20/11/2016 Sunday Politics East Midlands


20/11/2016

Andrew Neil and Marie Ashby hear from the candidates for the Ukip leadership and look ahead to the chancellor's Autumn Statement.


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Transcript


LineFromTo

Morning folks - welcome to the Sunday Politics.

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Theresa May says she'll deliver on Brexit but does that mean leaving

:00:42.:00:44.

the EU's Single Market and the Customs Union?

:00:45.:00:48.

Tory MPs campaign for a commitment from the Prime

:00:49.:00:51.

The Chancellor pledges just over a billion pounds worth of spending

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on Britain's roads but is that it or will there be

:01:04.:01:10.

And in the East Midlands: 18 days in the job.

:01:11.:01:16.

The jobs bust taking workers from struggling areas to find

:01:17.:01:19.

Plus, the Derbyshire firm sdlling rice to the Chinese.

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in London: Is the battle for Richmond Park based on the skies? Or

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is it about a bigger conflict in Europe?

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And with me - as always - and, no, these three aren't doing

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the Mannequin challenge - it's our dynamic, demonstrative

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dazzling political panel - Helen Lewis, Isabel Oakeshott

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and Tom Newton Dunn they'll also be tweeting throughout the programme.

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First this morning - Theresa May has said

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"Brexit means Brexit" - but can the Prime Minister -

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who was on the Remain side of argument during the referendum

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Well, Leave-supporting Tory MPs are re-launching

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the "European Research Group" this morning to keep Mrs May's feet

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Are you worried that you cannot trust Theresa May until payment to

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deliver full Brexit was Magellan like I totally trust Theresa May,

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100% behind her. She has displayed a massive amount of commitment to

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making a success of Brexit for the country.

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We don't know that yet, because nothing has happened. Why, then

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have you formed a pressure group? We were fed up with the negativity

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coming out around Brexit. I feel positive about the opportunities we

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face, and we are a group to provide suggestions. Who do you have in mind

:02:56.:02:58.

when you talk about negativity the Chancellor? No, from the Lib Dems,

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for example, from Labour MPs. This is a pressure group for leaving

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membership of the single market and customs union, correct? That is what

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we are proposing. It has a purpose other than just to combat

:03:18.:03:20.

negativity. When it comes to membership of the single market and

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the customs union, can you tell us what Government policy is towards

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both or either? Rightly, the Government hasn't made the position

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clear, and I think that is the right approach, because we don't want to

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review our negotiating hand. What we're saying... I'm not asking what

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you are saying. Can you tell us what Government policy is towards

:03:46.:03:47.

membership of these institutions? The Government wants to make sure

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British businesses have the right to trade with EU partners, to forge new

:03:53.:03:56.

trade deals with the rest of the world. We hope to Reza may speak at

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Mansion house this week. -- we had Theresa May speak at Mansion house

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this week. She has been clear, saying it was not a binary choice.

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And she's right. Let's run that tape, because I want to pick up on

:04:13.:04:16.

what she did say. This is what she had to say about the customs union

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at Prime Minister's Question Time. On the whole question of the customs

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union, trading relationships that we have with the European Union and

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other parts of the world once we have left the European Union, we are

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preparing carefully for the formal negotiations. We are preparing

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carefully for the formal negotiations. We want to ensure we

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have the best possible trading deal with the EU once we have left. Do

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you know what she means when she says being in the customs union is

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not a binary choice? I think she's right when she says that. At the

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moment, and you know this, as long as we are in the customs union, we

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cannot set our own tariffs or rules, cannot have a free trade agreement

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with the US or China. We need to leave a customs union to do that.

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Binary means either you are in or you are out, self which is it? We

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still want to trade with the EU and I think we can have a free trade

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agreement with the EU. That is a separate matter, and it has to do

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with the single market. What about the customs union? We need to leave

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the customs union. We do it and properly. That is how to get the

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most out of this opportunity. Summit is a binary choice? The Prime

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Minister is right when she says it's not a binary choice. Both can't be

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right. We can leave the customs union, get their benefits, and have

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a free trade agreement with zero tariffs with the EU. So it is a

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binary choice an either be stale really. Yellow like I am saying the

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Prime Minister is right when she says it is not a binary choice. -- I

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am saying the Prime Minister is right. We need clarity. Youth had

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said -- you have said it is a binary choice. We need to leave the

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constraints of the customs union. It pushes up prices. The EU is not

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securing the right trade deals, and if we want to make the most of it,

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we need to get out there and get some deals going. Do you accept that

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if we remain in the customs union, we cannot do our own free-trade

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deals? Yellow right 100%. That is why we have to leave. -- 100%. Do

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you accept that if we leave the customs union but stay with

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substantial access, I don't say membership, but substantial access

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to the single market, that goods going from this country to the

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single market because we're no longer in the union will be subject

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to complicated rules of origin regulations, which could cost

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business ?13 billion a year? I would like to see a free-trade agreement

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between the UK and the EU. Look at the Canadian deal. I give you that,

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but if we're not in the customs union, things that we bring in on

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our own tariffs once we've left we can't just export again willy-nilly

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to the EU. They will demand to see rules of origin. Norway has to do

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that at the moment and it is highly complicated expensive. I think if we

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agree a particular arrangement as part of this agreement with the EU,

:07:48.:07:50.

we can reach an agreement on that which sets a lower standard, which

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sets a different level of tariffs, which protects some of our

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industries. Let's suppose we have pretty much free trade with the EU

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but we are out of the customs union, and let's suppose that the European

:08:07.:08:10.

Union has a 20% tariff on Japanese whisky and we decide to have a %

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tariff - what then happens to the whisky that comes into Britain and

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goes on to the EU? The EU will not let that in. That will be part of

:08:24.:08:28.

the negotiation. I think there is a huge benefit for external operators.

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Every bottle of Japanese whisky they will have to work out the rules

:08:36.:08:38.

of origin. There have been studies that show there is a potential for

:08:39.:08:44.

50% increase in global product if we leave. We're losing the benefits of

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free trade. I understand, I am asking for your particular view

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Thank you for that. Is it not surprising Mr Hannan could

:08:52.:09:00.

not bring himself to say we would leave the customs union? It is

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messy. The reason there is this new group of Tory MPs signing up to a

:09:05.:09:10.

campaign to make sure we get a genuine Brexit is because there is

:09:11.:09:15.

this vacuum. It is being filled with all sorts of briefing from the other

:09:16.:09:20.

side. There is a real risk in the minds of Brexit supporting MPs that

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the remaining side are going to try to hijack the process, not only

:09:26.:09:27.

through the Supreme Court action, which I think most Brexit MPs seem

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to accept the appeal will fail, but further down the line, through

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amendments to the great repeal bill. This is a pressure group to try to

:09:40.:09:43.

hold the Prime Minister to account. There is plenty of pressure on the

:09:44.:09:47.

Prime Minister effectively to stay in the single market and the customs

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union, and if you do both of these things, de facto, you have stayed in

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the EU. She is in a difficult position because there is no good

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faith assumption about what Theresa May wants because she was a

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Remainer. There is all this talk about a transitional arrangement,

:10:09.:10:11.

but she can't sell that as someone who voted to remain. The way Isabel

:10:12.:10:17.

has characterised it is interesting. There is a betrayal narrative.

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Everyone is looking to say that she has betrayed the true Brexit. Since

:10:22.:10:25.

the Government cannot give a clear indication of what it once in terms

:10:26.:10:31.

of the customs union, which sets external tariffs, or the single

:10:32.:10:35.

market, which is the free movement of people, capital, goods and

:10:36.:10:38.

services, others are filling this vacuum. Right. The reasons they

:10:39.:10:46.

can't do this are, first, they don't know if they can get it or not. We

:10:47.:10:49.

saw this with the renegotiation the last Prime Minister. What are they

:10:50.:10:56.

hoping to get? The world on a stick, to get cake and eat it. You go into

:10:57.:11:06.

a negotiation saying, let's see what we can get in total. Are they going

:11:07.:11:10.

to ask the membership of the single market? Yellow I think they will ask

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for a free trade agreement involving everything. You can demand what you

:11:15.:11:27.

want. The question is, do they stand a cat's chance in hell of getting

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it? They don't know. Welcome back. We will be back, believe me. It is

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150 day since we found out the UK had voted to leave the EU, but as we

:11:39.:11:43.

have heard, remain and leave campaigners continue to battle about

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what type of relationship we should have with the EU after exit.

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Leave campaigners say that leaving the EU

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also means quitting the

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Single Market, the internal European trading bloc that includes free

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movement of goods, services, capital and people.

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They point to evidence that leading Leave supporting

:12:03.:12:04.

politicians ruled out staying in the Single Market during

:12:05.:12:06.

Andrea Leadsom, for example, said it would almost

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certainly be the case that the UK would come out of the Single Market.

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When asked for a yes or no on whether the UK should stay

:12:19.:12:23.

"No, we should be outside the Single Market."

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And Boris Johnson agreed with his erstwhile ally, saying, "Michael

:12:27.:12:29.

Gove was absolutely right to say the UK

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They've released a video of clips of Leave campaigners speaking before

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the referendum apparently saying that the UK should stay in the

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Nigel Farage, for example, once said that on leaving

:12:46.:12:48.

the EU we'll find ourselves part of the European economic area

:12:49.:12:51.

Owen Paterson, the former Environment Secretary,

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once made the startling statement that only a madman would actually

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And Matthew Elliott, the Vote Leave chief, said

:13:01.:13:05.

that the Norwegian option would be initially attractive for some

:13:06.:13:07.

But do these quotes create an accurate picture of what

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To cast some light on where these quotes came from we're

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joined by James McGrory, director of Open Britain

:13:19.:13:21.

Welcome to the Sunday Politics. . Your video has statements from leave

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campaigners hinting they want to stay in the single market. How many

:13:36.:13:38.

were made during the referendum campaign? I don't know. Not one was

:13:39.:13:46.

made during the referendum campaign. Indeed, only two of the 12

:13:47.:13:50.

statements were recorded after Royal assent had been given to the

:13:51.:13:54.

referendum. Only one was made this year before the referendum.

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Throughout the campaign am a leave campaigners lauded the Norwegian

:14:00.:14:02.

model. Norway are in the single market but not in the EU. They went

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out of their way not to be pinned down on a specific trading

:14:09.:14:11.

arrangement they want to see in the future with Europe, when the

:14:12.:14:15.

Treasury model the different models it was the EEA or a free-trade

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agreement. I understand. Does it not undermine your case that none of the

:14:21.:14:23.

12 statements on your video were made during the campaign itself

:14:24.:14:28.

when people were giving really serious thought to such matters The

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Leave campaign weren't giving serious thought to such matters

:14:34.:14:36.

They did not set out the future trading model they wanted to see.

:14:37.:14:41.

But you cannot produce a single video with somebody saying we should

:14:42.:14:45.

stay in the single market during the campaign. Daniel Hanna had talked

:14:46.:14:50.

about the Norwegian model as a future option. One comment from

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Nigel Farage dates back to 2009 when we didn't even know if we would

:14:57.:14:59.

have a referendum or not. Does it not stretch credibility to go back

:15:00.:15:04.

to the time when Gordon Brown was Prime Minister? The overall point

:15:05.:15:07.

stands. It is not supposed to be an exhaustive list of the options.

:15:08.:15:14.

Daniel Hannan, described as the intellectual godfather of the Leave

:15:15.:15:18.

movement is saying that no one is talking about threatening our place

:15:19.:15:22.

in the signal market. I think it's legitimate to point out the Leave

:15:23.:15:26.

campaign never came forward with a credible argument. We have

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highlighted some of the quotes you picked out from leave campaigners

:15:31.:15:33.

over time. Do you think you have fully encapsulated their arguments

:15:34.:15:39.

accurately? I don't think in a 2nd video you can talk about the full

:15:40.:15:45.

thing. -- a 90-2nd video. Some of them want to seek a free-trade

:15:46.:15:50.

agreement, some to default on to World Trade Organisation tariffs.

:15:51.:15:57.

There is a range of opinion in the Leave campaign. Let's listen to the

:15:58.:15:59.

clip you used on Owen Paterson first.

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Only a madman would actually leave the market.

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Only a madman would actually leave the market.

:16:09.:16:12.

It's not the EU which is

:16:13.:16:14.

a political organisation delivering the prosperity and buying our goods.

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It's the market, it's the members of the market and we'll carry on

:16:18.:16:20.

I mean, are we really suggesting that the

:16:21.:16:23.

economy in the world is not going to come to come

:16:24.:16:26.

to a satisfactory trading arrangement with the EU?

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Are we going to be like Sudan and North

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It is ludicrous this idea that we are going to leap off a

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What he said when he said only a madman would leave Europe, was that

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we would continue to trade, we would continue to have access. Any country

:16:49.:16:52.

in the world can have access. What the Leave campaign suggested is our

:16:53.:16:55.

trade would continue uninterrupted, they are still at it today, David

:16:56.:16:59.

Davis used the phrase, uninterrupted, from the dispatch box

:17:00.:17:03.

recently. You misrepresented him by saying only a madman would leave the

:17:04.:17:06.

Single Market and stopped it there, because he goes onto say that of

:17:07.:17:11.

course we want Leave in the sense of continuing to have access. I don't

:17:12.:17:12.

think he was about axis, he is talking

:17:13.:17:31.

about membership. He doesn't use the word membership at all. He talks

:17:32.:17:33.

about we are going to carry on trading with them, we will not leap

:17:34.:17:36.

off, we will carry on trading. Anybody can trade with the EU, it's

:17:37.:17:39.

the terms on which you trade that is important and leave campaigners and

:17:40.:17:41.

Patterson is an example of this saying we can trade as we do now,

:17:42.:17:44.

the government saying we can trade without bureaucratic impediments and

:17:45.:17:46.

tariff free. The viewers will make up their mind. Let's listen to the

:17:47.:17:48.

views of Matthew Elliott, the Chief Executive of Vote Leave.

:17:49.:17:50.

When it comes to the Norwegian option, the EEA option, I think that

:17:51.:17:53.

it might be initially attractive for some business people.

:17:54.:17:55.

So you then cut him off there but this is what he went on to say in

:17:56.:17:59.

the same clip, let's listen to that. When it comes to the Norwegian

:18:00.:18:02.

option, the EEA option, I think that it might be initially attractive

:18:03.:18:06.

for some business people. But then again for voters

:18:07.:18:08.

who are increasingly concerned about migration in the EU,

:18:09.:18:11.

they will be very concerned that it allows free movement

:18:12.:18:14.

of people to continue. Again, you have misrepresented him.

:18:15.:18:26.

He said the Norwegian model has attractions but there are real

:18:27.:18:28.

problems if it involves free movement of people, which it does.

:18:29.:18:33.

But you cut that bit out. I challenge anyone to represent them

:18:34.:18:36.

accurately because they took such a range of opinions. I don't know what

:18:37.:18:40.

we are supposed to do. You are misrepresenting them. He is saying

:18:41.:18:44.

the Norwegian option is attractive to business, I understand why. It

:18:45.:18:48.

might not be attractive for voters. But then he said if it allowed free

:18:49.:18:55.

movement of people it could be an issue. You took that out. You are

:18:56.:18:59.

saying this is a definitive position. I'm suggesting you are

:19:00.:19:02.

distorting it. This is what you had Mr Farage say.

:19:03.:19:04.

On D+1 we'll find ourselves part of the European economic area

:19:05.:19:07.

This is what he then went on to say in that same clip that you didn t

:19:08.:19:15.

run. There is absolutely

:19:16.:19:16.

nothing to fear in terms of trade from leaving

:19:17.:19:18.

the on D+1 we'll find ourselves part

:19:19.:19:19.

of the European Economic Area and we should use our

:19:20.:19:23.

membership of the EEA as a holding position from which

:19:24.:19:32.

we can negotiate as the European Union's biggest export

:19:33.:19:35.

market in the world, as good a deal, my goodness me,

:19:36.:19:38.

if Switzerland can have one we So there again, he says not that we

:19:39.:19:48.

should stay in the Single Market as a member, but that we stay in the EA

:19:49.:19:53.

as a transition until we negotiate something. -- EEA. This whole clip

:19:54.:20:03.

is online, how would you get away with this distortion? It is not a

:20:04.:20:06.

distortion, the whole point is to point out they do not have a

:20:07.:20:10.

definitive position, he is arguing for membership of the Single Market,

:20:11.:20:13.

for a transitional period. For the transition. How long does that go

:20:14.:20:18.

on, what does he want to then achieve? Not very quickly but he

:20:19.:20:21.

does not say we should stay members of the Single Market and you didn't

:20:22.:20:25.

let people see what he went on to say, you gave the impression he

:20:26.:20:28.

wanted to stay in the one it. It would not be a video then, it would

:20:29.:20:32.

be a seven-week long lecture. They took so many positions, and the idea

:20:33.:20:36.

now that they were clear with people that we should definitely leave the

:20:37.:20:39.

Single Market I think is fictitious. You are trying to make out they all

:20:40.:20:43.

had one position which was to remain members of the one it. You see the

:20:44.:20:48.

full clips that is not what they are saying. We are trying to point out

:20:49.:20:52.

there is no mandate to leave the Single Market. The idea the Leave

:20:53.:20:55.

campaign spoke with unanimity and clarity of purpose and throughout

:20:56.:20:59.

the whole campaign said we will definitely leave the Single Market

:21:00.:21:03.

is not true. That is the whole point of the media. We showed in the

:21:04.:21:06.

montage in the video just before we came on, we said that then Prime

:21:07.:21:11.

