22:19

for first-time offenders.

0:22:190:22:21

More than 15,000 drivers have been

fined under the new rules.

0:22:210:22:26

In the Lords, peers asked

about the impact of the regulations.

0:22:260:22:29

Young people aged between the ages

of 17 and 29 are more likely to use

0:22:290:22:34

hand-held mobile phones

and other hand-held devices.

0:22:340:22:40

Can my noble friend the Minister say

what the Government is doing to take

0:22:400:22:44

action against this,

and also in relation to further

0:22:440:22:48

education for that particular group?

0:22:480:22:52

My noble friend is right

to highlight the importance

0:22:520:22:54

of addressing young drivers.

0:22:540:22:57

Around 20% of new drivers

will have a crash within the first

0:22:570:23:00

six months of passing their test.

0:23:000:23:02

So any novice drivers caught

using a mobile phone

0:23:020:23:04

within the first two years

will have their licence revoked.

0:23:040:23:08

We've announced changes

to the practical driving test,

0:23:080:23:10

which will come

into force in December.

0:23:100:23:18

I've mentioned the Think campaign,

which is targeting young drivers,

0:23:180:23:20

we have also produced a provisional

licence mailing insert

0:23:200:23:22

which is estimated to reach nearly

1.7 million new drivers annually.

0:23:220:23:25

What representations, if any have

Transport Ministers been making

0:23:250:23:27

to the Treasury that

road traffic offences,

0:23:270:23:31

including vehicle theft

and using hand-held mobile phones

0:23:310:23:33

while driving cannot,

even in increasing

0:23:330:23:35

numbers of occasions,

even be pursued by the police,

0:23:350:23:38

let alone see perpetrators brought

to justice, due to the continuing

0:23:380:23:41

squeeze on police budgets

and continuing reductions

0:23:410:23:45

to the number of police officers?

0:23:450:23:47

Can I take it the Department

for Transport, despite the recent

0:23:470:23:49

publicly expressed concerns of HM

Inspectorate of Constabulary, has

0:23:490:23:53

remained utterly silent on the issue

of inadequate police resources?

0:23:530:23:57

My Lords, we are very sensitive

to the pressures which police face

0:23:570:24:03

and we recognise the importance

of wider police spending in the

0:24:030:24:06

2015 Police Spending Review,

which did protect overall

0:24:060:24:09

police spending in real terms.

0:24:090:24:11

It is of course up to Police

and Crime Commissioners and chief

0:24:110:24:14

constables for each force to decide

how they deploy resources.

0:24:140:24:16

Can the Minister tell us what she's

going to do about cyclists

0:24:160:24:19

who use their phones,

often at high speed,

0:24:190:24:22

and are becoming a danger

on our roads?

0:24:220:24:27

My Lords, I agree that everyone

who uses highways does have

0:24:270:24:30

responsibility to behave safely.

0:24:300:24:31

There are a number of offences that

can cover cycling behaviour.

0:24:310:24:34

Fixed penalty notices,

or officers can report the

0:24:340:24:37

road user for prosecution.

0:24:370:24:40

The Government announced last

month its cycle safety review that

0:24:400:24:42

will involve a consultation on these

were issues, and is working

0:24:420:24:46

with stakeholders for their input

and will publish results this year.

0:24:460:24:50

Members of the Lords come

from all walks of life.

0:24:500:24:52

Lord Bradshaw worked for

Thames Valley Police association,

0:24:520:24:55

specialising in road safety.

0:24:550:24:57

He was concerned about drivers

stopping to take calls.

0:24:570:25:03

Throughout the area,

the regulations about parking

0:25:030:25:05

are universally ignored,

and some very dangerous parking

0:25:050:25:11

is taking place in a town centres.

0:25:110:25:14

Does this not indicate a lack

of respect for the law?

0:25:140:25:18

I wonder what the Government

is doing about that?

0:25:180:25:22

I'm afraid am not aware of

the incident the noble Lord raises.

0:25:220:25:29

Obviously, we're working with police

forces across the country to ensure

0:25:290:25:32

enforcement is taking place.

0:25:320:25:33

Because laws are only as good

as their enforcement.

0:25:330:25:36

That's it, but do join us

at the same time tomorrow

0:25:360:25:39

for another round-up

of the day at Westminster.

0:25:390:25:42

For now, from me,

Mandy Baker, goodbye.

0:25:420:25:45