10/07/2014 The Papers


10/07/2014

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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of 24 degrees. A bit of everything as we move into the weekend, hot and

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humid, and then turning pressure on Sunday.

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Hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be

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bringing us tomorrow. Tomorrow's front pages...starting with... The

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FT leads on fears over one of Portugal's biggest banks which led

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to a sharp selloff of shares across European markets.

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Money worries of a different kind feature in the Metro. The paper says

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young women are getting into debt at twice the rate of men their own age

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as they try keep up with celebrity lifestyles.

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The Telegraph leads on a major health study that shows men who have

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vasectomies are at a higher risk of developing prostate cancer.

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The Guardian reports on the concessions the Prime Minister made

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in order to secure cross party support for emergency surveillance

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laws. The Independent also leads on those

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emergency laws and says the Prime Minister is planning to reintroduce

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what they call a 'snoopers' charter where people's social media and

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internet history would be recorded. And the top story in the Express top

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story reveals that a million more people are to be offered free weight

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loss surgery in a bid to stop them developing diabetes and heart

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disease. The Mail also leads on that story,

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saying it means two million people may be eligible for the surgery

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overnight. And The Mirror has a story about a

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mother who said she could intuitively tell a man she met a

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random had received her dead son's heart in a transplant operation. So

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let's begin... We will start with the Daily Mail. Thousands more to

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get obesity operations on the NHS, a call for a huge increase in surgery

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and even obesity charities condemn it. It is an interesting story. One

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in four of us is classified as obese and they think by 2050, half of us

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will be. The cost are actually huge for the NHS. Something has to be

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done and this is attracting quite a bit of controversy. They have

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criticism from campaigners and patient groups saying that these

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people should just eat less and exercise more. I think they are

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wrong on this account. When you get to be morbidly obese, it is a

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psychological issue and doctors across the world recognise that the

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most cost`effective way to deal with it is through bariatric surgery as

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it is the only thing that works. A recent report came out that

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obesity, studied in 138 countries, over 30 years, none of them had

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managed to cut the growth. It looks as if the Daily Mail, the way it has

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written this, even obesity charities condemned this. I think the issue is

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that lots of people who are perhaps watching this programme now,

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themselves or their relatives would like various drugs to combat cancer,

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expensive drugs and they are denied those treatments often by the NHS

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and they think, why are overweight people who are. Way largely because

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they eat too much going to get this and I can't? At Eden Hazard he

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suggested, 10% of the whole cost will be about treating lifestyle

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related diseases including obesity `` Ian. What do policymakers do with

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that? They are saying that if we don't tackle the obesity crisis, and

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this is one of the best ways to do it, we will not be able to afford

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any kind of expansion of healthcare in years to come. We need to

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differentiate between people who are minorly obese or overweight and

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issues with people who are morbidly obese which is what we are talking

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about. It is quite interesting, in country's that have healthcare, this

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is often paid for. `` countries. It is quite cost`effective however much

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the opposite it might seem. We will have to grapple with these big

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issues or the NHS will not survive. Berlin puts its foot down over US

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espionage and expels a spy. We found out not long ago that the national

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security agency was spying on Germany and in fact, bugging the

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mobile of Angela Merkel. Now we have all of this happening. It seems to

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be added to the Cold War developing. OK maybe not. I think

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the truth is, most nations spy on one another, for commercial or other

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reasons. America has a big interest at the moment in knowing if Germany

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is getting close to Russia and Britain. We spy? I think we do,

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wobbly not an America. Do you believe that? `` probably. I do. I

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don't think there is the kind of surveillance that we see an America

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and Germany `` in. Germany is the economic powerhouse of Europe and

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they are close to Russia for energy supplies and trade and therefore, a

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may not take the kind of action that is needed to restrain it Russia in

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places like Crimea and Ukraine because of these commercial

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interests and so America is spying on Germany to understand how to deal

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with that issue. Isn't that the kind of thing that Americans could get

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anyway by talking to the ambassador or Angela Merkel? I do get is pretty

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basic and rudimentary information that is usually eavesdropped on. ``

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think it is. But if it is her mobile phone, they may be getting some

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pretty sensitive information. We are talking about people within the

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heart of the defence administration within Germany, so that would be

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sensitive information and it is a big issue for both countries. Where

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are we with Mac we will stay with the Financial Times and Wonga. The

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Church of England has decided to cut its ties with Wonga as the

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Archbishop of Canterbury famously said that payday lenders were a

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scourge on society and should be dealt with but in fact, the

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organisation that he runs has been deeply involved. It has not been a

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correct episode for the Archbishop and it is probably his biggest

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public scandals since he took over so it is quite embarrassing. He

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famously said that he was going to rival Wonga and use his commercial

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acumen to set up a church led sort of loan system which I don't think

