03/03/2017 Newsnight


03/03/2017

In-depth investigation and analysis of the stories behind the day's headlines with Kirsty Wark.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to 03/03/2017. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

The Prime Minister is fighting on two fronts.

:00:00.:00:00.

Not content with hitting the EU head on over Brexit,

:00:00.:00:08.

she's taken a huge swipe at the Scottish Government.

:00:09.:00:11.

Politics is not a game, and government is not a platform for

:00:12.:00:14.

which to pursue constitutional obsessions.

:00:15.:00:18.

A tunnel vision nationalism, which focuses only on

:00:19.:00:22.

independence at any cost, sells Scotland short.

:00:23.:00:27.

Is this how you talk to a neighbour supposedly

:00:28.:00:29.

We ask the SNP and the Conservative Secretary of State for Scotland.

:00:30.:00:37.

Also tonight - she was a serving officer for 13 years, the face

:00:38.:00:40.

Now she has quit spectacularly on Facebook saying the stress

:00:41.:00:44.

and anxiety brought on by falling police numbers and lack of care

:00:45.:00:47.

And later we'll be live from Belfast, from the Northern Ireland

:00:48.:00:55.

elections where Sinn Fein look like they are having their best

:00:56.:00:58.

showing ever and the leader of the Ulster Unionists has resigned.

:00:59.:01:10.

Few would dispute that we are in a constitutional maelstrom

:01:11.:01:15.

in the UK at the moment, but today that vortex intensified.

:01:16.:01:18.

We had a bruising referendum campaign about the future

:01:19.:01:22.

of the United Kingdom in the EU, but now the fight within the UK

:01:23.:01:25.

Today, Theresa May took the Brexit gloves off with a speech to the Tory

:01:26.:01:30.

Party in Scotland which accused the Scottish Government

:01:31.:01:33.

of an obsession with Independence stoking up endless constitutional

:01:34.:01:37.

grievance, and tunnel vision nationalism.

:01:38.:01:40.

Is this the same Prime minister who arrived in Scotland's capital

:01:41.:01:43.

the day after she won the Tory leadership in July assuring

:01:44.:01:48.

the Scottish government that she wanted it fully engaged

:01:49.:01:50.

Are we heading for a rematch, Indi Ref II?

:01:51.:02:03.

The Brexit referendum has turned what was supposedly a once

:02:04.:02:06.

in a generation decision into a live question once again.

:02:07.:02:10.

The Prime Minister was at the Scottish Conservative Conference

:02:11.:02:12.

today, accusing the SNP of using the EU vote to reheat

:02:13.:02:17.

arguments that the Scottish people have already rejected once.

:02:18.:02:24.

Politics is not a game and government is not

:02:25.:02:26.

a platform for which to pursue constitutional obsessions.

:02:27.:02:28.

It is about taking the serious decisions to improve people's lives.

:02:29.:02:32.

A tunnel vision nationalism which focuses only on independence

:02:33.:02:37.

The SNP government has been pressing for what it calls a differentiated

:02:38.:02:47.

settlement for Scotland post-Brexit, staying in the EU single market

:02:48.:02:50.

Today, the Prime Minister ruled out such an arrangement.

:02:51.:02:57.

I am determined to ensure that as we leave the EU,

:02:58.:03:00.

we do so as one United Kingdom which prospers outside the EU

:03:01.:03:04.

That means achieving a deal with the EU which works

:03:05.:03:10.

for all parts of the UK, England, Scotland, Wales

:03:11.:03:12.

And for the United Kingdom as a whole.

:03:13.:03:23.

The truly irritating thing about it all is that there are deals

:03:24.:03:26.

There is a deal with Nissan, a deal for the City of London.

:03:27.:03:31.

There's probably going to be a deal for Ireland,

:03:32.:03:33.

maybe one for soft fruit farmers in East Anglia.

:03:34.:03:36.

And yet the one group of people who have voted so

:03:37.:03:39.

emphatically to want a deal to stay in the EU and the single

:03:40.:03:47.

market are the Scots, and there's no deal available for us.

:03:48.:03:53.

For our precious union, of nations and of people. Theresa May's defence

:03:54.:04:02.

of the union went down well in the hall, but how strong is it in the

:04:03.:04:07.

hearts of Scottish voters? At the independence referendum in 2014,

:04:08.:04:16.

