31/12/2016 Reporters - Short Edition


31/12/2016

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Hello.

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Now

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Now Reporters.

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Hello.

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Welcome to Reporters.

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In this special edition of the programme, we're looking back

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at some of the best reports from this year from our network

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of correspondents around the world.

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Coming up: I'm a heroin addict.

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I've overdosed four times.

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We report on the epidemic of heroin and pain killers creating

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a generation of users and killing tens of thousands of people.

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The drug

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they call the devil has hit hardest in small town America,

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already ravaged by years of economic decline.

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We're hearing outgoing fire.

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The troops are trying to gauge how much resistance

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is in these villages.

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We join the Kurdish forces on the frontline, as Mosul awaits

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from deliverance from so-called Islamic State.

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Also before and after - the pioneering surgery

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without scalpels.

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I'm

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I'm in

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I'm in Antarctica.

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And a year in the life of the penguin caught on camera.

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Victoria Gill joins scientists as they track how the birds

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are adapting to climate change.

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America is in the grip of a heroin and prescription

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pain killer epidemic.

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More Americans, as many as 50,000 a year, are dying from drug

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overdoses than from car crashes or being shot.

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Increasingly, the victims are young, white and middle-class people.

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They've become hooked on the deadly drugs.

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Over the past year, Ian Pannell and his cameraman have

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followed a number of addicts as they try to kick the habit.

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You may find some of the scenes in their report difficult to watch.

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A darkness has descended across America.

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40-ish-year-old female possibly not breathing OD.

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A plague of drug addiction and death greater than there's ever been.

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Opioid pain killers and heroin are killing more

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Americans than ever before.

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Oh, my God.

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What's wrong with her?

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Get out of the way.

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We were just here for a female in her 40s who wasn't breathing.

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It was apparent drug overdose.

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How common is this?

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Every day.

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Every day?

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Sometimes more than once a day.

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We have a dry spell where we'll go a day or two, but mostly every day.

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Started when I was 17 years old.

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I was at a party, high school.

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I started doing the pills.

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When I was 13 I started using pain pills.

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Five, six people I known died last year.

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All my values and morals, they went out the window.

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It will take everything you have, all the money you have,

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everything you've worked for, everyone you love.

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There was nothing, almost nothing that I wouldn't do for it.

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I'm a heroin addict.

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My brother is also an addict.

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I know I will die if I go back home.

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I've overdosed four times.

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My own sister had to save me.

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I know that a lot of words are overused in our lexicon,

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historic and unprecedented and unique.

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We fall back on those words all the time in.

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In this case, this is an epidemic.

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That's precisely the right word.

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This crisis has spread across America, created

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by massive overprescription of morphine-like pain killers.

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It gave birth to a nation of addicts.

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A heroin epidemic is sweeping across America.

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It respects no man or woman whatever their creed, colour or class.

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Friends, families, whole communities have been left

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to bury the dead and deal with the devastation

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addiction brings.

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But the drug they call the devil has hit hardest in small town America.

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Taking hold in areas like this, that have already been

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ravaged by years

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of economic decline.

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For so many people, the future looks bleak.

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Increasingly addicts are young, white kids

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from the suburbs and rural areas.

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They've moved from pills to heroin, because it's

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cheaper and easier to get.

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But it's far more deadly and it's no exaggeration to say this

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generation's under threat.

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# I hurt myself today

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# To see if I still feel #

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Dr Huckerbee is the medical director here.

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He's an expert on pain medication and what it does.

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He's also a recovering addict, who became hooked after getting pain

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pills for a broken foot.

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# The needle tears a hole

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# The old familiar sting #

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I was given the oxycodone.

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It was like pulling the trigger.

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I could not turn it loose.

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It tickled my brain in such profound ways that it totally blind sided me

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to the point that I eventually was injecting myself in

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the operating room and was fortunate to have partners intervened.

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You were injecting yourself?

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Yes.

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Powerless.

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Powerless over it.

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I promised myself all the time, "We're not going to do this again."

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"We're not going to do this again today."

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And by the end of the day, you know, just couldn't control it.

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It's a real hopeless feeling.

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I remember feeling it one time that, you know, this is my fate in life.

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I'm just going to die from this.

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I'm addicted to heroin.

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I've about died six times.

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All I can think about is when am I going to get some more.

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To feel better, but I'm never feeling better.

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I'm tired of this.

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I remember the first time I OD'ed.

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My boyfriend was filming me.

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He brought me back.

