08/05/2016 The Papers


08/05/2016

A lively, informed and in-depth conversation about the Sunday papers.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to 08/05/2016. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

Hello and welcome to our Sunday morning edition of The Papers.

:00:12.:00:14.

With me are journalist Lucy Cavendish and Reuters Business

:00:15.:00:16.

The new mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, has written in the Observer claiming

:00:17.:00:27.

the Conservative tactics in the campaign were "straight out

:00:28.:00:29.

The main picture shows the Leicester City players lifting

:00:30.:00:34.

The Independent online says the Shadow Chancellor,

:00:35.:00:40.

John McDonnell, is calling on Labour to support proportional

:00:41.:00:43.

Two former heads of MI5 and MI6 have told The Sunday Times that leaving

:00:44.:00:48.

the European Union could undermine the UK's "ability to protect

:00:49.:00:51.

The Telegraph reports on new figures which the paper claims show schools

:00:52.:00:58.

in the UK are under increasing pressure, because of EU migration.

:00:59.:01:02.

According to The Mail on Sunday, a navy officer who trained

:01:03.:01:05.

in the UK, has fled to Syria to join so-called Islamic State.

:01:06.:01:08.

And "Dignity for Diana at last" is the main headline in the Express

:01:09.:01:11.

- with news that her grave at Althorp House

:01:12.:01:13.

Let's begin with the spy chief story. This intervention by the

:01:14.:01:27.

former head of MI5, MI6. I don't know what's going to change,

:01:28.:01:32.

it is an interesting story. And part of it is because it has been leapt

:01:33.:01:38.

on by Cameron, and now that Boris has left his job he will be going a

:01:39.:01:42.

big -- on a big tour. The actual story is that the former

:01:43.:01:47.

head of MI5 and the former head of MI6 has said that it is going to

:01:48.:01:51.

pose a risk because we are not going to be able to -- to have that sort

:01:52.:02:02.

of power to get information. It was said that it is like a man running

:02:03.:02:07.

-- walking out on his wife and children, and it would be a total

:02:08.:02:10.

disaster, and the relationship would be unhappy. They have also said they

:02:11.:02:14.

have come to it not from any political viewpoint, so Cameron will

:02:15.:02:20.

leap on that, and that is a good story for him. Whether it will

:02:21.:02:25.

change votes or not, it might do. It is unnerving. Security is a kind

:02:26.:02:29.

of gut issue, isn't it? It is one of the key issues, if you

:02:30.:02:35.

look at the economy, immigration. It is probably one whether

:02:36.:02:39.

Government's position and they remain campaign has not been as

:02:40.:02:40.

strong. This would be positive for them. It

:02:41.:02:47.

is not the only intervention, so Richard Taylor said last week --

:02:48.:02:53.

last month he didn't see much of a downside from leaving.

:02:54.:03:03.

-- so Richard Deerlove. There are also issues as to how the EU

:03:04.:03:09.

security apparatus is affected by the biggest -- would be affected by

:03:10.:03:14.

the biggest member of it leaving. To go back to what impact it would

:03:15.:03:19.

make. Nigel Farage was talking to us recently and he was saying, you

:03:20.:03:24.

know, we've got the Prime Minister against Barack Obama, the IMF,

:03:25.:03:30.

Goldman Sachs, in other words the more the elite say we shouldn't

:03:31.:03:33.

leave, the better it is for his campaign.

:03:34.:03:38.

Well, that is a very Nigel Farage things to say, we are the underdog

:03:39.:03:47.

standing up for absolute values... Personally I think if spy chiefs say

:03:48.:03:50.

it will cause a problem, I would probably listen to that more than I

:03:51.:03:54.

would listen to Nigel Farage. Boris is going to do all sorts of things

:03:55.:03:58.

this week, he will be out battling on. Let's see what he says, he will

:03:59.:04:06.

probably say "Stuff and nonsense." I haven't run MI5 or MI6, I don't know

:04:07.:04:11.

how that elite power works. I would love to know, I am not going to

:04:12.:04:16.

know. I am kind of going to trust these two, because they have run it.

