11/01/2016 The Papers


11/01/2016

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Allen Stanford tells us he regrets that the embarrassment he has caused

:00:00.:00:00.

English cricket. We have an exclusive interview. That's all in

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Sportsday in 15 minutes after The Papers.

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Hello, and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers

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With me are Dan Bilefsky from the New York Times, and Tim Montgomerie,

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The world mourns a pop icon - the International New York Times

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"The Stars Look Very Different Today," the Metro quotes

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"Ashes to ashes," is the Bowie quote chosen by tomorrow's i, illustrated

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Another intriguing image of the Thin White Duke leads the Guardian, which

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like many of tomorrow's papers devotes its front page to him.

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As well as joining the tributes to David

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Bowie, the Express cover offers hope for sufferers of back pain -

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The Telegraph leads with the story that junior doctors could

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be called off the picket line during tomorrow's strike

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In the Times, a call from David Cameron

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for every child to have a so-called tiger mum to push them to succeed.

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And the Daily Mail leads on the resignation of the Environment

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Agency boss, Sir Philip Dilley, amid anger over this winter's floods.

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So, let's just hone in and of course we must start with David Bowie. Tim,

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the Guardian with this beautiful front-page spread with words like,

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audacious life. This is one of the most captivating and intriguing

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pictures. There is no make up. This is the real man. No other papers,

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not many other broadcast, have had this particular picture. This is a

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rockstar, an actor, an innovator, cultural innovator, who has been

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with us for 60 years. You know, three or four or five decades when

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he has been centrestage. People comparing him to Frank Sinatra,

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Elvis Presley, his stature. Of course, he reinvented himself so

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many times in different ways with different genre is. I think this

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picture in fights us, asking, who was the man behind this

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extraordinary cultural innovation? -- genres. Is a blank canvas,

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essentially. -- the blank canvas. It reminds me of Madonna, even Lady

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Gaga, before them, he was bending gender, fusing art and music, rock

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'n' roll, fashion, in a way that seems obvious today, but would not

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exist without David Bowie. You have a sense of that androgynous Ziggy

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Stardust -like persona. What we've heard today from ordinary fans,

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let's move on to the Mirror, with the image many think of, the daring

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to be different, the ability to say, I don't mind what people think, this

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is who I am or a character I want to play. And people being able to

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empathise and think, oh, great, I can be am and I don't have to be

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ashamed. Absolutely, and the 1970s was the decade when he was most

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culturally impactful, certainly in the UK and write to your point on

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Top of the Pops, he was inviting people to be themselves -- right. I

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think that he gave people a lot of confidence in that respect. He was

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himself. He fashioned himself almost from a space. Millions from around

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the world, whether you are in New York, London or Hong Kong, he made

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it seem OK to be different. That was hugely empowering to many people.

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That is why today people feel his death with such a visceral grief, he

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touched people in a very visceral way. It was the affirmation that you

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can be yourself. He transcended politics, culture, language. One of

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my favourite stories of his life is something we feature in the Times

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tomorrow, which was that he lived in Berlin for a period when he was

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recovering from drug problems, that was there where he wrote Heroes,

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from the west of the Berlin Wall when the country was divided, and he

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could hear those from east Berlin singing his lyrics, and I think that

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was a very moving moment for him. He was at live aid. For many that was

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one of the defining it -- episodes of our time. He has been an

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important part of the cultural punctuation of recent decades --

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Live Aid. Damn, if we move onto the Times, they haven't got a picture,

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but fragile David Bowie swore friends to secrecy -- Dan. This gets

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to the heart of why people are so shocked today. His death came as a

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shock because it was very private. There isn't a beach on the front

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page but there is a special wraparound cover, so the Times

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hasn't neglected the great man. No, but in the age of Twitter, when

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everything is linked, when people are so open about things, in this

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confessional age, it is remarkable that it was kept under wraps. Even

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good friend of his and collaborators were surprised by his death and

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shocked by it. He had been e-mailing with his friend even until last