44.7% of Scots voted yes. After that, the pro-independent side got a

:04:17.:04:21.

boost into the high 40s but it settled down to mostly occupy the

:04:22.:04:27.

40, 40 5% zone. Then came the Brexit vote. The fact Scotland was being

:04:28.:04:31.

taken out of the EU against its will created a slight in the

:04:32.:04:35.

pro-independence polling numbers, but then it settled back down to the

:04:36.:04:40.

same zone it was in before the Brexit vote. There has been a

:04:41.:04:45.

significant number of voters, about 15% have, according to the polls

:04:46.:04:50.

move to yes. But that has been balanced by a significant number of

:04:51.:04:55.

voters moving in the opposite direction. So there has been a fair

:04:56.:05:01.

amount of churn. It hints at something deeper and longer

:05:02.:05:05.

standing, which is nobody really knows exactly how a second

:05:06.:05:09.

independence referendum, if it were to happen in 2018 or in 2019, if it

:05:10.:05:16.

happens at all, would play out. Scotland's economic standing has

:05:17.:05:30.

worsened. North Sea oil prices have dropped. And according to the

:05:31.:05:35.

Scottish Government's own figures, Scotland runs a fiscal deficit of

:05:36.:05:42.

9.5% of GDP, or ?15 billion a year. But in politics these days, other

:05:43.:05:46.

arguments seem to carry more weight than simple economics. Another

:05:47.:05:50.

potentially important change since the independence referendum was the

:05:51.:05:54.

wiping out in Scotland of the Labour Party. In 2014 they were confident

:05:55.:05:59.

of delivering their voters for the no side. Since then, those voters

:06:00.:06:06.

have deserted them. Jeremy Corbyn's apparent willingness for abandoning

:06:07.:06:10.

the notion Labour could be a plausible party of government at

:06:11.:06:15.

Westminster, opens the door to Conservative rule in London from

:06:16.:06:21.

2010 to 2030. The SNP think that is something that will powerfully

:06:22.:06:25.

concentrate Scottish minds and make independence see more plausible and

:06:26.:06:31.

unappealing motion. Securing Scotland's place in the EU was a key

:06:32.:06:35.

plank of the 2014 anti-independence campaign. Now it is a key part of

:06:36.:06:40.

the nationalist case. How decisive it might be in changing minds,

:06:41.:06:44.

depends on the Brexit we end up with.

:06:45.:06:46.

David Mundell is the Secretary of State for Scotland.

:06:47.:06:48.

He'll make his speech at the Tory Party Conference

:06:49.:06:50.

Good evening to you. David Mundell, a good photo call with Nicola

:06:51.:07:02.

Sturgeon two days after she became leader, great sound bites. This is

:07:03.:07:06.

the real Theresa May, it was an attack on a national government with

:07:07.:07:12.

its own mandate? It is not anything of that kind. What it is, it is

:07:13.:07:17.

asking Nicola Sturgeon to take the issue of independence of the table.

:07:18.:07:22.

What your report didn't cover was the fact that all polling that has

:07:23.:07:26.

taken place in Scotland indicates the overwhelming majority of people,

:07:27.:07:33.

whether they are for or against independence, are against having

:07:34.:07:35.

another independence referendum at this time. They believe we have made

:07:36.:07:41.

the decision, they think another referendum would be divisive. It is

:07:42.:07:45.

about saying, let's not talk all the time about independence, let's focus

:07:46.:07:54.

on the day job, the issues with health and education. Education,

:07:55.:07:58.

where standards have slumped in Scotland. And on the issue of

:07:59.:08:02.

Brexit, let's come together, work together and get the best deal for

:08:03.:08:09.

Scotland. Working together you assume, means taking a well

:08:10.:08:14.

considered substantial document produced by the Scottish Government

:08:15.:08:18.

before Christmas, giving it credence, having a discussion about

:08:19.:08:22.

it. Why does the reason may not think this is a legitimate document?

:08:23.:08:27.

