09/03/2018 Newswatch


Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS


09/03/2018

Samira Ahmed rounds up viewers' reactions to BBC coverage of the attack on Sergei Skripal, the Oscars and other news stories.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to 09/03/2018. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

Now on BBC News, Samira Ahmed

presents this week's round-up

0:00:000:00:02

of audience reaction on Newswatch.

0:00:020:00:04

Hello and welcome to Newswatch,

with me, Samira Ahmed.

0:00:090:00:12

The attempted murder of a double

agent on British soil,

0:00:120:00:16

did BBC News report it

proportionately and fairly?

0:00:160:00:25

And was the Oscars ceremony

an excuse for trivial gushing over

0:00:250:00:28

celebrities or a welcomed

dose of glamour?

0:00:280:00:31

The week began with some news

that could have come

0:00:310:00:34

from a John le Carre novel,

described here at the top of

0:00:340:00:38

Monday's News at 10 by Fiona Bruce.

0:00:380:00:40

A former Russian spy is critical

in hospital after a suspected

0:00:410:00:44

poisoning in Salisbury.

0:00:440:00:47

Sergei Skripal, convicted of spying

on Russia for the UK,

0:00:470:00:50

has been living in Britain

for nearly eight years.

0:00:500:00:54

Police in protective clothing have

sealed the area after the Russian

0:00:540:00:57

and a young woman were found

unconscious on a bench.

0:00:570:01:01

We'll bring you the latest,

as police and doctors race

0:01:010:01:03

to establish if this is another

example of a Russian

0:01:030:01:06

being poisoned on UK soil.

0:01:060:01:09

That last suggestion of Russian

involvement was examined many

0:01:090:01:12

times during the week,

but without any conclusive

0:01:120:01:14

proof being put forward,

and that prompted one Twitter user

0:01:140:01:16

to complain that...

0:01:160:01:20

Evidence of Russian involvement

wasn't the only thing lacking.

0:01:240:01:28

Despite plenty of airtime

being devoted to the story,

0:01:280:01:38

actual news developments

were slow to emerge.

0:01:380:01:40

A viewer called John e-mailed...

0:01:400:01:43

Meanwhile, Mike Barnes had

a different point to make.

0:01:460:01:50

If some thought there should be

a presumption of innocence

0:02:150:02:19

for Russia over the nerve agent

attack, then for others the same

0:02:190:02:22

was true of Bradley Wiggins.

0:02:220:02:24

The Olympic gold medal winning

cyclist was found by a House

0:02:240:02:27

of Commons Select Committee

on Monday to have crossed an ethical

0:02:270:02:29

line in taking asthma drugs

to enhance his performance.

0:02:290:02:36

Richard Conway reported

on the story for the News at 6.

0:02:360:02:39

He is a sporting icon,

a Tour de France winner

0:02:390:02:41

and Britain's most decorated

Olympian, but a damning report has

0:02:410:02:48

accused Sir Bradley Wiggins of

unethical behaviour over his use

0:02:480:02:51

of drugs that MPs say were taken

to boost performance and not

0:02:510:02:54

just for medical need.

0:02:540:02:55

John Sheffield got in

touch with us to say...

0:02:550:02:57

Now, the main purpose of BBC News

is to inform its audience,

0:03:210:03:26

but is there such a thing

as too much information?

0:03:260:03:29

That was the charge that's been made

over the past week by viewers

0:03:290:03:32

of the BBC News Channel,

some of whom were watching

0:03:320:03:35

the Prime Minister's speech

about Brexit last Friday,

0:03:350:03:37

and found their eyes

drawn to the right side

0:03:370:03:41

of the screen, as we look at it.

0:03:410:03:43

We are clear that as we leave

the EU, free movement of people

0:03:430:03:47

will come to an end,

and we will control

0:03:470:03:49

the number of people who come

to live in our country.

