13/07/2016 The Papers


13/07/2016

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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Transcript


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Hello, and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be

:00:15.:00:17.

With me are Paul Johnson, deputy editor of the Guardian,

:00:18.:00:20.

and Tim Collins, the former Tory MP and managing director

:00:21.:00:23.

The Guardian, which pictures a laughing Prime Minister

:00:24.:00:31.

and her husband, Philip, on the steps of Number Ten.

:00:32.:00:37.

The paper says her speech was focused on the "middle ground".

:00:38.:00:40.

The i uses a phrase from that speech, with the Prime Minister

:00:41.:00:43.

saying, "Let's build a fairer Britain."

:00:44.:00:47.

A photo from the other side of the famous Downing Street door

:00:48.:00:50.

dominates the Telegraph's front page.

:00:51.:00:52.

The headline is "May brings in the Brexiteers."

:00:53.:00:59.

The Times calls tonight's government appointments,

:01:00.:01:00.

"May's clean break," after the Prime Minister sacked

:01:01.:01:02.

Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson features in Express alongside

:01:03.:01:06.

Brexit Secretary David Davis, calling the pair, "May's team

:01:07.:01:08.

The Mirror pictures Boris stuck on that infamous zipwire,

:01:09.:01:14.

with the simple headline, "Dear world...sorry."

:01:15.:01:24.

The FT looks at the possible impact of Philip Hammond taking over

:01:25.:01:31.

at the Treasury, describing him as, "Low-key".

:01:32.:01:33.

The departing Cameron family feature on the Metro,

:01:34.:01:35.

alongside details of new government appointments to what it calls,

:01:36.:01:37.

Let's start with you, Paul Dahmer because we have the front of the

:01:38.:01:52.

Guardian here. Very nice photo of Theresa May with Philip. In the

:01:53.:01:59.

corner it says, a speech to make Ed Miliband choke on his teeth. To come

:02:00.:02:03.

back to the photograph, it is terrific, it captures the moment she

:02:04.:02:10.

told her husband Boris Johnson would be Foreign Secretary! LAUGHTER.

:02:11.:02:16.

They laughed in Paris and Brussels and New York et cetera. To come back

:02:17.:02:24.

to the speech, it was interesting, powerful, direct, talked about

:02:25.:02:28.

disadvantage and discrimination. She said, when we make the calls we

:02:29.:02:32.

won't think of the powerful bite of you. When we pass laws we won't

:02:33.:02:39.

think of the mighty bite you -- but. When it comes to taxes we will

:02:40.:02:43.

prioritise not the wealthy but you -- but. Powerful speech. Slight

:02:44.:02:49.

echoes, some commentators say it could have been delivered by Ed

:02:50.:02:52.

Miliband, but there are some echoes, Tim would be expert of this than the

:02:53.:02:58.

-- more the expert of this than me, but when Margaret Thatcher is quoted

:02:59.:03:04.

St Francis of Assisi. When there is discord, may we bring harmony. With

:03:05.:03:08.

the chaos in Labour at the moment, alarm bells will be ringing. I think

:03:09.:03:12.

they will perpetually be ringing in Labour for about 12 months. I think

:03:13.:03:19.

we need to come back to the ring. What you do and what you say are

:03:20.:03:22.

different things. Actions speak stronger than words. Just above the

:03:23.:03:31.

main story, Cabinet takes a tilt to the right. You feel the Guardian has

:03:32.:03:35.

got it wrong. I fear the Guardian aren't the right people to

:03:36.:03:40.

understand what goes on in the Tory party and I wouldn't read the Daily

:03:41.:03:43.

Telegraph to understand what is going on in the Labour Party. After

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20 years in politics, ten years analysing it, this is by eight

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country mile the cleverest, most successful reshuffle I have seen any

:03:56.:04:01.

Prime Minister make in a 30 year period. She has created a complete

:04:02.:04:09.

free hand to do what she said she wanted to do on the steps of Downing

:04:10.:04:12.