There is nothing to suggest it is her view. Have you had a formal

:08:28.:08:35.

response? She has said and I have said, we take this document as a

:08:36.:08:40.

serious contribution to the debate. That is why officials from both

:08:41.:08:45.

governments have been working assiduously together to look at the

:08:46.:08:48.

areas in that document where we have common ground and there are a large

:08:49.:08:52.

numbers of areas where we have common ground, workers' rights,

:08:53.:08:59.

criminal justice, and security. But not the single market? What the

:09:00.:09:03.

position is in relation to the single market, the SNP position is

:09:04.:09:07.

to have membership of the single market. Our position is to have

:09:08.:09:14.

access to the single market. In so many areas, the ends we want to

:09:15.:09:19.

achieve the same. If we can agree on those, it seems to me there is a way

:09:20.:09:26.

forward. Why does Theresa May think her voice in Scotland is more

:09:27.:09:30.

legitimate than the First Minister in a country where there was only

:09:31.:09:34.

one Conservative MP returned in the whole country, and that was you. She

:09:35.:09:39.

doesn't think her voice is more legitimate, but she is the Prime

:09:40.:09:43.

Minister of the whole of the United Kingdom. She is entitled to say to

:09:44.:09:50.

Nicola Sturgeon, stop banging on about independence all the time. The

:09:51.:09:54.

people of Scotland made their decision in 2014. They made it clear

:09:55.:09:58.

in all the polling they don't want to have another... I don't think

:09:59.:10:07.

Theresa May started talking about independence three hours after the

:10:08.:10:10.

declaration of the result in the EU referendum. It is the first time

:10:11.:10:15.

Nicola Sturgeon mentioned independence and she has mentioned

:10:16.:10:20.

it every single day since the 24th of June. You cannot say she has

:10:21.:10:27.

mentioned it every day, so let's leave that. Why does the government

:10:28.:10:31.

reject the idea Britain cannot go it alone outside the EU, and uses the

:10:32.:10:36.

same arguments for why Scotland cannot go it alone? We have had a

:10:37.:10:42.

referendum in Scotland and people have decided to remain decisively,

:10:43.:10:47.

part of the United Kingdom. The overwhelming view of people in

:10:48.:10:52.

Scotland is they should move on from this constitutional debate. I think

:10:53.:10:56.

people want to see both governments working together so we can get the

:10:57.:11:00.

best possible deal from the EU as we exited. That is what we are trying

:11:01.:11:09.

to achieve. In the possibility there is another referendum on Scottish

:11:10.:11:16.

independence, who is going to run a better together campaign? Argument

:11:17.:11:21.

remains, there could be another independence referendum, but we

:11:22.:11:23.

don't believe there should be and we will continue to make the argument

:11:24.:11:27.

we should not have another independence referendum. But the

:11:28.:11:32.

Theresa may put herself on the front of a better together campaign? What

:11:33.:11:37.

Theresa May is doing is emphasising her commitment to the United

:11:38.:11:41.

Kingdom, setting out the benefits of Scotland being in the United

:11:42.:11:46.

Kingdom, but calling on Nicola Sturgeon to take this divisive issue

:11:47.:11:49.

of the threat of another independence referendum of the

:11:50.:11:54.

table. Let's not talk about the independence referendum, Theresa May

:11:55.:11:57.

said she would not be triggering Article 50 until she had a UK

:11:58.:12:02.

approach. The truth is, you don't have a UK approach yet? What doing

:12:03.:12:09.

is continuing to work with the Scottish Government and other

:12:10.:12:12.

devolved administrations to take on board issues and concerns they have

:12:13.:12:17.

raised, so we can go forward into these EU negotiations with a team UK

:12:18.:12:21.

approach. That is the approach that will get is the best results and

:12:22.:12:25.

that is why we want the Scottish Government and the government in the

:12:26.:12:29.

other part of the UK on board, so we can work together. That is how we

:12:30.:12:32.

will get the best approach and that is Theresa May's approach.

:12:33.:12:37.

Stephen Gethins is the SNP's Europe Spokesperson.

:12:38.:12:38.

Theresa May has called Nicola Sturgeon's bluff, so why not just

:12:39.:12:52.

call a referendum and be done with it? Well, in the interview you have

:12:53.:12:58.

just had, we have had David Mundell saying it is still alive document.

:12:59.:13:03.

The biggest crisis we face right now is being taken out of the European

:13:04.:13:10.

Union in a Tory hard Brexit. It could cost thousands of jobs. The

:13:11.:13:14.

most detailed document was produced by the Scottish Government, looking

:13:15.:13:19.

for a compromise that would bring in Northern Ireland and Scotland who

:13:20.:13:24.

voted to remain overwhelmingly. I think trying to pull together that

:13:25.:13:29.

compromise was the right thing to do. It is a serious document. If

:13:30.:13:36.