:04:17.:04:23.

Trying to crunch the economy figures, and all these other things.

:04:24.:04:30.

He can do that...! I guess I can, but you've got near

:04:31.:04:35.

unanimity on the issue of the economy, this is more difficult for

:04:36.:04:39.

the issue of the remain campaign. The Brexit issue is kind of

:04:40.:04:46.

intuitive, so this kind of intervention from experts is

:04:47.:04:48.

interesting. Let's move on to the election of

:04:49.:04:57.

Sadiq Khan. The Observer's said, Sadiq Khan accuses the -- Goldsmith

:04:58.:05:04.

of using Donald Trump tactics to get votes. -- accuses David Cameron.

:05:05.:05:14.

I think Sadiq Khan could say anything right now, and everybody

:05:15.:05:18.

would be happy. He really, really wanted that job, and he campaign

:05:19.:05:21.

really hard and I think his message was very, very clear. -- he

:05:22.:05:28.

campaign. Somehow or other that campaign with Zac Goldsmith didn't

:05:29.:05:39.

really work. I think what's really interesting about Sadiq Khan right

:05:40.:05:43.

now is is he is sort of transcending both parties in a way. He has this

:05:44.:05:50.

absolutely -- absolute position of power, he is a big personality with

:05:51.:05:55.

a lot to say, he has a great background. He can say to people,

:05:56.:06:00.

you can do this, we can all join together, and the Conservative

:06:01.:06:03.

campaign did come across as being just -- divisive and wrong.

:06:04.:06:11.

The interview in the Guardian were Zac Goldsmith came out very, very

:06:12.:06:15.

strongly, very personally against Sadiq Khan was quite shocking. I

:06:16.:06:20.

think people leapt on that and it became a sort of platform.

:06:21.:06:24.

He may not have wanted that, his sister even wrote, this isn't the

:06:25.:06:27.

sort of person I know. But that was leapt on by Sadiq

:06:28.:06:31.

Khan's team. But that was a very odd tweet from

:06:32.:06:38.

his sister, he was basically saying he was not strong enough to stand up

:06:39.:06:42.

to his advisors...? That's not what she meant but...

:06:43.:06:49.

If you are running a campaign which even people within your own party

:06:50.:06:56.

say is dodgy, that in itself... We have got a lot of Monday morning

:06:57.:07:01.

quarterbacks here, and it is a subject on which people probably

:07:02.:07:05.

come on TV and talk about with less information than they do on anything

:07:06.:07:07.

else. We don't know why 3 million people

:07:08.:07:11.

voted the way they did, so we're probably guessing. But negative

:07:12.:07:16.

campaigning works, it is why people use it. So to be dismissive and say

:07:17.:07:21.

that is why he lost is focusing I think one particular area that seems

:07:22.:07:26.

intuitive to us. Obviously this is one of the issues that Sadiq Khan

:07:27.:07:30.

has drawn attention to in this argument in the newspaper, but he

:07:31.:07:35.

has talked about a lot of things, and the Telegraph are focusing about

:07:36.:07:39.

the way he has attacked Corbin implicitly in this article. It does

:07:40.:07:45.

lay out his thinking on the world as such. -- Jeremy Corbyn. They could

:07:46.:07:52.

be said -- seen as him saying how he is positioning himself for a

:07:53.:07:54.

leadership role sometime in the future.

:07:55.:07:58.

He has only just become mayor! Sadiq Khan takes on with Davidson in

:07:59.:08:06.

the 2025 election! -- Ruth Davidson. I agree with him,

:08:07.:08:12.

that Labour did to look out. So he appears modern, with it, thoughtful,

:08:13.:08:18.

speaking the language people want to hear who are Labour voters. Was the

:08:19.:08:27.

whole Jeremy Corbyn approach is very inward looking. -- wearers. He is

:08:28.:08:31.

obviously absolutely passionate and focused. Which Goldsmith has

:08:32.:08:39.

probably found very difficult. But London in 2015 was one of the

:08:40.:08:43.

few areas in this entire country where Labour did quite well. So it's

:08:44.:08:46.

not surprising that a Labour city would vote for a Labour mayor. The

:08:47.:08:50.

real surprise you might say was the fact that Boris Johnson got the job,

:08:51.:08:57.

that was a personal thing for him. So it's not surprising Zac Goldsmith

:08:58.:09:00.

lost in a sense. It tells you the kind of candidate

:09:01.:09:04.

you have -- need to have, somebody who could talk to a broad audience.

