15/04/2016 The Papers


15/04/2016

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Hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be

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With me are Prashant Rao, deputy Europe business editor with

:00:18.:00:23.

And Beth Rigby, media editor at The Times.

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The I leads on the war of words between the two sides

:00:34.:00:39.

of the EU referendum debate, as the official

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Claims from Ken Clarke that David Cameron won't last 30 seconds

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as Prime Minister in the event of a vote to leave the EU are among

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There's a free window sticker for readers of the Express,

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which is launching what it calls a special crusade for Brexit.

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The terror arrests in Birmingham and at Gatwick Airport

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It reports on UK security forces being on high alert ahead

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of the Queen's 90th birthday and President Obama's

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The personal finances of former Prime Minister Tony Blair

:01:10.:01:12.

are scrutinised in an investigation carried out by the Times.

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The Mail reports on claims that high street banks are secretly

:01:21.:01:22.

psychologically profiling customers.

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And in the Mirror, the chief of Eurovision criticises

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the approach the late Sir Terry Wogan had

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Fans have fought back already. So, let's make a start and where else to

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begin but, yes, we EU referendum. It is on a lot of the papers but we

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will only trouble you with two of them tonight. Here is the headline.

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I would love to get an American view on this in a moment but first of

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all, day run and the big guns are being rolled out already. It was

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interesting when Boris Johnson said he was going to join the Brexit

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camp, he also said he wasn't going to be front and centre stage,

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campaigning hard against David Cameron and here he comes, on day

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one, guns blazing. He has references to the fear campaign by the Remain

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camp. He is the front man of the exit campaign. Just explain the

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Gerald Ratner thing. We don't want to shock anybody. There is a swear

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word coming up. This story. What Johnson did today was he said that

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David Cameron and his allies were the Gerald Ratner's of the Jewish

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politics and the reference is of the affordable jeweller. He basically,

:03:05.:03:10.

in 91, described his products as total crap. He said, by-products are

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rubbish and this was the beginning and end of the jewellery trade and

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consumers stopped buying it. Boris is trying to align this to the

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remain as, saying, is this all they can come up with? Our relationship

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with the EU is a bit rubbish but it is the worst we've got so we have

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got to stick with it. We have to explain who Gerald Ratner was. Most

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people will have forgotten. How does your paper report what is going on

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in the EU? It must be quite baffling in many respects to your readers. It

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is a huge, enormous issue and the White House is weighing in and even

:03:57.:04:01.

from an American perspective, it is critically important. I think what

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is interesting is a lot of people are already exhausted and the

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campaign started today. Imagine voters here? It is kind of amazing.

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At the New York Times I think we have tried to take a bit of a

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removed approach, trying to look at issues from a step back because I

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don't think the New York Times readers are massively concerned that

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Boris Johnson is for or against. They would know who a lot of the

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personalities are. The international perspective was easier with George

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Osborne being the International Monetary Fund, and he was able to

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talk about what he regards as the global view of where Britain should

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be. That's right. I think in the Financial Times, George Osborne is

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quoted as saying he was abraded publicly by the Japanese, Chinese, a

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number of Europeans, the IMF and others. Everyone is talking about is

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around the world. And president Obama is about to come to the UK and

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Boris Johnson got his guns out on that. He said, don't be

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hypocritical, Barack Obama, and ask the richest people to vote Remain,

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when you wouldn't give up sovereignty. I think that is a sign

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that in this war of attrition between the In and Out, it is white

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noise where it is claimed and counterclaim and those in favour of

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Brexit know that when President Obama comes over and probably says

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we think it is better for the UK economy to stay in and the UK people

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to stay in, that potentially has more potency because he doesn't have

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skin in the game in the way that phase in the daily battle to you.