Theresa May has made it clear she is not interested in an approach which

:13:37.:13:40.

allows you to differentiate and remain in the single market, if she

:13:41.:13:45.

has made it clear and it seems that she has, why not just call the

:13:46.:13:50.

referendum? As soon as she has triggered Article 50? Let's give

:13:51.:13:56.

them the opportunity to come back, David Mundell said it is still live

:13:57.:14:01.

so let's take them on their word. Theresa May had an extraordinary

:14:02.:14:06.

speech lashing out at a government when she doesn't have other problems

:14:07.:14:10.

to seek right now. This is the biggest crisis of this time right

:14:11.:14:17.

now, it could cost 80,000 jobs if we are taken out of the EU. David

:14:18.:14:22.

Mundell talks about independence, Theresa May talks a great deal about

:14:23.:14:25.

independence. People like me are happy with that. When the Scottish

:14:26.:14:29.

Government said we could put that to one side, we can try and compromise,

:14:30.:14:35.

we can look at the deal across the United Kingdom, that is an

:14:36.:14:38.

opportunity they should have seized. We have a situation in the UK where

:14:39.:14:43.

we are getting very few details nine months on. We know there is chaos in

:14:44.:14:51.

a number of Whitehall departments about what happens next. That should

:14:52.:14:53.

be the Prime Minister's priority right now. If you are getting

:14:54.:14:59.

signals in the key plank of your document, which is remaining in the

:15:00.:15:03.

single market, is not a runner, Nicola Sturgeon will look weak if

:15:04.:15:06.

she doesn't call a referendum now and you will be letting down the

:15:07.:15:09.

people who expect you to take one forward? Our first responsibility is

:15:10.:15:15.

about maintaining jobs in the economy. If you look at my own

:15:16.:15:23.

constituency, the University of St Andrews, which relies heavily on its

:15:24.:15:26.

relationship with the European Union, we have to try and seek the

:15:27.:15:31.

least worst option. This is a problem and this is chaos of

:15:32.:15:39.

Westminster's making. It was a Gross responsibility of believe campaign

:15:40.:15:42.

who campaigned on a blank piece of paper. How will the Scottish

:15:43.:15:49.

Government make the decision that concessions, whatever they are or

:15:50.:15:53.

what ever they are not, are sufficient or insufficient enough to

:15:54.:15:57.

call a referendum, when will we have some clarity on this from the SNP.

:15:58.:16:03.

The uni 's Prime Minister is talking about independence, but Nicola

:16:04.:16:07.

Sturgeon did raise it within a month of the referendum. Why not tell

:16:08.:16:12.

people what will govern your decision?

:16:13.:16:17.

Rather than coming up north to Scotland and indulging in some sabre

:16:18.:16:22.

rattling, maybe Theresa May would have been better to work in terms of

:16:23.:16:26.

partnership, take the document seriously. It sets out how we can

:16:27.:16:31.

deal with problems. Remember, this EU decision will have an impact and

:16:32.:16:36.

each and every one of us in terms of our rights, livelihoods, in terms of

:16:37.:16:39.

every single part of the economy. This is the biggest crisis we are

:16:40.:16:43.

facing and it will have an impact on each and everyone of us. There a

:16:44.:16:49.

live document at the moment that came from the Scottish Government

:16:50.:16:53.

that came from the Scottish Government that has more detail than

:16:54.:16:57.

we have seen so far. We want the Westminster government to take that

:16:58.:17:00.

more seriously, and try to work in partnership.

:17:01.:17:03.

Laura Beal joined Devon and Cornwall police 13 years ago when she was 19,

:17:04.:17:06.

She was regarded as such a good officer that her face was

:17:07.:17:11.

on the Constabulary's Annual Report and on posters advertising

:17:12.:17:13.

But this week she did something no other serving

:17:14.:17:16.

She quit very publically, publishing her resignation

:17:17.:17:21.

In it she talked about her mental breakdown.

:17:22.:17:27.

She says she was left disillusioned and suffering from stress

:17:28.:17:29.

and anxiety as a result of the increasing

:17:30.:17:31.

Falling police numbers in the Constabulary took its toll

:17:32.:17:36.

on her capacity to do her job and crucially, she says

:17:37.:17:39.

Good evening. Thank you for joining us. You had a tough time, but do you

:17:40.:17:53.

remember back when you first wanted to be an officer? Very well and very

:17:54.:17:58.

fondly. I used to hear so many fantastic stories from my father.