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week. The fact that he could maintain that secrecy, that his

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friend had such loyalty, is testament to his character and the

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bombs he had with his friends. Team, people taking comfort in the

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fact that he has controlled his passing in some way -- Tim. And

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written his own obituary in the form of his last album, Blackstar. It

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came out on Friday, his birthday. I think the residents of some of the

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tracks on that seven track album are so much more potent now that we know

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that he must have known that he was just on the eve of his death. I

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think people will listen to those lyrics again today, who perhaps

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heard them for the first time on Friday, but with new remorse and

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insight today. Just a final thought. Presumably, this is a

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massive story for us in the UK, art, Dan, the same extent in the State?

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He is a global icon. People were gathering outside his house in

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central Park this morning. He is a global icon who belongs to Britain,

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the son of Brixton, but a global star -- States. He resonated with so

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many people. He was an adopted New Yorker. The great thing about him

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was he justified his characterisation, and everyone

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across political boundaries, are crossed urography, religion, loved

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him, whether you are Madonna or the Archbishop of Canterbury --

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geography. Some wonderful tributes coming out. Let's turn our attention

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to the Daily Mail. They have that wonderful mural there in London,

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where people have been laying their floral tributes in Brixton. But

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their main story down the bottom, Tim, the chief of floods quits in

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shame. This is the case of Sir Philip Dilley who has been under a

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lot of pressure. Lots of families, especially in the north of England,

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or having their Christmas ruined, their houses racked, lots of people

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unable to ensure their homes because houses that have been hit by floods

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before, they cannot afford cover. And then there is the head of the

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Floods Agency on ?100,000 per year, saying he was on holiday with

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family, of course, we learnt that he was not just at any home but that he

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was in Barbados. If you are in the public eye, if you are willing to

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take that kind of money from the public purse and you are not able to

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understand that you cannot be so remote during a moment of crisis,

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then you are not probably fit for the job. And he has fallen on his

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sword today, probably inevitably. Some make the point that, perhaps,

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Dan, has he fallen on his sword because it is politically expedient

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to go because it takes the heat of the politicians? Pot of money that

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is needed just isn't there. He has taken the easy way out by parting.

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As Tim said, he needed to be there in his wellingtons on the scene. It

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reminds me of George W bush as president. During Hurricane Katrina,

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he was nowhere to be found. He arrived quite late on the scene. It

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is just unacceptable given the human suffering and the scale of the

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suffering. Partly, of course, politicians and officials cannot

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win. If they are there to early they are interfering with the rescue and

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cleanup. If they are there too late they are accused of not caring. This

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was a clear case when he needed to do more. It is worth suggesting that

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this won't be the end of the debate. It has become very painful

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politically with a lot of suggestions that - where is the

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money that should be put into flood defences and so one? And it

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resonates with the debate about climate change. -- so on? People on

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the left think David Cameron and the Tory government isn't doing enough

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to tackle climate change at its roots. Yes, the immediate issue of

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spending on flood defences. Jeremy Corbyn tried to raise in the House

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of Commons last week some of the projects that hadn't gone ahead that

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he thinks should have. David Cameron will come back and say, well, we

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could only afford flood defences because we have a sound economy.

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Would you be able to do that, Jeremy Colburn? Climate change, economy,

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public spending, austerity, the flood issue and the protection

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against flooding will become a big political issue. Let's stay with

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public spending and austerity, all of these issues, also taking a --

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asked into this story about junior doctors and the strike on the new

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contract. The suggestion is an interesting angle that they might be

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called off the picket line. That the idea is because the medical

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hospitals will be stretched and people are at risk. What is striking

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is health officials are warning the public to avoid falling ill today,

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urging people to look up symptoms online or go to your pharmacy. It

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kind of smacks of... In a country famed for its health-care system,

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however tricky it might be, people are basically being told, please,

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don't get sick, it could be inconvenient. Remember to take your

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buy-to-let or a. Have a good breakfast. -- to take your vitamin C

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at rapid assault in cotton wool. Cash vitamin C. Wrap yourself in

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cotton wool. The BMA union is very cross. That you can strike and then

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be told off, that you cannot strike and you have to be inside. The

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doctors, the medical profession, they do have a right to strike.

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There is a clash of rights and duties here. I think the public will

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have reasonable sympathy with the first two of the three strikes that

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the doctors are planning. Doctors are very well respected in society.

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And the first two days of action cover nonemergency treatment. That

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will be a lot of inconvenience for a lot of people. But the third day is

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about actually withdrawing emergency cover. I was really surprised and

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quite shocked when I heard that doctors were considering doing that.

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I think as much as they are respected in society, not providing

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emergency cover, I think possibly... (CROSSTALK). It seemed

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absolutely nuts. I would be surprised if this last more than two

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hours. If you need to see a doctor, people have the right to strike and

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ask for their demands, but surely doctors have a higher Hippocratic

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duty. It is not the same as a highway driver. Doctors have a

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strong hand to play and they are respected but I think they are

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overplaying their hand. Talks are still ongoing. In the meantime,

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let's turn the attention to the FT. Toyota will stay even if Britain

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votes to leave the EU, Dan. This is an important story in which Toyota

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says it will stay in Britain even if the country votes to leave the EU.

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Toyota, the big iconic company is saying it will stay in Europe. So,

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it is a blow for David Cameron, you know, supporting to stay in the EU.

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At the same time, it is surprising in some sense, since so many global

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car companies operate in the eurozone. In fact, Toyota is willing

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to in and deal with the hedging costs of a financial cost on that

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occasion, it which is quite surprising to me. This is a very

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good story for those of us who would like Britain to leave the EU. Lots

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of people want to leave the EU because they think we can control

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our borders. People are worried about immigration. Lots of people

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want to leave the EU because we spend ?20 billion on Allen and the

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ship of the EU. That is money we could get back if we left the EU --

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our membership. People worry that could be some economic risk, that

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companies like Toyota won't invest in Britain. If Toyota says it won't

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affect investment, your jobs or OK, this is a good news story. Except

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the vast majority of companies, including most automobile companies,

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say they would like Britain to remain in the EU. That is true. If

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they say that they would prefer you to stay in but we are still

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committed to the UK, that is a good news story for those supporting

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Britain becoming an independent nation again. A nation like the US.

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For these to start fighting, let's finish with the Times. -- before

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these to start fighting. All children should have tiger mum is

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according to the Prime Minister -- two. Do you think it is a good

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thing? Remind people what a tiger mum is. It was a huge story in the

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US. It was based on a book, a law professor, who argue that people

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with children should be high to ambitious and focused on work and

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that this was the recipe for having successful kids. There is another

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argument that if you put too much pressure on your children you have

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kids on the edge of a nervous breakdown or they are emotionally

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unhappy. I am not sure, with this bad weather and austerity problems

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in this country, do you need a nation of tiger mum is all people

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who become completely despondent? Well, you know, you want parents and

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mums who push their children to be the best that they can be but you

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also want homes where children always feel love regardless of their

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achievement in life. Some children are not going to be good

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academically or good at sport. And there are some people who worry that

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too much pressure from parents can be dangerous for children's

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upbringing. So, this is part of a wider push by David Cameron to

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position the Conservative Party as interested in issues other than

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economics. But this is... (CROSSTALK). By creating a nation of

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stressed out kids?! That is the problem. It is a bit of a mixed

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message. That is a good point on which to end. Dan and Tim, thank you

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both for being with us this evening. Thank you,

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Tim Montgomerie and Dan Bilefsky. Coming up next,

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it's time for Sportsday. Hello and welcome to Sportsday,

:16:25.:16:39.

I'm Anjana Gadgil. Argentina and Barcelona forward

:16:40.:16:41.

Lionel Messi wins the Ballon d'Or for a record fifth time,

:16:42.:16:43.

beating Cristiano Ronaldo

:16:44.:16:46.

No need to wait until tomorrow morning to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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