0:03:490:03:54

But UK citizens will still want

to work and study in EU countries,

0:03:540:03:57

just as EU citizens will want to do

the same here.

0:03:570:04:00

There's quite a lot going

on on the screen there,

0:04:000:04:03

the breaking news banner

with the description

0:04:030:04:05

of what Theresa May is saying,

the scrolling ticker below that,

0:04:050:04:11

summarising other news stories,

tweets reacting to the speech,

0:04:110:04:13

oh, and the speech itself.

0:04:130:04:14

Susan Rowe was one of those

who found it all too much.

0:04:140:04:21

The live speech reaction panel

and the right-hand side

0:04:210:04:23

of the screen, with random comments

from journalists political

0:04:230:04:25

commentators rendered it almost

impossible to concentrate

0:04:250:04:33

on the contents of the speech.

0:04:330:04:35

There was already comment

at the bottom of the screen.

0:04:350:04:37

Please give the British public

the chance to listen and watch

0:04:370:04:40

without being constantly interrupted

by random comments from all

0:04:400:04:42

and sundry, which pretty much

repeat each other anyway.

0:04:420:04:47

The practice of splitting the screen

in this way is also used

0:04:510:04:54

during the live broadcast

of Prime Minister's Questions,

0:04:540:04:56

and last week James Turner objected

to the presence of this tweet

0:04:560:04:59

from Carrie Symonds,

who was the Conservative Party's

0:04:590:05:03

Director of Communications.

0:05:030:05:04

A fact not made clear on air.

0:05:040:05:07

And after this week's PMQs

Adrian David also thought...

0:05:070:05:10

Do let us know what you think

of those tweets appearing on screen,

0:05:210:05:25

added value or just a distraction?

0:05:250:05:27

If you think it's the latter,

you may like to know that

0:05:270:05:33

Prime Minister's Question Time

is shown not just on the news

0:05:330:05:35

channel, but also on BBC Two,

where it appears full frame,

0:05:350:05:38

without tweets running

along the side.

0:05:380:05:42

There will be details

of how to contact us

0:05:420:05:44

at the end of the programme.

0:05:440:05:46

Sunday night saw the big night

of the year for the film industry.

0:05:470:05:53

Some love watching

the Oscars for the glitz,

0:05:530:05:56

the outfits, the drama.

0:05:560:05:57

For others, as we will see,

the appeal is not so great.

0:05:570:06:00

For Breakfast on Monday morning,

Rebecca Jones is outside

0:06:000:06:06

the post-ceremony Vanity Fair

party collaring some of

0:06:060:06:08

the night's winners.

0:06:080:06:09

Yes, morning everyone

from Hollywood.

0:06:090:06:10

I have a great British

success story here,

0:06:100:06:12

and the headline reads for itself.

0:06:120:06:17

From Hollyoaks to Hollywood -

I've got the winners of the best

0:06:170:06:27

short film for The Silent Child,

Rachel Shenton, Chris

0:06:360:06:38

Overton, from Britain!

0:06:380:06:39

Show us your Oscars.

0:06:390:06:40

Yes.

0:06:400:06:41

And they've already got your name

is already engraved on them.

0:06:410:06:44

David Baker also felt the BBC's news

values were wrong on Monday morning.

0:06:440:06:47

And Rosemary Smith agreed.

0:07:010:07:02

On Tuesday, BBC News reported

on calls from public health

0:07:180:07:22

officials for Britain to go

on a diet.

0:07:220:07:30

Health editor Hugh Pym set up

the numbers for the 6

0:07:300:07:33

and 10 o'clock bulletins.

0:07:330:07:34

Here's the obesity problem.

0:07:340:07:38

A child's diet might include

breakfast with nearly 500 calories,

0:07:380:07:40

a packed lunch with more than 1000,

an after-school snack at around 250,

0:07:400:07:43

and pasta and a pudding for dinner,

with more than 800 calories.

0:07:430:07:46

But that's nearly 600

above the recommended limit

0:07:460:07:50

for children, which is like eating

an extra meal a day.

0:07:500:07:54

Most television reports on obesity

like this one show footage

0:08:000:08:02

of the bodies but not the faces

of overweight members of the public.

0:08:020:08:05

One news watch viewer,

a medical doctor who preferred

0:08:050:08:08

to remain anonymous,

e-mailed us recently with his

0:08:080:08:09

thoughts about that practice.

0:08:100:08:12

Hugh Pym was also on the air

on Thursday with some statistics

0:08:380:08:42

about what has become a familiar

story this winter,

0:08:420:08:45

about cancelled nonurgent surgery

in English hospitals.

0:08:450:08:51

Figures out today reveal the scale

of the cancellations.

0:08:510:08:53

In December, there were nearly

27,000 fewer routine operations

0:08:530:08:56

carried out in England than the same

month a year earlier.

0:08:560:08:59

In January, there was

a drop of nearly 14,500.

0:08:590:09:03

And for the most recent two week

period, bed occupancy

0:09:030:09:10

in hospitals at more than 95%

was the highest this winter.

0:09:100:09:13

Steve Gordon wrote to

us with his reaction.

0:09:130:09:15

Finally, Andy Cross is a keen

watcher of BBC News programmes

0:09:450:09:49

but has a frustration he shared

with us recently.

0:09:490:09:51

He recorded this video to explain.

0:09:510:09:55

Could you please explain the logic

of scheduling news programmes

0:09:550:09:58

at the same time on different

channels every night?

0:09:580:10:04

I watched the News at 10 on BBC One,

and then I'm invited

0:10:040:10:07

to either watch my local news

or turn over to Newsnight, starting

0:10:070:10:10

at the same time on BBC Two.

0:10:100:10:12

As someone who enjoys news

programmes, it's so frustrating

0:10:120:10:14

to have to either choose between two

programmes or record one for later,

0:10:140:10:18

especially as there's always

a taster of what's to come

0:10:180:10:21

on Newsnight given at

the end of the news.

0:10:210:10:26

Newsnight has testimonies

from the women at the centre.

0:10:260:10:29

If this is two competing channels,

I'd completely understand,

0:10:290:10:32

but they're both BBC.

0:10:320:10:33

To add insult to injury,

Question Time then competes

0:10:330:10:37

with Newsnight every

Thursday as well.

0:10:370:10:39

Don't BBC One and BBC Two

talk to each other?

0:10:390:10:42

And why only on the

later programming?

0:10:420:10:50

BBC Two offers an alternative

to the News at Six.

0:10:500:10:52

The later scheduling is a pain

to everyone, really.

0:10:520:10:54

If you like news programmes,

you can't watch them all,

0:10:540:10:57

and if you don't like news

programmes, you can't

0:10:570:10:59

get away from them.

0:10:590:11:00

It's very frustrating.

0:11:000:11:01

Thank you for that.

0:11:010:11:04

And to all of those who got

in touch with us this week.

0:11:040:11:07

We welcome all your opinions on BBC

News and current affairs

0:11:070:11:13

and broadcast as many as we can

whether sent in by e-mail,

0:11:130:11:16

telephone or video.

0:11:160:11:17

You can leave a message

on our phone line...

0:11:170:11:19

Or send us an e-mail...

0:11:190:11:20

You can also post your

views on twitter...

0:11:200:11:24

And do have a look at our website,

where you can watch any programmes

0:11:240:11:28

we've made over the past year.

0:11:280:11:29

That's all from us, we'll be back

to hear your thoughts about BBC News

0:11:290:11:32

coverage again next week.

0:11:320:11:33

Goodbye.

0:11:330:11:37

Viewers' comments about BBC News coverage, presented by Samira Ahmed. This week, reactions to the reporting of the attack on Sergei Skripal, the Oscars and other news stories.