:17:59.:18:01.

Who was an officer for ten years. Yes. The day I got in wasn't

:18:02.:18:07.

drastic, I was so proud. You were in the force for 14 years, do you

:18:08.:18:11.

remember when he started to feel unwell? It is probably a year or two

:18:12.:18:17.

after the cuts came in, there was the Windsor report and Theresa May

:18:18.:18:20.

did drastic cuts about two years after that. What actually happens to

:18:21.:18:27.

you, what were your symptoms? It ranged from just struggling to get

:18:28.:18:31.

out of bed, and the stereotypical ones where you struggle, it's got to

:18:32.:18:37.

a point to even going shopping was too much. So you just come back.

:18:38.:18:41.

What happened when you were actually on the beat, what impact did your

:18:42.:18:46.

stress levels have on you then? Dramatically. You put your uniform

:18:47.:18:50.

on and put a face on, and that's what everyone is able to do, but it

:18:51.:18:54.

got to the point where even putting your uniform on, which is kind of a

:18:55.:18:58.

mask, you can't even do it any more, and I wasn't able to do it any more,

:18:59.:19:03.

and it was affecting me too much. Did you feel exposed out in the

:19:04.:19:08.

field? Yes, I didn't feel safe. There's not enough of us. I didn't

:19:09.:19:14.

feel safe to drive the vehicle is so quickly in a night and so far. They

:19:15.:19:20.

were expecting us to do so much and there is no support for mental

:19:21.:19:24.

health. The procedures we have to go through, if you say you are not

:19:25.:19:28.

coping well, they sent you to occupational health, who ask if you

:19:29.:19:32.

have seen your doctor, and you'll only get six counselling sessions.

:19:33.:19:35.

If you can't have those sessions, they say you have to find your own

:19:36.:19:40.

route to getting well. Did you feel, as it were, when I say exposed in

:19:41.:19:45.

the field, did you feel frightened or in danger or putting others in

:19:46.:19:49.

danger? I was too professional to feel like I was putting others in

:19:50.:19:52.

danger. The reason I went off sick was because I felt I couldn't do my

:19:53.:19:56.

job properly. I wouldn't put myself at other people in danger because I

:19:57.:20:02.

couldn't do my job properly. You made a career, 13 years, how did you

:20:03.:20:08.

come to the decision? When you are thinking about going into work and

:20:09.:20:12.

it's a sad thing, it shouldn't be said. The whole point of being alive

:20:13.:20:17.

is to be happy, I think. When you go into work and you are making out you

:20:18.:20:21.

are trying to be happy and you can't, it's so suffocating. Even the

:20:22.:20:26.

thought of putting on my uniform was suffocating. How did your family

:20:27.:20:29.

deal with that? How did your father help you, was it difficult for him?

:20:30.:20:33.

My family and friends have been my rocks. I doubt has been so

:20:34.:20:40.

supportive. He has been my inspiration to join, and also to

:20:41.:20:44.

have the courage to leave and say, no, you need to be happy, and that's

:20:45.:20:51.

most important. You have made quite a lot of serious criticisms of

:20:52.:20:55.

police numbers, the way the police are deployed and so forth. Some

:20:56.:20:58.

people might say a stressful job isn't the job for you. I wouldn't

:20:59.:21:02.

have been doing it for 13 years if that was the case. Stress is

:21:03.:21:07.

something you can manage. It is manageable, and I loved my job and I

:21:08.:21:11.

was damned good at it, and you just have to see the comments put on

:21:12.:21:16.

there, it's not just me. A lot of messages of support. So many. All of

:21:17.:21:20.

them resonate about mental health, they were so stressed, they were

:21:21.:21:24.

telling supervisors they were stressed and not coping. What

:21:25.:21:27.

happens is as a result of that they go off sick, and they can't go off

:21:28.:21:33.

sick. These are colleagues in the police that have contacted you. They

:21:34.:21:37.

can't go off sick, and because they are stressed little things happen,

:21:38.:21:40.

they make mistakes, then they are penalised and forced out of the job

:21:41.:21:44.

that weight and all because of their mental health. Do you think there

:21:45.:21:48.

are circumstances you would go back into the police force? No, it's too

:21:49.:21:53.

broken for me. I found my way out and I'm starting to find happy

:21:54.:21:59.

happiness again. I'm doing mobile dog grooming now. Completely

:22:00.:22:05.

