05/07/2016 The Papers


05/07/2016

No need to wait until tomorrow morning to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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Transcript


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Hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be

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With me are Hugo Rifkind, Columnist at The Times

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The Financial Times, which has on its front page

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the likely Democratic presidential nominee, Hilary Clinton,

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who today discovered that the FBI would not be recommending criminal

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charges be brought against her over her use of private emails

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The Daily Express leads with a story on the rise in the number

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of migrants and refugees entering the EU by sea.

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Quoting the International Organization for Migration,

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the paper says the figure has soared by 60%

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'Meltdown' reads the Metro's headline,

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with a story about how commuters who use Southern rail services

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are losing their jobs because they are unable to get

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to work due to cancellations and delays.

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The Daily Star leads with Wales's historic Euro

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semi-final against Portugal tomorrow night, the biggest match

:01:09.:01:09.

The Guardian has on its front page a warning

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from the Bank of England that risks to the economy have

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Theresa May's overwhelming victory in the first

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round of the contest to become the next Conservative leader

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and UK prime minister is the Daily Telegraph's lead story.

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The Daily Mail also leads with the Home Secretary's victory,

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speculating over who will clinch the second spot in the ballot. The Times

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also has more about the race to become the next Prime Minister. We

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start with the Daily Telegraph, Theresa May coming out of number

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ten, she has not got the job yet, but she is in pole position, to lead

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the party. She is storming ahead with the MPs, 165 votes from the

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MPs. Andrea Leadsom is following on 66, Michael Gove on 48. Some

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suggestion that some of Michael Gove's support might be coming from

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Theresa May's supporters because I would rather she fight him rather

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than Andrea Leadsom -- they would. It now depends on the membership,

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when the MPs have voted it goes to the mass membership of the

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Conservative Party, the first time a sitting Prime Minister will have

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been put into office by a mass vote amongst party membership. That has

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never happened. People are not sure what the Tory membership will do.

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70% of them voted Brexit, Theresa May was backing, albeit softly,

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Remain. That being said, they could do anything, they also voted for

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Iain Duncan Smith. Or are they? Since then we have at the rise of

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Ukip, and some people believe many of them are the extreme wing of the

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Conservative Party, they have melted away to Ukip, now you have a

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centrist party. David, the thing is, Theresa May, she was Remain, but she

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has made it clear that if she gets the top job she will carry through

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the will of the people. That will persuade people in the party who

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might be worried? Yes, she was fought Remain, and that was about

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all she did in the referendum campaign. -- she was four. It is a

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mystery to some of us, if you were inside Downing Street, and you knew

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the Prime Minister had put your head above the parapet like David

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Cameron, you might resent one of your most senior ministers saying

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they were in favour of a Remain and then disappearing on a sabbatical,

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as it appeared. How will that go down with the majority of Tory

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members who voted out? Anecdotally, in the West Midlands, I was well

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aware last weekend of what some Conservatives from Warwickshire

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thought about Theresa May's performance in the referendum

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campaign. Even though they won? Yes, absolutely. They did not see her as

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part of winning. And now to the Guardian. We all have those moments

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when we say things which we hoped would not get out there in the

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public domain. Twitter has allowed people to say many things and hide

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behind the shield of anonymity. Kenneth Clarke and Malcolm Rifkind.

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Parents, what are you going to do? That is your dad. This is a great

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story. Ken Clarke, and Malcolm Rifkind, they were doing interviews

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on Sky News, and they had a chat, thinking they were not being

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recorded, and they were being recorded. Everyone thinks because

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they did not know they were being recorded and they said these

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interesting things, they must have been things they wish they hadn't

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said. In fact they have said the same thing on air, on the record and

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Ken Clarke said Michael Gove was behaving like a student politician

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early in the way, which is not that much different from what he said

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today. Both of them have said that they are not fast at all. -- fast.

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It does matter. What they said was not matter at all, it would seem,

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and Ken Clarke, 75, he would not care. I would expect that. But I'm

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still, as an old-fashioned journalist, uneasy about the way in

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which this generation private conversations without too much of a

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question seemed to be accepted that they go into the public domain, if

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they turn up. I find that slightly uneasy. What it does for trust in

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our country, which I think is something which certain elements of

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the media bang on about, quite a bit. It is something. Going back to

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what Ken Clarke did say. It was fun. LAUGHTER

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He said with Michael Gove as Prime Minister we would go to war with at

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least three countries at once. Andrea Leadsom, he said so long as

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she understands she is not to deliver on the extremist you good

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things she has been saying. Regarding Theresa May, she is a

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bloody difficult woman, his words, but you and I, talking about your

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dad here, you and I worked with Margaret Thatcher. That is meant to

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be a condiment. Theresa May comes out of this quite well. -- a

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compliment. Strong and resolute, the kind of person who might be able to

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lead the country through the rigours of Brexit. I want to know the three

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countries that Michael Gove might lead us to war against. Is one of

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them Scotland? LAUGHTER And now to another story. Brexit

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fallout fears gripped the market. Some of us were aching today for

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Mark Carney, the governor of the Bank of England, to use the words I

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told you so, but he didn't. Here we have the concerns that he has

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expressed today, especially interesting. I have no memories

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during the Brexit campaign of Boris Johnson or Michael Gove telling us

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that forecasting a 31 year low of the pound against the dollar, that

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was not part of their forecasts, but still, that is where we were today.

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A special concern, the governor was saying about commercial properties,

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let alone domestic properties, the price of houses. Very sensitive

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issue. For a Conservative government. Hugo, the more we talk

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about this, Jacob freeze Mogg was on the news channel, saying he blames

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the BBC -- Jacob Rees Mogg. My eyes rolled around the roof was we are

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talking this up, that is the suggestion. Is that part of the

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problem? I blame Jacob Reeves Mogg for this happening and the rest of

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his Brexit crew. -- Jacob Rees Mogg. The pound is at $1 32, that is very

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bad. What irritates me, the pound is way down, the FTSE is slightly up,

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people say it can't be that bad. People need to understand the link

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between a plummeting pound and the FTSE going up. The FTSE is made up

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of British companies, yes, digging things out of the ground in Africa

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and selling things in dollars to the Chinese. If it becomes cheaper to

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buy into British companies, that is the fact. But the sky has not fallen

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in, those who voted for Brexit would say. Two weeks? We are not going to

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come out of the European Union, for two years, minimum. We will not have

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concrete figures on the real short-term effects of Brexit until

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November. Just to observe, Mark Carney is an impressive man, isn't

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it? When he gives these performances. Jacob Rees Mogg did

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not think he was. As Mark Carney said last week, he said, tell me

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which bit was I wrong about? On the Daily Mirror, Judgment Day, the

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Chilcot report, long delay, comes out tomorrow. Tony Blair is ready

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for a blistering attack. It is a big day, after the scandal of the report

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that is seven and a half years behind schedule, the original

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schedule. You can only imagine the 179 families who lost their loved

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ones in the war. We are promised there will be the answers to the big

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questions about the intelligence services, yes, and the military and

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work they, actually responsible for the equipment they did or did not

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have -- were they. And that is before you get to the politicians.

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This will centre on Tony Blair, of course, and no one would argue that

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the intelligence was wrong and that you have a situation where he

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himself will have to say this was wrong, that was wrong, and the

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other. Very quickly, is this Jeremy Corbyn's finest hour? It could be.

:11:34.:11:39.

If you look at what has been happening in the Labour Party, the

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coup that has not happened, this is why. They could not hit him before

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Chilcot, because if they are undergoing a leadership contest and

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he turns out to be the great point man on Chilcot, attacking Tony

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Blair, then he soars, we will see what happens. You are going to

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France tomorrow for the big day? Yes, lucky guy. I've been brushing

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up my Welsh credentials, I got the name for it. -- I've. They've been

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fantastic. In what they have achieved, the Welsh national team.

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You can argue how they have done it, but the great thing, they have a

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serious chance of actually winning. Amazing. Everyone will be watching

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the game tomorrow, and Chilcot. Busy day.

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Don't forget all the front pages are online on the BBC News website

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where you can read a detailed review of the papers.

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It's all there for you - 7 days a week at bbc.co.uk?papers -

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and you can see us there too - with each night's edition

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of The Papers being posted on the page shortly

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