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Right after that he went and did a shot.

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It was kind of like, wow, I just almost died.

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It is absolutely everywhere, in every town around here at least.

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There's somebody that sells drugs.

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It's predominantly heroin, because that's the big

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thing around here.

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In the streets and strip malls of western Pennsylvania

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heroin's taken root.

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The journey through addiction is a long, dark one for so many.

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Steve has been trying to get clean for years.

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But shaking it without serious, long-term help is rare.

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I can get it, but it's right in the middle of the hood.

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I don't like going over there period, let alone at midnight.

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Steve's trapped in an endless hunt for a high that

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will never be enough.

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For something his body craves, that he knows he shouldn't do.

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Because there's no way to know what's in each packet

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and whether or not it will kill you.

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This stuff's gotten hold of me.

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I just...

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I'm obsessed with it.

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It runs my life.

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Heroin's addictive like no other drug.

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For many there are only two ways out.

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Rehab or death.

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Today the victim is just as likely to be your friend,

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your neighbour or even your child.

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Miss you so much.

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I miss you so much.

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I held him first on February 11th, 1994.

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Then I held him last on August 22, 2015.

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I never want a parent to ever have to do that.

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It's the hard est thing that you'll ever do.

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There's nothing else you can do that will hurt like this.

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Oh, that should never be.

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This epidemic is only getting worse.

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There'll be more families devastated and more lives lost.

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One country which really got tough on drugs this year

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was the Philippines.

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Its hard line new president campaigned for his election

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by promising to kill 100,000 drug dealers and criminals in his first

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six months in office.

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His controversial, tough tactics, which critics say turning a blind

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eye to extra judicial killings, led to an unprecedented

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rise in the murder rate.

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Around 2,000 people were killed in just the first two

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months of the crackdown.

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Jonathan Head reports on the Philippines'

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deadly war on drugs.

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The war on drugs is reaching all corners of the Philippines.

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Even here, in the jails.

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Many of these men are already serving long sentences for drug use.

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In cells, so packed with bodies, it's hard to breathe.

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It says something about the extent of the drug problem here

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in the Philippines that the police have had to come here

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and raid one of the biggest prisons around Manila.

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There are clearly concerns about real drug problems here.

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The focus, as with so much of this campaign, are the people at the very

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bottom of the trade, not the people running it.

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At least here they can stay alive.

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But not here.

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The bodies of dealers and addicts are discovered every night

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in the slums of Manila, killed either by the police

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or by shadowy hit squads.

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It started when this man, an outspoken crime fighting mayor

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was elected president in May.

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When he said he would kill drug dealers, he meant it.

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That's the lives of ten criminals really matter to me?

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If I am the one facing the grief, would 100 lives of this idiot

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would mean anything to me?

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The president is still wildly popular for this kind of talk.

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Drug addiction has blighted neighbourhoods, already

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burdened by poverty.

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But his campaign has forced Roger, not his real name, into hiding.

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He's been a minor drug dealer for years.

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Now he's on the run.

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TRANSLATION: I've done some awful things I know.

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I've wronged a lot of people because they've become addicted

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to drugs because I'm one of the many who sells them drugs.

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Not everyone who uses drugs commits crimes.

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Me, I'm an addict.

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But I don't kill.

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This chilling security camera video shows why those targeted

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by the antidrug campaign have so much to fear.

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A motorbike slows down for a moment.

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The passenger firing at point blank range.

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It might easily have been Maria, a young mother and a hired assassin.

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She says she's killed five people since the president

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won the election.

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Like Roger, she says it was poverty that drove her into the job.

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TRANSLATION: I tell my husband that we can't

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keep doing this forever.

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We have children.

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I would not want our children to know what we do.

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I do not want them to come back at us and say that they got to live

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because we killed for money.

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Nearly 700,000 terrified drug addicts have already surrendered

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to the Philippines police to save their lives.

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They must somehow now be accommodated in these

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teeming, overcrowded cells.

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The Iraqi city of Mosul waited for deliverance as Iraqi and Kurdish

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forces battled for two months to liberate the last

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strong hold of so-called Islamic State in the country.

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As the troops continued their drive towards the city, the militants

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fought back using suicide bombers.

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At the start of the siege, Orla Guerin and her cameraman

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were among the first journalists to get into the village

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on the outskirts of Mosul as it was being liberated from IS.

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A harbinger of terror.

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We entered hostile territory, taking the battle to IS,

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with Kurdish Peshmerga fighters.