different! If you see officers in the same circumstances as you,

:22:06.:22:08.

should they stay and fight for change or should they quit? It's all

:22:09.:22:14.

on an individual basis. You know yourself, be honest and true with

:22:15.:22:17.

yourself. It's not as daunting as you think it's going to be and you

:22:18.:22:21.

owe the police force nothing. You are your own boss. Thank you very

:22:22.:22:23.

much indeed, Laura. A spokesperson for Devon

:22:24.:22:26.

and Cornwall told us... "We do hear concerns from officers

:22:27.:22:29.

and staff and recognise It requires skills and personal

:22:30.:22:31.

resilience which are often We are a supportive force

:22:32.:22:36.

and will always assist an officer It's been another tumultuous

:22:37.:22:40.

week for Donald Trump. Days after a senior member

:22:41.:22:45.

of his team had to resign because of his contacts

:22:46.:22:48.

with a Russia diplomat, the President's top legal official

:22:49.:22:50.

Jeff Sessions also became embroiled in a similar row, leading him

:22:51.:22:54.

to distance himself from any official role in investigating

:22:55.:22:56.

Russian links to I have now decided to recuse myself

:22:57.:22:58.

from any existing or future investigations of any matter

:22:59.:23:06.

relating in any way to the campaigns So, the Presidency mired

:23:07.:23:10.

in another week of scandal. But to one leading American

:23:11.:23:17.

Academic, Timothy Wu, there is no such thing as a bad

:23:18.:23:20.

headline for Mr Trump. Earlier I asked him why the

:23:21.:23:27.

president thrives on negative press. He has a completely different

:23:28.:23:31.

strategy and different way His main interest is always

:23:32.:23:33.

getting attention first, always being the centre of every

:23:34.:23:37.

headline, dominating all the news. I think as far as he's concerned,

:23:38.:23:40.

if he does that, he wins. But did he come upon this

:23:41.:23:43.

by accident or design? You know, I think certain things

:23:44.:23:47.

are just people's intuition. He's an entertainer, however,

:23:48.:23:50.

he understands that the show with the greatest ratings

:23:51.:23:53.

tends to win. And I think what he understands

:23:54.:23:58.

is that the American public's Got a million things

:23:59.:24:00.

going on and most of all And if he actually gets to reach

:24:01.:24:05.

people with his messages, In a sense, his own unpredictability

:24:06.:24:11.

is exciting, are you suggesting? You know, the things that really get

:24:12.:24:18.

people hooked are unpredictable Whether it is on purpose or not,

:24:19.:24:21.

he seems to have more of America paying attention to the presidency

:24:22.:24:29.

than any time maybe since So, he has really succeeded

:24:30.:24:32.

in a very unusual method that most So the idea is, you don't

:24:33.:24:40.

necessarily have to win a quick hit, you just have to keep going and be

:24:41.:24:45.

out there the whole time and by even It's kind of counterintuitive,

:24:46.:24:48.

but it suggests that ultimately it is a contest for attention

:24:49.:24:55.

and the win-lose All that matters in the end is who's

:24:56.:24:58.

getting the most attention, who's getting their message

:24:59.:25:03.

across and by that metric, Donald Would that also suggest

:25:04.:25:05.

that there is no such thing as bad publicity or is there something that

:25:06.:25:12.

could be his downfall? You know, for him I really

:25:13.:25:16.

believe his downfall will not be through normal means,

:25:17.:25:20.

but more like by being Not like Richard Nixon,

:25:21.:25:22.

but more like Paris Hilton where people just get sick of him

:25:23.:25:27.

and forget about it and then His power comes from

:25:28.:25:31.

a very different place But you could forget

:25:32.:25:33.

about Paris Hilton, it's a little bit more difficult to forget

:25:34.:25:37.

about the president, isn't it? He will have other forms of scrutiny

:25:38.:25:39.

than Paris Hilton had. That's why I think it's safe to say

:25:40.:25:42.

he's hacked the media. Even the story we are doing

:25:43.:25:45.

here, it's irresistible, he is the President,

:25:46.:25:52.

you can't ignore him He's hacked the power

:25:53.:25:54.

of the media and he's using it Even if that means losing -

:25:55.:25:59.

losing in the superficial sense - he's trying to win in

:26:00.:26:05.

the deeper sense. So, is the kind of counterpunch then

:26:06.:26:08.

to have the media ignore a lot of what he says,

:26:09.:26:12.