Street. She said she wanted to deliver Grexit. She has put in

:04:13.:04:17.

charge people who will do that -- Brexit. And in doing that, she has

:04:18.:04:22.

given herself a complete FreeHand. The right-wing of the Tory party,

:04:23.:04:28.

the Leave side, they will fall give her anything. Their view is she will

:04:29.:04:32.

deliver Brexit and that will allow her to do the other things on

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tackling social injustice, rebalancing the economy, because the

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other part of the reshuffle was the first dismissal of a chancellor

:04:43.:04:46.

since Harold Macmillan in the 1950s, the night of the Long knives, to

:04:47.:04:51.

fire your chancellor, indicating she is serious when she says she wants a

:04:52.:04:55.

fundamentally different, interventionist, redistributionist

:04:56.:05:00.

economic strategy -- long knives. Was it important to have such an

:05:01.:05:06.

execution? I think it was made clear when she talked in her launch speech

:05:07.:05:11.

earlier this week, and on Downing Street today, about wanting to be

:05:12.:05:16.

not on the side of the privileged but working people, when she talks

:05:17.:05:22.

about intervening to protect British businesses from being overtaken by

:05:23.:05:26.

overseas businesses, she means it. It is fundamentally different from

:05:27.:05:30.

George Osborne's approach. The way she has taken charge of this

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government. She has put in Philip Hammond. He wants to be the

:05:35.:05:38.

chancellor, not Prime Minister. He won challenge Theresa May on major

:05:39.:05:43.

economic questions. There is one slight flaw but I bow to your

:05:44.:05:47.

knowledge of the intricacies of the Tory party -- won't. There is a

:05:48.:05:50.

history of chancellors wanting to become Prime Minister. Philip

:05:51.:05:55.

Hammond and his rather low... His rather low-key approach. Who knows

:05:56.:06:02.

if he is a threat? Andrea Leadsom... I know him very well. He will be a

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great chancellor and he is not a threat at all. The Daily Express

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front page and you have to Mac Brexiteers, Boris Johnson and David

:06:13.:06:20.

Davis. Who will lead negotiations? Some rumours will be Boris Johnson

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won't be allowed to go to Brussels. You can't have a department in

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charge of Brexit without making it very clear the Foreign Office is not

:06:31.:06:35.

in charge of that. David Davis, he has given a great deal of thought to

:06:36.:06:39.

it, it binds Boris Johnson, after leading a campaign that got 70.5

:06:40.:06:43.

million votes, but he will go out and she rocked the world, he will go

:06:44.:06:48.

to America, China and India, David Davis will do the job of the Brexit.

:06:49.:06:54.

According to the Foreign Secretary, this is a politician who has

:06:55.:07:00.

insulted Barack Obama, Clinton, the Turks, the Germans, Africans, the

:07:01.:07:08.

Kurds and Liverpool. He has had to make apologies about all of these

:07:09.:07:11.

things. It is a curious piece of diplomacy. You could read it in a

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different way, the new drink of the Foreign Office. Negotiations will be

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carried out by David Davis in terms of that and so forth -- neutering.

:07:24.:07:28.

And secondly, with Liam Fox, another one brought back from the wilderness

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to lead the trade deals that people like him say we will sign with China

:07:37.:07:40.

and America. We are rather ratty back of the queue with America. With

:07:41.:07:45.

a lot of things from the Remain came before June 23 that had been

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retracted... What is significant is, don't underestimate just how bright

:07:51.:07:54.

Boris Johnson is. He is the first Foreign Secretary who is fluent in

:07:55.:08:00.

multiple languages. He was mayor of London. Very successfully went round

:08:01.:08:04.

and did trade deals for London in various parts of the world. I think

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he will surprise people how good he will be. He is also in charge of

:08:08.:08:14.