Minister, the then Chancellor, Boris Johnson, Michael Gove, being

:21:12.:21:14.

categorical that if you vote to leave the EU, you vote to leave

:21:15.:21:17.

membership of the Single Market What bit of that didn't you

:21:18.:21:21.

understand? Under duress they occasionally said they wanted to

:21:22.:21:24.

leave. Some of them wanted to leave the Single Market. All of the other

:21:25.:21:30.

promises they made, whether ?35 million for the NHS, whether a VAT

:21:31.:21:35.

cut on fuel, points-based system. You do not have a single quote of

:21:36.:21:38.

any of these members saying they want to be a member. Daniel Hannan

:21:39.:21:42.

has said consistently that Norway are a part of the Single Market You

:21:43.:21:47.

spend the referendum campaign criticising for Rim misrepresenting

:21:48.:21:49.

and misrepresenting and lying and many thought they did. Having seen

:21:50.:21:52.

this many will conclude that you are the biggest liars. I think it is

:21:53.:21:56.

perfectly reasonable to point out that the Leave campaign did not have

:21:57.:21:59.

a clear position on our future trading relationship with Europe.

:22:00.:22:03.

That is all this video does. It doesn't say we definitely have to

:22:04.:22:06.

stay in the Single Market, it just says they do have a mandate to drag

:22:07.:22:10.

us out of our biggest trading partner.

:22:11.:22:13.

Now people have seen the full quotes in context our viewers will make up

:22:14.:22:14.

their mind. Thank you. Now - voting closes next week

:22:15.:22:16.

in the the Ukip leadership contest. The second Ukip leadership contest

:22:17.:22:19.

this year after the party's first female leader - Diane James -

:22:20.:22:22.

stood down from the role Since then the party's lurched from

:22:23.:22:25.

farce to fiasco. It's a world gripped by uncertainty,

:22:26.:22:28.

split into factions. Yes, 2, because they're

:22:29.:22:43.

having their second Watch as the alpha male,

:22:44.:22:53.

the Ukip leader at Nigel Watch as the alpha male,

:22:54.:23:01.

the Ukip leader Nigel Farage, hands power to the new alpha

:23:02.:23:03.

female Diane James. The European Parliament

:23:04.:23:06.

in Strasbourg, October. Another leading light and possible

:23:07.:23:20.

future leader, the MEP Steven Wolfe,

:23:21.:23:23.

has been laid low after an alleged tussle with a colleague

:23:24.:23:25.

during a meeting. A few days later he is

:23:26.:23:27.

out of hospital and I will be withdrawing my

:23:28.:23:30.

application to become I'm actually withdrawing

:23:31.:23:34.

myself from Ukip. You're resigning from the party

:23:35.:23:37.

I'm resigning with immediate effect. And this week a leaked document

:23:38.:23:43.

suggested the party improperly spent EU funds on political

:23:44.:23:47.

campaigning in the UK. Another headache for whoever takes

:23:48.:23:52.

over the leadership of the pack One contender is Suzanne Evans,

:23:53.:23:58.

a former Tory councillor and was briefly suspended for

:23:59.:24:01.

disloyalty. Also standing, Paul Nuttall,

:24:02.:24:10.

an MEP from Liverpool who has been by Farage's side

:24:11.:24:13.

as his deputy for six years. There's another big beast

:24:14.:24:18.

in the Ukip leadership contest, and I'm told

:24:19.:24:21.

that today he can be spotted He's John Rees-Evans,

:24:22.:24:24.

a businessman and adventurer who is offering members the chance

:24:25.:24:29.

to propose policies via a website We've got really dedicated

:24:30.:24:32.

passionate supporters who feel like they're not really

:24:33.:24:46.

being listened to and are not even Typically what happens

:24:47.:24:48.

is they just basically sit there until six months before

:24:49.:24:51.

a General Election when they are contacted and asked to go out

:24:52.:24:54.

and leaflet and canvas. Even at branch level people feel

:24:55.:24:56.

there is not an adequate flow of communication

:24:57.:24:59.

up-and-down the party. Are you not going to take part in

:25:00.:25:01.

any hustings? He left a hustings saying

:25:02.:25:10.

the contest was an establishment coronation and has

:25:11.:25:13.

made colourful comments in the past. He's in favour of the death penalty

:25:14.:25:15.

for crimes like paedophilia. I think there is a clear

:25:16.:25:18.

will amongst the offences should be dealt with

:25:19.:25:20.

decisively. But again, on an issue like that,

:25:21.:25:24.

that is something that Our members are not

:25:25.:25:26.

going to agree with me on everything and I don't believe that

:25:27.:25:32.

I would have any authority to have the say and determine

:25:33.:25:34.

the future What method would you use

:25:35.:25:36.

for the death penalty? Again, that is something that could

:25:37.:25:40.

be determined by suggestions made So you'd have like an online

:25:41.:25:42.

poll about whether you use the electric chair,

:25:43.:25:46.

or lethal injection? For example, arguments would be made

:25:47.:25:52.

in favour of This is such a small aspect

:25:53.:25:54.

of what I'm standing for. Essentially, in mainstream media

:25:55.:25:59.

they try to by focusing on pretty irrelevant

:26:00.:26:00.

details. This is one vote that

:26:01.:26:06.

the membership would have. What I'm actually trying to do

:26:07.:26:09.

in this party is to revolutionise the democratic

:26:10.:26:13.

process in the UK, and that's really what your viewers should

:26:14.:26:15.

be concentrating on. With him at the helm he reckons Ukip

:26:16.:26:19.

would win at Meanwhile, in New York,

:26:20.:26:22.

on a visit to Trump Tower, Nigel Farage admired the plumage

:26:23.:26:30.

of the President-elect, a man he has described as

:26:31.:26:38.

a silverback gorilla, a friendship that's been condemned by some

:26:39.:26:41.

in this leadership contest. There are also elections

:26:42.:26:44.

to the party's National Executive Committee, a body

:26:45.:26:46.

that's been roundly criticised by And we're joined now by two

:26:47.:26:49.

of the candidates in the Ukip leadership election -

:26:50.:27:04.

Suzanne Evans and Paul Nuttall. We are going to kick off by giving

:27:05.:27:14.

each of them 30 seconds to lay out their case as to why they would be

:27:15.:27:17.

the less leader starting with Suzanne Evans.

:27:18.:27:20.

Ukip is at its best when it is scaring the political establishment,

:27:21.:27:23.

forcing it to address those problems it would rather ignore. But it

:27:24.:27:27.

really change people's lives for the better and fast, we need to win

:27:28.:27:30.

seats and elections right across the country. To win at the ballot box we

:27:31.:27:34.

need to attract more women, more ethnic

:27:35.:27:54.

minorities, and more of those Labour voters who no longer recognise their

:27:55.:27:57.

party. I know how to do that. Ukip under my

:27:58.:28:00.

leadership will be the same page about it, common-sense, radical

:28:01.:28:02.

party it has always been, just even more successful. Thank you, Suzanne

:28:03.:28:04.

Evans, Paul Nuttall. I'm standing on a platform of unity and experience.

:28:05.:28:07.

I believe the party must come together if it is to survive and

:28:08.:28:09.

prosper. I believe I'm the best candidate to ensure that happens, I

:28:10.:28:12.

am not part of any faction in the party, and beyond that I have done

:28:13.:28:15.

every single job within the party, whether that is as head of policy,

:28:16.:28:17.

whether that is Party Chairman, deputy leader for Nigel for the past

:28:18.:28:20.

six years. I believe Ukip has great opportunities in Labour

:28:21.:28:22.

constituencies where we can move in and become the Patriot invoice of

:28:23.:28:26.

working people, and beyond that we have to ensure the government's feet

:28:27.:28:29.

are held to the fire on Brexit and we get real Brexit, not a

:28:30.:28:36.

mealy-mouthed version. How will you get a grip on this? People have to

:28:37.:28:40.

realise that the cause is bigger than any personality, we have to get

:28:41.:28:44.

together in a room and sort out not just a spokespeople role but roles

:28:45.:28:47.

within the organisation, Party Chairman, party secretary, and

:28:48.:28:52.

whatnot. But as I say, Ukip must unite, we are on 13% in the opinion

:28:53.:28:56.

polls, the future is bright, there are open goals but Ukip must be on

:28:57.:29:00.

the pitch to score them. He says he's the only one that can get a

:29:01.:29:04.

grip on this party. I disagree, I have a huge amount of experience in

:29:05.:29:07.

the party as well and also a background that I think means I can

:29:08.:29:10.

help bring people together. I have always said nothing breeds unity

:29:11.:29:21.

faster than success and under my leadership we will be successful.

:29:22.:29:23.

There is concern about the future of our National Executive Committee

:29:24.:29:26.

going forward. Mr Farage called it the lowest grade of people I have

:29:27.:29:29.

ever met, do you agree? I think he must have been having a bad day I

:29:30.:29:32.

think we need to make it more accountable to the membership, more

:29:33.:29:35.

open, more democratic. What would you do with the National Executive

:29:36.:29:39.

Committee? I have been calling for the National Executive Committee to

:29:40.:29:43.

be elected reasonably since 201 giving the members better

:29:44.:29:46.

communication lines and make it far more transparent. Would you have a

:29:47.:29:50.

clear out of the office? I wouldn't, I think the chairman of the party,

:29:51.:29:54.

Paul Upton, the interim chairman, is doing a good job and the only person

:29:55.:29:58.

who has come out of the summer with his reputation enhanced. Let me show

:29:59.:30:01.

you a picture we have all seen of your current leader, Mr Farage, with

:30:02.:30:09.

President-elect Donald Trump. Paul Nuttall, you criticise Mr Farage's

:30:10.:30:12.

decision to appear at rallies during the American election and called Mr

:30:13.:30:16.

Trump appalling. Do you stick by that? I wouldn't have voted for him.

:30:17.:30:22.

I made it clear. Do you still think he's appalling now that he is

:30:23.:30:25.

President-elect? Some of the things he said were appalling during the

:30:26.:30:30.

campaign that he said. But he would be good for Britain, trade,

:30:31.:30:33.

pro-Brexit and he is an Anglo file and the first thing he did was put

:30:34.:30:37.

the bust of Winston Churchill back in the Oval Office. You, Suzanne

:30:38.:30:42.

Evans, called Mr Trump one of the weakest candidates the US has had. I

:30:43.:30:47.

said the same about Hillary Clinton. They cannot both be the weakest The

:30:48.:30:51.

better candidate on either side would have beaten the other, that is

:30:52.:30:55.

quite clear. Do you stand by that, or are you glad that your leader Mr

:30:56.:31:00.

Farage has strong ties to him? I am, why wouldn't I be? For Ukip to have

:31:01.:31:05.

that direct connection, it can be only good for a party. Were you not

:31:06.:31:09.

out of step and Mr Farage is in step because it looks like your vote is

:31:10.:31:12.

according to polling I have seemed like Mr Trump and his policies? Let

:31:13.:31:18.

me finish. If I am the leader of Ukip I will not be involving myself

:31:19.:31:21.

in foreign elections, I will because in trading here in this country

:31:22.:31:25.

ensuring we get Ukip people elected to council chambers and get seats in

:31:26.:31:26.

2020. The other thing your leader has in

:31:27.:31:36.

common with Mr Trump is that he rather admires Vladimir Putin. Do

:31:37.:31:43.

you? I don't. If you look at Putin's record, he has invaded Ukraine and

:31:44.:31:50.

Georgia. I am absolutely not a fan. I think that Vladimir Putin is

:31:51.:31:54.

pretty much a nasty man, but beyond that, I believe that in the Middle

:31:55.:31:59.

East, he is generally getting it right in many areas. We need to

:32:00.:32:05.

bring the conflict... Bombing civilians? We need to bring the

:32:06.:32:10.

conflict to an end as fast as possible. The British and American

:32:11.:32:14.

line before Donald Trump is to support rebels, including one is

:32:15.:32:21.

affiliated to Al-Qaeda, to the Taliban. We need to clear these

:32:22.:32:24.

people out and ensure that Syria becomes stable. This controversial

:32:25.:32:32.

breaking point poster from during the referendum campaign. Mr Farage

:32:33.:32:36.

unveiled it, there he is standing in front of it. You can bend it - do

:32:37.:32:41.

you still? Yes, I think it was the wrong poster at the wrong time. I

:32:42.:32:45.

was involved with the vote Leave campaign as well as Ukip's campaign,

:32:46.:32:50.

and I felt strongly that those concerned about immigration were

:32:51.:32:53.

already going to vote to leave because it was a fundamental truth

:32:54.:32:57.

that unless we left the European Union we couldn't control

:32:58.:32:59.

immigration. I thought it was about approaching those soft wavering

:33:00.:33:08.

voters who weren't sure. I don't think I said it was racist, but it

:33:09.:33:12.

was about sovereignty and trade and so forth. That was where we needed

:33:13.:33:16.

to go. I was concerned it might put off some of those wavering voters.

:33:17.:33:20.

People may well say, it was part of the winning campaign. It was Ukip

:33:21.:33:27.

shock and all, which is what you stand for and what makes you

:33:28.:33:34.

different. I said I would know how that I said I would not have gone

:33:35.:33:37.

for that person and I thought it was wrong to do it just a week out from

:33:38.:33:40.

the referendum. However, I believe it released legitimate concerns

:33:41.:33:47.

with a deluge of people making their way from the Middle East and Africa

:33:48.:33:54.

into the European continent. Where is the low hanging fruit for you,

:33:55.:33:58.

particularly in England? Is it Labour or Conservative voters? I

:33:59.:34:03.

want to hang onto the Conservative voters we have got but I think the

:34:04.:34:09.

low hanging fruit is Labour. Jeremy Corbyn won't sing the national

:34:10.:34:13.

anthem, Emily Thornbury despises the English flag. Diane Abbott thinks

:34:14.:34:16.

anyone talking about immigration is racist. Not to mention John

:34:17.:34:21.

McDonnell's feelings about the IRA. Labour has ceased to be a party for

:34:22.:34:25.

working people and I think Ukip is absolutely going to be that party.

:34:26.:34:30.

It is clear, I absolutely concur with everything Suzanne has said. I

:34:31.:34:36.

first voiced this back in 2008 that I believe Ukip has a fantastic

:34:37.:34:39.

opportunity in working-class communities, and everyone laughed at

:34:40.:34:43.

me. It is clear now that we resonate with working people, and you have

:34:44.:34:46.

seen that in the Brexit result. Would you bring back the death

:34:47.:34:53.

penalty? It wouldn't be Ukip policy. Absolutely not. Would you give more

:34:54.:34:56.

money to the NHS and how would your fanatic? You like it is important to

:34:57.:35:00.

fund it adequately, and it hasn t been to date. We promised in our

:35:01.:35:10.

manifesto that we would give more money. Where does the money come

:35:11.:35:15.

from? It is about tackling health tourism. I think the NHS is being

:35:16.:35:20.

taken for a ride at the moment. That may be right, but where does the

:35:21.:35:25.

money come from? It is about scaling back management in the NHS, because

:35:26.:35:29.

that has burgeoned beyond control. They are spending far more money on

:35:30.:35:34.

management. Where would you save money? We need to look at HS two,

:35:35.:35:38.

foreign aid. Now we have Brexit and we will be saving on the membership

:35:39.:35:44.

fee. We need to cut back on management, as Suzanne says. It

:35:45.:35:47.

cannot be right that 51% of people who work for the NHS in England are

:35:48.:35:54.

not clinically qualified. The NHS needs money now - where would you

:35:55.:36:00.

get it? From HS two. That is capital spending spread over a long period.

:36:01.:36:06.

Where will you get the money now? OK, another one. We spent ?25

:36:07.:36:10.

million every day on foreign aid to countries who sometimes are richer

:36:11.:36:15.

than ourselves. Through the Barnett formula. You would take money away

:36:16.:36:19.

from Scotland? Yes, I think they get far too much. PG tips or Earl Grey?

:36:20.:36:35.

Colegrave. PG tips. Strictly come dancing or X Factor? Neither.

:36:36.:36:42.

Strictly. I would love to be on it one day. There you go. Thank you

:36:43.:36:48.

It's just gone 11:35am, you're watching the Sunday Politics.

:36:49.:36:52.

We say goodbye to viewers in Scotland, who leave us now

:36:53.:36:54.

Coming up here in 20 minutes, the Week Ahead.

:36:55.:37:05.

In the East Midlands: What help for the people left behind

:37:06.:37:08.

We are in what you could call the East

:37:09.:37:13.

Midlands' coal dust belt, with a message

:37:14.:37:17.

They keep saying about a northern powerhouse.

:37:18.:37:21.

They're talking Manchester, Nottingham, place like that.

:37:22.:37:27.

They're not talking about lhttle villages like here, Edwinstow.

:37:28.:37:32.

And never mind calls to Newcastle, one East Midlands food

:37:33.:37:35.

manufacturer is selling ricd to China, but what difference will

:37:36.:37:38.

Making the UK stand alone as a power country

:37:39.:37:44.

If our Government cannot offer an alternative scheme,

:37:45.:37:50.

it would allow bogus products effectively into the

:37:51.:37:55.

marketplace and that would `ffect our sales and potentially otr

:37:56.:37:57.

So plenty for our guests to get their teeth into this week.

:37:58.:38:02.

Heather Wheeler is the Consdrvative MP for South Derbyshire

:38:03.:38:04.

and was appointed an assist`nt whip by Theresa May.

:38:05.:38:06.

Labour's Anne Western is thd leader of Derby County Council.

:38:07.:38:09.

First up, the news this week of course that the preferred route of

:38:10.:38:16.

HS2 through the Midlands has been published.

:38:17.:38:20.

It comes into our region from just north of Birmingham.

:38:21.:38:23.

There are changes to the earlier proposals.

:38:24.:38:25.

It was due to pass through the west of the region, but

:38:26.:38:28.

Plans for a tunnel under East Midlands Airport, but that has been

:38:29.:38:32.

The line passes around it to the east.

:38:33.:38:35.

The route goes through the liddle of London, that is still

:38:36.:38:38.

There could be a tunnel or a viaduct over the town.

:38:39.:38:48.

And there is a boost for Chesterfield with the possibility of

:38:49.:38:52.

a stop there as part of a spur up to Sheffield from the mainlhne.

:38:53.:38:56.

Of course, don't pick your tickets to

:38:57.:38:57.

us yet, it's not due to be tp and running until 2033.

:38:58.:39:00.

Heather Wheeler, an awfully long time to wait for all of it.

:39:01.:39:03.

with it is it really going to happen?

:39:04.:39:06.

I'd like it to start not just at the south, but at

:39:07.:39:10.

the north at the same time, because the point of this is about

:39:11.:39:13.

conductivity between the south and north.

:39:14.:39:14.

economy from the south to the Midlands and the north and H think

:39:15.:39:19.

it's a fantastic opportunitx for economic regeneration in an area

:39:20.:39:21.

that is we're going to see a little bit later on,

:39:22.:39:24.

Because the planning side of it needs to be done.

:39:25.:39:30.

There's more work already bden done in London on the first day `nd

:39:31.:39:34.

now this is, literally, the second phase.

:39:35.:39:35.

What I'm looking for is phase three as well.

:39:36.:39:37.

Anne Western, great news for Chesterfield as we

:39:38.:39:40.

have just heard, but a bit of a blow there for Long Eaton.

:39:41.:39:43.

There is either going to be a tunnel around

:39:44.:39:45.

it or a viaduct over it, but it s still going to go right through it.

:39:46.:39:49.

It will do, because Long Eaton is so close to Toton station and it's

:39:50.:39:52.

always been known that it would go through Long Eaton.

:39:53.:39:55.

How do we deal with the potdntial roads being severed and the

:39:56.:40:01.

Now we know, this very week, we now know what the

:40:02.:40:05.

Now we can start working on how we deal with the detailed

:40:06.:40:09.

We had an East Midlands HS2 board meeting this

:40:10.:40:12.

morning and we've agreed that there is a whole new phece

:40:13.:40:15.

That's looking at the route and working with the Governlent

:40:16.:40:21.

and HS2 to say, these are the problems it's going to create.

:40:22.:40:24.

How do we limit the damage that is going

:40:25.:40:26.

Because as Heather has said, it's going to bring massive

:40:27.:40:41.

opportunities for jobs and growth in a way that has been

:40:42.:40:44.

We need to capitalise on that, but we also got

:40:45.:40:48.

to be mindful that this will cut through communities and imp`ct on

:40:49.:40:51.

people, sometimes in the most severe way.

:40:52.:40:52.

So, we've got to deal with that

:40:53.:40:54.

And then of course, Heather, there is phase three to

:40:55.:40:58.

Just to echo what Anne has said, the local council

:40:59.:41:02.

The terms and conditions about amelioration and compdnsation,

:41:03.:41:08.

they are actually sorted out right now.

:41:09.:41:10.

The good news is, there is an

:41:11.:41:12.

excellent process to take this forward.

:41:13.:41:13.

Big spending plans in the ftture for the East Midlands on

:41:14.:41:19.

The Brexit vote and the election of Donald

:41:20.:41:24.

Trump have focused attention on former industrial areas left behind

:41:25.:41:26.

as factories and jobs have disappeared.

:41:27.:41:28.

The Chancellor's Autumn Statement will be keenly

:41:29.:41:29.

watched this week to see if anything will be done to help them.

:41:30.:41:32.

Our political editor Tony Roe has joined workers on the new jobs bust

:41:33.:41:36.

picking up people in our very own rust belt

:41:37.:41:38.

and taking them to work in

:41:39.:41:39.

It's 5am, ahead of a 12 hour shift, Lee and Fabian won't see daxlight

:41:40.:41:47.

The job is only possible because the council

:41:48.:41:53.

has laid on a bus to get them to Newark.

:41:54.:41:56.

My first reaction was, Newark is a bit far?

:41:57.:41:58.

But she said, we pay your transport there and back,

:41:59.:42:00.

Without this bus, I wouldn't be able to

:42:01.:42:03.

It would be too far, it takes too long.

:42:04.:42:06.

And the bus is vital, because there is no

:42:07.:42:12.

commercial route from places like this to Newark with thd

:42:13.:42:15.

I think in the post-industrhal era, we've got a different skill set

:42:16.:42:26.

required and a lot of the pdople who were living here and working

:42:27.:42:29.

Lee and Fabian are working at the massive warehouse here.

:42:30.:42:46.

Getting skills like operating forklift

:42:47.:42:47.

trucks to help their chances in the future.

:42:48.:42:49.

The two rich schemes of employment in Ollerton used the call

:42:50.:42:52.

The mine went first and when it was cheaper for Marks

:42:53.:43:00.

Spencer to get clothes made in the far east,

:43:01.:43:02.

Chris from Edwinstow had worked there since she was 15.

:43:03.:43:06.

We could do with people looking at the

:43:07.:43:08.

area and thinking, yes, coming to the area,

:43:09.:43:10.

area and thinking, yes, comhng to the area, we're here to work

:43:11.:43:13.

16 years on, she is still using her skills working from home

:43:14.:43:18.

and she believes the area has been let down.

:43:19.:43:20.

They keep saying about in

:43:21.:43:21.

They are talking Manchester, Nottingham,

:43:22.:43:24.

They are not talking about little villages like

:43:25.:43:26.

They are all going to want ` job sometime in their life.

:43:27.:43:35.

They say kids today don't want to work.

:43:36.:43:39.

They can't work if they can get a job,

:43:40.:43:41.

One thing Ollerton really needs our jobs.

:43:42.:43:44.

A big employer to come to the town, especially for a

:43:45.:43:47.

new generation going into the workplace.

:43:48.:43:48.

If it can't get jobs, it

:43:49.:43:49.

needs better infrastructure to get people to where the jobs do exist.

:43:50.:43:52.

There are now three generathons of some families who haven't worked.

:43:53.:44:12.

When the pits shut, the Olldrton energy village toook root at

:44:13.:44:14.

has recently located seasonal work for some.

:44:15.:44:18.

My son has only just found a job and he's 22.

:44:19.:44:21.

That's down at clipper and that is seasonal.

:44:22.:44:23.

After Christmas, he is going to be out of work again.

:44:24.:44:26.

In Newark one shift ends, another begins.

:44:27.:44:27.

Back to what you could call the East Midlands

:44:28.:44:29.

They have a message for the Government.

:44:30.:44:32.

They need to concentrate more on getting

:44:33.:44:33.

the people there in the first place and making jobs more accesshble to

:44:34.:44:37.

If not, you're just stuck in one local area and obviously thdre

:44:38.:44:41.

is only so much work for so many people.

:44:42.:44:43.

With the influx of people into the country, there are only so

:44:44.:44:46.

Without it, we would be stuck and probably end up

:44:47.:44:49.

This is really such a simpld idea at heart, isn't it?

:44:50.:44:58.

Taking people from areas whdre jobs have disappeared to areas where

:44:59.:45:03.

there seem to be more and it's changing lives as well.

:45:04.:45:07.

We've also heard that another 15 people have

:45:08.:45:11.

actually been for an inducthon to get into work, so it is very

:45:12.:45:14.

A lot of the work now that the job centres do I working in

:45:15.:45:20.

partnership with bigger employers to see where

:45:21.:45:22.

their needs for growth is

:45:23.:45:23.

and the sorts of employees that they want and how that mirrors

:45:24.:45:26.

to what people are in pockets around the

:45:27.:45:28.

It's not new, but it seems to have come of age and I

:45:29.:45:33.

hope other employers think about taking it on.

:45:34.:45:35.

It's being done as a partnership led by the local council

:45:36.:45:38.

and it is helping people in training like forklift truck driving, so

:45:39.:45:41.

things can be done even on a small-scales to make more jobs

:45:42.:45:44.

In Derbyshire, there are three things, like that story

:45:45.:45:48.

from you, what we're doing in Derbyshire

:45:49.:45:50.

is we are regenerating some of the

:45:51.:45:51.

That is the start example of that at the side of

:45:52.:45:55.

We are creating thousands of jobs there on a former pit site.

:45:56.:45:59.

It has taken so long, though, hasn't it?

:46:00.:46:01.

It has, it has, because that area was hit by the recession.

:46:02.:46:10.

We are also, just this last fortnight, we

:46:11.:46:18.

have started the clean-up of the former Coalite site.