:09:05.:09:13.

If you look at what Sadiq Khan has written, it is closer to the

:09:14.:09:17.

Conservative Party narrative, equality of opportunity. A lot of

:09:18.:09:24.

people would associate Jeremy Corbyn with the equality of outcome

:09:25.:09:31.

approach. Sadiq Khan came from a poor background, he worked hard and

:09:32.:09:37.

got ahead in a profession it is quite difficult to get ahead in. So

:09:38.:09:44.

that is interesting, the broader piece he has written.

:09:45.:09:47.

The Sunday Telegraph, interesting story. Systems struggling to cope

:09:48.:09:55.

with 7000 pupils from European migrant families. This of course is

:09:56.:10:06.

a Brexit story. It is, but it is obviously slightly

:10:07.:10:12.

-- also slightly more complicated. The 7000 pupils are not necessarily

:10:13.:10:15.

pupils who have just sort of recently come into the UK. Their

:10:16.:10:22.

headline looks scary, oh no, there are 7000 -- 700,000 more coming to

:10:23.:10:28.

school. As Tom said, his children would come into that.

:10:29.:10:34.

I realised I was in the statistics! You come in as a journalist and

:10:35.:10:40.

leave as a statistic. Lots of people are not from...

:10:41.:10:45.

Taking your jobs and your school places!

:10:46.:10:54.

We've had to be on talking about her running schools is much more

:10:55.:10:57.

difficult than he thought. He has been open about the fact he found it

:10:58.:11:03.

very difficult. My own personal story is there has been so much of a

:11:04.:11:07.

rise in children in the area I live in is -- that last year my son going

:11:08.:11:12.

into the year seven didn't get a place at the local school, but got a

:11:13.:11:17.

place at a school 16 miles away. 16?

:11:18.:11:20.

I went to appeal. But what happened is that the local

:11:21.:11:25.

secondary school sold off their playing fields and that will

:11:26.:11:27.

continue... I asked the council how that was

:11:28.:11:33.

working, why there were so many going into year seven. They said it

:11:34.:11:36.

was a big birth rate. Birth rates?

:11:37.:11:45.

I was interested, because I've got a friend who is a Spanish journalist

:11:46.:11:50.

who said, do you realise there are 800,000 British people in Spain who

:11:51.:11:57.

tend to be older, and they are "Overburdening our health care

:11:58.:11:58.

system"? I don't know if these figures are

:11:59.:12:00.

right... When you look at these numbers in

:12:01.:12:07.

more detail, obviously as I say I am coming here as part of the

:12:08.:12:13.

statistics. What -- but with French people, of course, the UK has been

:12:14.:12:19.

one of the biggest French cities. But the issue the Telegraph is

:12:20.:12:22.

drawing concern to is the more recent increase, and that is about

:12:23.:12:27.

half this figure. About 350,000 people. We are talking about the

:12:28.:12:32.

school population of 9 million, so 3% to 4% additional figures, which

:12:33.:12:36.

is not enormous. And the other aspect of this is what is the

:12:37.:12:40.

benefit? These children, their parents work here and pay taxes, so

:12:41.:12:47.

it is not a 0-sum game. So in the totality, it is not

:12:48.:12:53.

necessarily proving the case that there is an increased burden on the

:12:54.:12:58.

state, but of course at individual levels like Lucy's case, it doesn't

:12:59.:13:03.

necessarily feel good. It does get difficult if the schools can contain

:13:04.:13:12.

the pupils, but I don't really know. You've done the numbers. Maybe we

:13:13.:13:17.

can get Tom's children to talk about how they feel!