MI6. Yes, absolutely. The point is, as the Mayor of London he was in

:08:15.:08:19.

charge of the Met Police. You are saying he won't be in charge of

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Brussels. There is a European foreign council meeting, so he will

:08:24.:08:28.

be in Brussels. It will be clear what the agenda is. If it will cover

:08:29.:08:31.

Brexit it will make sense for David Davis to be there. (CROSSTALK). It

:08:32.:08:38.

isn't clear. It depends on the agenda. If it is primarily on Brexit

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it will be David Davis. If it is Ukraine or the Middle East, it will

:08:44.:08:48.

be Boris. Look at the initial reactions, people are completely

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aghast. Consistency from Boris Johnson... Ten days ago he set

:08:52.:08:56.

Andrea Leadsom was the only person with the determination to become the

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next Prime Minister. What Paul can't cope with is that the Labour Party

:09:02.:09:04.

is tearing itself to shreds and cannot even unite over the rules of

:09:05.:09:09.

the contest. The Tory party is clearly coming together very

:09:10.:09:12.

powerfully and I think Theresa May has had a very good reshuffle

:09:13.:09:15.

because the Tory party is more united than it has been in half a

:09:16.:09:19.

century. Let me look at the second page in The Express. It has the big

:09:20.:09:24.

appointments. There is only one woman. There is the Prime Minister!

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A LAUGHTER. This is very... (CROSSTALK). This is

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very, very curious, because the briefings last night leading to

:09:37.:09:39.

front-page headlines this morning was she would rebalance... Tony

:09:40.:09:42.

Blair had eight women in his cabinet. David Cameron had seven at

:09:43.:09:47.

one time. We have had six announcements today and one person,

:09:48.:09:51.

Amber Rudd. We do have tomorrow. There will be a lot of

:09:52.:09:55.

announcements. The top jobs... One of the top jobs. I know that we have

:09:56.:10:01.

all been through the Blair era, the Brown era, the camera nearer, this

:10:02.:10:05.

year is a Prime Minister who so far has kept her word on everything --

:10:06.:10:10.

Cameron era. She said she would have a team to deliver Brexit, she has

:10:11.:10:14.

kept her word on appointing a chancellor who can dramatically

:10:15.:10:17.

change economic policy, she has restructured the business department

:10:18.:10:20.

in a way that will make it much easier to have an intervention

:10:21.:10:23.

strategy, if she says she will have more women, by the time she has

:10:24.:10:26.

finished composing her cabinet she will have many more women.

:10:27.:10:30.

Where are these women going to go? There's health, education,

:10:31.:10:37.

transport, important departments were several will be led by women I

:10:38.:10:42.

suspect. The front of the Mirror, fairly self-explanatory. Echoes what

:10:43.:10:49.

Paul has been saying. You are the Daily Mirror guy, now, Paul. It is

:10:50.:10:55.

this idea of Boris Johnson being it wired around the world. It was the

:10:56.:11:02.

Olympics, a huge success. -- zip wired. But he is a good salesman,

:11:03.:11:09.

isn't he? He did very well at selling the London Olympics. If he

:11:10.:11:13.

has to sell Brexit Britain, is he a good man to do that? Let's see how

:11:14.:11:18.

the other nations, the EU nations, the Americans and Chinese react. So

:11:19.:11:25.

far his diplomatic tours have ended slightly disastrously. Think about

:11:26.:11:29.

how he had to cut short his trip to Palestine and scuttle out to

:11:30.:11:33.

Kurdistan over some trouble about an unpaid bar bill. Let's hope this

:11:34.:11:40.

doesn't happen. He will have to show some character in this role, more

:11:41.:11:45.

serious. Exactly. People said he couldn't be London mayor but he was

:11:46.:11:49.

extremely successful for eight years and one thing that was decided in

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the referendum was we needed to organise our politics around what is

:11:54.:11:56.

best for us not what other countries think is best. He might bring a bit

:11:57.:12:01.

of fun to the Cabinet table because they are all quite serious people,

:12:02.:12:06.

Teresa made. Philip Hammond is not a rip tickler, it has to be said,

:12:07.:12:12.

Boris will bring some fun. Theresa May has already proved she has a

:12:13.:12:15.

wonderful sense of humour by doing this Cabinet! The FT, it's quite

:12:16.:12:23.

interesting, it does call them Philip Hammond, Tim's friend, a

:12:24.:12:28.

fiscal hawk, which is quite interesting. She also talks about...

:12:29.:12:33.

They come back to this David Miliband point, saying her speech in

:12:34.:12:37.

Downing Street contained things that bore an uncanny resemblance to those

:12:38.:12:42.

championed by Ed Miliband. The difference between George Osborne

:12:43.:12:46.

and Philip Hammond are really marked. That was humiliating for

:12:47.:12:52.

Osborne, longtime bookies favourite and others favour to be the next

:12:53.:12:56.

Prime Minister. He had to come in by the backdoor and he left by the

:12:57.:13:00.

backdoor. There's a really plaintive tweet tonight saying I will leave it

:13:01.:13:05.

to others to judge whether I left the economy in a better shape than I

:13:06.:13:09.

inherited it, and extraordinary exit from somebody so prominent for so

:13:10.:13:14.

long. I hope was ticked up on Twitter tonight. Lots of people

:13:15.:13:21.

talking about that. Talking about Hammond, the fiscal hawk, how does

:13:22.:13:27.

that square with Theresa May's plan for austerity? The important thing

:13:28.:13:30.

about Philip is he is a loyalist, he will do what he is told, he won't be

:13:31.:13:36.

like Gordon Brown or George Osborne, trying to be a Deputy Prime

:13:37.:13:40.

Minister. The Treasury will have a lot less power, that's important,

:13:41.:13:43.

it's a different style of government, the Treasury will be

:13:44.:13:46.

back in its box and the kind of Treasury we had 30 or 40 years ago.

:13:47.:13:50.

He will be good on the detail and the numbers. And is a very

:13:51.:13:55.

successful shadow chief secretary he was responsible for lots of economic

:13:56.:14:00.

thinking prior to the election in 2010 for the Tory party. Teresa May

:14:01.:14:07.

has committed to abandoning the deficit target from George Osborne

:14:08.:14:12.

by 2020, Philip will deliver. He won't be in charge of these new

:14:13.:14:17.

international trade deals? That will be Liam Fox. Extraordinary power to

:14:18.:14:21.

Liam Fox. And extraordinary opportunity because it's important

:14:22.:14:24.

to recognise there are countries around the world that have expressed

:14:25.:14:28.

interest in bilateral trade agreements with the UK, China,

:14:29.:14:33.

India, Australia, the US, the UAE, many interested in doing that.

:14:34.:14:37.

Bilateral trade agreements can be done within a year or two, South

:14:38.:14:41.

Korea, Iceland and Norway have done that. We could be in a position in a

:14:42.:14:46.

few years where we have free trade agreements with 2.5 billion people,

:14:47.:14:50.

which puts into context the question of our relationship with the EU.

:14:51.:14:56.

You're saying we will negotiate with the EU but back load the

:14:57.:14:59.

negotiations so when we get to the final sign of we can say you're not

:15:00.:15:05.

as important as you thought. One of the problems with being in the EU is

:15:06.:15:10.

you can't negotiate your own trade deals, we don't get that back until

:15:11.:15:15.

we exit but we can put the negotiations in place so that when

:15:16.:15:18.

we exit we can do the deals with the other countries and turnaround to

:15:19.:15:21.

the EU, if they want to be difficult, which I hope and believe

:15:22.:15:25.

they won't be, turn around and say unlike the rest of you we do most of

:15:26.:15:29.

our trade already with the rest of the world, not with the rest of

:15:30.:15:33.

Europe, and we have done these deals, don't assume all the

:15:34.:15:37.

negotiating power is with you. Tim can see the way to the sunny

:15:38.:15:44.

uplands, pie in the sky perhaps, but the Bank of England, the IMF, the

:15:45.:15:48.

World Bank, the IMF, most economists, let's see what happens.

:15:49.:15:54.

It's a very rosy picture. The key thing for Liam Fox and the Brexit

:15:55.:15:59.

team is they won't talk to us until article he is activated. Exactly.

:16:00.:16:08.

That seems to have been missed --. Is there still disagreement on

:16:09.:16:11.

whether Article 50 needs to be activated? -- Article 50. Tim has

:16:12.:16:16.

gone through the gears very quickly, he thinks we can do exit in about

:16:17.:16:21.

6.5 seconds. We can't do that, Philip Hammond send yesterday we

:16:22.:16:27.

could take six years. -- said. He was talking about ratification of

:16:28.:16:31.

other EU member states on the final terms of Brexit. That's precisely

:16:32.:16:35.

the point. Every free trade agreement we want to do with every

:16:36.:16:39.

country outside the EU, as long as we are inside it, need the agreement

:16:40.:16:44.

from 27 other countries. That's why out of our ten largest export

:16:45.:16:48.

markets outside the EU only inside the EU do we have access to two free

:16:49.:16:52.

trade agreements, we can get through the other a very quickly once we are

:16:53.:17:01.

have been saying, this is a very have been saying, this is a very

:17:02.:17:03.

different direction for the government domesticly at least.

:17:04.:17:08.

Absolutely. She is somebody who is very clearly not intending just to

:17:09.:17:13.

be a legacy Prime Minister or a caretaker Prime Minister or someone

:17:14.:17:17.

who is just there to carry on on autopilot what she inherited from

:17:18.:17:20.

David Cameron, she is serious about changing the direction of policy on

:17:21.:17:24.

a whole range of issues and that's why the reshuffle is so exciting

:17:25.:17:28.

because she is creating the space within her party and beyond her

:17:29.:17:32.

party to do that. Some of the new departments she will set up tomorrow

:17:33.:17:36.

and the appointments will indicate she is serious, this isn't just

:17:37.:17:40.

rhetoric what she talked about on the doorstep, she will do some very

:17:41.:17:44.

radically different things. The Times comes to something we haven't

:17:45.:17:48.

talked about before, there's one third of the day we haven't talked

:17:49.:17:56.

about, David Cameron's Commons exit, he was hugely amusing, he set out

:17:57.:18:01.

his list of achievements, cutting the deficit, more jobs, better

:18:02.:18:06.

schools, protecting the NHS, but he didn't tackle one thing. We've left

:18:07.:18:10.

the EU by mistake as far as he's concerned and this is a mess. I will

:18:11.:18:15.

come to Brexit because the Metro has it on the front but to finish on

:18:16.:18:22.

Theresa May, a vicar's daughter, a former banker, not a PR spin like

:18:23.:18:26.

David Cameron and the others, she's a serious thinker. -- spinner. You

:18:27.:18:32.

can be reassured the old Bullingdon ways are out of the door? That was

:18:33.:18:37.

one target for her, when she kept on about the wealthy and privileged,

:18:38.:18:41.

when she turns it on her head and talked about the discriminated and

:18:42.:18:45.

disadvantaged, it's a clear sign and that's a breakup. Then enter Boris

:18:46.:18:49.

Johnson and we will see what happens with the others tomorrow. We talk

:18:50.:18:54.

about... Paul mentioned what Mrs Thatcher said when she first became

:18:55.:18:59.

Prime Minister, I don't think Tony Blair or David Cameron or Gordon

:19:00.:19:04.

Brown did what she did today, talk about the experience of a black or

:19:05.:19:07.

working class person, somebody who is from one of the most deprived

:19:08.:19:12.

areas in the country. That's a really different approach and if she

:19:13.:19:15.

is serious, and I think she is, about tackling those issues, that

:19:16.:19:19.

could mean different policies from what we have ever seen. You could

:19:20.:19:24.

say tough on the causes of Brexit. Let's move on to the Metro, the

:19:25.:19:29.

family picture, it's all about legacy for David Cameron today. I

:19:30.:19:33.

will give you the first shot at this, Paul, what will the legacy be?

:19:34.:19:38.

What will the legacy be? He came in with the "Big Society" vision, we

:19:39.:19:42.

haven't heard much from "Big Society". He came in with an agenda

:19:43.:19:47.

which was encompassing and quite green, then they transferred through

:19:48.:19:51.

the journey from a green consciousness into green rubbish as

:19:52.:19:56.

it were. There was a journey here. We saw that other side of him in the

:19:57.:20:02.

Commons today where he was generous. He was witty and amusing. Clearly a

:20:03.:20:06.

plastic lid lucrative time for him on the after-dinner speaking circuit

:20:07.:20:13.

should he want -- fantastically. The things that he saw as his legacy,

:20:14.:20:17.

and he outlined seven or eight of them, we talked about stronger

:20:18.:20:21.

defence and schools and NHS and so forth, seemed to me to be dwarfed

:20:22.:20:27.

by... We're in a mess now. George Osborne hasn't left a note for

:20:28.:20:30.

Philip Hammond saying the money is all spent but he may have is well

:20:31.:20:34.

have. The Telegraph picks up on that quote, I was the future once, once

:20:35.:20:42.

said of Tony Blair. How will people look back on David Cameron? It's

:20:43.:20:46.

very poignant because when he said that to Tony Blair, that was the end

:20:47.:20:51.

of 2005 and its remarkable his entire political career from the

:20:52.:20:55.

moment he became Leader of the Opposition to exiting as Prime

:20:56.:20:59.

Minister is in ten years. Careers in politics in Britain these days are

:21:00.:21:04.

much faster. On the "Big Society", he was very proud with what he did

:21:05.:21:08.

on national citizenship. On the greens staff, the amount of energy

:21:09.:21:15.

generated by renewables has tripled, not insignificant achievement is. He

:21:16.:21:21.

inherited a fundamentally broken economy -- achievements. The

:21:22.:21:25.

challenge is a lot of people felt left behind and to end on a note

:21:26.:21:29.

that I agree with my friend, that was a big factor in the Leave vote

:21:30.:21:33.

that so many people felt they needed to kick the elite because the elite

:21:34.:21:38.

didn't listen to them. I want to go to the cartoon here. That's not the

:21:39.:21:42.

pound, says this character looking at the graph. That is Boris

:21:43.:21:51.

Johnson's career. Plunged downwards. It has soared tonight. Very amusing

:21:52.:21:55.

but one paragraph on the front of the Telegraph which is hugely

:21:56.:22:01.

significant, economy slows as the Leave effect takes hold. And so

:22:02.:22:06.

begins. Underneath some of the positive notes we have heard from

:22:07.:22:10.

the FTSE and the pound recovering... Quantitative easing could start

:22:11.:22:14.

tomorrow, a cut in interest rates. All your viewers do what I have done

:22:15.:22:19.

since June the 24th, get up, scan the sky and see whether the

:22:20.:22:22.

Luftwaffe have started bombing, I don't think it has yet. All this

:22:23.:22:27.

alarmism. We will be much better off. How could you have anyone in

:22:28.:22:31.

government trying to sell the strength of the UK around the world

:22:32.:22:36.

who had said it would be a calamity? The reality is it won't be, we will

:22:37.:22:39.

get through and be stronger as a result. We will leave it there. More

:22:40.:22:44.

to come tomorrow, more appointments and we will talk about it then. Jim

:22:45.:22:49.

and Paul, thank you for your company. That's it for the Papers.

:22:50.:22:53.

Coming up next, the latest weather.

:22:54.:22:55.

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