14/02/2014 The Papers


14/02/2014

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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of Fulham after less than three months in charge. Felix Magath

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replaces him. All that in 15 minutes after The Papers.

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Hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be

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bringing us tomorrow. With me are journalist Eva Simpson and

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broadcaster Alice Arnold. Tomorrow's front pages. A lot of the

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papers are showing a picture of Lizzy Yarnold.

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Lizzy Yarnold features on the front of the Express, which also has some

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good news, finally, about the weather, saying "storm misery to end

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at last". The i also goes with the weather,

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saying the storms are "wreaking destruction" across the UK.

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The Telegraph has an interview with the Archbishop of Westminster who

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has been criticising the government's welfare reforms,

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claiming they "punish the poor." The Mail claims the NHS is losing

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the files of almost 2,000 patients every day.

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And the Independent says there is "an immigration crisis on Britain's

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doorstep". It says hundreds of refugees from war-torn countries are

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being left to rot in a camp. I want to come back to the Winter

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Olympics and Team GB's success later, but the story that is

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dominating so many of the papers is the ongoing storms, and the headline

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in the Express, storm misery to end at last. An optimistic note. Very

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optimistic. Given the weather in the past few weeks and months, it is

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great news, but if you scroll down to the sub headline it says only

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after violent 80 mph wind, snow and rain. So... Yes, I think the

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forecast is a little better but the storms are obviously not at their

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peak for some of the country. We are expecting high wind tomorrow, even

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in London, up to 60 mph and higher across the rest of the country. At

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first glance, this is quite a pleasing headline but when you read

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further into the story, it is not all that it seems. And there is more

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rain. Yes, but all the BBC whether staff know their stuff. And they are

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all generally saying the extremes of the low pressures, which is what is

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causing the wind and storms, they will not be as extreme. That is what

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they see in the long-term forecast. Any forecaster will tell you they

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cannot forecast more than three or four days in advance, but the

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Express, for once, might be sort of right, that the absolute worst of it

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is over. However, the Telegraph contradict that, and they say we

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have warnings of flooding until spring. Flooding can go on longer

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than the bad weather, because the weather -- the water seeps through

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and it takes quite a long time to make floods, so the rain happening

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now might not affect flooding for a week or so. So the flooding could go

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on much longer than the storms. The Telegraph suggest it will go on for

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a considerable time and that should not surprise anyone, sadly. I like

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the very small cartoon, with a couple, and the man is holding up a

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speeding fine notice which says, our roof was photographed on the road

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doing 85 mph. Humour in despair. I think it will take many people along

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time to see any humour in this situation, given the appalling

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circumstances they find themselves in. Many of the newspapers are going

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to this. But there is no doubt that the amount of homes still without

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power, we have the updated figure earlier, as was an considerably from

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24-hour 's ago. Seeing the Somerset Levels, it is no surprise, even with

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no more rain, that the headline will be correct. It is long-term for

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these people. Long after those who have not been flooded have forgotten

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about the floods, those people will still be dealing with not being able

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to get back into their homes. It takes months. And insurance. And

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insurance, which will be a problem, or getting insurance next time,

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which they may not be able to do. But just the upheaval of having your

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home ruined, for thousands, is dreadful. And it won't be in the

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headlines for that much longer but they will still be dealing with it.

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And if you do sort it out, you will be wondering what the happening 12

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months. Will the floods return? Some people have only just finished their

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house from the previous occasion. On to the Daily Mail and a different

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story. The only paper that has this story, the headline, 2000 NHS

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patients' records are lost every day. It is slightly compensated

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because they are lost in lots of different ways. We were reading this

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earlier, and we were struck because it said many of the records had been

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sold on eBay. I know you can get many things on eBay, what patient

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records! -- but patient records! But it is not quite that. It turns out

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that among other things, three former NHS computers were sold on

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eBay. It strikes me as a bizarre way to... And the hard drives allegedly

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had not been wiped. Again, it would cause concern. We constantly hear

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stories about data going missing and things ending up in skips, in dumps

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in the back of cars. As a patient, you expect your records to be

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treated with the utmost care, so the fact that they are being discarded

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all over the place is worrying. Even left in a grocery store, apparently.

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They are talking about the records of GPs being left lying around,

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which I would have thought they would not be taking out with them

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anyway, but maybe it is on tablets or something. It strikes me as

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incredibly odd that the NHS would be selling their second-hand computers

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on eBay. 2000 records every day. That is extraordinary. It is an

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incredible lack of security and it has to be tightened up. They are

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asking us if we will let records be kept on databases. No wonder people

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are mistrusting of that. Doing the maths, 600,000 odd a year are going

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missing. I have not seen that story anywhere else apart from the Daily

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Mail. Onto the financial Times. I think this is an interesting

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headline. This is all, is it not, Alice, all about what it is calling

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the middle-class, but how the middle-class is diverging. Yes, it

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is a history of the middle-class, and they are talking about from

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1975, 40 years ago, the difference of what we called a middle-class

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person then and what we call a middle-class person now, in terms of

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income. And the group, of course, that have stretched away and are

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becoming completely separate from the rest of what we all consider

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middle-class, are the bankers. So it says the average earning for a

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banker is ?102,000. That is what we are talking about as an average, so

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obviously many bankers get paid an awful lot more than that. Whereas

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academics, who we would have considered very middle-class and

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high earners 40 years ago, they are now not considered high earners and

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they are run under 50,000, just about getting into the 40% tax rate.

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-- they are on under 50,000. So this is a new phenomenon. There is a new

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layer of middle-class, led by the financial services, who are paid

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extraordinary sums of money. Professions which were once

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considered middle-class and high earning, academics, mechanical

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engineers and so on, wages have not kept up. I think this is something

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that has been talked about over the past few months, the idea of the

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squeezed middle, the middle classes. . #baffled somebody earning

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?40,000 a year is going to look at the banker bonuses and think, they

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are meant to be in the same bracket? In the grand scheme of things, it is

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still a very high salary to be earning, over ?40,000. I think the

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national level is much lower than that. Still, for a professional or

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academic, I would expect they would be earning more than that. The

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Financial Times reminds us that we had the general election of 1

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million miles away, sometime over the next year or so Labour are

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planning to restore the 50p rate for people earning over ?50,000. Some

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Conservatives are pressing for a reduction. Can you see that playing

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very big over the next few months, once the floods are over, as a

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mystic story? Is The economy always plays big when it comes to the

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election, yes. I think I would be surprised if the Conservatives went

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for 40p. It's brought joy to lots of people, great news from Sochi, where

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Team GB has won a gold medal, or, more appropriately, Lizzy Yarnold

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has won a gold medal on the skeleton. Lots of papers showing

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great photos. Certainly in The Times, a picture of her lying as

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flat as possible. Boy, do they go quickly? Do you fancy doing this?

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No, but it has brought joy to us. They don't have a track in England.

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They don't have one of those I see things. Whatever it is called. They

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trained to do the running. The running bets are really important.

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The sprinting bit. She was a sprinter. What they do with the

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English lot is they pick a few really good sprinters, train them to

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do the sprinting bit. And in the winter they go to other countries

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that do have the hurdy-gurdy track thing. And we are obviously very

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good. Expert analysis! We are very good at pushing 80 trade. She spoke

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very well. Her interview was brilliant, I loved it. It was really

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inspirational, encouraging people to follow their dreams, pursue their

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dreams, not give up. Great for women's sport and great for her.

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Lets hope there is more medals on the way. That is it for the papers

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this hour. A big thank you to our guests. You will both be back at

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11:30 for another look at the stories making the news tomorrow.

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Hello and welcome to Sportsday. I'm Lizzie Greenwood-Hughes, the

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headlines this evening: Sir Tom Finney, one of English football

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greatest players,

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