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This was their second attempt to free this village.

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Last week they faced heavy resistance.

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Along the way, tension building, as we start to come under

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fire and to respond.

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We're moving forward now very slowly and carefully.

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We're hearing quite a bit of outgoing fire.

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The troops are trying to gauge how much resistance

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is in these villages.

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This was the answer.

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A massive roadside bomb just ahead.

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It was one of four on our route.

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Then the Peshmerga moved to confront a suspected suicide bomber.

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They have to check him for explosives with their bare hands.

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This time they were lucky, just a civilian.

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We arrive in what looks like a deserted village.

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Locals start to emerge, tentatively to offer

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thanks, but soon, this...

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GUNFIRE

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Warning shots from weary troops.

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-- wary.

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At last, freedom and relief.

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There's nothing to worry about, he says.

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It's all over.

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But there's a legacy of torment.

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"They destroyed us," says Mohammed.

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"They completely destroyed us."

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There was a sense of a community coming back to life,

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of old friends reuniting, freed from the tyranny of IS.

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A moment of victory for the Peshmerga.

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And for some here, of rebirth.

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"I can't find words to express how happy I am," He said.

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"It feels like I have been born again."

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Nearby locals attacked an IS sign that had loomed over them,

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instructing women to cover themselves from head to toe.

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Amar was happy to be wearing her best and not wearing a hijab.

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As this woman thanks the Peshmerga, IS make their presence

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felt, not far away.

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GUNFIRE Helping to secure the village, a volunteer

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sniper from Scotland.

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He's fought with the Peshmerga since 2014 and has been

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part of the recent push against IS or Daesh.

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It's kind of funny because places that are weak, places

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they'll stand and fight.

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They're very up and down.

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You're talking a lot of these people cheering now would probably Daesh.

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They've just gone back into their community.

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So they haven't gone away.

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Even as they celebrate, the troops know their enemy

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could soon re-emerge.

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The Peshmerga are moving through the village.

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They're securing the area street by street and more and more

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civilians are appearing.

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They can speak freely for the first time in over two years, but there

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is still some tension here.

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The fighters are concerned that among those coming

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out onto the streets there could be suicide bombers.

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But there were no threats concealed among the villagers.

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They were savouring the chance to reclaim old pleasures,

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banned by the jihadis.

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The black flag of IS has been pulled down from the mosque.

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The Peshmerga vowing never again will it be allowed to fly here.

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Here's a thought, imagine surgery but without knives

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or scalpels, just sound waves.

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That's what doctors at a hospital in London have used to operate deep

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inside the human brain.

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The pioneering treatment was performed on a patient

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who suffered from uncontrollable trembling in his right hand.

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It could also be used to control the tremors caused by conditions

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such as Parkinson's disease.

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Over the past something years it's got worse and worse.

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Selwyn is a painter and decorator.

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His job is made increasingly difficult by this, an uncontrollable

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tremor in his right hand.

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The shaking is caused by a mistiming of the electrical signals,

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the commands sent from the brain to the muscles in the hand.

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One million people in the UK suffer from tremors.

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The last 15 years it's gradually got worse to the extent I can't use it.

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I've got to use my left hand.

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Early morning at St Mary's Hospital in London.

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And Selwyn is being prepared for deep brain surgery.

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But this razor is the only blade that will be used today.

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This frame will ensure his head is kept completely

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still during surgery.

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Once it is placed inside this machine, the first of its kind

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in the UK, which operates using sound waves.

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It works like this: The device has more

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than a thousand ultrasound beams.

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When focussed on a single point, they generate enough

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heat to destroy tissue.

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The target is a tiny point at the base of the brain,

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which is causing the faulty signals, which trigger the tremors.

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697 watt, 13 seconds.

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This is precision medicine.

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The team constantly monitor MRI scans and gradually increase

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the energy of the sound beams.

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Selwyn's wife is there to re-assure him.

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I've witnessed quite a lot of brain surgery and it is brutal and bloody,

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drilling through the skull and cutting through tissue.

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The contrast here is astonishing.

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There are no scalpels, it's all done with sound waves

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and the patient is awake throughout.

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And the result - remarkable.

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The tremors have gone.

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His right hand is steady and this is a permanent fix.

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Doctors believe ultrasound surgery could treat other conditions.

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It could help involuntary movements in Parkinson's and help tremor

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in multiple sclerosis as well as other neurological

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conditions emanating from the brain.

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It has a big future?

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An enormous future.

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This was Selwyn before treatment.