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They would be difficult to find an equivalent to President Obama to

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argue the case. That is right and it is not just an economic concern,

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there is defence as well. The government has argued that Russia

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could come in and wreak havoc if Britain left the EU. Who is to say

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whether or not that would happen? It is not just an economic concern for

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the US, it is a security is concerned. There are a lot of things

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at play which make it interesting. Today it is a lot about the sort of

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individuals at play and the issues, I would say, beginning to come to a

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form. The Daily Telegraph, which is the other thing we talked about. The

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reference to Gerald Ratner. The fact that Britain exports knickers to

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France and the suggestion we couldn't do that outside the EU. The

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fact is we probably could. He is stating facts and somebody else

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could state the opposite. At the moment we don't know what the facts

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are. I think what Boris Johnson was trying to do today with the Gerald

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Ratner references and the knickers if he was trying to say, don't be

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afraid of leaving. You know, there is a silver lining. I think the exit

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accompanied to give the British people some sort of road map of what

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that looks like because actually, he might want to say, we can trade with

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Europe but every time they have puts forward a different model, look at

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the Canadian trade agreements... Whatever. It is not really clear

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about what it actually means so I think they need to give the British

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people the sense of what would a Britain outside of Europe look like?

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As opposed to saying, it will be OK. He also talked about the need for

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democracy and the fact we can be in charge of our own laws and we don't

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have to go to the European Court of Justice to be the final arbiter. We

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can do that for ourselves and that will appeal to a lot of people. I

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think that's right. The people who want to leave on making the argument

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that it empowers British politicians and voters. The argument today about

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whether or not money that went to Brussels would be better spent on

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the NHS, things like that. It is very much a case of trying to put

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forward the case of, we will be in charge again. It won't be giving

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money to Brussels, whatever the figure might be. This seems to be

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what the debate centred around today. We have ten more weeks to go.

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Pace yourselves. Let's stay with the Telegraph for a

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non-EU story. Here is the headline. These are leaked e-mails revealed

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last month that a doctor from the BMA doesn't think a full walk-out is

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easy to defend and not reasonable. This won't please... It speaks to

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something about how... I think, certainly, of the people I speak to,

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there is a lot of sympathy for the junior doctors and we think they are

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going through. There is a point at which it becomes an unpopular thing

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and I think the BMA, fiercely, they will be embarrassed by this but it

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speaks to the fact they have to understand the art surgeon lines

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that if you cross them, it becomes hard justify strike action. Do you

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remember, the junior doctors and Jeremy Hunt have been locked in a

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long battle about this and there have been walk-outs and protests. He

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has come under a lot of fire and in for a lot of criticism and he has

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basically imposed the contract. Eventually he imposed it and they

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were furious but I think what it is beginning to show now is the resolve

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is beginning to wane. They had the public on the side but over time,

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that support could begin to fade. And if I was in the government now,

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I would look at that leaked e-mails being exposed and say, I think we

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have lost this battle. You wonder how long any campaign can go on for

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because people get fatigued. Senior doctors make the point that if

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junior doctors are out on strike, they are still there, stepping into

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the breach. That is true but the NHS is such an enormous thing that is so

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pervasive in Britain that there are so many services that come under

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threat and I think what they speak to in this is the should continue to

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work in paediatric services on strike days because there are

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certain things that you need sufficient numbers of medical staff.

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The other point is the government will not back down on this and that

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is partly because they want to introduce different contracts to

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different parts of the NHS and care system so if they back down now,

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they can't introduce reforms down the line. Let's look at the FT. A

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number of very highly paid individuals, all of them then, I

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don't know what that says... Investors on the war path over

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executive pay. The suggestion that he has got so great that

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shareholders might have something to say about it. Be very interesting

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story. There was a row over executive pay in the height of the

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financial crisis when suddenly workers wages were stagnating and

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people were losing their jobs and there was this at the top of

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Britain's corporate life that were being paid a lot of money and then

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it seemed to dissipate a bit. This week, a couple of big companies, the

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shareholders have voted down the pay packages of the people at BP and

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Smith and nephew. What is beginning to happen is when you look at this

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story, what investors are saying is that actually, he has kept on rising

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and it is an acceptable. The average pay ratio between a fit the 100 pay

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executive and the average worker is 150 times, compared to 50 times in

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the 1990s. -- FTSE 100 company. In-depth as -- investors are now

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saying this is not sustainable in a culture where people are becoming

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very angry, not just about corporate paper as you saw in the Panama

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Papers, received wealthy people, people who are very rich, not paying

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their share. There are some countries that have a limit, did

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they? Some companies have a limit about how much the person at the top

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can be paid as a multiple of the person at the bottom?

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There are limits. The case here is that people on the side of the

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salaries argued that the BP chief executive has his markers and if he

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hits them, he gets paid for hitting the markers. It doesn't matter to

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them that lots of people are losing their jobs at BP and the company is

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losing money. These aren't the only companies. There are investor

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meetings coming up. Anglo-American, Shire.

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Big companies. We don't often have a chance to feature the international

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New York Times. Briefly, if you would, explain this story.

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A German comedian has gone out and put out an aggressive, the difficult

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take on the Turkish leader -- satirical take on the Turkish leader

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and the Turkish leader has come back and has basically got Germany to

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allow this comedian to now be prosecuted under a pretty antiquated

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law in which a foreign leader to deduct criticising a foreign leader

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can lead to a prosecution. And he could get a prison sentence.

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It has been used before the against Pinochet of Chile. The migrant

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crisis is the background to this. You have to see this in the context

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of where is Angela Merkel with Turkey and what is the relationship?

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Of course, she has, along with European colleagues, negotiated a

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deal whereby they can send refugees back to Turkey from Greece, which

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has been absolutely overwhelmed by a deluge of people fleeing from Syria,

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Iraq and Afghanistan. She doesn't want to upset the apple cart and it

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is very important for her, in terms of her relationship with the German

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people, that she doesn't accept the Turkish because the Germans were not

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happy with her letting in a million migrants last year. But at the same

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time, it is not going to play well because if you are a German citizen,

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is it right that she should be effectively arguably curtailing the

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freedom of speech of one of her citizens?

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Fascinating. Finally... Not finally. I'm getting ahead of myself.

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Momentarily, the Daily Mail. Big Brother. Staff creating secret

:16:17.:16:21.

psychological profiles of customers. Why is this?

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The story is they are carrying out secret psychological tests on

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customers to sell them more stuff. You can be labelled one of four

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personality types. Which one are you?

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Would you like to guess? It would be boring to be amiable or

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a logical thinker. When it comes to money, it would be

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good to be a logical thinker. I don't know about emotionally

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expressive when it comes to being in a bank?

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I think, when it comes to this story, Tesco, for example, with the

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loyalty card, will divide you into categories of shopper to sell you

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more stuff. More data driven than taking a look

:17:10.:17:15.

at you as you walk in. The point is that companies do this.

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They take information they can get to sell you more things.

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Finally, the times. Page 43. We love this story. Chinese footballers

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ordered to win the World Cup by 2050, and they probably well.

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What are they doing? China has been massively successful at improving

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its sports teams over the years so now we have this story whereby by

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2015... By 2050, China must be, according to a document that has

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been circulated, a first-rate major footballing power and it can lift up

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the sports dream and that could be the blueprint for the nation's

:18:01.:18:06.

revival. We have seen astonishing sporting

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revivals. When you look at the height of the

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Cold War, the Chinese and Russians were formidable in the battles

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between the US, you know, and the Eastern powers. In gymnastics, the

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Chinese, basically, if they put their minds to a sport, they

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normally have great success. This is going to be fascinating. If you

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imagine a new economy, if you'd like.

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If you imagine, a billion people or more, they have a great deal of

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talent to look at. It is not anywhere near the top tier

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of global footballing rankings but they are really putting some weight

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behind this. There is some really nice analysis on how Chinese clubs

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are enticing players away from some big European clubs like Chelsea and

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Paris Saint Germain because the money is in China and interesting

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opportunities. If only saying it out loud could

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make it come true. Maybe we could win the World Cup by

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2050! Let's say it and cross our fingers.

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I would like to say that my opposite number has been an title keith-mack

:19:25.:19:40.

-- has been an Have I. News for Yeo. -- has been on a comedy programme.

:19:41.:19:44.

There is the official campaign that got underway.

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Gatwick Airport at the front of the Daily Telegraph, with reports of the

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security forces on high alert ahead of the visit from the Queen and

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President Obama. And the mail claiming high street banks are

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secretly psychologically profiling customers. All of those front pages

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are online and you can read a detailed review of the papers every

:20:08.:20:14.

day of the week. You can also see a repeat of our review. Posted every

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night shortly after we have finished online. It is an eye player or at

:20:18.:20:23.

this address. Thank you.

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