:46:19.:46:20.

The Avenue site in north-east Derbyshire is the same.

:46:21.:46:35.

The first thing is that, thd second thing is public transport is an

:46:36.:46:40.

issue, because these are semirural areas.

:46:41.:46:41.

We create jobs, but people in

:46:42.:46:43.

the surrounding villages can't always get them.

:46:44.:46:44.

It's about that infrastructtre or lack of infrastructure.

:46:45.:46:46.

We do need to invest in the infrastructure.

:46:47.:46:50.

The third things about the type of jobs.

:46:51.:46:52.

We need high-quality jobs that are well

:46:53.:46:57.

paid, going back to HS2, thd boost to Chesterfield is not just about

:46:58.:47:00.

high-speed trains stopping there, they would be the Staveley

:47:01.:47:03.

maintenance depot, which will bring back

:47:04.:47:04.

to that area a tradition of

:47:05.:47:05.

high quality engineering jobs that we can take pride in.

:47:06.:47:08.

Not low paid, low skill, seasonal jobs.

:47:09.:47:09.

We need something with some substance that

:47:10.:47:11.

people can look forward to further children,

:47:12.:47:13.

that give people a sense of security and faith in the future.

:47:14.:47:16.

The Autumn Statement is coming up this week.

:47:17.:47:18.

What can we expect from the Chancellor?

:47:19.:47:20.

Any help you for us in the Dast Midlands?

:47:21.:47:29.

You can't possibly expect md as a minister

:47:30.:47:30.

of the Government to tell you what is going to be in the Autumn

:47:31.:47:34.

What I would like to look ott for is some nice plum infrastructure

:47:35.:47:39.

opportunities, but also mord long-term things I could thd

:47:40.:47:41.

There are over 200 firms around area that

:47:42.:47:47.

are involved in the rail industry alone.

:47:48.:47:49.

We have great news going on, more contacts only have ever had.

:47:50.:47:52.

Rolls-Royce, more contacts than ever.

:47:53.:47:53.

Thank goodness, we want that to carry on going.

:47:54.:47:57.

It is the next step and the next step.

:47:58.:47:59.

That's what I want to look out for out of the

:48:00.:48:02.

infrastructure projects coming through.

:48:03.:48:03.

All eyes on Philip Hammond on Wednesday.

:48:04.:48:10.

Will there be much in his Autumn Statement far as

:48:11.:48:12.

And will there be much vaunted Midlands engine

:48:13.:48:17.

One of the region's experts on the economy says the

:48:18.:48:22.

Chancellor's statement is a vital moment for that project.

:48:23.:48:24.

I think the Autumn Statement is very important.

:48:25.:48:26.

It think it's a crucial test of credibility, actually.

:48:27.:48:28.

We've heard a lot said about the potential of the

:48:29.:48:31.

Midlands engine, Theresa Max in the summer was very bullhsh

:48:32.:48:33.

in sending out her support for that initiative,

:48:34.:48:35.

but as yet, we've seen very little in the way of investment ch`nnelled

:48:36.:48:38.

into the Midlands under that initiative.

:48:39.:48:39.

It's a big contrast with wh`t we've seen in the north and the

:48:40.:48:43.

northern powerhouse, whereas they estimated something

:48:44.:48:44.

like ?7.8 billion worth of public money has

:48:45.:48:46.

If you're asking the same qtestion of the Midlands, we're

:48:47.:48:49.

struggling to identify more than a couple of hundred million.

:48:50.:48:56.

That's quite a big gap, isn't it, between the

:48:57.:48:58.

spending for the northern powerhouse in the Midlands engine?

:48:59.:49:04.

Two things, first of all, we are going to get HS2

:49:05.:49:07.

It's going to take time to have that.

:49:08.:49:10.

But that is what he was really saying, that actually win the

:49:11.:49:14.

northern powerhouse became Mr Osborne's key focus, it has then

:49:15.:49:17.

taken five years for that money to come through.

:49:18.:49:19.

We do not want that for the Midlands engine and I think

:49:20.:49:22.

one of the things that is so good about us

:49:23.:49:24.

and where we can go, we are

:49:25.:49:26.

the beating heart of the nation that's what we do, engineerhng jobs,

:49:27.:49:28.

You have just returned from a trip to China

:49:29.:49:38.

I went on it thinking, I'm not really sure, like you, how

:49:39.:49:47.

much substance is there to the Midlands engine.

:49:48.:49:53.

I have come back absolutely enthused, because the prospdct of

:49:54.:49:55.

bringing back investment from China are staggering.

:49:56.:49:57.

The Government policy in Chhna is to

:49:58.:49:58.

internationalise their economy and to look to invest, so wd are

:49:59.:50:01.

There's massive potential to get investment in our

:50:02.:50:04.

Post Brexit, we do need to look elsewhere other than

:50:05.:50:08.

How will winning those cont`cts in China help us here,

:50:09.:50:11.

As a starter, I think we can do a very

:50:12.:50:26.

There is a growing middle class in China that

:50:27.:50:30.

There are very interested in heritage.

:50:31.:50:32.

Bringing them to Chatsworth, I was showing them photo

:50:33.:50:35.

We can get tourism input straightaway.

:50:36.:50:44.

Then we can get investment from manufacturing and so on.

:50:45.:50:46.

We're not going to be able to rely on European

:50:47.:50:50.

What was important about th`t trip was the folk from East

:50:51.:50:54.

Midlands Airport went and that is absolutely key for us.

:50:55.:50:56.

Birmingham is only down the road and lots of south

:50:57.:51:01.

If we can get links between the regional

:51:02.:51:04.

cities in China and East Midlands Airport

:51:05.:51:10.

To be honest, I think there is more substance knowingly Midlands

:51:11.:51:13.

engine then that is in northern powerhouse.

:51:14.:51:15.

I think it is a bit superficial.

:51:16.:51:17.

I think beneath that there is not an awful

:51:18.:51:21.

I maybe wrong, I am the outside looking in.

:51:22.:51:28.

Midlands engine, the local authorities

:51:29.:51:30.

Midlands are now coming togdther anyway that I have seen before and I

:51:31.:51:34.

certainly made it my business Derbyshire is in there, bec`use I

:51:35.:51:37.

want us to get the maximum benefit from this.

:51:38.:51:39.

Some cash would be good at Autumn Statement, wouldn't it?

:51:40.:51:41.

I think that there are many, many opportunities to go and visit

:51:42.:51:45.

I am lucky enough to be able to work in the

:51:46.:51:54.

international trade Departmdnt, so I know the diaries the mhnisters

:51:55.:51:56.

The Midlands engine has been trying to

:51:57.:52:03.

boost exports to China, as we have just been hearing.

:52:04.:52:05.

One Derbyshire firm is doing just that in

:52:06.:52:07.

spectacular style, by selling rice to the Chinese.

:52:08.:52:09.

Granny Mary's in Derbyshire says its winning contacts

:52:10.:52:11.

around the world as the pound falls in value.

:52:12.:52:13.

The company has welcomed thd Brexit vote and says it is good

:52:14.:52:16.

news for the region's food producers.

:52:17.:52:26.

Others are worried about wh`t life outside the EU will mean for our

:52:27.:52:29.

speciality foods, which havd protected status.

:52:30.:52:30.

However our relationship with the EU pans out,

:52:31.:52:34.

we still need to eat and

:52:35.:52:36.

food producers in the East Lidlands are already eyeing up new

:52:37.:52:38.

opportunities here and abro`d - whatever the outcome of Brexit.

:52:39.:52:44.

In Chesterfield, Granny Mary's produces

:52:45.:52:46.

high-quality meat products to original family recipes.

:52:47.:52:48.

They are a success, having recently secured an

:52:49.:52:52.

They want a yellow rice in particular instead of whhte rice,

:52:53.:53:15.

they can't produce good-quality yellow race in Hong Kong.

:53:16.:53:17.

Most people eat away from home in Hong Kong.

:53:18.:53:19.

They have a couple of stories in Hong Kong.

:53:20.:53:23.

They fly by jet each day re`dy meals to their shops

:53:24.:53:25.

Will leaving be used to help this firm?

:53:26.:53:29.

For us, for export, it's made it so much easier

:53:30.:53:31.

for people from outside of the UK wanting to buy, because of the

:53:32.:53:34.

It has meant they can buy so much more for a

:53:35.:53:38.

For us it has helped and I think making the UK stand

:53:39.:53:41.

alone as a power country is only going to be of benefit.

:53:42.:53:44.

Until 2003, the UK had its own stringent meat

:53:45.:53:46.

and food production rules, then EU regulation came in and many local

:53:47.:53:49.

food producers say that might not have helped consumers.

:53:50.:53:51.

Labelling is being destroyed on food by the EU.

:53:52.:53:53.

In 2003, they abandoned all the food regulations,

:53:54.:53:56.

provided now you say somewhdre, you call it chicken

:53:57.:54:02.

korma, that can only have 4% chicken in it.

:54:03.:54:04.

That's all that's needed to qualify that.

:54:05.:54:11.

If you put the list of

:54:12.:54:12.

ingredients, 4% chicken, that is fine.

:54:13.:54:14.

At Brocklesby, they rely on EU rules to

:54:15.:54:22.

If our Government cannot offer an alternative scheme,

:54:23.:54:25.

have some sort of protectivd status for a food

:54:26.:54:27.

product, then it will effectively open the door to anybody who wants

:54:28.:54:34.

to call their porkpie a porkpie to do so.

:54:35.:54:37.

It would allow bogus products into the marketplace and th`t would

:54:38.:54:46.

affect sales and potentiallx our livelihood.

:54:47.:54:48.

Back in Chesterfield, they are looking beyond Europe to

:54:49.:54:50.

sell traditional British me`ls, like chicken korma.

:54:51.:54:55.

Granny Mary's there certainly showing us how you can

:54:56.:54:59.

A company that is very sure we are better off out of thd EU

:55:00.:55:04.

I think that it's just typical of Derbyshire

:55:05.:55:06.

Let's find a solution to the problem.

:55:07.:55:13.

I think there are people out there that will seize opportunities.

:55:14.:55:19.

My ask to Government is to give us some certainty, given some certainty

:55:20.:55:22.

about how long EU funding is going to continue

:55:23.:55:24.

Provide us with openings into international markets and I'm sure

:55:25.:55:29.

For the porkpie manufacturers, I can completely see

:55:30.:55:33.

At the moment, those pies h`ve protected status, as you know.

:55:34.:55:41.

Stilton cheese, take that away and anyone can just go and lake it

:55:42.:55:47.

Well, take away that protected status, remove th`t

:55:48.:55:53.

Why would anybody take the protected status away?

:55:54.:55:55.

OK, are you saying that it would

:55:56.:55:57.

Andrea Leadsom, who is a superb Secretary of State for

:55:58.:56:05.

environment, food and rural affairs, understands to her fingertips were

:56:06.:56:07.

the rural areas need and the farmers need

:56:08.:56:09.

and the producers of food and

:56:10.:56:11.

We actually import something like 75% of our

:56:12.:56:13.

We need to get better at doing this anyway.

:56:14.:56:28.

The Department of trade, we've taken on the UK TI.

:56:29.:56:30.

The great brand is going all over the world.

:56:31.:56:33.

These trade missions are going out there day

:56:34.:56:36.

are launching in January a fantastic new website and my challengd to you

:56:37.:56:40.

and all your wonderful viewers is, I want to see

:56:41.:56:43.

a brand-new company in

:56:44.:56:44.

every constituency, 650 odd new companies

:56:45.:56:45.

Becoming new exporters, because they would get

:56:46.:56:49.

every single assistance to

:56:50.:56:50.

I admire your enthusiasm, but it do think the

:56:51.:56:56.

I think David Cameron has a lot to answer for, because you

:56:57.:57:06.

She has inherited a bit of a problem.

:57:07.:57:19.

We need from the Government now they

:57:20.:57:21.

like my certainty about how Brexit is going to play out.

:57:22.:57:24.

Your Government cannot offer that right

:57:25.:57:25.

Firstly, Andrea Leadsom has already given certainty to the

:57:26.:57:28.

It is 2020 and beyond for the CAP funding.

:57:29.:57:34.

That gets is not only over 2019 but beyond that.

:57:35.:57:37.

Then it will be reviewed in line with what the actual producdrs want,

:57:38.:57:41.

because at the minute, there are some parts that don't fit

:57:42.:57:49.

very well for our country, compared to other

:57:50.:57:51.

Similarly, when it comes to trade, the pound

:57:52.:57:54.

being low doesn't buy too many bits and pieces.

:57:55.:57:56.

It helps you with the product that you sell out.

:57:57.:57:58.

Time now for a round-up of some of the other

:57:59.:58:04.

political stories from the East Midlands today.

:58:05.:58:06.

Controversial plans to carrx out tests drilling to assess

:58:07.:58:09.

the potential for fracking hn Nottinghamshire have been ghven the

:58:10.:58:11.

The county council approved the plans for a site at Misson

:58:12.:58:24.

Valley are to be switched off to save cash.

:58:25.:58:29.

The borough council says 55 cameras have recorded little or

:58:30.:58:31.

Unite union has strongly criticised plans

:58:32.:58:34.

to cut over a quarter of he`lth visitors in Nottinghamshire.

:58:35.:58:36.

The candy bars make health care trust

:58:37.:58:38.

A personal plea in the housd from South Leicestershire MP Alberto

:58:39.:58:42.

He wants assurances his Italian parents will be able to stax

:58:43.:58:51.

Canny Prime Minister assure me that she will never instruct me to vote

:58:52.:59:03.

in a lobby to take away the rights of my parents and millions of EU

:59:04.:59:08.

citizens? Theresa May told him she could not make any promises ahead of

:59:09.:59:19.

the Brexit negotiations. Paroled Arbel through a cost rather worried

:59:20.:59:25.

about his parents and their future. -- Alberto Costa. Think it hs

:59:26.:59:29.

excellent use the Prime Minhster's Questions for that. It helps Theresa

:59:30.:59:32.

May get the point of there that we have lots of UK citizens working

:59:33.:59:36.

abroad and we need to make sure they are safe as well. She offerdd no

:59:37.:59:43.

guarantees. It's a negotiathon. He is still worried about it. We are

:59:44.:59:50.

always worried about her appearance. Of course, we are. You can see our

:59:51.:59:54.

reports again on social medha pages. Thank you very much to our guest

:59:55.:59:56.

this week, never happened and will not happen

:59:57.:59:59.

in four years. It is subject we should spend more time on. Back to

:00:00.:00:01.

you. What will the Chancellor have to say

:00:02.:00:10.

in his first big economic statement? What impact will the forecasters say

:00:11.:00:14.

Brexit will have on the economy And who will face the Front

:00:15.:00:17.

National's Marine Le Pen in Well, the Shadow Chancellor

:00:18.:00:19.

and the Chancellor have both been touring the television

:00:20.:00:34.

studios this morning. Let's be clear, a lot of this

:00:35.:00:36.

is going to be gimmicks and press As I've said, in the

:00:37.:00:42.

pipeline, we've only seen one in five delivered

:00:43.:00:45.

to construction, that's all. So a lot of this will be a repeat

:00:46.:00:48.

of what I'm not going to reveal

:00:49.:00:51.

what I'm going to say on We don't have unlimited

:00:52.:00:55.

capacity, as one might imagine from listening

:00:56.:01:00.

to John McDonnell, to borrow hundreds of billions of pounds more

:01:01.:01:03.

for discretionary spending. That simply doesn't

:01:04.:01:07.

exist if we're going to retain this country's hard-won

:01:08.:01:11.

credibility in the financial markets if we are going to remain

:01:12.:01:13.

an attractive place for business to We didn't learn very much, Helen,

:01:14.:01:30.

but the papers were briefed this morning that there will be another

:01:31.:01:32.

?1.3 billion for roads and things like that. ?1.3 billion is 0.08 of

:01:33.:01:44.

our GDP. Not exactly an infrastructure investment programme,

:01:45.:01:48.

is it? Yellow like I have to say, it was not thrilling to read the

:01:49.:01:57.

details. -- I have to say... It is the first big financial statement

:01:58.:01:59.

that is going to come and I think there will be a big row about the

:02:00.:02:04.

OBE are forecast because they cannot set out a range, they have to commit

:02:05.:02:08.

to one forecast. Everything they do is incredibly political. DOB are is

:02:09.:02:18.

on a hiding to nothing. -- DOB are -- the Office for Budget

:02:19.:02:25.

Responsibility. I don't know how they will square the circle. It is

:02:26.:02:30.

an interesting week. It is all about the economy and public finances and

:02:31.:02:33.

we don't have to talk about Brexit until next Sunday, but no, I have a

:02:34.:02:38.

terrible feeling that by the end of Wednesday afternoon we will be

:02:39.:02:48.

screaming and shouting about how Brexit is going to be for the

:02:49.:02:51.

economy. Just imagine the Treasury comes out with his forecast that it

:02:52.:02:55.

is going to collapse growth and collapsed Treasury takings, people

:02:56.:03:03.

will be apoplectic. Until now, the economy has continued to grow

:03:04.:03:10.

strongly. Pretty well. They cannot say, we have noticed it slowing down

:03:11.:03:13.

and that will continue. They have to take a punt if they think it will

:03:14.:03:17.

slow down. It affects the Chancellor's figures, because the

:03:18.:03:20.

more they say it is slowing down, and I have seen that it will go from

:03:21.:03:26.

2% down to 1.4%, the more the Chancellor's deficit rises even

:03:27.:03:30.

without any more tax cuts and spending. Absolutely. I think Tom is

:03:31.:03:35.

right. What we will see this week is a continuation of the debate we have

:03:36.:03:40.

been having all along. If the Office for Budget Responsibility has

:03:41.:03:43.

negative and gloomy predictions there will be howls of agony, and

:03:44.:03:52.

rightly howls of frustration from Brexiteers who will say that all the

:03:53.:03:55.

dire predictions from before the referendum have not come to pass and

:03:56.:03:59.

now you are talking things down in a way that becomes a self-fulfilling

:04:00.:04:06.

prophecy. The money for roads, you were dismissive about it, but every

:04:07.:04:12.

little helps. I don't dismiss it, I say it doesn't amount to a fiscal

:04:13.:04:17.

stimulus in macro economic terms. I'm sure if you are on that road, it

:04:18.:04:25.

will be useful. They are going to build a super highway between Oxford

:04:26.:04:33.

and Cambridge. I would like to see them go out to Japan and learn how

:04:34.:04:40.

to fill a hole in two days. I would suggest the road from Oxford to

:04:41.:04:44.

Cambridge is not for the just managing classes, even though it

:04:45.:04:47.

goes through Milton Keynes, and that simply freezing due freezing fuel

:04:48.:04:58.

duty isn't going to hack it, either. These just about managing people are

:04:59.:05:03.

potentially quite a big band. With income tax rises, it means anything

:05:04.:05:07.

you do to help them is incredibly expensive. The universal credit

:05:08.:05:10.

freeze is an interesting example of that. Philip Hammond sounded

:05:11.:05:16.

ambivalent about it after pre-briefings that it might not the

:05:17.:05:24.

cuts might not go ahead. There are people who are in work but because

:05:25.:05:28.

they are low paid don't have the number of hours, they require

:05:29.:05:34.

welfare benefits to top up their pay, and these welfare benefits as

:05:35.:05:39.

it stands, are frozen until 202 , and yet inflation is now starting to

:05:40.:05:43.

rise. That's a problem for the just managing people. Correct. It is

:05:44.:05:49.

worse than that, because we are talking about April 2017 when tax

:05:50.:05:57.

credits become universal credits, so the squeeze will be greater. We will

:05:58.:06:03.

get a small highway between a couple of university towns, but if he has

:06:04.:06:07.

any money left to spend at all, it will be on some pretty seismic

:06:08.:06:14.

jazzman for the just about managing people. I am so glad we're not

:06:15.:06:20.

calling them Jams on this programme, because it is a patronising tone.

:06:21.:06:26.

What the Chancellor and Shadow Chancellor did not confront is that

:06:27.:06:34.

Mr Trump's election is a watershed in terms of being able to borrow

:06:35.:06:38.

cheaply. The Federal Reserve is about to start raising rates. The

:06:39.:06:42.

days of cheap borrowing for governments could be coming to an

:06:43.:06:46.

end. You can feel a bit sorry for labour here because after having had

:06:47.:06:51.

six years of being told that we need a surplus and these things are

:06:52.:06:53.

important, we can't deny the deficit, we have switched now and

:06:54.:06:58.

the first thing that Philip Hammond did was to scrap George Osborne s

:06:59.:07:04.

borrowing targets. He has given himself more wriggle room than

:07:05.:07:08.

George Osborne had. He has and it will cost them more. Debt servicing

:07:09.:07:16.

will now rise as a cost. Where is the next political earthquake going

:07:17.:07:17.

to happen? It could be Italy, or the French

:07:18.:07:23.

elections coming up next spring Now, who will face the Front

:07:24.:07:30.

National's Marine Le Pen in next year's French Presidential

:07:31.:07:33.

elections? Well, France's centre-right

:07:34.:07:34.

part, Les Republicans, are selecting their candidate

:07:35.:07:35.

in the first round of Well, France's centre-right

:07:36.:07:38.

part, Les Republicans, are selecting their candidate

:07:39.:07:40.

in the first round of Let's speak to our correspondent

:07:41.:07:43.

in Paris, Hugh Schofield. Welcome to the programme. Three main

:07:44.:07:57.

candidates, the former -- two former prime ministers and Nicolas Sarkozy,

:07:58.:08:02.

the former president. It is not clear who the front runner is.

:08:03.:08:07.

Robbins it is quite an exciting race, because four weeks it did look

:08:08.:08:17.

as if it was going to be Juppe. It is a two round race. Two go through

:08:18.:08:25.

and the idea is that they rally all the support together. It looked like

:08:26.:08:29.

the first round would be dominated by Juppe and Nicolas Sarkozy, and

:08:30.:08:32.

there was a clear binary combination there, because Sarkozy was looking

:08:33.:08:41.

for squeamish far right voters. In other words, veering clearly to the

:08:42.:08:44.

right and far right on immigration and identity issues. And Juppe is

:08:45.:08:50.

the opposite, saying we had to appeal to the centre. That was what

:08:51.:08:56.

it looked like. But the third candidate has made this really quite

:08:57.:09:00.

staggering surge in the last few days. There was a debate on Thursday

:09:01.:09:05.

and he was deemed to have won it on television. He is coming up

:09:06.:09:09.

strongly, and I wouldn't be at all surprised to see him go through

:09:10.:09:13.

which would be interesting from a British perspective, because if the

:09:14.:09:18.

becomes president, he will be the first president with a British wife.

:09:19.:09:23.

His wife Penelope is Welsh. We will have to leave it there. I

:09:24.:09:30.

would suggest that the reason it is fascinating is that whoever wins

:09:31.:09:33.

this primary for the centre-right party is likely to be the next

:09:34.:09:38.

president, and who the next president is will be very important

:09:39.:09:42.

for Britain in these Brexit negotiations. Nothing will really

:09:43.:09:45.

happen until it is determined. Then after the German elections in

:09:46.:09:51.

October. I would add one more constituent part. The most important

:09:52.:09:56.

thing about the race is who can stop Marine Le Pen. Marine Le Pen will

:09:57.:10:03.

almost be one of the ones in the run-off. The Socialists don't expect

:10:04.:10:11.

much. Francois Hollande is done There is too much of a cliff to

:10:12.:10:19.

climb. Which one of these three centre-right candidates can stop

:10:20.:10:23.

Marine Le Pen? We have had Brexit and Trump, but we could also have

:10:24.:10:28.

Marine Le Pen. If it is Sarkozy it is the battle of the right. In some

:10:29.:10:35.

areas, he has moved to the right of marine Le Pen. I suppose he feels he

:10:36.:10:42.

has do in order to take the wind out of our sails. You wonder if she

:10:43.:10:46.

could succeed later on if she does not this time. Talking to French

:10:47.:10:49.

analysts last night, there was suggesting that she could not do it

:10:50.:10:53.

this time but could win the next time. All the events in France over

:10:54.:10:58.

the last year seemed to provide the most propitious circumstances for

:10:59.:11:02.

her to do well, and particularly if you throw in Trump and Brexit.

:11:03.:11:08.

Suppose it is Mr Sarkozy, and he goes through and wins the Republican

:11:09.:11:12.

nomination, and he and Marine Le Pen go through to the second round, that

:11:13.:11:19.

would mean, think about it, is that a lot of French socialist voters and

:11:20.:11:24.

those on the father left would have to grit their teeth and vote for

:11:25.:11:31.

Nicolas Sarkozy. They might not do it. We might see what we saw in

:11:32.:11:36.

America, where lots of potential Clinton voters did not turn out You

:11:37.:11:47.

got politicians like Melanchon on the far left saying there are

:11:48.:11:50.

foreign workers taking bread out of French workers' mounts. We sometimes

:11:51.:11:57.

forget, because we tend to emphasise the National of the National front,

:11:58.:12:04.

but actually, there are economic policy is quite Bennite. Sarkozy is

:12:05.:12:15.

the Hillary Clinton of the French elections. He is Mr establishment.

:12:16.:12:27.

Juppe and the other third candidate are the same. You have to

:12:28.:12:31.

re-establish candidates running against an antiestablishment

:12:32.:12:34.

candidate. There are populist economic policies from the National

:12:35.:12:39.

front. The other three want to raise the retirement age and cut back on

:12:40.:12:42.

the 35 hour week, which are not classic electoral appeals. Mr Juppe

:12:43.:12:51.

used to be the Mayor of Bordeaux. And we are the biggest importers of

:12:52.:12:54.

claret, so that could have an effect. In 2002, it was Jack Shear

:12:55.:13:03.

against John Marine Le Pen, and the socialist campaign slogan was, vote

:13:04.:13:10.

for the Crook, not the fascist. We will see what they come up with this

:13:11.:13:12.

time. The Daily Politics is back at noon

:13:13.:13:14.

tomorrow on BBC Two, where on Wednesday I will have full

:13:15.:13:19.

coverage of the Chancellor's Autumn But remember, if it's Sunday,

:13:20.:13:24.

it's the Sunday Politics.

:13:25.:13:34.

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