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we have seen much evidence of. He is a former city councilman as well. He

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knows how the markets operate. It was a big mistake, wasn't it? Not

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knowing that the church itself was involved with Wonga. It was

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embarrassing and what was just alluded to is that he made a big

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deal, shortly after he became The Archbishop of Canterbury, to say

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that he would outcompete Wonga. What the church does no is that church

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numbers are down in almost every part of the country `` know. One of

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the things they usually get from every parish is collection money and

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they are not getting it lately. So when he said that the Turks would

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outcompete Wonga, `` church, my genuine question is why? The big

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thing, the big promise that he made was an alternative offer. It was a

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smart approach, but where is it? It would be quite sad if the church

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doesn't follow through. They need to get some reporters on it to ask

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questions. We need to sort this out. The Guardian. What is all this

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about? A link to offshore tax havens at Nando's? . The Guardian has been

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doing quite a bit of work on this and have been looking into everyone

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who has money stashed away. Not just the Guardian. The Times as well. Am

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I allowed to say that? Well this is just the latest one. The best weapon

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against all this tax nonsense with company after company being caught,

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we saw Starbucks as well, the public are now saying that there needs to

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be far more transparency as the government has talked about it but

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haven't actually done anything in terms of closing down these tax

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havens. Air is too much going on. The strongest power will be just to

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say that they will boycott these places. Are you going to forsake

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your chicken? I haven't been for a long time. They are not doing

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anything illegal, are they? They are not. We can condemn companies that

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take aggressive forms of tax avoidance. Starbucks had struggled a

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little bit since the revelations came out but we have a ludicrously

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complicated tax system and the only people who seem able to understand

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it are the highly trained and highly paid accountants. If the government

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really wants to deal with this problem coming they will have to

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simple by the tax system so that people cannot exploit these

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loopholes. Because these people will always be able to afford the best

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lawyers and accountants and they can always say that there is a moral

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imperative to pay your fair share of taxes but beyond that the government

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can't do much. You are absolutely right. They make it easy for them to

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avoid tax. The harder we make it, the better it will be. It should

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also be made known so that the public can decide whether they want

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to give money to these people. We're going to go to the Independent. 1

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million workers from public sector unions were out today protesting

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cuts and pay freezes. The government says that less than half of that

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took part. I am not sure that is the most attractive public`sector

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servant that we have ever seen but that is the one the Independent has

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chosen. It is interesting that he is almost on his own there, because

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this is what the government has said. It was supposed to be one of

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the biggest days of industrial action that Britain has seen and the

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evidence seems to be that most of the services that were due to be

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affected, most public`sector workers actually didn't go on the picket

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lines and went to work. But one in five schools in England were

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closed. These strikes were triggered by just 20% of members of trade

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unions voting and yet, big disruption is possible when you have

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very small turnouts. I think that is why the Conservatives are trying to

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say that you can only have a strike if 50% of people take place in a

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ballot. We had all the discussions yesterday, some MPs returned with

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less than 10% of the vote. No MP had more than 50%. These arguments have

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been swirling around for hours. I suppose the point is that everyone

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agrees, the government agrees, and says that it is a good thing that

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public`sector workers are in a worse state now than they were four years

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ago. Gas, but they also don't have pension security `` yes. But when

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you talk about the private sector, you are including bankers from the

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Royal Bank of England. There has been a pay increase of 8% in many

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places but if you take out bankers and a certain people who are earning

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much more than your teacher or your garbage man, it is not point to be

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right. There is no doubt that it is tough to be in the private sector

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and I don't think anyone should hide from that. The correct answer is to

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consider whether children not going to school is the issue. Nobody

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doubts that they're working very hard in the public`sector and Don

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reduced budgets but the reality is that we cannot afford to carry on

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spending as we are. The debt is still rising and we have to resolve

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it. Strike is not the best way to resolve it, in my opinion. On to the

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Telegraph. Oh, nevermind. I have been told that it is the Metro. Here

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we are. I can see why you really want to do this story. It is

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important. Women/the plastic to keep up with female celebrities ``

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flash. We have just been talking about the debt we are in as a nation

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but Britain has a twin debt crisis and that his household and personal

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debt. We have the highest in Europe and it is still very dangerous. That

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is with interest rates at extraordinary historically low

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levels. It seems a bit fun at face value but it isn't. Lots of young

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people are already in huge amount of debt. If interest rates start to

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rise, which is what the Bank of England has said will happen, people

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are going to be in trouble and this is the sad thing, we think the

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economy is growing and some people are beating to think that bad

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economic times are behind us what we have big challenges ahead ``

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beginning. Many thanks for that. We will have much more on the expulsion

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of the US intelligence official in Berlin by the German government

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following allegations of spying but now we will hear about the sports.

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