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And after.

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It avoids the risks associated with conventional brain surgery.

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And recovery is immediate.

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You've got a big smile on your face.

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Yeah.

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It's nice isn't it.

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Brilliant to pick something up with that hand and know it's not

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going to spill everywhere.

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Selwyn's treatment is part of an international trial.

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Once that's completed next year, there's likely to be huge demand

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for this pioneering surgery.

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A really fascinating insight into the life of the penguin now.

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Scientists in Antarctica have been working on a ground breaking project

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to capture the activity of a colony of penguins on camera.

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They spent much of the year watching them using remote cameras to see how

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they're adapting to climate change and of course the threats

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they now face.

0:22:270:22:29

Victoria Gill was given exclusive access to their research.

0:22:290:22:34

Her report contains flashing images.

0:22:340:22:42

I'm in Antarctica following a team of scientists setting up remote

0:22:470:22:50

cameras in penguin colonies here.

0:22:500:22:55

I'm Tom, a scientist at Oxford University.

0:22:550:23:00

We've probably got 40 and they are spread out the length

0:23:000:23:02

and breadth of the peninsula.

0:23:030:23:06

The bottom one, that takes photos all year round, every hour.

0:23:060:23:12

The whole reason we're here is to monitor penguins on a vast level.

0:23:120:23:18

If we have a constant presence in all these colonies, we can look

0:23:180:23:22

at how many chicks survive.

0:23:220:23:25

It's like CCTV.

0:23:250:23:28

Seeing was going on in winter is something

0:23:280:23:30

you would never get to see.

0:23:300:23:35

The partnership with tourism, this access is really

0:23:350:23:38

important, isn't it?

0:23:380:23:39

It's vital.

0:23:390:23:41

We would never have the access without them.

0:23:410:23:43

Partly we're doing this because there's a potential threat

0:23:430:23:45

and we want to measure it.

0:23:450:23:51

Where we've looked, there seems to be very little impact of tourism.

0:23:510:23:56

We have quite a close partnership and they drop us off

0:23:560:23:59

where we want to go.

0:23:590:24:01

In return, we educate their tourists about conservation and hopefully

0:24:010:24:04

inspire them to conserve penguins.

0:24:040:24:08

This is the gangway.

0:24:080:24:10

Before we go ashore, we have to wash our boots.

0:24:100:24:16

It's a pristine place.

0:24:160:24:18

We don't want to take anything onto the Antarctic mainland

0:24:180:24:20

which shouldn't be there.

0:24:200:24:24

This is The Zodiac, it's a rubber boat.

0:24:250:24:28

We use this to get around.

0:24:280:24:29

They're fantastic boats, very fast, very stable.

0:24:290:24:33

They bounce when you hit them up against a rock.

0:24:330:24:35

They're wonderful for down here.

0:24:350:24:42

I work as expedition leader.

0:24:420:24:46

It's incredible to see how ubiquitously everyone

0:24:460:24:49

is affected by Antarctica.

0:24:490:24:51

One of the things that we love about working with the production

0:24:510:24:56

of scientific knowledge is that we give people

0:24:560:24:59

the kind of emotional attachment to the place.

0:24:590:25:03

They provide ground work and relevance for people to put

0:25:030:25:06

that energy, you know.

0:25:060:25:10

Then of course, it also brings home a lot of bigger picture questions

0:25:100:25:16

about human beings' presence on the planet.

0:25:160:25:20

So this is the last camera of this expedition now?

0:25:210:25:26

That's it for this year, for this camera any way.

0:25:260:25:30

Now it's just turn it on and fingers crossed.

0:25:300:25:33

Back next year.

0:25:330:25:34

Yeah.

0:25:340:25:37

And that's it from this special edition of Reporters looking back

0:25:390:25:42

at some of the very best reports from this year.

0:25:420:25:45

From me, bye for now.

0:25:450:26:06

This is BBC News.

0:26:060:26:07

I'm Martine Croxall.

0:26:070:26:08

Viewers on BBC One will join us shortly for a full

0:26:080:26:11

round up of the day's news.

0:26:110:26:12

First, a look at the weather for the week ahead

0:26:120:26:15

with Sarah Keith-Lucas.

0:26:150:26:16

Hello, there.

0:26:180:26:19

2016's ended on a fairly mild and cloudy sort of note.

0:26:190:26:22

A weekly programme of stories filed by BBC reporters from all over the world, ranging from analyses of major global issues to personal reflections and anecdotes.


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