08/02/2017 Outside Source


08/02/2017

Ros Atkins with an innovative take on the latest global stories.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to 08/02/2017. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

Hello, I'm Ros Atkins, this is Outside Source.

:00:08.:00:12.

British MP's have voted for the government to begin

:00:13.:00:14.

The bill was never in any doubt, but a key amendment,

:00:15.:00:20.

guaranteeing the rights of EU nationals already in

:00:21.:00:22.

One of the Democrats' top senator has been silenced by the leader

:00:23.:00:34.

of the Senate for breaking the rules.

:00:35.:00:38.

Senator Warren said Senator Sessions has used the awesome power of his

:00:39.:00:47.

office to chill the free exercise of the vote by black citizens.

:00:48.:00:49.

We'll be live in Washington in a moment.

:00:50.:00:51.

We're also going to talk about Donald Trump.

:00:52.:00:53.

It would be so great for our justice system if they would be able to read

:00:54.:01:04.

The most high-profile opposition figure in Russia has been been found

:01:05.:01:08.

Alexei Navalny can no longer run for president next year.

:01:09.:01:13.

If you want to get in touch at any time, you can at #BBC OS.

:01:14.:01:36.

British MPs have voted to allow the Government to formally begin

:01:37.:01:40.

the process of leaving the European Union.

:01:41.:01:45.

the process of leaving the European Union.

:01:46.:01:49.

Didn't have one to the right 494, the noes to the left, 122. -- the

:01:50.:02:08.

ayes to the right, 494. The ayes to the right 494, the noes to the left,

:02:09.:02:14.

122. The ayes habit, the ayes habit! The bill will now move

:02:15.:02:18.

onto the Upper House - If the Lords make any

:02:19.:02:22.

changes to the bill, it will be considered again

:02:23.:02:25.

by the Commons. We can join Rob Watson

:02:26.:02:27.

at Westminster now. We knew this Bill was going to go

:02:28.:02:38.

through but what have we learned from the results? It is a moment of

:02:39.:02:46.

history. This will go down as a key moment in European history and

:02:47.:02:50.

Britain's departure from the European Union. What have we

:02:51.:02:56.

learned? That although most MPs personally voted to Remain, this was

:02:57.:03:01.

the power of the referendum, with most of the MPs despite what they

:03:02.:03:06.

think of the possible consequences of Brexit, falling in behind this

:03:07.:03:11.

love that Theresa May once past so she can fired the starting gun.

:03:12.:03:14.

Before they voted for the bill overall, MPs spent hours voting

:03:15.:03:16.

on amendments to the bill, none of them passed.

:03:17.:03:22.

The one that was getting the most attention was probably from Harriet

:03:23.:03:25.

Harman who said. Not enough of them date. Was that

:03:26.:03:43.

expected? Yes, it was. The interesting thing here is what that

:03:44.:03:46.

tells you about the process that lies ahead and the various

:03:47.:03:51.

complexities and big issues. We still don't know exactly how that

:03:52.:03:58.

will be resolved, what will happen to do the many EU nationals living

:03:59.:04:07.

here. I is trade going to work, how will banking work? Hi Will movement

:04:08.:04:13.

and immigration of people? Rather than getting bogged down with the

:04:14.:04:17.

Parliamentary process here in the UK, what was instructive about that

:04:18.:04:23.

is just how complex this process of Britain leaving the eerie -- leaving

:04:24.:04:25.

the European Union is likely to be. He's referring to this headline

:04:26.:04:28.

in The Herald newspaper - "Support for independence surges

:04:29.:04:32.

on hard Brexit vow". That is related to Theresa May

:04:33.:04:51.

saying that Britain will leave the single market. It doesn't

:04:52.:04:54.

necessarily mean we will get a second referendum, does it? It does,

:04:55.:05:00.

but those who wanted Britain to remain in the European Union feared

:05:01.:05:05.

his threat to the United Kingdom itself. The Scottish National Party

:05:06.:05:09.

sense an opportunity. The opinion polls may be moving in that

:05:10.:05:13.

direction. It is not a done deal that there is no doubt that the

:05:14.:05:17.

union of the United Kingdom is shakier now than it was some weeks

:05:18.:05:25.

and months ago. One final thoughts, what happens next is that Theresa

:05:26.:05:30.

May will be hoping to have this law and trigger the process of Britain

:05:31.:05:34.

leaving the European Union at an EU summit on the 9th of March. That is

:05:35.:05:40.

where a real challenge begins, getting a good deal with the other

:05:41.:05:47.

EU 27. The staff in the Parliament was a relative piece of cake. A lot

:05:48.:05:51.

of these MPs are deeply worried about Brexit and will be watching

:05:52.:05:57.

these negotiations closely indeed. Thank you very much. If you want

:05:58.:06:04.

lots of background information on the Brexit processed you can find it

:06:05.:06:09.

online at any time you wanted at our website that BBC News.

:06:10.:06:11.

Things are getting spikey in the US Senate.

:06:12.:06:13.

The confirmation hearing for Attorney General nominee

:06:14.:06:15.

But Democrat Senator Elizabeth Warren has been banned from speaking

:06:16.:06:26.

She'd read out a 30-year-old letter written by the widow

:06:27.:06:29.

The letter contains the accusation that Mr Sessions had "used

:06:30.:06:37.

the awesome powers of his office in a shabby attempt to intimidate

:06:38.:06:40.

The senator has impugned the motives and conduct of our member for

:06:41.:07:03.

Alabama. Senator Warren said Senator session has used the awesome power

:07:04.:07:07.

of his office to chill the free exercise of the vote by black

:07:08.:07:12.

citizens. I called the senator to order under the provision of rule

:07:13.:07:22.

19. Mr President... Mr President, I am surprised that the words of Mrs

:07:23.:07:29.

King are not suitable for debate in the United States Senate. I as leave

:07:30.:07:33.

of the Senate to continue my remarks.

:07:34.:07:34.

Mitch McConnell, the Republican majority leader, judged that to have

:07:35.:07:49.

Mitch McConnell, the Republican majority leader, judged that to have

:07:50.:07:54.

We can go to Washington now and join Anthony Zurcher.

:07:55.:08:01.

In trying to get quietened in this debate, they have Nato into a

:08:02.:08:11.

liberal marker. This is putting Elizabeth Warren in touch with the

:08:12.:08:15.

Democratic base and pushing her to the forefront of the 2020 race for

:08:16.:08:23.

the Democratic presidential nomination. They might have thought

:08:24.:08:28.

they were taking someone who was in punching the qualities of a

:08:29.:08:31.

colleague, but what they have done is turn this into a multi-day

:08:32.:08:36.

controversy. The data is captured looking ahead to the next

:08:37.:08:40.

presidential election! I can't help myself!

:08:41.:08:41.

Donald Trump addressed police chiefs earlier.

:08:42.:08:43.

Inevitably he turned to his travel ban which is currently suspended.

:08:44.:08:51.

I don't ever want to call a court biased, so I won't call it biased

:08:52.:08:59.

and we haven't had a decision yet. But courts seem to be so political

:09:00.:09:06.

and it would be so great for our justice system if they would be able

:09:07.:09:14.

to read a statement and do what is right, and that has to do with the

:09:15.:09:17.

security of our country, which is so important. Right now we are at risk

:09:18.:09:20.

because of what happened. A US Appeals court has

:09:21.:09:29.

said it will not deliver a ruling on Donald Trump's

:09:30.:09:33.

immigration ban today. How Washington -based journalist has

:09:34.:09:49.

said this. Would you agree with that analysis,

:09:50.:10:05.

or is that too strong? Donald Trump has profited over the course of his

:10:06.:10:10.

political rise in questioning established norms and political

:10:11.:10:15.

power structures. That is part of why his base like sin. It is unusual

:10:16.:10:20.

to see a president so directly question the judgment of the

:10:21.:10:24.

judicial system. He almost acknowledges that he is going to use

:10:25.:10:33.

-- lose this case. He is commenting on a court while they are

:10:34.:10:38.

considering his case, that is extraordinary. I think he is trying

:10:39.:10:43.

to rally the base and laid the blame of any future terrorist attacks of

:10:44.:10:49.

the judiciary because he doesn't think he will win in the court room.

:10:50.:10:57.

Anthony, thank you very much. In a few minutes we will talk to a court

:10:58.:11:01.

case in Russia. Alexei Navalny is a leading Russian

:11:02.:11:03.

opposition figure and he's just been The former entertainer Rolf Harris

:11:04.:11:05.

has been found not guilty of three counts of indecent

:11:06.:11:17.

and sexual assault. A jury at Southwark Crown court

:11:18.:11:20.

was unable to reach verdicts on four The allegations in this trial

:11:21.:11:22.

spanned a 40-year period Our correspondent Sangita Myska has

:11:23.:11:25.

been at Southwark Crown Court. The prosecution has already asked to

:11:26.:11:39.

go our way to consider as to whether it can have a retrial on those kinds

:11:40.:11:43.

were the jury could not reach a verdict. In the meantime, Rolf

:11:44.:11:48.

Harris issued a statement in which he thanked the jury for the care and

:11:49.:11:53.

consideration and for clearing him of three counts of indecent assault

:11:54.:11:58.

today. Rolf Harris has protested his innocence throughout this trial but

:11:59.:12:02.

he did not walk out of court today a free man. Instead, he is heading

:12:03.:12:06.

back to Stanford prison because it is there that he is already serving

:12:07.:12:11.

a sentence for indecently assaulting four other women and girls. That

:12:12.:12:13.

trial was back in 2014. This is Outside Source live

:12:14.:12:21.

from the BBC newsroom. British MP's have voted

:12:22.:12:23.

for the Government to begin proceedings to leave the EU

:12:24.:12:27.

by a huge majority. South Africa's President,

:12:28.:12:37.

Jacob Zuma, has ordered the deployment of about 440 troops

:12:38.:12:42.

to maintain law and order in Parliament for his State

:12:43.:12:45.

of the Nation address on Thursday. Opposition parties have

:12:46.:12:50.

called the decision It's Mohamed Abdullahi Farmajo -

:12:51.:12:51.

he was selected by MPs. The vote has been

:12:52.:13:00.

postponed for four years. But it finally happened

:13:01.:13:03.

at Mogadishu Airport, which one of the few places

:13:04.:13:05.

where security can be guaranteed. Somalia has not had a one-person

:13:06.:13:08.

one-vote democratic The Yemeni Government has told

:13:09.:13:10.

America it must coordinate with it on any future military missions

:13:11.:13:35.

on the ground. Last month a US commando

:13:36.:13:37.

raid didn't go plan. It happened on January 29th

:13:38.:13:39.

and targeted an al-Qaeda stronghold near a town called Al-Bayda

:13:40.:13:41.

in southern Yemen. More than a dozen civilians

:13:42.:13:43.

were killed, including children. Here's Mohamed Yehia

:13:44.:13:46.

from BBC Arabic. This story started this morning with

:13:47.:14:09.

withdrawal of permission from the Yemeni government to the American

:14:10.:14:14.

government to carry out ground operations. We have been trying all

:14:15.:14:18.

day to get through to the Yemeni government to ask this question but

:14:19.:14:22.

they have not applied. They said they did not withdraw permission for

:14:23.:14:27.

the Americans to conduct operations against Al-Qaeda and other terrorist

:14:28.:14:33.

groups, but they have reservations about the operations that happened

:14:34.:14:39.

on the 29th of January and they want to coordinate future operations with

:14:40.:14:45.

the Americans. The target was an Al-Qaeda base, heavily guarded

:14:46.:14:49.

cluster of buildings over there. Among the people killed the was an

:14:50.:14:57.

Al-Qaeda local commander, but he is also linked to tribal forces who are

:14:58.:15:06.

fighting people who are fighting alongside Saudi Arabia. This is

:15:07.:15:09.

where it gets murky and detentions get high amongst the Yemeni

:15:10.:15:12.

officials. So, in some ways they can be helpful

:15:13.:15:21.

in fighting the rebels? It is a web of intermingled tribals. But

:15:22.:15:27.

indirectly? The sky is thought to be an Al-Qaeda leader but he is also

:15:28.:15:31.

allied to tribal porters who are fighting against the who sees. We

:15:32.:15:44.

tried to bring you the best of information from around the world.

:15:45.:15:46.

Let's go to Russia. Russia's most prominent opposition

:15:47.:15:49.

leader is Alexei Navalny and he's has been given a five-year suspended

:15:50.:15:51.

sentence for embezzlement. This was a retrial and he got

:15:52.:15:54.

the the sentence is the same Navalny tweeted from the courtroom

:15:55.:15:57.

"Even the witness statements are Although this time they were of

:15:58.:16:02.

course in a different order. Navalny claims both trials

:16:03.:16:06.

were politically motivated. He was intending to run

:16:07.:16:09.

for president in 2018. This is his official

:16:10.:16:14.

campaign website. Today's verdict means

:16:15.:16:16.

he's barred from running TRANSLATION: what we have seen

:16:17.:16:38.

neither is a sort of telegrams sent from the Kremlin saying that they

:16:39.:16:42.

believe that I, my team and the people whose views I voice too

:16:43.:16:46.

dangerous to take part in the election campaign. Nevertheless, we

:16:47.:16:52.

don't recognise this ruling. It will be overturned. I have every right to

:16:53.:16:56.

take part in the election according to the Constitution and I will do

:16:57.:16:57.

so. I wanted to know if there is any

:16:58.:16:59.

evidence that this trial suffered OS regular Olga Ivshina from BBC

:17:00.:17:02.

Russian helped me out. The European Court of Human Rights

:17:03.:17:15.

has ruled that the case was politically motivated and that is

:17:16.:17:19.

the reason why the Supreme Court of the Russian Federation had to send

:17:20.:17:24.

this case for a retrial. If you carefully look at the materials of

:17:25.:17:28.

the case it is quite weird. Many guys who are giving testimony back

:17:29.:17:34.

in 2013 and this time the could not answer the questions, they could

:17:35.:17:38.

barely remember what was going on. There were more questions than

:17:39.:17:43.

answers in this case. The ruling of the European Court of Human Rights

:17:44.:17:48.

tells us a lot. How does a suspended sentence work in Russia? The thing

:17:49.:17:52.

that is important in this case is that according to the Russian

:17:53.:17:56.

Constitution, people found guilty of serious crimes, they are not allowed

:17:57.:18:01.

to run for presidential campaigns. They can't participate in any

:18:02.:18:06.

elections as a candidate. On the other hand, today's ruling put it

:18:07.:18:12.

all back to stage one. It is a huge saga now because temp can appeal,

:18:13.:18:17.

prosecutors can appeal and that will go back and forth. They can go up to

:18:18.:18:22.

the Supreme Court again and again he can go to the European Court of

:18:23.:18:25.

Human Rights. What is playing against Alexei Navalny this time

:18:26.:18:29.

because he wants to run for the presidential campaign and the last

:18:30.:18:32.

if you can register is December 2,000 17. This week President Putin

:18:33.:18:39.

signed into law and you measure that decriminalise some forms domestic

:18:40.:18:43.

violence, a first offence that results in minor harm to a woman

:18:44.:18:47.

such as lacerations or bruising is will not be considered criminal.

:18:48.:18:54.

This has caused huge controversy around the world. Is it causing

:18:55.:19:00.

controversy in Russia? Not that much, to be honest. There is an old

:19:01.:19:03.

Russian saying that if a husband beats you it mean to loves you. Not

:19:04.:19:12.

supported by many people. Domestic violence is spreading in Russia and

:19:13.:19:17.

according to activists of the 87% of the cases do not get reported, so

:19:18.:19:20.

nobody goes to the police and reports. He basically took corporate

:19:21.:19:28.

bad thing, saying that the law on domestic violence is not working,

:19:29.:19:32.

but the way they changed it has raised a lot of discussions because

:19:33.:19:36.

people are not reading laws that deeply. They heard on TV is that it

:19:37.:19:41.

this could spark a lot of violence. this could spark a lot of violence.

:19:42.:19:46.

Was it supported by a lot of women MPs? By a huge majority in the

:19:47.:19:51.

Russian State Parliament, but we need to remember that in that

:19:52.:19:55.

parliament party discipline very important, so if the chief of the

:19:56.:19:59.

party told them to vote they would because it is part of the

:20:00.:20:01.

discipline. US media giant Time Warner

:20:02.:20:13.

is in a pretty good It's released better than expected

:20:14.:20:16.

results for the fourth quarter - revenue is up 11.5% -

:20:17.:20:20.

and the company's CEO Jeff Bewkes said today

:20:21.:20:22.

the $85 billion merger with AT - CEO Randall Stephenson,

:20:23.:20:27.

is still on track. There's one problem though -

:20:28.:20:29.

this man is opposed to the deal. On the campaign trail he said "It's

:20:30.:20:32.

too much concentration of power Let's go to New York. Samir Ek, the

:20:33.:20:51.

president was not keen when he said the Pope would he have any influence

:20:52.:20:56.

over whether this happens? He has echoed those few since becoming

:20:57.:21:01.

president, saying that he does not believe that this merger should

:21:02.:21:07.

happen. If you look on the part of these two companies, Time Warner, it

:21:08.:21:14.

owns CNN. CNN has received quite a lot of press, so to speak, from

:21:15.:21:21.

Donald Trump. He does not like them as a media organisation. If you look

:21:22.:21:25.

at AT they are trying really hard to make sure this gets pushed

:21:26.:21:29.

through by regulators. It has been reported that they are on a big

:21:30.:21:33.

trump offensive in Washington and have more than a dozen lobbyists

:21:34.:21:38.

working behind the scenes to make sure that this gets pushed through.

:21:39.:21:42.

The one thing that is happening here that is interesting is that it is

:21:43.:21:46.

not just president Trump he is against it, but there are

:21:47.:21:54.

republicans and Democrats who have spoken out against this merger. It

:21:55.:21:56.

comes at a time in which we are seeing a lot of this kind of

:21:57.:21:59.

consolidation and that is bringing about some concern amongst people.

:22:00.:22:00.

Thank you very much. I got discrete from David dashed

:22:01.:22:12.

tweet from David in the UK saying interestingly, no coverage on the

:22:13.:22:16.

BBC of the Intel investment pledge yet. The problem was I had not been

:22:17.:22:21.

on air after I had heard of that story. Here is Donald Trump saying

:22:22.:22:28.

thanks to the CEO of Intel, a great investment of $7 billion in what he

:22:29.:22:32.

calls in American innovation and jobs. He has been at the White House

:22:33.:22:42.

talking with the president. This is Brian, you should say a few words.

:22:43.:22:48.

It is an honour to be here today representing Intel. To be able to

:22:49.:22:56.

announce our 7 billion dollar investment in the most advanced

:22:57.:23:01.

factory in Chandler, Arizona. We will be completing that factory to

:23:02.:23:06.

make the most advanced semiconductor chips on the planet.

:23:07.:23:12.

Let's look at the mania. A snowstorm, a mild earthquake, power

:23:13.:23:20.

blackouts have all been going on the people are still demonstrating and

:23:21.:23:25.

the temperature is minus three Celsius. It is day nine of these

:23:26.:23:30.

protests. Most of them have been happening in the capital, Bucharest.

:23:31.:23:33.

Here are some of the latest pictures. This all began after a

:23:34.:23:39.

decree that weakened anti-corruption laws. The decree was overturned at

:23:40.:23:44.

the weekend, but the protests go on. They want the government gone. Here

:23:45.:23:52.

are some protesters explaining why. We are keeping our petition strong

:23:53.:23:55.

and we want our government to resign because we can't trust them. They

:23:56.:24:01.

come in in the middle of the night to pass corrupt laws for corrupt

:24:02.:24:05.

politicians. We will keep coming every night until they resign. We

:24:06.:24:13.

want to make the point that you cannot accuse the people like this

:24:14.:24:18.

and sustain power. It will not happen any more. Today the

:24:19.:24:23.

government survived a no-confidence vote. The president has also been

:24:24.:24:30.

dying talking to the protesters. The president has a largely ceremonial

:24:31.:24:34.

role, but the protesters were shouting for him to resign of the

:24:35.:24:35.

same. Today the focus shifted to

:24:36.:24:46.

Parliament and a no-confidence vote in the social Democrat Liberal

:24:47.:24:50.

coalition government. On paper there are still strong, only being in

:24:51.:24:54.

power a month, but in practice they have been badly wounded by the size

:24:55.:24:59.

of the protest against them. This is a country were demonstrations are

:25:00.:25:04.

often successful, only two years ago a previous social Democratic

:25:05.:25:09.

government was brought down, also after a corruption scandal.

:25:10.:25:12.

Protesters are well organised with excellent communications. The

:25:13.:25:18.

protesters have an important ally in the president. When he accused the

:25:19.:25:23.

governing social Democrats of defending their own corrupt

:25:24.:25:27.

interests, the MPs left the chamber. All eyes in Romania are not on what

:25:28.:25:33.

the government will do next. Just had a message from somebody watching

:25:34.:25:40.

in Mumbai in India saying there is more online on the story about the

:25:41.:25:42.

main opposition figure in Russia being given a five-year suspended

:25:43.:25:46.

sentence. If you go to the front page of the BBC News website, click

:25:47.:25:51.

on the Europe tag and you will find extensive coverage of that. I will

:25:52.:25:55.

be back with you in a couple of minutes for the second half of

:25:56.:25:57.

outside source. Memories of the drought that has

:25:58.:26:13.

been gripping California over recent years quickly fading away. Another

:26:14.:26:17.

weather system is moving in from the Pacific to bring heavy rain, not

:26:18.:26:21.

that we need any more that just at the moment because we have seen some

:26:22.:26:25.

pretty nasty flooding in parts of California over recent days. Roads

:26:26.:26:30.

have been turned to rivers. There is more rain on the way. Across the

:26:31.:26:34.

north-east of the United States it is a different problem. The pressure

:26:35.:26:38.

will bring a spell of snow as we head through the

:26:39.:26:55.

night into Thursday. Anyone planning to catch a transatlantic flight bear

:26:56.:26:59.

this in mind as it could get as much as 25 centimetres of snow. There

:27:00.:27:01.

will be disruption to the roads and airports and it could be flight

:27:02.:27:04.

cancellations. This was the scene in Vancouver, and mass snowball fight

:27:05.:27:07.

as we have seen lots of heavy still here over recent days. There will be

:27:08.:27:09.

more of that before the snow turns back to rain on Thursday. We have a

:27:10.:27:12.

relatively mild there are pushing into the midwest, bitterly cold and

:27:13.:27:14.

central Canada. Temperatures as a maximum of -15 in Winnipeg. In

:27:15.:27:19.

Europe, a big area of high pressure in Scandinavia, cold easterly winds

:27:20.:27:23.

feeding in across much of Eastern Europe brings cloudy skies and snow

:27:24.:27:28.

flurries. By the skies in the Mediterranean, bringing rough seas

:27:29.:27:31.

and gale force gusts of wind and outbreaks of rain that will be back

:27:32.:27:36.

in Corsica, Sardinia and mainland Italy and Sicily. Some of those

:27:37.:27:43.

heavy showers will move into the North of Tunisia and north-east

:27:44.:27:50.

Algeria as we go through Thursday. In our weather, the clues to what is

:27:51.:27:55.

happening lie in the jet stream. War on terror is being pushed up into

:27:56.:27:59.

the Arctic, building this big area of high pressure in Scandinavia that

:28:00.:28:03.

is going nowhere fast in the next few days. On the southern flanker

:28:04.:28:12.

that high, we get these winds moving across the continent into the UK.

:28:13.:28:15.

Temperatures will be below par for the next few days and the rest of

:28:16.:28:19.

the week will be cloudy. It will turn colder and the cloud will be

:28:20.:28:23.

thick enough for some snow showers at times. Here is the picture to

:28:24.:28:26.

take us through the night. A lot of cloud around, but under the clear

:28:27.:28:31.

skies it will be cold. The temperature potentially getting down

:28:32.:28:35.

to -3 in western parts of England, Scotland and Wales. Temperatures

:28:36.:28:41.

hovering close to freezing on the East Coast because we have that

:28:42.:28:46.

cloud here back could turn to snow overnight into Thursday. There could

:28:47.:28:51.

places, but otherwise I cloudy and places, but otherwise I cloudy and

:28:52.:28:55.

cold day with a bitter wind. That is your latest weather. Bye for now.

:28:56.:30:18.

Hello, I'm Ros Atkins - this is Outside Source.

:30:19.:30:20.

Brexit gets a step closer to happening.

:30:21.:30:25.

The bill was never in any doubt, but a key amendment guaranteeing

:30:26.:30:35.

the rights of EU nationals already in the UK was not passed.

:30:36.:30:38.

Donald Trump is unhappy with how long it's taking

:30:39.:30:40.

Mark Urban's been investigating how easy it'll be to get things done

:30:41.:30:44.

There is no obedience with this Congress and there never has been

:30:45.:30:55.

but I do not think with this president, there will be.

:30:56.:30:57.

The Dakota Access oil pipeline was the focus of mass protests

:30:58.:31:00.

Its construction had been suspended, but now it's got the go-ahead

:31:01.:31:04.

And Qatar is spending $500 million a week on World Cup preparations.

:31:05.:31:09.

We'll look at what it's getting for its money.

:31:10.:31:40.

As Donald Trump keeps reminding us the confirmation hearings

:31:41.:31:42.

Today, the Senate will vote Jeff Sessions, who is Donald Trump's

:31:43.:31:46.

And the President isn't happy about the pace of this.

:31:47.:31:50.

"It is a disgrace that my full Cabinet

:31:51.:31:51.

is still not in place, the longest such delay

:31:52.:31:54.

That's not true, by the way - it's not the longest such delay.

:31:55.:32:04.

Anyhow, it is very likely Mr Trump will get the cabinet he wants.

:32:05.:32:07.

But he will still face significant challenges

:32:08.:32:09.

if he wants his main policies through.

:32:10.:32:11.

And this next report, by the Mark Urban from the BBC's

:32:12.:32:13.

Newsnight programme, looks at just that.

:32:14.:32:17.

You can come here, promising to drain the swamp or dethrone

:32:18.:32:19.

the establishment, but this city has a way of protecting its interests,

:32:20.:32:22.

slowing down those who challenge its ways.

:32:23.:32:24.

So the Trump administration's process of nominating a Cabinet

:32:25.:32:26.

This level of obstruction at the beginning of an administration

:32:27.:32:31.

is really record-setting in a very unfortunate way.

:32:32.:32:33.

While the Senate have blamed the Democrats for the go slow,

:32:34.:32:36.

they don't have the numbers to wreck Trump's agenda.

:32:37.:32:41.

Rather, it's doubts among Republicans that could pose the most

:32:42.:32:44.

Keen to impress the people who voted for him, President Trump has signed

:32:45.:32:48.

some highly significant and emotive executive orders.

:32:49.:32:50.

But you can't run the country by those alone, particularly when it

:32:51.:32:52.

comes to spending money or changing existing laws.

:32:53.:33:05.

For that, you need to go up to the Hill and get people

:33:06.:33:08.

Thousands of people work on the Hill in offices so widely spread,

:33:09.:33:16.

Things here travel at the speed legislators can work with.

:33:17.:33:27.

As many presidents elected on a reform ticket have discovered.

:33:28.:33:37.

John has been a Hill insider for the best part of 20 years.

:33:38.:33:41.

With a Republican majority of just two in the Senate,

:33:42.:33:43.

he sees particular risks there for the White House.

:33:44.:33:47.

The members of the Senate especially, because they have

:33:48.:33:49.

these six-year terms, they have tremendous power, they can

:33:50.:33:51.

gum up the works any time they want, and you'll see that,

:33:52.:33:54.

especially for some Republicans who don't really like Donald Trump

:33:55.:33:56.

or trust him, they will step up and say what they feel.

:33:57.:34:07.

So there is no obedience with this Congress, there never has been but,

:34:08.:34:11.

but especially with this President, I don't think there ever will be.

:34:12.:34:14.

The combination, seen with the nomination Betsy DeVos,

:34:15.:34:15.

of Democrats keen to thwart Trump voting with a small number

:34:16.:34:18.

of dissident Republicans could pose all manner of problems

:34:19.:34:20.

To avoid them, he must stick to policies where

:34:21.:34:23.

he and Congressional Republicans are on the same page.

:34:24.:34:26.

I believe in the need for bilateral agreements with the UK or Japan,

:34:27.:34:29.

We all agree that our tax code is overly complex,

:34:30.:34:44.

there are over 70,000 pages in our tax code, it's too complex.

:34:45.:34:56.

People want it simpler, fairer and in many respects flatter.

:34:57.:34:59.

So that's something we should be focused on and I think

:35:00.:35:01.

we'll find common ground with the administration.

:35:02.:35:03.

Among those on powerful Senate committees, there are already key

:35:04.:35:05.

figures who now challenge Trump on issues such as the handling

:35:06.:35:08.

of his immigrant ban or his professed admiration

:35:09.:35:10.

Are you worried by what the President's been saying?

:35:11.:35:15.

There have been a lot of things said that I wouldn't

:35:16.:35:18.

say but I think that, as time moves on, there'll

:35:19.:35:20.

be a much more coming together on those issues.

:35:21.:35:22.

I think that the administration is just getting going and my sense

:35:23.:35:25.

is that, in the very near future, things will be in the

:35:26.:35:28.

On nominations, health care or Russian sanctions,

:35:29.:35:48.

Trump campaign trail pledges are already being modified

:35:49.:35:50.

As the President starts to spend money, that will intensify.

:35:51.:36:12.

It might know it is time for Outside Source Sport. -- now it is time for.

:36:13.:36:20.

For the first time, a women's bout will headline a night of boxing

:36:21.:36:24.

Star of the show is Claressa Shields.

:36:25.:36:26.

She's the most successful amateur boxer in US history,

:36:27.:36:29.

and a two-time Olympic gold medallist.

:36:30.:36:30.

Now to Hugh Woozencroft, at the BBC Sport Centre.

:36:31.:36:32.

I guess despite her success this is still a sizeable leap up? Yes,

:36:33.:36:36.

hello. It is a sizeable leap. Well, it's interesting, isn't it,

:36:37.:36:40.

the rise of mixed martial arts in recent years has

:36:41.:36:42.

included women's fights? And that popularity,

:36:43.:36:44.

led by the likes of Ronda Rousey, Following that extra

:36:45.:36:46.

attention in women's bouts come more sponsorship

:36:47.:36:49.

and more money and quality. Now the quality in women's boxing

:36:50.:36:51.

has been there for a long long time, so could the rise in professional

:36:52.:36:54.

female boxers spur American Claressa Shields

:36:55.:36:56.

headlines when she takes on Hungary's Szilvia Szabados

:36:57.:37:13.

for North American Boxing Federation title in Detroit

:37:14.:37:15.

on the 10th of March. Shields is just 21, but took Olympic

:37:16.:37:17.

middleweight gold in 2008 and 2012 and with the likes of Olympic

:37:18.:37:20.

champion Katie Taylor of Ireland and Great Britain's Nicola Adams

:37:21.:37:23.

also leaving amateur boxing in favour of the professional ranks,

:37:24.:37:25.

I think we can expect to see much A good start. And just ask you about

:37:26.:37:47.

the FA Cup game? Yes, the replay in the FA Cup between Derby County and

:37:48.:37:53.

Leicester City has just finished. We will see extra time to see which of

:37:54.:37:57.

these two says will get through to the last 16. As it has finished 1-1

:37:58.:38:10.

at full-time. Thank you, and you can keep up-to-date with that on the BBC

:38:11.:38:15.

sport web page. Take a look at this guy and remember

:38:16.:38:18.

the name - Mohit Ahlawat. He could be cricket's

:38:19.:38:21.

next big thing. He's 21, and has hit 300 in a local

:38:22.:38:23.

Twenty20 match in Delhi. He scored at four runs a ball -

:38:24.:38:26.

which, if you're not into cricket, This was taking place

:38:27.:38:29.

in a game in Delhi. He was playing against a team

:38:30.:38:34.

called Friends 11 - how unfriendly Mohit

:38:35.:38:36.

was to their bowlers! 39, and let me just repeat that -

:38:37.:38:38.

39, sixes he hit, and he also added 14 fours,

:38:39.:38:41.

when he couldn't be bothered He needed 50, basically,

:38:42.:38:43.

off the last two overs. He finished hitting

:38:44.:38:47.

five consecutive sixes. When asked afterwards,

:38:48.:38:48.

he said he felt that he was Continuing our commitment

:38:49.:38:51.

to covering sports that's don't get much coverage,

:38:52.:39:09.

let me show the final moments It doesn't matter how many of these

:39:10.:39:19.

you have potted before, and he has done millions of them, it is the

:39:20.:39:21.

World Championships, the big one. There were entrants from the UK,

:39:22.:39:22.

France, Norway, Ireland, He is perfect, absolutely plum. He

:39:23.:39:24.

from Shooters Sports Bar He is perfect, absolutely plum. He

:39:25.:39:44.

could pot- both... Pot-shot, there will be each cheer after this. And

:39:45.:39:48.

that is the one that clinched it. Congratulations to Craig.

:39:49.:39:51.

We've also been in touch with international bodies

:39:52.:39:52.

for downhill skateboarding, kite surfing, table tennis

:39:53.:39:54.

More under-reported sports next week on Outside Source.

:39:55.:39:57.

Have you seen how much Qatar is spending on hosting the World Cup?

:39:58.:40:12.

New figures put it at $500 million - a week.

:40:13.:40:14.

By the time it comes round in 2022, it's predicted the bill will be more

:40:15.:40:18.

Brazil spent $11 billion in 2014.

:40:19.:40:22.

Russia is expected to spend $10.7 billion on the 2018 event.

:40:23.:40:24.

This is what the country's finance minister said:

:40:25.:40:41.

With that kind of spending, you wouldn't think there would be

:40:42.:40:44.

What the finance minister was saying, I think,

:40:45.:40:53.

was two things and one was reassurance, because Qatar,

:40:54.:40:55.

like other Gulf countries, has faced quite a fall

:40:56.:40:58.

in its revenue in the last couple of years.

:40:59.:41:00.

There have been a number of cutbacks in a number of its businesses.

:41:01.:41:03.

What he is making clear is that will not affect

:41:04.:41:05.

What he is also making clear, in a sense, is that $200 million,

:41:06.:41:09.

if that is all being spent specifically on the stadiums

:41:10.:41:12.

and the footballing aspect of the World Cup, then that

:41:13.:41:14.

absolutely dwarfs any spending has ever been before in a World Cup.

:41:15.:41:31.

What he was saying is this is the infrastructure

:41:32.:41:33.

being built around it - roads, transport, hotels,

:41:34.:41:35.

So in a sense Qatar is using this a reason to continue with...

:41:36.:41:39.

Obviously there has been huge building for years in Qatar,

:41:40.:41:42.

but to make it infrastructure even bigger and stronger,

:41:43.:41:44.

with the World Cup being the target it is aiming for.

:41:45.:41:47.

And I guess with this huge increase in construction,

:41:48.:41:49.

more questions about how the construction is working,

:41:50.:41:51.

the conditions in which people are working under?

:41:52.:41:53.

Yes, I mean the problem Qatar has with its migrant workers is one

:41:54.:41:56.

again faced across the whole of the Gulf, where they don't have

:41:57.:41:59.

rights - although there are laws which are supposed to protect them,

:42:00.:42:02.

they are not always enforced, and Qatar has faced

:42:03.:42:04.

There have been reports that workers have died on the site.

:42:05.:42:15.

It has turned out I think that most of the deaths that have been

:42:16.:42:18.

reported have not actually be directly connected with

:42:19.:42:20.

the World Cup, but there have been many calls internationally

:42:21.:42:23.

from governments to rights organisations that they need

:42:24.:42:25.

They promised a couple of months ago that there would be

:42:26.:42:28.

Every time a country hosts the World Cup,

:42:29.:42:42.

whether it's South Africa or Brazil, or any others, there is an internal

:42:43.:42:45.

discussion about whether this is money well spent.

:42:46.:42:47.

I don't think that kind of discussion quite happens in Qatar.

:42:48.:42:52.

It has not reached a stage where money is so short

:42:53.:42:54.

that they have to be concerned, but Qatar, like other

:42:55.:42:57.

Gulf countries, again, is going to be undergoing certain

:42:58.:42:59.

changes in the way that it provides for its people

:43:00.:43:01.

VAT, for instance, is going to be introduced across the Gulf.

:43:02.:43:12.

It could be the first element of tax actually being brought in,

:43:13.:43:15.

and obviously when you start having tax people become more

:43:16.:43:17.

concerned about the way their money is being spent.

:43:18.:43:19.

So that process may begin to start happening by the time

:43:20.:43:22.

of the World Cup, but for now I don't think we have to worry.

:43:23.:43:33.

They have a tiny population - 90% of the population

:43:34.:43:35.

Massively bolstered by the numbers, the hundreds of thousands,

:43:36.:43:39.

who comes specifically for the World Cup.

:43:40.:43:48.

You will remember we were covering protests over a proposed oil

:43:49.:43:56.

pipeline in Dakota. President Obama suspended that and President Trump

:43:57.:43:59.

has now intervened and it looks like it will now go ahead. We will bring

:44:00.:44:00.

you details on that. A woman has won an appeal

:44:01.:44:08.

to the Supreme Court after being denied payments

:44:09.:44:10.

from her late partner's Chris Buckler reports

:44:11.:44:12.

on the significance of the case. Denise Brewster had lived

:44:13.:44:21.

with her fiance, Lenny, for ten years and they were making

:44:22.:44:23.

plans for their future. When I look at this picture,

:44:24.:44:25.

I think that's just how we were. He was a fun loving guy,

:44:26.:44:30.

he had lots of friends. But in 2009, just days after

:44:31.:44:33.

they got engaged, he died suddenly. It was such a difficult time and it

:44:34.:44:41.

will always remain difficult for me. But I feel Lenny has

:44:42.:44:44.

given me strength at For 15 years, Lenny worked

:44:45.:44:46.

for Translink, which provides public transport in Northern Ireland and,

:44:47.:44:58.

during that time, like many workers, he paid into a local

:44:59.:45:00.

government pension scheme, which he thought would provide

:45:01.:45:02.

some security for him But when he died, Denise

:45:03.:45:04.

was informed she wouldn't benefit. Because Denise wasn't married,

:45:05.:45:12.

she was told that she wasn't Her partner would have had to have

:45:13.:45:15.

filled out this, a nomination form. She argued that that was a lawful

:45:16.:45:23.

discrimination and today the Supreme Court ruled

:45:24.:45:25.

in her favour. We say that she is entitled

:45:26.:45:27.

to receive a pension and that the nomination requirement

:45:28.:45:30.

should no longer be applied. It's a ruling that could benefit

:45:31.:45:32.

the partners of some other public sector workers like nurses,

:45:33.:45:35.

teachers and civil servants although that could depend

:45:36.:45:37.

on the rules of each There are over 6 million

:45:38.:45:39.

people across the country Many of them are in company

:45:40.:45:49.

pension schemes, public sector pension schemes,

:45:50.:45:52.

and they should be treated equally So I hope all pension schemes

:45:53.:45:54.

will review their rules And the woman who fought this case

:45:55.:45:58.

hopes it will provide greater At least I just had to defend

:45:59.:46:02.

for myself and I had to take my hardships but,

:46:03.:46:08.

when you have other families that have a young daughter or son

:46:09.:46:11.

who are losing their daddy or their mummy, and then

:46:12.:46:13.

they have the financial burden on top of that,

:46:14.:46:15.

the inequality and the injustice And this is a judgment which perhaps

:46:16.:46:18.

reflects changes to what the word This is Outside Source,

:46:19.:46:23.

live from the BBC newsroom. British MPs have voted

:46:24.:46:49.

for the Government to begin proceedings to leave the EU

:46:50.:46:54.

by a huge majority. If you're outside of the UK,

:46:55.:46:56.

it's World News America next. With no decision expected

:46:57.:47:04.

on the travel ban today, they'll be looking at the mood

:47:05.:47:06.

in the US administration with the help of the Time magazines

:47:07.:47:09.

White House correspondent. Here in the UK, the

:47:10.:47:14.

News at Ten is next. Our Europe editor Katya Adler has

:47:15.:47:21.

been looking at the rise of populist Earlier the International Committee

:47:22.:47:24.

of the Red Cross in Afghanistan Confirming that six of its staff had

:47:25.:47:47.

been killed in Afghanistan. We know this happened in the north of the

:47:48.:47:54.

country and an convoy were missing -- an aid convoy was missing.

:47:55.:48:00.

Drivers and five field officers were on their way to deliver some

:48:01.:48:16.

livestock to the needy people of a village in this northern

:48:17.:48:19.

province of Afghanistan, that they were stopped on the way,

:48:20.:48:21.

Six of them were killed, two of them were kidnapped, and we do not know

:48:22.:48:26.

Now, the local officials tell the BBC that they have sent

:48:27.:48:30.

a delegation of elders to that area controlled mainly by Uzbek

:48:31.:48:32.

and militants related to either Isis or Daesh to try to reach a deal

:48:33.:48:36.

to try to release the two staff members.

:48:37.:48:40.

to try to release the two staff members of ICRC.

:48:41.:48:42.

The Taliban, the Afghan government, the ICRC have all have

:48:43.:48:45.

all condemned the attack, and no one has yet taken

:48:46.:48:47.

responsibility for this killing and kidnapping,

:48:48.:48:49.

but the police chief of the province tells us that this area

:48:50.:48:52.

is where most militants loyal to Isis or Daesh operate.

:48:53.:49:11.

Lets move from Afghanistan to North Dakota...

:49:12.:49:14.

The final stage of a controversial oil pipeline in North Dakota has

:49:15.:49:17.

These are pictures from today and also from protests in the past.

:49:18.:49:28.

Opponents of the pipeline have called for worldwide

:49:29.:49:30.

These pictures are from today but the rest

:49:31.:49:36.

The protestors are mainly made up of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe

:49:37.:49:40.

This is the background to this story.

:49:41.:49:45.

The pipeline is supposed to cross four states,

:49:46.:49:47.

to transport crude oil to a terminal in Illinois.

:49:48.:49:54.

Most of it is already built, except for this bit -

:49:55.:50:04.

the section closest to the Standing Rock

:50:05.:50:05.

Members of the tribe say the construction

:50:06.:50:08.

will damage their water supplies and ancestral cultural sites.

:50:09.:50:10.

These protests helped lead to the suspension of construction.

:50:11.:50:12.

That decision has been reversed by Donald Trump.

:50:13.:50:21.

The BBC's Peter Bowes is covering the story from Los Angeles.

:50:22.:50:24.

I asked him if there's anything the protesters can do at this stage.

:50:25.:50:27.

They can go to court and file an injunction hoping to stop the

:50:28.:50:36.

issuing of the permit, as it is known, the easement, that helps the

:50:37.:50:40.

company behind this pipeline. It would potentially stop them from

:50:41.:50:43.

starting the drilling necessary to install this final one mile section

:50:44.:50:48.

of this pipeline. Time is not on the side of the Sioux tribe, the

:50:49.:50:55.

Standing Rock Tribe, and this needs to happen very quickly, because that

:50:56.:50:58.

permit is likely to be issued later on today, which means the drilling

:50:59.:51:03.

could start as early as tomorrow. Presumably those who support the

:51:04.:51:06.

drilling or do they do respect this tribe and they do respect the

:51:07.:51:12.

importance of their water supply? Yes, they do, and they also say

:51:13.:51:17.

there is no mac danger. The company says the pipeline is entirely safe

:51:18.:51:23.

in its view, however local people disagree with that and they say, and

:51:24.:51:28.

they were gratified by the actions of the Obama administration in the

:51:29.:51:34.

middle of December, just a few weeks ago, really, which halted this

:51:35.:51:38.

project pending a further longer term environmental review of the

:51:39.:51:42.

situation. That review would have been followed by consultation with

:51:43.:51:46.

local people. What Donald Trump has done since taking office is

:51:47.:51:50.

expediting the process, essentially telling the army he wanted a quick

:51:51.:51:55.

decision, and that is what has come in the last 24 hours, which means

:51:56.:51:59.

this is very likely to go ahead. Presumably it is a tough time to

:52:00.:52:04.

protest against this one, firstly because of the weather, and secondly

:52:05.:52:09.

because Donald Trump is president, so protests are likely to be focused

:52:10.:52:13.

in Washington rather than North Dakota? Yes, it is a very remote

:52:14.:52:18.

area. As you mentioned, protests around this project have been

:52:19.:52:22.

global. It has really garnered a lot of support set around this country

:52:23.:52:26.

but globally as well. But in terms of physical protest, getting to this

:52:27.:52:29.

area and getting their very quickly is actually quite difficult. That

:52:30.:52:33.

may pose a problem but certainly from the statements issued by the

:52:34.:52:37.

Standing Rock Tribe tripe and others, they are determined to keep

:52:38.:52:41.

this fighting and ticket to the courts if it comes to -- the Sioux

:52:42.:52:43.

tribe. The top story today, MPs in

:52:44.:52:53.

Westminster have supported a bill in the House of Commons to allow the UK

:52:54.:52:58.

to start formal negotiations with the European Union to trigger its

:52:59.:53:02.

exit, triggering Article 50. Nigel Farage, former leader of the UK

:53:03.:53:10.

Independence party, has said... Of course until we get to the end of

:53:11.:53:13.

those negotiations we cannot know the form Brexit will take. What we

:53:14.:53:19.

do know now is that Prime Minister Theresa May is in a position to go

:53:20.:53:22.

to the European Union with the backing of the House of Commons, to

:53:23.:53:27.

trigger article 50 and begin those two years of negotiations, and of

:53:28.:53:30.

course we will be covering that every step of the way here on

:53:31.:53:33.

Outside Source. Just quickly, if you are a football fan, let me bring up

:53:34.:53:39.

some news coming through the BBC newsroom, to update you on that FA

:53:40.:53:51.

Cup game we were speaking about earlier. The game between the

:53:52.:53:53.

Premier League champions Leicester, and Derby. Leicester are in front.

:53:54.:53:56.

That is not a full-time results and keep an eye on the BBC sport app to

:53:57.:53:59.

find out which we that one goes. That is Outside Source for tonight.

:54:00.:54:03.

Thank you for watching.

:54:04.:54:08.