which would presumably I think that's the only

:26:13.:26:14.

way for him to really have his downfall is if the media,

:26:15.:26:22.

and frankly the public, just get sick of him,

:26:23.:26:24.

kind of like an act that's gone one It seems strange, he is

:26:25.:26:27.

still the president, but I think it's possible people

:26:28.:26:33.

could get sick of the whole shtick. Indeed, surely if there was some

:26:34.:26:37.

crisis that befell America, something which required

:26:38.:26:41.

the president to step up to the plate and he fell short

:26:42.:26:44.

in that, would that not be I think he could be impeached

:26:45.:26:47.

and that would be a turning point. I think his absurd handling

:26:48.:26:53.

of some crisis in some very strange way would,

:26:54.:26:58.

by his metric, not damage him as much as it would

:26:59.:27:02.

damage anybody else. Now we bring you the very latest

:27:03.:27:04.

on a very significant night As the votes come in for

:27:05.:27:11.

the Northern Irealnd Assembly elections, the Ulster Unionist Party

:27:12.:27:17.

leader Mike Nesbitt has resigned, and Sinn Fein are on their way

:27:18.:27:19.

to their best night ever. The BBC's Ireland correspondent

:27:20.:27:23.

Chris Buckler joins us There are still about 15 of the 90

:27:24.:27:37.

seats to be filled and counting continues, but it's clear Sinn Fein

:27:38.:27:41.

has had a very good election. They went into this vote campaigning

:27:42.:27:45.

about what they said was the DUP's arrogance, a botched green energy

:27:46.:27:49.

scheme and issues like the Irish language, and there is no doubt that

:27:50.:27:53.

motivated their vote to come out, and they have given them a great

:27:54.:27:57.

deal of support. In fact, they have narrowed the gap between their form

:27:58.:28:02.

a coalition partners, the DUP, two fractions of a percentage point

:28:03.:28:08.

whenever you look at the share of first percentage vote. Saying that,

:28:09.:28:10.

the DUP have done relatively well, they have shored up their position

:28:11.:28:15.

and it will be a very tight result. However, speak to some Democratic

:28:16.:28:17.

Unionists politicians and privately they say it's a bad day for

:28:18.:28:23.

unionism, partly because UUP President Mike Nesbitt has resigned

:28:24.:28:27.

because of his party's poor performance. We have seen the middle

:28:28.:28:31.

ground getting squeezed and this divisive election, this sectarian

:28:32.:28:34.

election, has led to success for Sinn Fein in particular and also the

:28:35.:28:39.

DUP. What do you think the most likely formulation will be at the

:28:40.:28:44.

end? The big problem is trying to form some sort of power-sharing

:28:45.:28:48.

government. That will not be easy. We have already had Sinn Fein set

:28:49.:28:52.

out a red line saying they want Arlene Foster to step aside, not

:28:53.:28:56.

become First Minister, if they are going to go back into government

:28:57.:29:00.

with the DUP, at least as long as a public enquiry lasts into the

:29:01.:29:05.

botched green energy scheme. She was the minister in charge of that

:29:06.:29:08.

scheme when it was set up inexplicably without cost controls.

:29:09.:29:13.

That'll put pressure on Arlene Foster and the DUP. I think trying

:29:14.:29:19.

to put a deal into power-sharing back. They have three weeks to get

:29:20.:29:24.

eight First Minister and Deputy First Minister elected. Frankly,

:29:25.:29:28.

that's looking like a tough ask. It raises the possibility that

:29:29.:29:30.

Westminster might have to step in and take over, effectively what's

:29:31.:29:34.

known as direct rule, where they run things in Northern Ireland while

:29:35.:29:37.

there isn't a functioning executive. Neither Sinn Fein nor the DUP want

:29:38.:29:40.

that, but tonight it doesn't look like they want to work with each

:29:41.:29:45.

other at this stage either. Thank you, Chris.

:29:46.:29:47.

But before we go, Nintendo launched a new games console today.

:29:48.:29:51.

No doubt it'll render Mario in ever more detail than before

:29:52.:29:54.

But a part of us wonders whether the energetic plumber

:29:55.:29:57.

Quite a wet start to the day for Scotland and Northern Ireland. It

:29:58.:30:50.

will be windy and quite cold as well. Any rain doesn't last too long

:30:51.:30:54.

in eastern England. There

:30:55.:30:55.

Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS