10/12/2016 Reporters - Short Edition


10/12/2016

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The shocking human cost of Yemen's Civil War.

:00:00.:00:07.

Fergal Keane reports on one of the Arab world's poorest

:00:08.:00:09.

countries, where 7 million people are facing famine.

:00:10.:00:13.

There are several causes of this war - a battle between regional powers,

:00:14.:00:17.

But there's only one consequence - death and destruction

:00:18.:00:25.

John Maguire catches up with the first woman to fly

:00:26.:00:32.

across the English Channel on a paramotor.

:00:33.:00:36.

Once the cliffs get bigger and bigger and bigger,

:00:37.:00:38.

We start with powerful new evidence that the suffering in Yemen,

:00:39.:00:49.

one of the Arab world's poorest countries, where the Civil War

:00:50.:00:52.

is having devastating human consequences.

:00:53.:00:55.

More than 7000 people have been killed in the fighting,

:00:56.:00:58.

the majority in air strikes by Saudi-led forces.

:00:59.:01:02.

3 million people have been forced to flee their homes and,

:01:03.:01:05.

according to the UN, an estimated 14 million are at risk

:01:06.:01:09.

of hunger and half of them are on the brink of famine.

:01:10.:01:12.

Fergal Keane, producer Kate Benyon-Tinker and cameraman

:01:13.:01:15.

Robert McGee have travelled to one of the worst-affected areas.

:01:16.:01:19.

Their report contains some distressing images.

:01:20.:01:27.

All the living have fled along roads where death can descend at any time,

:01:28.:01:42.

This is the story of a journey into a people's tragedy that

:01:43.:01:53.

will reveal images of child suffering that are not easy to look

:01:54.:01:56.

at but without which we cannot comprehend the cost of this war.

:01:57.:02:06.

She has been fighting to survive since the day she was born.

:02:07.:02:24.

10,000 children have died from preventable diseases.

:02:25.:02:29.

This baby, nine months old, is one of the few who make it to hospital.

:02:30.:02:47.

Half the health facilities no longer function.

:02:48.:02:54.

TRANSLATION: We have few resources and that limits

:02:55.:02:56.

We hope we will get support from international aid

:02:57.:03:01.

Child malnutrition has jumped 200% in two years.

:03:02.:03:13.

Before the war, Yemen imported 90% of staple food but the supply

:03:14.:03:19.

God will punish the bombers, this man says.

:03:20.:03:28.

The bridge was hit just two weeks ago.

:03:29.:03:31.

Civilians and food trucks use the same roads as soldiers.

:03:32.:03:37.

In the rural areas, they are furthest from aid,

:03:38.:03:39.

In this village, medics from Save The Children battle to help.

:03:40.:03:47.

In another, people brought their sick infants to us.

:03:48.:03:54.

The old man and his hungry grandchildren.

:03:55.:04:00.

This baby is nine months old, sick with liver problems

:04:01.:04:03.

He died of malnutrition five months ago.

:04:04.:04:14.

Their mother has no money for medicine.

:04:15.:04:17.

What do you want to happen for this child?

:04:18.:04:19.

Coalition bombing and import restrictions devastate the economy.

:04:20.:04:36.

The rebels frequently delay aid getting through because they seek

:04:37.:04:38.

And just half the international funding promised has been delivered.

:04:39.:04:45.

This is a crisis that we just don't recognise and it will come back

:04:46.:04:48.

to haunt us because the consequences of our indifference,

:04:49.:04:53.

the consequences of what we are not doing here will play back at us.

:04:54.:04:56.

But at the same time, we are trying to grasp sand

:04:57.:04:59.

because we can't deal with what's going on here because

:05:00.:05:01.

the numbers are so massive, the pressures are so great

:05:02.:05:04.

It all leads back inevitably to this - to this baby, 21 days old.

:05:05.:05:16.

His twin brother died soon after he was born.

:05:17.:05:20.

He seems impossibly fragile but fights to live.

:05:21.:05:28.

There are several causes of this war - a battle between regional powers,

:05:29.:05:32.

But there's only one consequence - death and the destruction

:05:33.:05:39.

And an image like that, no matter how many wars you've covered,

:05:40.:05:46.

This girl is three, with energy only for that most universal

:05:47.:05:57.

This is what it means to be forgotten by the world.

:05:58.:06:06.

One woman, 7000 kilometres, 11 countries, all by paramotor.

:06:07.:06:15.

It's been quite a journey for conservationist Sacha Dench,

:06:16.:06:17.

who's become the first woman to complete the epic journey.

:06:18.:06:20.

It's all part of her daring bid to track the migration of Bewick's

:06:21.:06:24.

John Maguire has been following her journey and he caught

:06:25.:06:29.

up with her as she crossed the English Channel and touched down

:06:30.:06:32.

For Sacha Dench, the human swan, crossing the English Channel

:06:33.:06:38.

will mean her expedition is almost over but this is her most

:06:39.:06:42.

For the past three months, her expedition has followed

:06:43.:06:46.

the migratory route of the Bewick's swans from their breeding

:06:47.:06:50.

ground in northern Russia to their winter home on the banks

:06:51.:06:53.

of the River Severn at the Wildfowl Wetlands Trust

:06:54.:06:56.

Her mission has been to find out why their numbers have declined

:06:57.:07:01.

dramatically over recent years and to educate people

:07:02.:07:05.

along the swans' flyway, to persuade them not

:07:06.:07:08.

But now, the only consideration is getting safely from Calais to Dover.

:07:09.:07:16.

I expect it's going to look quite daunting because, there,

:07:17.:07:21.

you're at the midpoint where there is absolutely no chance

:07:22.:07:24.

So it might be slightly different up there and we won't know

:07:25.:07:29.

exactly what the conditions are like until we are

:07:30.:07:31.

The Flight of the Swans expedition hasn't been without its setbacks.

:07:32.:07:36.

Sacha injured her knee so had to adapt her paramotor.

:07:37.:07:40.

She now flies a trike rather than on foot.

:07:41.:07:43.

So, after 7000 kilometres, several weeks flying all the way

:07:44.:07:47.

down from northern Russia, this is the very last

:07:48.:07:50.

Perhaps though the biggest, of course, crossing the Channel -

:07:51.:07:54.

a huge expanse of water, the busiest shipping

:07:55.:07:57.

Perhaps the final challenge for this expedition.

:07:58.:08:02.

Microlight pilot and instructor Rob Keane explained why

:08:03.:08:07.

this leg of the journey, although just 20 miles

:08:08.:08:10.

All pilots really have a fear of going across a long

:08:11.:08:16.

bit of water because, if they go in the water in December,

:08:17.:08:19.

you haven't got long before you need to be rescued because you'll

:08:20.:08:22.

certainly suffer from major hyperthermia very quickly

:08:23.:08:26.

We leave the safety of France, the solid ground, and head

:08:27.:08:34.

As we climb above 2500 feet, the white cliffs, tinted golden

:08:35.:08:40.

by the early morning sun, seem enticingly close

:08:41.:08:44.

After around 40 minutes, the cliffs are no longer ahead,

:08:45.:08:50.

The first woman to cross the Channel in a paramotor, Sacha is back home.

:08:51.:08:59.

Nerve-wracking in the middle of it where you know that the water

:09:00.:09:03.

Once the cliffs get bigger and bigger and bigger,

:09:04.:09:09.

The number of Bewick's making this perilous,

:09:10.:09:14.

annual odyssey has fallen from 29,000 to around

:09:15.:09:18.

The achievement has been made possible because of all

:09:19.:09:22.

of the professionalism, the teamwork and modern technology.

:09:23.:09:26.

The swans, of course, just have instinct to rely upon.

:09:27.:09:30.

To be able to add a first-person or a first-swan view

:09:31.:09:36.

By tracking the swans with radio collars and flying as they do,

:09:37.:09:43.

the expedition's already learned so much about the threats they face.

:09:44.:09:48.

The human swan has done her bit to protect her feathered friends.

:09:49.:09:53.

And that's all from Reporters for this week.

:09:54.:09:59.

From me, Tim Willcox, and the whole team here in London, bye-bye.

:10:00.:10:25.

Rain is setting to spoil the day across England and Wales. Better

:10:26.:10:32.

conditions for Northern Ireland and Scotland where we have

:10:33.:10:33.

A weekly programme of stories filed by BBC reporters from all over the world, ranging from analyses of major global issues to personal reflections and anecdotes.


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