:13:18.:13:22.

Let's talk -- move onto the front page of the Sunday Times, Prince

:13:23.:13:31.

Harry gets no satisfaction "At home on my..." And I have been told by

:13:32.:13:36.

the BBC I cannot say what he is sitting on!

:13:37.:13:41.

I was more interested in his comments about over say.

:13:42.:13:47.

We've had a ding dong about this because part of me feels kind of"

:13:48.:13:52.

tough". A member of the Royal family, it

:13:53.:13:57.

kind of goes with the territory. I'm not sure, I can understand it feels

:13:58.:14:02.

horrible, but we've almost got to a stage where privacy is not about our

:14:03.:14:07.

journalists invading privacy, everybody has a phone, takes

:14:08.:14:14.

pictures of people... You know, if you are a member of the Royal family

:14:15.:14:18.

and there is a lot of stuff that goes with that, good and bad, you

:14:19.:14:23.

have to suck it up a bit or a and live somewhere very, very quiet.

:14:24.:14:30.

Everybody is invading people's privacy all the time, not just his

:14:31.:14:35.

privacy, and people are constantly sending tweets, saying, I saw him

:14:36.:14:40.

doing this... And he is doing a lot of good work, so yeah, keep your

:14:41.:14:44.

shirt on. That's a better headline!

:14:45.:14:56.

One has a lot of sympathy, it is human rights, flavour of the week,

:14:57.:15:01.

but we are entitled to privacy. Given his mother's death, his

:15:02.:15:05.

background, we feel sympathy. But there is a line, as he says, but

:15:06.:15:11.

that line is difficult -- different for a public citizen who is not

:15:12.:15:15.

seeking public office or celebrity. If you are a member of the Royal

:15:16.:15:21.

family, you are in public office but you are actually in public office

:15:22.:15:24.

where people cannot get rid of you. So your character is actually much

:15:25.:15:28.

more important than that of a private individual next door. I

:15:29.:15:34.

suspect that if people sat down and talked about -- thought about this

:15:35.:15:40.

objectively, and decided where the line was, it might not be where he

:15:41.:15:44.

wants it to be. I think a lot of people would say, I

:15:45.:15:50.

think he is right, and still by the newspapers anyway.

:15:51.:15:53.

Let's end with... We were debating before we went on air. My secret

:15:54.:16:01.

heartache, by the Masterchef winner. I've never seen Masterchef, I'm a

:16:02.:16:07.

bloke! It's presented by two blokes. I am a

:16:08.:16:13.

Masterchef fan, and this really, really is a must amazing story.

:16:14.:16:22.

I cried when I watched it. This is the winner, absolutely against the

:16:23.:16:30.

odds winner. She has four children, she stays at home, and she cooks

:16:31.:16:36.

gluten-free food which I cook occasionally, it is very, very

:16:37.:16:41.

difficult to make taste gorgeous. But on top of all that, she has had

:16:42.:16:46.

a very serious battle with cancer for over a decade and three years

:16:47.:16:51.

ago nearly died. And she didn't tell the judges that, John and Gregg,

:16:52.:17:02.

because she wanted to be judged on the food that she produced. And she

:17:03.:17:10.

beat two trendy looking boys with beards, who could also beautiful...

:17:11.:17:16.

Tom, help me out here! I haven't seen it either.

:17:17.:17:21.

We did have a TV in the kitchen, which is where I am. I'm not an

:17:22.:17:29.

armchair chef. It's terrible. Well, I think it's an

:17:30.:17:34.

amazing story and good luck to her. Indeed. Thank you both very much.

:17:35.:17:36.

Just a reminder, we take a look at tomorrow's front pages every

:17:37.:17:42.

evening at 10:30 and 11:30 here on BBC News.

:17:43.:17:48.

Time for a look at the weather, with Peter Gibbs.

:17:49.:17:59.

We are spreading the warm weather a little

:18:00.:18:00.

Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS